Date   

Re: Andre CITROEN #general

BasGinger@...
 

Henriette and the others,
(many people seem to be interested in that topic!)

Of course you are right about the French word "citron", but the trouble
is that, according to a genealogical tree which is in our possession, it
is not Andre, but Andre CITROEN's grandfather who changed his name, >from
LIMOENMAN to CITROEN, with "oe" at the end.
And you are probably right when you say that the two dots over the E
where added (not by Andre but by his father and several uncles) in order
for the name not to be pronounced in a manner similar to the French word
"citron".
By the way, this name is quite common among Jews, with various spellings:
Citroen, Citron, Cytron, Kitron, Tsitron, Tsytron, Zitron...(see the
Avotaynu webpage http://www.avotaynu.com/csi/csi-home.html). It can be
found, among other sources, in the JGFF, the FTJP, the Grodno Gubernia 1912
Voters List,the two Dictionaries by A. Beider (Russian Empire and Poland).

About the possible connection between Andre CITROEN and Poland, I noticed
his mother's given name, Masza (Masza Amalia Kleinman), which looks Polish
to me (but I am not a specialist). Probably more information could be found
in a book which was indicated by Eve Line Blum a few days ago (I have not
read it).

Basile Ginger,
Cercle de Genealogie Juive, Paris
http://www.genealoj.org

Henriette Moed Roth wrote:=20

One more name to add to the list in my previous message: CITRON, Louis
(without the "e"). Of course, in French the word "citron" means
"lemon." Perhaps, Andre did not feel comfortable naming his cars
"Lemon" and kept the family name with the "E" which requires a tr=E9ma
(two dots over the E) in French to be pronounced correctly. The Dutch
"Citroen" is pronounced "citroon" in English.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Andre CITROEN #general

BasGinger@...
 

Henriette and the others,
(many people seem to be interested in that topic!)

Of course you are right about the French word "citron", but the trouble
is that, according to a genealogical tree which is in our possession, it
is not Andre, but Andre CITROEN's grandfather who changed his name, >from
LIMOENMAN to CITROEN, with "oe" at the end.
And you are probably right when you say that the two dots over the E
where added (not by Andre but by his father and several uncles) in order
for the name not to be pronounced in a manner similar to the French word
"citron".
By the way, this name is quite common among Jews, with various spellings:
Citroen, Citron, Cytron, Kitron, Tsitron, Tsytron, Zitron...(see the
Avotaynu webpage http://www.avotaynu.com/csi/csi-home.html). It can be
found, among other sources, in the JGFF, the FTJP, the Grodno Gubernia 1912
Voters List,the two Dictionaries by A. Beider (Russian Empire and Poland).

About the possible connection between Andre CITROEN and Poland, I noticed
his mother's given name, Masza (Masza Amalia Kleinman), which looks Polish
to me (but I am not a specialist). Probably more information could be found
in a book which was indicated by Eve Line Blum a few days ago (I have not
read it).

Basile Ginger,
Cercle de Genealogie Juive, Paris
http://www.genealoj.org

Henriette Moed Roth wrote:=20

One more name to add to the list in my previous message: CITRON, Louis
(without the "e"). Of course, in French the word "citron" means
"lemon." Perhaps, Andre did not feel comfortable naming his cars
"Lemon" and kept the family name with the "E" which requires a tr=E9ma
(two dots over the E) in French to be pronounced correctly. The Dutch
"Citroen" is pronounced "citroon" in English.


Re: The name ALKUNEH #general

Simon Barak
 

BABYCAT3 wrote:

Last night I came in on the end of a yiddish movie.....one of the actors
was listed as ALKUNEH.
ALKUNEH is the Ashkenazi pronountiation of the Biblical name ELKANAH. There
were at least 4 of them in the Bible:
1 The Husband of Hannah and father of Samuel.
2 The Head of a Levitical family.
3 An Officer of Ahaz’s household.
4 The doorkeeper of the Ark of the Covenant.

Happy Hannuka
Shimon Barak


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The name ALKUNEH #general

Simon Barak
 

BABYCAT3 wrote:

Last night I came in on the end of a yiddish movie.....one of the actors
was listed as ALKUNEH.
ALKUNEH is the Ashkenazi pronountiation of the Biblical name ELKANAH. There
were at least 4 of them in the Bible:
1 The Husband of Hannah and father of Samuel.
2 The Head of a Levitical family.
3 An Officer of Ahaz’s household.
4 The doorkeeper of the Ark of the Covenant.

Happy Hannuka
Shimon Barak


Re: occupation "cutter" #general

Chuck Haas <haascn@...>
 

A "cutter" was a person in the garment trades who cut large stacks of
cloth into the pieces that were sewn together (i.e., using a
pattern). My understanding is that this was a frequent occupation
for men in the garment industry.
--
Charles N. Haas
haas@...
searching:
Romania: SIMON, SIMOVITCH, HERZKOVITZ, AVRAM
France: ROSENFELD, ROSENFELD-ARON, HAAS


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:occupation "cutter" #general

Chuck Haas <haascn@...>
 

A "cutter" was a person in the garment trades who cut large stacks of
cloth into the pieces that were sewn together (i.e., using a
pattern). My understanding is that this was a frequent occupation
for men in the garment industry.
--
Charles N. Haas
haas@...
searching:
Romania: SIMON, SIMOVITCH, HERZKOVITZ, AVRAM
France: ROSENFELD, ROSENFELD-ARON, HAAS


Re: The name ALKUNEH #general

m rogow <mrogow@...>
 

In M. Vashavski's familiar poem about "yikhes", he says (in Yiddish) at
the first line of the second stanza "here comes uncle Alkuneh." I don't as
yet know the derivation of the name, but I can make proper inquiries and
will certainly let you know.

Mel Rogow
Los Angeles


At 07:55 PM 12/22/00 +0000, you
wrote:
Last night I came in on the end of a yiddish movie being shown on my local
PBS station. When the credits were run at the end one of the actors was
listed as ALKUNEH. There is no way to tell whether that was the first or
last name. Has anyone ever come across this name? I would love to find
out if this is a given or surname and its origin.
Thank you and a Happy Chanukah
Barbara Meyers
searching:Alk,Kaflowitz >from Bialystok


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The name ALKUNEH #general

m rogow <mrogow@...>
 

In M. Vashavski's familiar poem about "yikhes", he says (in Yiddish) at
the first line of the second stanza "here comes uncle Alkuneh." I don't as
yet know the derivation of the name, but I can make proper inquiries and
will certainly let you know.

Mel Rogow
Los Angeles


At 07:55 PM 12/22/00 +0000, you
wrote:
Last night I came in on the end of a yiddish movie being shown on my local
PBS station. When the credits were run at the end one of the actors was
listed as ALKUNEH. There is no way to tell whether that was the first or
last name. Has anyone ever come across this name? I would love to find
out if this is a given or surname and its origin.
Thank you and a Happy Chanukah
Barbara Meyers
searching:Alk,Kaflowitz >from Bialystok


Re: occupation: Cutter?? #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

I came across my great-grandfather'sbrother in various records putting his
occupation down as "Cutter." What exactly would this be?

TIA
Howie Zakai
This mean's a tailor's cutter -- the guy who cuts out the cloth using a
pattern.

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: occupation: Cutter?? #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

I came across my great-grandfather'sbrother in various records putting his
occupation down as "Cutter." What exactly would this be?

TIA
Howie Zakai
This mean's a tailor's cutter -- the guy who cuts out the cloth using a
pattern.

Judith Romney Wegner


Re: listing family names in the Newsletter #belarus

Elsebeth Paikin
 

At 11:25 23-12-00 +0200, Ofer Cohen wrote:
Could you please advise what is the typical time between the
submittance of an article until it is published and what is
the process it is passing? My previous article publication was
delayed for almost three months, and my new article and the
update of my previous one were submitted by mid November,
and were not published as yet.
-----------------------
I regret to say that there is no "typical time between the submittance
of an article until it is published". (The article by Avram Chani which
was published a few days ago has been one year under way! That was
partly due to difficulties in finding and getting permissions >from the
copyrightholders.)

I do my best to publish as soon as possible, but it depends on all my
other duties, "real" job, health, computer problems etc. Please remember
that everything on JewishGen - and Belarus SIG also - is based on
volunteer work.

These past six months have been absolutely terrible filled with all sorts
of problems as well as illness - therefore there has been no new articles
between October 6 and yesterday. I have been "the one and only" working
on the Belarus Newsletter since Brian Poliakoff had to quit mid-1999.
So please bear over with me.
(Maybe it'll help to hear that much to my regret I have not had time
for my own research the past 1-2 years!?)

As for the "the process": That also depends ....
Some artciles have already been published elsewhere, and if I receive
them with a permission to republish them, they can almost instantly go
online.

Other articles have to be edited and proof-read (as English is not my
mother tongue) and the time it will take depends my time and the time of
the proof-reader (other work, illness, vacations, etc.)

Other articles again needs permissions/donor agreements >from several people and that can take some time.

So all I can say is that I am sorry when articles are delayed for some
reason. I do my best -- and so does the proof-reader.

*********************
Now to the good news:
*********************

I am very grateful and happy to announce that Jack Blagman has just
volunteered to join me as editor of the newsletter, so now things
will hopefully improve.

I want to extend a warm welcome to Jack >from the Belarus SIG and the
editorial board.

Best wishes for a happy chanukah and new year to all Belarus SIG'ers.

And thank you to all who send in articles, photos etc.


Elsebeth Paikin, Editor
Belarus SIG Online Newsletter
http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/bnl_index.htm
e-mail: elsebeth@...
--


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: listing family names in the Newsletter #belarus

Elsebeth Paikin
 

At 11:25 23-12-00 +0200, Ofer Cohen wrote:
Could you please advise what is the typical time between the
submittance of an article until it is published and what is
the process it is passing? My previous article publication was
delayed for almost three months, and my new article and the
update of my previous one were submitted by mid November,
and were not published as yet.
-----------------------
I regret to say that there is no "typical time between the submittance
of an article until it is published". (The article by Avram Chani which
was published a few days ago has been one year under way! That was
partly due to difficulties in finding and getting permissions >from the
copyrightholders.)

I do my best to publish as soon as possible, but it depends on all my
other duties, "real" job, health, computer problems etc. Please remember
that everything on JewishGen - and Belarus SIG also - is based on
volunteer work.

These past six months have been absolutely terrible filled with all sorts
of problems as well as illness - therefore there has been no new articles
between October 6 and yesterday. I have been "the one and only" working
on the Belarus Newsletter since Brian Poliakoff had to quit mid-1999.
So please bear over with me.
(Maybe it'll help to hear that much to my regret I have not had time
for my own research the past 1-2 years!?)

As for the "the process": That also depends ....
Some artciles have already been published elsewhere, and if I receive
them with a permission to republish them, they can almost instantly go
online.

Other articles have to be edited and proof-read (as English is not my
mother tongue) and the time it will take depends my time and the time of
the proof-reader (other work, illness, vacations, etc.)

Other articles again needs permissions/donor agreements >from several people and that can take some time.

So all I can say is that I am sorry when articles are delayed for some
reason. I do my best -- and so does the proof-reader.

*********************
Now to the good news:
*********************

I am very grateful and happy to announce that Jack Blagman has just
volunteered to join me as editor of the newsletter, so now things
will hopefully improve.

I want to extend a warm welcome to Jack >from the Belarus SIG and the
editorial board.

Best wishes for a happy chanukah and new year to all Belarus SIG'ers.

And thank you to all who send in articles, photos etc.


Elsebeth Paikin, Editor
Belarus SIG Online Newsletter
http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/bnl_index.htm
e-mail: elsebeth@...
--


Re: listing family names in the Newsletter #belarus

Ofer <oferco@...>
 

Ms. Paikin,
Could you please advise what is the typical time between the submittance of
an article until it is published and what is the process it is passing? My
previous article publication was delayed for almost three months, and my new
article and the update of my previous one were submitted by mid November,
and were not published as yet.

Ofer Cohen
Israel

----- Original Message -----
Elsebeth Paikin wrote:

from time to time I get e-mails with requests for listing the
names they are researching in the "Surname list" on the index
page of the Belarus Online Newsletter.

However, the surname list is only an index to the articles --
if you click on a surname, you will be taken to the article
where the surname appears. So the only way to get the surnames
you are researching on the Belarus Online Newsletter is to write
an article of some kind -- and articles are more than welcome!!
...snip....
-----------------------


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: listing family names in the Newsletter #belarus

Ofer <oferco@...>
 

Ms. Paikin,
Could you please advise what is the typical time between the submittance of
an article until it is published and what is the process it is passing? My
previous article publication was delayed for almost three months, and my new
article and the update of my previous one were submitted by mid November,
and were not published as yet.

Ofer Cohen
Israel

----- Original Message -----
Elsebeth Paikin wrote:

from time to time I get e-mails with requests for listing the
names they are researching in the "Surname list" on the index
page of the Belarus Online Newsletter.

However, the surname list is only an index to the articles --
if you click on a surname, you will be taken to the article
where the surname appears. So the only way to get the surnames
you are researching on the Belarus Online Newsletter is to write
an article of some kind -- and articles are more than welcome!!
...snip....
-----------------------


Sara's Children: The Destruction of Chmielnik #general

Ronald R Seagrave <seagraver@...>
 

Sara's Children: The Destruction of Chmielnik
By Suzan Esther Hagstrom
Sergeant Kirkland's Press www.kirklands.org
ISBN: 1-887901-28-0
6 by 9" Trade paper
Retail Price $29.95
Publication Date Jan. 15, 2001

Sara's Children is full of love, joy, and hope, Nathan Garfinkel's
wedding portrait on the back of this book cover captures one of life's
turning points. The occasion, however, was more momentous than any one
could ever imagine. Only six years earlier Nathan and his sisters, who
surround him in the photograph, were reduced to living skeletons, victims
of anti-Semitism that raged out of control during World War II. Nazi
Germany and its sympathizers brutally murdered more than 6 million Jews
across Europe, wiping out entire families and, in some cases, villages.
Through sheer luck and by helping each other, the Garfinkels overcame
seemingly insurmountable odds to evade death. Sara's Children records how
the five siblings survived slave labor, starvation, beatings, typhus,
exposure, and fatigue. The starkly written narrative relies heavily on the
Garfinkels' own words and interviews with other survivors >from their
hometown of Chmielnik, Poland. The nonfiction work begins with what they
lost: loving parents, an extended family, loyal friends, and a simple, but
vibrant, lifestyle. Nonetheless, disturbing signs of anti-Semitism mar
their happy childhood. Violence and hatred escalate as Germany razes Poland
and sweeps Europe. Each chapter explodes with details of the Garfinkels'
terrible ordeal. More than just an individual's memoir, Sara's Children
expresses a community's destruction via heartbreaking testimonials >from
numerous other Holocaust survivors.
Written documents >from Germany, photographs >from the late 1940s, and
maps reinforce and verify their account. Places like Czestochowa, Kielce,
and Skarzysko-Kamienna, where the Garfinkels were imprisoned and exploited,
may not be as familiar to readers as Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen, but they
were just as deadly. With its vivid descriptions of lesser-known camps,
Sara's Children sheds more light on Nazi Germany's vast network of evil.
The Garfinkels provide a rare, uplifting footnote to an era of
incomprehensible cruelty and unprecedented genocide. While their experience
is rooted in the Holocaust, their story of rising above degradation and
despair has universal appeal.

What People are Saying About Sara's Children:

"...portrays the best in Jewish and other people, faith in God, close
sibling love, sacrifice in the worst of times and under the most difficult
of conditions. This classic restores trust and understanding of other human
beings." Dr. Felicja Karay, author of Death Comes in Yellow

"...a compelling and absorbing report >from hell. It is skillfully built
around the words of the Garfinkels, Polish Jews, four sisters and a
brother, all of whom survived nearly three years of Hitler's slave labor
camps. The narrative is enhanced and confirmed by the recollections of
other Holocaust survivors whose paths crossed those of the Garfinkels in
those terrible years. ...a unique and valuable contribution." David S.
Wyman, Professor of History, Emeritus University of Massachusetts, Amherst;
PBS's The Abandonment of the Jews

About the Author:
Suzan Esther Hagstorm is a freelance journalist in San Diego and a Phi Beta
Kappa graduate of the University of California at Berkeley. She researched
and wrote Sara's Children in her spare time while working as a financial
news reporter for the Orlando Sentinel in Florida.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Sara's Children: The Destruction of Chmielnik #general

Ronald R Seagrave <seagraver@...>
 

Sara's Children: The Destruction of Chmielnik
By Suzan Esther Hagstrom
Sergeant Kirkland's Press www.kirklands.org
ISBN: 1-887901-28-0
6 by 9" Trade paper
Retail Price $29.95
Publication Date Jan. 15, 2001

Sara's Children is full of love, joy, and hope, Nathan Garfinkel's
wedding portrait on the back of this book cover captures one of life's
turning points. The occasion, however, was more momentous than any one
could ever imagine. Only six years earlier Nathan and his sisters, who
surround him in the photograph, were reduced to living skeletons, victims
of anti-Semitism that raged out of control during World War II. Nazi
Germany and its sympathizers brutally murdered more than 6 million Jews
across Europe, wiping out entire families and, in some cases, villages.
Through sheer luck and by helping each other, the Garfinkels overcame
seemingly insurmountable odds to evade death. Sara's Children records how
the five siblings survived slave labor, starvation, beatings, typhus,
exposure, and fatigue. The starkly written narrative relies heavily on the
Garfinkels' own words and interviews with other survivors >from their
hometown of Chmielnik, Poland. The nonfiction work begins with what they
lost: loving parents, an extended family, loyal friends, and a simple, but
vibrant, lifestyle. Nonetheless, disturbing signs of anti-Semitism mar
their happy childhood. Violence and hatred escalate as Germany razes Poland
and sweeps Europe. Each chapter explodes with details of the Garfinkels'
terrible ordeal. More than just an individual's memoir, Sara's Children
expresses a community's destruction via heartbreaking testimonials >from
numerous other Holocaust survivors.
Written documents >from Germany, photographs >from the late 1940s, and
maps reinforce and verify their account. Places like Czestochowa, Kielce,
and Skarzysko-Kamienna, where the Garfinkels were imprisoned and exploited,
may not be as familiar to readers as Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen, but they
were just as deadly. With its vivid descriptions of lesser-known camps,
Sara's Children sheds more light on Nazi Germany's vast network of evil.
The Garfinkels provide a rare, uplifting footnote to an era of
incomprehensible cruelty and unprecedented genocide. While their experience
is rooted in the Holocaust, their story of rising above degradation and
despair has universal appeal.

What People are Saying About Sara's Children:

"...portrays the best in Jewish and other people, faith in God, close
sibling love, sacrifice in the worst of times and under the most difficult
of conditions. This classic restores trust and understanding of other human
beings." Dr. Felicja Karay, author of Death Comes in Yellow

"...a compelling and absorbing report >from hell. It is skillfully built
around the words of the Garfinkels, Polish Jews, four sisters and a
brother, all of whom survived nearly three years of Hitler's slave labor
camps. The narrative is enhanced and confirmed by the recollections of
other Holocaust survivors whose paths crossed those of the Garfinkels in
those terrible years. ...a unique and valuable contribution." David S.
Wyman, Professor of History, Emeritus University of Massachusetts, Amherst;
PBS's The Abandonment of the Jews

About the Author:
Suzan Esther Hagstorm is a freelance journalist in San Diego and a Phi Beta
Kappa graduate of the University of California at Berkeley. She researched
and wrote Sara's Children in her spare time while working as a financial
news reporter for the Orlando Sentinel in Florida.


Re: Street in Lodz #lodz #poland

Seflaum@...
 

The street you refer to, 11-go Listopada Street was in existence after WWI -
it translates literally as 11th of November Street, or World War I Armistice
Day. Therefore, this is probably not the street you are searching.

Regards,
Shirley Rotbein Flaum
Houston, Texas

Gilbert Hendlisz wrote:
I know the street name where my g-granfather lived >from 1890 to 1939:
Konstantynegasse N=B043 or 45. I think that the name of this street was
changed in Listopada (november) after the war but I can't find it on the map
of Lodz on the LARG site.
Thanks for any information.
Gilbert Hendlisz (Brussels)


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Re: Street in Lodz #lodz #poland

Seflaum@...
 

The street you refer to, 11-go Listopada Street was in existence after WWI -
it translates literally as 11th of November Street, or World War I Armistice
Day. Therefore, this is probably not the street you are searching.

Regards,
Shirley Rotbein Flaum
Houston, Texas

Gilbert Hendlisz wrote:
I know the street name where my g-granfather lived >from 1890 to 1939:
Konstantynegasse N=B043 or 45. I think that the name of this street was
changed in Listopada (november) after the war but I can't find it on the map
of Lodz on the LARG site.
Thanks for any information.
Gilbert Hendlisz (Brussels)


Street in Lodz #lodz #poland

Hendlisz Gilbert <gilbert.hendlisz@...>
 

Hello,

I know the street name where my g-granfather lived >from 1890 to 1939:
Konstantynegasse N°43 or 45. I think that the name of this street was
changed in Listopada (november) after the war but I can't find it on the map
of Lodz on the LARG site.
Thanks for any information.
Gilbert Hendlisz (Brussels)


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Street in Lodz #lodz #poland

Hendlisz Gilbert <gilbert.hendlisz@...>
 

Hello,

I know the street name where my g-granfather lived >from 1890 to 1939:
Konstantynegasse N°43 or 45. I think that the name of this street was
changed in Listopada (november) after the war but I can't find it on the map
of Lodz on the LARG site.
Thanks for any information.
Gilbert Hendlisz (Brussels)