Date   

Re: Immigration to USA through Canada #general

MsRachelR <msrachelr@...>
 

You will need the soundex to go into the US National Archives microfilm
series M1461 which is the St Albans Index where you will find the 3x5 card
images previously mentioned. The card image contains much of the
information >from the passenger list, including a pointer to that exact
list. The card image also contains a number in the form xxx-yy-z which
points you to the volume(xxx), sheet(yy) and line number (z) of the exact
microfilm in series M1464 St Albans Passenger Lists for you to see the
passenger manifest.

Rachel Reisman in Poughkeepsie, NY

Researching: KAPELUSNIC(Janow/Ivanovo), RATNOWSKY(Janow/Ivanovo),
LEVINE(Vilna/Kovno), GORDON(Vilna/Kovno), MALARSKA(Warsaw/Odessa?),
REISMAN/RAJZMAN(Warsaw/Odessa?), ABRAHAMSON(Russia-but where?),
SIMON(Russia-but where?)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Immigration to USA through Canada #general

MsRachelR <msrachelr@...>
 

You will need the soundex to go into the US National Archives microfilm
series M1461 which is the St Albans Index where you will find the 3x5 card
images previously mentioned. The card image contains much of the
information >from the passenger list, including a pointer to that exact
list. The card image also contains a number in the form xxx-yy-z which
points you to the volume(xxx), sheet(yy) and line number (z) of the exact
microfilm in series M1464 St Albans Passenger Lists for you to see the
passenger manifest.

Rachel Reisman in Poughkeepsie, NY

Researching: KAPELUSNIC(Janow/Ivanovo), RATNOWSKY(Janow/Ivanovo),
LEVINE(Vilna/Kovno), GORDON(Vilna/Kovno), MALARSKA(Warsaw/Odessa?),
REISMAN/RAJZMAN(Warsaw/Odessa?), ABRAHAMSON(Russia-but where?),
SIMON(Russia-but where?)


Re: given name Hodes(h) #general

Cyndee Meystel <cmeys@...>
 

The female name Hodes, or Hodas is a derivative of the Hebrew name Hadassah.

Cyndee Meystel
Chicago, IL

--
NOTICE: The e-mail address is deliberately incorrect. Delete "nospam" from
the e-mail address to reply.
cmeys@nospamearthlink.net


What's the origin of the *given name* Hodes (or Hodesh)? Is it Hebrew?
Thanks
Tom
--


Re: given name Hodes(h) #general

gail prissman <gailp71@...>
 

Hodesh (or Chodesh) with a 'chet' in Hebrew, means 'month'. I think that
it is related to the word 'chadash', meaning 'new'.

Kodesh, with a kuf, is related to the word for Holiness.

Gail.

What's the origin of the *given name* Hodes (or Hodesh)? Is it Hebrew?


Re: given name Hodes(h) #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

If it is a female's name the origin could be Yehudit. Tevya's daughter was
named Hodl (pronounced Hudl in Ukrainian Yiddish) There is a surname Hodes
which is a matronymic.
Sincerely,
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, israel

What's the origin of the *given name* Hodes (or Hodesh)? Is it Hebrew?
Thanks
Tom
--


Re: Immigration to USA through Canada #general

David Cooper <dcooper@...>
 

It is my understanding that the "index cards" are the Soundex index to
the St. Albans records. Each card represents a "Passenger Manifest"
entry similar to that used for ships. I have recently requested a copy
of the Manifest >from one of the index cards; but, it has not yet arrived.

...david

Researching: ALLEN,BERZONER,COHEN,COOPER,KUPFERZMIDT,
POSNER (POIZNER), PRITIKIN, STARKMAN

The immigrant records of those entering Canada are in the
Canadian Archives in Ottawa and the U.S. records of those who
crossed >from Canada are in the National Archives in Washington
with copies at different branches. I believe the N.Y.C branch of
the National Archives also has copies of those records on microfilm.
The records of those who crossed >from Canada where often kept on 3x5
cards and that is the format you will see them in when you review the
microfilm. The hand writing can be 'challenging'.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: given name Hodes(h) #general

Cyndee Meystel <cmeys@...>
 

The female name Hodes, or Hodas is a derivative of the Hebrew name Hadassah.

Cyndee Meystel
Chicago, IL

--
NOTICE: The e-mail address is deliberately incorrect. Delete "nospam" from
the e-mail address to reply.
cmeys@nospamearthlink.net


What's the origin of the *given name* Hodes (or Hodesh)? Is it Hebrew?
Thanks
Tom
--


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: given name Hodes(h) #general

gail prissman <gailp71@...>
 

Hodesh (or Chodesh) with a 'chet' in Hebrew, means 'month'. I think that
it is related to the word 'chadash', meaning 'new'.

Kodesh, with a kuf, is related to the word for Holiness.

Gail.

What's the origin of the *given name* Hodes (or Hodesh)? Is it Hebrew?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: given name Hodes(h) #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

If it is a female's name the origin could be Yehudit. Tevya's daughter was
named Hodl (pronounced Hudl in Ukrainian Yiddish) There is a surname Hodes
which is a matronymic.
Sincerely,
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, israel

What's the origin of the *given name* Hodes (or Hodesh)? Is it Hebrew?
Thanks
Tom
--


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Immigration to USA through Canada #general

David Cooper <dcooper@...>
 

It is my understanding that the "index cards" are the Soundex index to
the St. Albans records. Each card represents a "Passenger Manifest"
entry similar to that used for ships. I have recently requested a copy
of the Manifest >from one of the index cards; but, it has not yet arrived.

...david

Researching: ALLEN,BERZONER,COHEN,COOPER,KUPFERZMIDT,
POSNER (POIZNER), PRITIKIN, STARKMAN

The immigrant records of those entering Canada are in the
Canadian Archives in Ottawa and the U.S. records of those who
crossed >from Canada are in the National Archives in Washington
with copies at different branches. I believe the N.Y.C branch of
the National Archives also has copies of those records on microfilm.
The records of those who crossed >from Canada where often kept on 3x5
cards and that is the format you will see them in when you review the
microfilm. The hand writing can be 'challenging'.


FINKELSTEIN of Hyannisport #general

Paul Silverstone
 

I am looking for the family of Nathan (Nahum) Finkelstein who
died in Hyannisport in 1965. His wife was named Sarah and he
had two children Harriet (Nathanson) and Jimmy Finkelstein

--
Paul Silverstone
New York

reply to: paulh@aya.yale.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen FINKELSTEIN of Hyannisport #general

Paul Silverstone
 

I am looking for the family of Nathan (Nahum) Finkelstein who
died in Hyannisport in 1965. His wife was named Sarah and he
had two children Harriet (Nathanson) and Jimmy Finkelstein

--
Paul Silverstone
New York

reply to: paulh@aya.yale.edu


MIRACLE IN THE UKRAINE? #ukraine

ADAVIS@...
 

An associate of mine recently returned >from Ukraine. Following are some of
his observations, and while they are not genealogical in nature, they may
be of interest to many.

Original Message
From: Mark D Singer [mailto:marksinger1@juno.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 02, 2001 11:43 AM
To: ADAVIS@jbbworldwide.com
Subject: Re: Ukraine

Adam,

Please feel free to post or share the essay with anyone.
Thanks for your interest.

Regards,
Mark


MIRACLE IN THE UKRAINE?
by Mark Singer (12-29-00)

This Hanukkah we celebrated the victory of the Jewish religion and the
miracle of the olive oil. Commonly, people argue that miracles no longer
occur. I cannot confirm with certainty whether this claim is true;
however, this Hanukkah I found additional evidence supporting the
possibility that miracles, in fact, continue to exist.

I just returned >from a 10 day trip to the Ukraine, a republic of the
former Soviet Union that gained independence in 1991. In various
Ukrainian cities, I participated in a Hanukkah celebration program along
with 7 other American students and our Ukrainian student counterparts.
Logistically, the program was designed to align the American and
Ukrainian students for the purpose of conducting Hanukkah celebrations in
various venues, including Jewish homes and community centers. I
emphasize, without hesitation, that the experience of those who
participated was valueless and beyond words; nonetheless, I wanted to
share brief segments of the story.

Arriving at the Kiev airport, we were warmly greeted by the Ukrainian
students and Hillel director. >from that time until the moment that they
personally returned us to the airport for departure, the Ukrainian
students treated us generously and kindly. We traveled in a small bus to
a nearby campground, which ironically one of the American Ukrainian
students, Polina, had attended as a child before emigrating to the United
States. Polina, upon realizing this, became the first of many people to
cry with joy over the next 10 days. What had once been used as a camp
for Communist indoctrination was about to be used by over 20 Jewish
students for a Hanukkah celebration preparation! I met my Ukrainian
roommate, Vlad, who proudly wore a large Star of David and spoke in
broken English of his passion for Israel. Vlad is an active member of
the Hillel and also regularly volunteers at Chesed, a respectable Jewish
community center and soup kitchen for the elderly.

Over the course of the next two days we toured Kiev and trained for the
Hanukkah program. On the tour, we visited the two remaining synagogues
in Kiev (there were as many as 70 before the Communists and Nazis
confiscated or lay to rubble all but two). In fact, the two old
synagogues had just been reactivated over the past few years after being
desecrated as puppet theaters and horse stables for the Communists and
Nazis. The Rabbi at one of these synagogues, Rabbi Bleich, is an
American who has served the community for over 5 years. He said that he
was only supposed to be in Kiev for 3 weeks, but would now "stay there
until he left." I met two of his well-spoken and eloquent sons, both
under the age of 12, and was impressed with the work that the family was
doing, including running a thriving Jewish day school for close to 200
children, a mikvah, the synagogue, and summer camps. Just over 9 years
ago, all of these activities were illegal and non-existent. We witnessed
a sparkle of hope >from a pile of rubble.

Sadly, we also visited "Babiy Yar." About 2.5 million Jews lived within
the borders of contemporary Ukraine in 1939. German forces invaded the
country in June 1941 and soon occupied every kilometer of land. Together
with local Ukrainian forces, they murdered about 1,850,000 Jews who lived
in the country at the time. In Ukraine, most Jews were force-marched to
pits or ravines and shot. "Babiy Yar" in Kiev is the best known of such
places. We conducted a poignant candle memorial service at "Babiy Yar"
in front of a monumental menorah that overlooked a tree forest grown with
the burnt ashes of Holocaust victims who had once lead a thriving,
educated, and cultured Jewish civilization. Here we stood, small Jewish
remnants of a lost world, with Nazis and Communists nowhere to be found.

Following the first two days, the students were divided into smaller
teams. Each team was given an itinerary for different cities and would
be on there own for the next 6 days. My team included three Ukrainian
students, Luba, Anton, and Yasia. While each of them was intelligent,
kind, hardworking, and caring, Luba had an especially beautiful singing
voice, Anton had a wonderful sense of humor, and Yasia had the face of an
adorable doll. The two other American students were Savva and Stacy.
Savva is an 18 year old student originally >from Moscow who showed great
wisdom, knowledge and charisma for his age. He was able to move with
ease between the Ukrainian and American worlds and often served as my
personal interpreter. Stacy is also a particularly special woman. She
is passionate, energetic, and a lot of fun. Our group would spend almost
every moment with each other over the next six days in a city called
"Zhytomyr." We were also accompanied by our driver and a personal
security guard that Stacy nicknamed "Commando."

Each day we would travel to Jewish homes and community centers to conduct
Hanukkah programs. Many of the visitations were called "home visits,"
constituting us and the one elderly Jewish person living there. Other
visits were called "warm houses," consisting of a family and 12-15
"shtetl" (neighborhood) friends. Upon our arrival, we could see tears
settle in many of their eyes. We were often welcomed with kisses and
hugs. Many of these survivors told us that "the egg was teaching the
hen," meaning that the young students were teaching the older generation
about Judaism and Hanukkah. These heroes and heroines survived communism
and the holocaust. They shared their stories of survival and hope. One
man survived the Holocaust by being hidden by a Ukrainian family, one
woman explained that when she was a child her mother forced her to stop
speaking yiddish because it was dangerous to be discovered a Jew, others
explained how it used to be considered shameful to be a Jew under
communism, and almost all of them told of children or grandchildren who

had formed new lives in Eretz Israel. Despite the suppression of Judaism
for an entire generation, these people still know who they are and are
proud to be Jews.

One of the most moving experiences was at a warm house of older people,
but there was also a young girl named Jana. She is a beautiful eight
year old child who lit up the entire room. Although we were there to
conduct the Hanukkah program, she was the real star. She sang to us in
Yiddish, performed a Hanukkah dance, and counted in Hebrew for us. Here
she stood before us as the future of the Jewish people. For those of us
in the room, we knew that the future is grand. In another amazing
moment, an 83 year old man stood up at the dinner table and sang "Oh
Hanukkah, Oh Hanukkah" to us in Yiddish >from his heart. He sang with
pride. It's quite possible that he hadn't sang that song out loud for
many, many years.

While in "Zhytomyr" we also visited the local synagogue. The Lubavitcher
Rabbi, Moshe, was >from Israel and lived in "Zhytomyr" with his wife and
five children for the past 6 years. Amazingly, he ran the synagogue and
full time Jewish day school. As his wife said, "they could have lived a
more comfortable life elsewhere, but they couldn't be any happier." The
pinnacle of my experience with the congregation was following Havdalah
services. We all traveled to a town square to light a menorah that
proudly stood 40-50 feet in the air. With close to 200 old and young
Jews singing and dancing to Chasidic melodies, the Rabbi, in somewhat
Biblical proportions, was elevated by a bright yellow crane into the cold
sky to light aglow the Hanukkiah. Again, we stood in a public Ukrainian
square in awe of this moment. Who could have ever imagined over 9 years
ago that Jews would be celebrating Hanukkah in public with the Ukrainian
police standing by--standing by for realistically unneeded protection.
Now, the Ukrainian Jews celebrated publicly, proudly and with joy. The
Jews stood free and the Nazis and Communists lay vanquished! Young
children and old people celebrated, danced and sang. Do miracles still
exist?

Fortunately, I could continue to share many more vibrant moments.
However, for the purposes of this letter, I simply wanted to communicate
the overall purpose, depth, and meaning of my Ukrainian Hanukkah
experience. As we departed >from the Kiev airport I couldn't help but be
amazed by what the American and Ukrainian students were doing in the
middle of the airport. We stood in a circle, hand in hand, and together
we sang "Am Yisroal Chai" (The Jewish People Live). Yes, we did in fact
live.

Old Ukrainian Jews, Ukrainian Jewish university students, and Ukrainian
Jewish children--How is it possible that I and 7 other American Jewish
students were able to celebrate Hanukkah with all of them in the Ukraine?
Certainly the all powerful and former Soviet Union wouldn't have
permitted it; Certainly the Nazi murder machine tried to exterminate the
practice altogether. As we celebrated Hanukkah, commemorating the
survival of Judaism and the miracle of the olive oil, we made history and
these powerful forces were history.

Do miracles still exist?

By Mark Singer
December 29, 2000
Chicago, Illinois


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine MIRACLE IN THE UKRAINE? #ukraine

ADAVIS@...
 

An associate of mine recently returned >from Ukraine. Following are some of
his observations, and while they are not genealogical in nature, they may
be of interest to many.

Original Message
From: Mark D Singer [mailto:marksinger1@juno.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 02, 2001 11:43 AM
To: ADAVIS@jbbworldwide.com
Subject: Re: Ukraine

Adam,

Please feel free to post or share the essay with anyone.
Thanks for your interest.

Regards,
Mark


MIRACLE IN THE UKRAINE?
by Mark Singer (12-29-00)

This Hanukkah we celebrated the victory of the Jewish religion and the
miracle of the olive oil. Commonly, people argue that miracles no longer
occur. I cannot confirm with certainty whether this claim is true;
however, this Hanukkah I found additional evidence supporting the
possibility that miracles, in fact, continue to exist.

I just returned >from a 10 day trip to the Ukraine, a republic of the
former Soviet Union that gained independence in 1991. In various
Ukrainian cities, I participated in a Hanukkah celebration program along
with 7 other American students and our Ukrainian student counterparts.
Logistically, the program was designed to align the American and
Ukrainian students for the purpose of conducting Hanukkah celebrations in
various venues, including Jewish homes and community centers. I
emphasize, without hesitation, that the experience of those who
participated was valueless and beyond words; nonetheless, I wanted to
share brief segments of the story.

Arriving at the Kiev airport, we were warmly greeted by the Ukrainian
students and Hillel director. >from that time until the moment that they
personally returned us to the airport for departure, the Ukrainian
students treated us generously and kindly. We traveled in a small bus to
a nearby campground, which ironically one of the American Ukrainian
students, Polina, had attended as a child before emigrating to the United
States. Polina, upon realizing this, became the first of many people to
cry with joy over the next 10 days. What had once been used as a camp
for Communist indoctrination was about to be used by over 20 Jewish
students for a Hanukkah celebration preparation! I met my Ukrainian
roommate, Vlad, who proudly wore a large Star of David and spoke in
broken English of his passion for Israel. Vlad is an active member of
the Hillel and also regularly volunteers at Chesed, a respectable Jewish
community center and soup kitchen for the elderly.

Over the course of the next two days we toured Kiev and trained for the
Hanukkah program. On the tour, we visited the two remaining synagogues
in Kiev (there were as many as 70 before the Communists and Nazis
confiscated or lay to rubble all but two). In fact, the two old
synagogues had just been reactivated over the past few years after being
desecrated as puppet theaters and horse stables for the Communists and
Nazis. The Rabbi at one of these synagogues, Rabbi Bleich, is an
American who has served the community for over 5 years. He said that he
was only supposed to be in Kiev for 3 weeks, but would now "stay there
until he left." I met two of his well-spoken and eloquent sons, both
under the age of 12, and was impressed with the work that the family was
doing, including running a thriving Jewish day school for close to 200
children, a mikvah, the synagogue, and summer camps. Just over 9 years
ago, all of these activities were illegal and non-existent. We witnessed
a sparkle of hope >from a pile of rubble.

Sadly, we also visited "Babiy Yar." About 2.5 million Jews lived within
the borders of contemporary Ukraine in 1939. German forces invaded the
country in June 1941 and soon occupied every kilometer of land. Together
with local Ukrainian forces, they murdered about 1,850,000 Jews who lived
in the country at the time. In Ukraine, most Jews were force-marched to
pits or ravines and shot. "Babiy Yar" in Kiev is the best known of such
places. We conducted a poignant candle memorial service at "Babiy Yar"
in front of a monumental menorah that overlooked a tree forest grown with
the burnt ashes of Holocaust victims who had once lead a thriving,
educated, and cultured Jewish civilization. Here we stood, small Jewish
remnants of a lost world, with Nazis and Communists nowhere to be found.

Following the first two days, the students were divided into smaller
teams. Each team was given an itinerary for different cities and would
be on there own for the next 6 days. My team included three Ukrainian
students, Luba, Anton, and Yasia. While each of them was intelligent,
kind, hardworking, and caring, Luba had an especially beautiful singing
voice, Anton had a wonderful sense of humor, and Yasia had the face of an
adorable doll. The two other American students were Savva and Stacy.
Savva is an 18 year old student originally >from Moscow who showed great
wisdom, knowledge and charisma for his age. He was able to move with
ease between the Ukrainian and American worlds and often served as my
personal interpreter. Stacy is also a particularly special woman. She
is passionate, energetic, and a lot of fun. Our group would spend almost
every moment with each other over the next six days in a city called
"Zhytomyr." We were also accompanied by our driver and a personal
security guard that Stacy nicknamed "Commando."

Each day we would travel to Jewish homes and community centers to conduct
Hanukkah programs. Many of the visitations were called "home visits,"
constituting us and the one elderly Jewish person living there. Other
visits were called "warm houses," consisting of a family and 12-15
"shtetl" (neighborhood) friends. Upon our arrival, we could see tears
settle in many of their eyes. We were often welcomed with kisses and
hugs. Many of these survivors told us that "the egg was teaching the
hen," meaning that the young students were teaching the older generation
about Judaism and Hanukkah. These heroes and heroines survived communism
and the holocaust. They shared their stories of survival and hope. One
man survived the Holocaust by being hidden by a Ukrainian family, one
woman explained that when she was a child her mother forced her to stop
speaking yiddish because it was dangerous to be discovered a Jew, others
explained how it used to be considered shameful to be a Jew under
communism, and almost all of them told of children or grandchildren who

had formed new lives in Eretz Israel. Despite the suppression of Judaism
for an entire generation, these people still know who they are and are
proud to be Jews.

One of the most moving experiences was at a warm house of older people,
but there was also a young girl named Jana. She is a beautiful eight
year old child who lit up the entire room. Although we were there to
conduct the Hanukkah program, she was the real star. She sang to us in
Yiddish, performed a Hanukkah dance, and counted in Hebrew for us. Here
she stood before us as the future of the Jewish people. For those of us
in the room, we knew that the future is grand. In another amazing
moment, an 83 year old man stood up at the dinner table and sang "Oh
Hanukkah, Oh Hanukkah" to us in Yiddish >from his heart. He sang with
pride. It's quite possible that he hadn't sang that song out loud for
many, many years.

While in "Zhytomyr" we also visited the local synagogue. The Lubavitcher
Rabbi, Moshe, was >from Israel and lived in "Zhytomyr" with his wife and
five children for the past 6 years. Amazingly, he ran the synagogue and
full time Jewish day school. As his wife said, "they could have lived a
more comfortable life elsewhere, but they couldn't be any happier." The
pinnacle of my experience with the congregation was following Havdalah
services. We all traveled to a town square to light a menorah that
proudly stood 40-50 feet in the air. With close to 200 old and young
Jews singing and dancing to Chasidic melodies, the Rabbi, in somewhat
Biblical proportions, was elevated by a bright yellow crane into the cold
sky to light aglow the Hanukkiah. Again, we stood in a public Ukrainian
square in awe of this moment. Who could have ever imagined over 9 years
ago that Jews would be celebrating Hanukkah in public with the Ukrainian
police standing by--standing by for realistically unneeded protection.
Now, the Ukrainian Jews celebrated publicly, proudly and with joy. The
Jews stood free and the Nazis and Communists lay vanquished! Young
children and old people celebrated, danced and sang. Do miracles still
exist?

Fortunately, I could continue to share many more vibrant moments.
However, for the purposes of this letter, I simply wanted to communicate
the overall purpose, depth, and meaning of my Ukrainian Hanukkah
experience. As we departed >from the Kiev airport I couldn't help but be
amazed by what the American and Ukrainian students were doing in the
middle of the airport. We stood in a circle, hand in hand, and together
we sang "Am Yisroal Chai" (The Jewish People Live). Yes, we did in fact
live.

Old Ukrainian Jews, Ukrainian Jewish university students, and Ukrainian
Jewish children--How is it possible that I and 7 other American Jewish
students were able to celebrate Hanukkah with all of them in the Ukraine?
Certainly the all powerful and former Soviet Union wouldn't have
permitted it; Certainly the Nazi murder machine tried to exterminate the
practice altogether. As we celebrated Hanukkah, commemorating the
survival of Judaism and the miracle of the olive oil, we made history and
these powerful forces were history.

Do miracles still exist?

By Mark Singer
December 29, 2000
Chicago, Illinois


Lost Relative -Borach #ukraine

Anthony Barnett <shalomstudio@...>
 

Shalom,

"I am trying to find out the birthplace of my Great Grandfather.
I don't know if you can help me. I am subscribing to the Ukraine SIG
because there is a possibility that he (LEWIS ELIEZAR BARNETT or BORACH)
was born there.
When my Great Grandparents married in London in 1856, Great Grandfather
was a widower & was using the name BARNETT. His date of birth was given
as 1810 & his father's name as Isaac.
My Great Grandfather died in 1869, But in 1881 my Great Grandmother
appears on the census for that year as Julia BORACH (an annuitant) which
leads me to believe that BORACH was Lewis Eliezar's original family
name.
I'd really like to know - where Lewis Eliezar was born
- details of his 1st marriage
(including if there were children)
- more about my Great Great Grandfather, Isaac
- who was Isaac's wife
Am I asking too much?

HAPPY 2001!

TONY BARNETT

ST. IVES, CORNWALL TR26 2JJ, ENGLAND"


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Lost Relative -Borach #ukraine

Anthony Barnett <shalomstudio@...>
 

Shalom,

"I am trying to find out the birthplace of my Great Grandfather.
I don't know if you can help me. I am subscribing to the Ukraine SIG
because there is a possibility that he (LEWIS ELIEZAR BARNETT or BORACH)
was born there.
When my Great Grandparents married in London in 1856, Great Grandfather
was a widower & was using the name BARNETT. His date of birth was given
as 1810 & his father's name as Isaac.
My Great Grandfather died in 1869, But in 1881 my Great Grandmother
appears on the census for that year as Julia BORACH (an annuitant) which
leads me to believe that BORACH was Lewis Eliezar's original family
name.
I'd really like to know - where Lewis Eliezar was born
- details of his 1st marriage
(including if there were children)
- more about my Great Great Grandfather, Isaac
- who was Isaac's wife
Am I asking too much?

HAPPY 2001!

TONY BARNETT

ST. IVES, CORNWALL TR26 2JJ, ENGLAND"


Jews in Ukraine - New Book Available #ukraine

David Chapin <dchapin@...>
 

Announcing the publication of a new English-language book that has
significant genealogical value to those researching Ukraine, in particular
Podolia Guberniya:

TITLE: "The Road >from Letichev - the history and culture of a
forgotten Jewish community in Eastern Europe"

AUTHORS: David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock

BOOK WEB SITE: includes ordering info and free browse-online version
http://www.roadfromletichev.com

PUBLISHER: iUniverse.com, Inc.; 5220 S 16th, # 200, Lincoln NE 68512
tel: 877-823-9235
http://www.iUniverse.com

ISBN: At 904 pages, it is a two-volume set.
Volume 1: 0-595-00666-3; Volume 2: 0-595-00667-1.

DATE PUBLISHED: 2000.

TOWNS COVERED: Derazhnia, Letichev, Medzhibozh, Mikhalpol (Mikhampol,
Mikhalovka), Staro Zakrevsky Meidan, Volkovintsy, Zinkov,
Butsni (Butsnevtsy), Snitkov (Snitovka).

TOWNS DISCUSSED: Proskurov (Khmelnitsky), Kamenets-Podolsky, Bar, Ushitsa,
Dunaevtsy, Yarmolinitsy, Zhmerinka, Vinnitsa, Kiev, Staro
Konstantinov, Okupy, Felshtin (Gvardeyskoye), Litin,
Gaysin, Shargorod, Satanov.

UNIQUE SURNAMES: More than 600. For a complete list, see the book's web
site: http://www.roadfromletichev.com

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS INDEXED:

More than 8300. Includes a Holocaust necrology.

OTHER FINDING AIDS:
Table of Contents, Subject Index, People Index, Gazetteer
and Maps, Glossary, full references.

SYNOPSIS: The Letichev District (Podolia) of Ukraine was a microcosm of
Jewish life in Eastern Europe. But there were unique differences. It was
the home of the Baal Shem Tov and the cradle of the Chasidic movement.
This book is, in part, dedicated to the 300th anniversary of his birth.
The Road >from Letichev presents the history of the area through the eyes
of individuals who lived there. Interwoven into the fabric of Jewish life
are songs, food, folklore, health, education and crime. A complete
encyclopedia of the rabbis who traveled The Road >from Letichev is
provided, together with a detailed description of synagogues (most of
which are now destroyed) -- the first of its kind. The best description of
a Jewish agricultural colony to date is detailed. On a tragic note, new
information is provided on the 1648 Khmelnitsky massacres, as well as the
pogroms of 1882, 1903-7, and 1919-21.
Finally, the whole purpose for the book is to document what was destroyed
in the Holocaust. No understanding of the Holocaust is truly complete
without an understanding of what the Nazis took away >from the world. The
Road >from Letichev provides this insight. Through the testimonials >from
survivors of the Holocaust we learn new information about the horrors of
the Nazi occupation on Soviet soil. The Soviet experience in the Holocaust
is relatively unusual in the modern literature. Richly illustrated with
more than 400 rare photos and maps.

David A. Chapin
Austin, Texas USA
Email: dchapin@earthlink.net


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Jews in Ukraine - New Book Available #ukraine

David Chapin <dchapin@...>
 

Announcing the publication of a new English-language book that has
significant genealogical value to those researching Ukraine, in particular
Podolia Guberniya:

TITLE: "The Road >from Letichev - the history and culture of a
forgotten Jewish community in Eastern Europe"

AUTHORS: David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock

BOOK WEB SITE: includes ordering info and free browse-online version
http://www.roadfromletichev.com

PUBLISHER: iUniverse.com, Inc.; 5220 S 16th, # 200, Lincoln NE 68512
tel: 877-823-9235
http://www.iUniverse.com

ISBN: At 904 pages, it is a two-volume set.
Volume 1: 0-595-00666-3; Volume 2: 0-595-00667-1.

DATE PUBLISHED: 2000.

TOWNS COVERED: Derazhnia, Letichev, Medzhibozh, Mikhalpol (Mikhampol,
Mikhalovka), Staro Zakrevsky Meidan, Volkovintsy, Zinkov,
Butsni (Butsnevtsy), Snitkov (Snitovka).

TOWNS DISCUSSED: Proskurov (Khmelnitsky), Kamenets-Podolsky, Bar, Ushitsa,
Dunaevtsy, Yarmolinitsy, Zhmerinka, Vinnitsa, Kiev, Staro
Konstantinov, Okupy, Felshtin (Gvardeyskoye), Litin,
Gaysin, Shargorod, Satanov.

UNIQUE SURNAMES: More than 600. For a complete list, see the book's web
site: http://www.roadfromletichev.com

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS INDEXED:

More than 8300. Includes a Holocaust necrology.

OTHER FINDING AIDS:
Table of Contents, Subject Index, People Index, Gazetteer
and Maps, Glossary, full references.

SYNOPSIS: The Letichev District (Podolia) of Ukraine was a microcosm of
Jewish life in Eastern Europe. But there were unique differences. It was
the home of the Baal Shem Tov and the cradle of the Chasidic movement.
This book is, in part, dedicated to the 300th anniversary of his birth.
The Road >from Letichev presents the history of the area through the eyes
of individuals who lived there. Interwoven into the fabric of Jewish life
are songs, food, folklore, health, education and crime. A complete
encyclopedia of the rabbis who traveled The Road >from Letichev is
provided, together with a detailed description of synagogues (most of
which are now destroyed) -- the first of its kind. The best description of
a Jewish agricultural colony to date is detailed. On a tragic note, new
information is provided on the 1648 Khmelnitsky massacres, as well as the
pogroms of 1882, 1903-7, and 1919-21.
Finally, the whole purpose for the book is to document what was destroyed
in the Holocaust. No understanding of the Holocaust is truly complete
without an understanding of what the Nazis took away >from the world. The
Road >from Letichev provides this insight. Through the testimonials >from
survivors of the Holocaust we learn new information about the horrors of
the Nazi occupation on Soviet soil. The Soviet experience in the Holocaust
is relatively unusual in the modern literature. Richly illustrated with
more than 400 rare photos and maps.

David A. Chapin
Austin, Texas USA
Email: dchapin@earthlink.net


On the web #general

BarbaraHarris <maybug@...>
 

In crawling around the web, I was surprised to find - for the first time -
access to messages posted to the Jewish Gen list. I'd like some
clarification of this >from someone who knows. I had thought that postings
to this forum were limited to people who had subscribed to it. While our
postings are obviously public, in the strict sense of the word, I think
most of us have the sense of talking among ourselves at a restaurant table
rather than speaking through a microphone to an audience full of
miscellaneous strangers.,

Barbara Harris

MODERATOR NOTE: "Public" is the correct term. The Discussion
Group is not just a mailing list, but also a Usenet group, and
it can be read by anyone at anytime. The JewishGen Disclaimer,
Site Use and Privacy Policy, at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/disclaimer.html (the link
is on JewishGen's homepage), states, "If you submit messages to
the JewishGen Discussion group, it will include your name and
e-mail address. We retain this information in the Discussion Group
archives. We do not use this information, but we cannot prevent
other persons >from using it."

Another subscriber, Hank Mishkoff, submitted a far more eloquent
summary of the trade-offs inherent in Internet usage. His post
can be found in the archives. To read it, go to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~archpop
and search for: "mishkoff usenet"


Research in Ukraine--a report #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

My recent messages regarding research in Ukraine have generated a lot
of interest (judging by responses I have received). Many people have
asked: "What did you learn?" In fact, I have gathered quite a bit of
information. If by chance you are interested in "my" surnames or "my"
towns in Ukraine, please let me know. I have prepared a very detailed
report that I would be glad to share with interested parties.

My surnames:

Liss / Lis / etc.
Oberman / Guberman / Huberman / etc.
Stein / Shtein / etc. (brief research only)

My towns in Ukraine:

Zaslav (now Izyaslav)--Volyn?
Medvedovka--Volynia
Proskurov (now Khmelnitskiy)--Podolia
Mikolajow (now Nikolayev)--Podolia
Krasilov--Volyn? Podolia?
Mogilev Podolskiy--Podolia?

Please respond to me off list, at:

dkazez@mail.wittenberg.edu

Dan

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@mail.wittenberg.edu>
Springfield, Ohio USA
Poland: TALMAN, ENGLANDER, JURKIEWICZ, STRAUSBERG, KIFER, CZAPNIK
Ukraine: OBERMAN-HOBERMAN-GUBERMAN, LISS, SOBLE-SOBEL, STEIN, AXMAN
Turkey: KAZEZ-KAZES, FRESKO-FRESCO, ALHADEF-ELHADEF
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/fam/ent/fam.html