Date   

Re: Joffe #latvia

SVass@...
 

In a message dated 3/26/01, Elya B. Joffe writes:

<< I believe that my Grandfather Hayman Lazar came >from Riga, Latvia, and not
Lithuania, so I must check it carefully. .....> >> Grandson to Hyman Lazor
(or Lazar) Joffe >from South-Africa. He (Hyman) emigrated to South Africa >from
Latvia at 1897, approximately. He was born in Latvia (possibly Riga?) in 1882
approximately. >>

Many Jews of Latvia in the nineteenth century may have been registered in
Lithuania. One of my relatives, whose father (born 1835) and he (born 1892)
were born in Kreutzburg (Krustpils) and was listed in the Riga police
register as being a citizen of Shavli, Lithuania in 1908. It appears that
Jews were allowed entry into cities to perform work and not granted
citizenship.
Sam Vass
Kent, Washington, USA


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Joffe #latvia

SVass@...
 

In a message dated 3/26/01, Elya B. Joffe writes:

<< I believe that my Grandfather Hayman Lazar came >from Riga, Latvia, and not
Lithuania, so I must check it carefully. .....> >> Grandson to Hyman Lazor
(or Lazar) Joffe >from South-Africa. He (Hyman) emigrated to South Africa >from
Latvia at 1897, approximately. He was born in Latvia (possibly Riga?) in 1882
approximately. >>

Many Jews of Latvia in the nineteenth century may have been registered in
Lithuania. One of my relatives, whose father (born 1835) and he (born 1892)
were born in Kreutzburg (Krustpils) and was listed in the Riga police
register as being a citizen of Shavli, Lithuania in 1908. It appears that
Jews were allowed entry into cities to perform work and not granted
citizenship.
Sam Vass
Kent, Washington, USA


Re: Vabolisnk #latvia

Harold Rhode <hrhode@...>
 

It's Vabalnik, and it's in northern Lithuania. Vabalninkas today?

----- Original Message -----
From: "Scott Noar" <sman@uscom.com>
Subject: [latvia] Vabolisnk

Does anyone have any idea where vabolinsk is or what it's modern day name
is? I was told it was in Latvia.

Scott



Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Vabolisnk #latvia

Harold Rhode <hrhode@...>
 

It's Vabalnik, and it's in northern Lithuania. Vabalninkas today?

----- Original Message -----
From: "Scott Noar" <sman@uscom.com>
Subject: [latvia] Vabolisnk

Does anyone have any idea where vabolinsk is or what it's modern day name
is? I was told it was in Latvia.

Scott



Map of Jewish neighborhood of Brisk #general

mrtfuzot <mrtfuzot@...>
 

I recently received a diagram of the layout of 2 streets, or parts of
streets, which were in Brisk and which the house of the "Brisker Rabbi",
the "Talmud Torah" and the "KATZOFF family house" were noted. This was a
hand written diagram.

Can anyone forward me to maps of the Brisk jewish neighborhood (which I
presume these houses were located) preferably on-line that would also note
names of residents so that I coulf verify the above diagram and expand on
it.

TIA

Yoni Ben-Ari (Katzoff), Jerusalem/Efrat


Re: Novgorod #latvia

acme100 <acme100@...>
 

Long story, please forgive me if I've misunderstood---is Novgorod a last name
or a place??? My father insisted the family came >from Novgorod, but I can find
zip, zero, zilch to back him up, he's dead, of course, and through a cousin, we
came >from Zolotonosha (sp?) now in Ukraine. BUT----my brother and I remember
our father saying Novgorod, sooooo
Thanks for any/all help.
Happy Passover.
Adrienne Creed Mendelson
Chevy Chase, MD
West Bloomfield, MI
Creed was the name SOME of the family changed theirs to in the U.S. & Canada.
Umpteen others changed to various other names. Confusing.

Moderator Note:
Novogorod is a place 163km SE of Leningrad.
Novogrudok is near Minsk in Belarus


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Map of Jewish neighborhood of Brisk #general

mrtfuzot <mrtfuzot@...>
 

I recently received a diagram of the layout of 2 streets, or parts of
streets, which were in Brisk and which the house of the "Brisker Rabbi",
the "Talmud Torah" and the "KATZOFF family house" were noted. This was a
hand written diagram.

Can anyone forward me to maps of the Brisk jewish neighborhood (which I
presume these houses were located) preferably on-line that would also note
names of residents so that I coulf verify the above diagram and expand on
it.

TIA

Yoni Ben-Ari (Katzoff), Jerusalem/Efrat


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Novgorod #latvia

acme100 <acme100@...>
 

Long story, please forgive me if I've misunderstood---is Novgorod a last name
or a place??? My father insisted the family came >from Novgorod, but I can find
zip, zero, zilch to back him up, he's dead, of course, and through a cousin, we
came >from Zolotonosha (sp?) now in Ukraine. BUT----my brother and I remember
our father saying Novgorod, sooooo
Thanks for any/all help.
Happy Passover.
Adrienne Creed Mendelson
Chevy Chase, MD
West Bloomfield, MI
Creed was the name SOME of the family changed theirs to in the U.S. & Canada.
Umpteen others changed to various other names. Confusing.

Moderator Note:
Novogorod is a place 163km SE of Leningrad.
Novogrudok is near Minsk in Belarus


Birth Certificate #general

Dschaefer3@...
 

Dear Genners,
My Dad was born August 18, 1884 in New York City in either Manhattan or
Brooklyn. I have sent away twice to the NYC Archives for his birth
certificate for both burroughs and both times the response was "no record
found". This does not seem possible to me as my parents took me to Europe
in 1929 on a vacation. I've lost the passport but am now wondering how my
Dad got a passport without a birth certificate. Can anyone out there tell
me how to get some record of his birth?
Dorothy Schaefer, Plymouth, Mn.

I"m researching the following names:
Goldsmith_ Hesse Cassel, Germany; Hess_ Lorhaupton, Germany
Fink_ Germany; Marx_Germany
Kreingold_Kiev; Socolsky_Kiev
Sochat_Lithuania
Kagan_Lithuania
Levitan_Lithuania


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Birth Certificate #general

Dschaefer3@...
 

Dear Genners,
My Dad was born August 18, 1884 in New York City in either Manhattan or
Brooklyn. I have sent away twice to the NYC Archives for his birth
certificate for both burroughs and both times the response was "no record
found". This does not seem possible to me as my parents took me to Europe
in 1929 on a vacation. I've lost the passport but am now wondering how my
Dad got a passport without a birth certificate. Can anyone out there tell
me how to get some record of his birth?
Dorothy Schaefer, Plymouth, Mn.

I"m researching the following names:
Goldsmith_ Hesse Cassel, Germany; Hess_ Lorhaupton, Germany
Fink_ Germany; Marx_Germany
Kreingold_Kiev; Socolsky_Kiev
Sochat_Lithuania
Kagan_Lithuania
Levitan_Lithuania


Re: Date of death using Social Security number #general

Herb <herbiem@...>
 

You should try to obtain a death certificate. The date of death and the
cemetery would be listed on the certificate. You do not need to know
exact date of death to obtain a copy of the death certificate. I f you
know the approximate year of death, most archives will do a search for
you.

Herb Meyers
Boulder, Colorado


Roberta Berman wrote in message <3AC1868F.CE9C6BC2@cts.com>...

Subject: Need help in finding grandmother's date of death and cemetery.
Sue Smithe's query:
"The cemetery where my gfather is buried, said they could not do a
check to see if my gmother is buried there, because I did not have the
date of death. She is probably buried there also.
I was not able to locate a Soc. Sec. no. for her at ancestry.com. I
have tried some of the websites for locations of graves, but have not
been successful."

Have you tried the Family Tree Maker
(www.familytreemaker.com/fto._ssdisearch.html)or Rootsweb
(ssdi.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/ssdi.cgi) SSDI? I have noticed
that Ancestry, Family Tree Maker and Rootsweb Social Security death
indexes do not always give the same results. It is best to try all
three before giving up on the SSDI.

Roberta Berman
San Diego, CA
danber@cts.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Date of death using Social Security number #general

Herb <herbiem@...>
 

You should try to obtain a death certificate. The date of death and the
cemetery would be listed on the certificate. You do not need to know
exact date of death to obtain a copy of the death certificate. I f you
know the approximate year of death, most archives will do a search for
you.

Herb Meyers
Boulder, Colorado


Roberta Berman wrote in message <3AC1868F.CE9C6BC2@cts.com>...

Subject: Need help in finding grandmother's date of death and cemetery.
Sue Smithe's query:
"The cemetery where my gfather is buried, said they could not do a
check to see if my gmother is buried there, because I did not have the
date of death. She is probably buried there also.
I was not able to locate a Soc. Sec. no. for her at ancestry.com. I
have tried some of the websites for locations of graves, but have not
been successful."

Have you tried the Family Tree Maker
(www.familytreemaker.com/fto._ssdisearch.html)or Rootsweb
(ssdi.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/ssdi.cgi) SSDI? I have noticed
that Ancestry, Family Tree Maker and Rootsweb Social Security death
indexes do not always give the same results. It is best to try all
three before giving up on the SSDI.

Roberta Berman
San Diego, CA
danber@cts.com


Naturalization vs. permanent residency, hopefully in plain text this time! #ukraine

Eve Greenfield <eve_rachel@...>
 

[Moderator: This is being re-posted because it was not properly received by our "individual mail" members, yesterday.]

As an immigration paralegal, I can tell you that not
only is it possible, but more common than you would
expect, for people to live here for many decades
without ever naturalizing. (It's quite legal, by the
way: a "green card" is legal permission to reside
permanently in the U.S., and entitles a person to
nearly all of the benefits of citizenship except
voting.) There is no time limit on how long one can
remain in the U.S. as a permanent resident.

There are, however, some other advantages to
citizenship besides the ability to vote. U.S.
citizens can't be deported (unless they are stripped
of their citizenship first, which is a messy process:
that's how the U.S. generally gets rid of Nazi war
criminals. One of the few ways of stripping someone's
U.S. citizenship is by proving that they gained it
through fraud or deception. In the case of Nazis who
were admitted initially to the U.S. as displaced
persons after WWII, part of the admission process was
swearing that they had not participated inthe
persecution of others. If the feds can prove that
they did persecute others in Federal court, the
citizenship is formally revoked, and deportation
procedings can commence.)

The main practical advantage of citizenship, though,
is that U.S. citizens enjoy preference in petitioning
for permanent rsidency for their close relatives.
Parents and spouses of U.S. citizens have no numerical
immigration quotas, whereas relatives of permanent
residents can face quotas which will force them to
wait many, many years until their place in line is
reached and they are able to immigrate. That's
genarally a powerful incentive for people to
naturalize as soon as they are statutorily able: 5
years after they become permanent residents, in
general, although in recent years INS processing
backlogs have added up to three years, in some
jurisdictions.

Hope this sheds some light on the process for you.
The INS Web site also has a geneaology section, which
should help you determine where your grandfather's
records are stored. Even if he never naturalized,
there should still be some kind of record of his
admission to the U.S. and of his permanent residency:
the trick will be to find it. Good luck!


Eve Greenfield, Chicago, Illinois


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Naturalization vs. permanent residency, hopefully in plain text this time! #ukraine

Eve Greenfield <eve_rachel@...>
 

[Moderator: This is being re-posted because it was not properly received by our "individual mail" members, yesterday.]

As an immigration paralegal, I can tell you that not
only is it possible, but more common than you would
expect, for people to live here for many decades
without ever naturalizing. (It's quite legal, by the
way: a "green card" is legal permission to reside
permanently in the U.S., and entitles a person to
nearly all of the benefits of citizenship except
voting.) There is no time limit on how long one can
remain in the U.S. as a permanent resident.

There are, however, some other advantages to
citizenship besides the ability to vote. U.S.
citizens can't be deported (unless they are stripped
of their citizenship first, which is a messy process:
that's how the U.S. generally gets rid of Nazi war
criminals. One of the few ways of stripping someone's
U.S. citizenship is by proving that they gained it
through fraud or deception. In the case of Nazis who
were admitted initially to the U.S. as displaced
persons after WWII, part of the admission process was
swearing that they had not participated inthe
persecution of others. If the feds can prove that
they did persecute others in Federal court, the
citizenship is formally revoked, and deportation
procedings can commence.)

The main practical advantage of citizenship, though,
is that U.S. citizens enjoy preference in petitioning
for permanent rsidency for their close relatives.
Parents and spouses of U.S. citizens have no numerical
immigration quotas, whereas relatives of permanent
residents can face quotas which will force them to
wait many, many years until their place in line is
reached and they are able to immigrate. That's
genarally a powerful incentive for people to
naturalize as soon as they are statutorily able: 5
years after they become permanent residents, in
general, although in recent years INS processing
backlogs have added up to three years, in some
jurisdictions.

Hope this sheds some light on the process for you.
The INS Web site also has a geneaology section, which
should help you determine where your grandfather's
records are stored. Even if he never naturalized,
there should still be some kind of record of his
admission to the U.S. and of his permanent residency:
the trick will be to find it. Good luck!


Eve Greenfield, Chicago, Illinois


Re: In Search of the Joffe Family Source #latvia

CWhippman@...
 

In a message dated 3/27/01 12:13:56 PM GMT Daylight Time,
acme100@attglobal.net writes:

When I click on the name of a Database, all I get is
general information in most cases, followed by the obligatory thank-yous
to the people to donated time, money & translations.
I'm a novice at this, so treat me as such & use one syllable words!
Thank you so much.
Adrienne Creed Mendelson
Chevy Chase, MD
West Bloomfield, MI
Hi, thank you so much for raising this problem. You are not alone! The way
to access the database is to go
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/latvia
Then take the cursor and scan right down to the bottom of the entry page.
That is where you find the space to type in the name you are searching. Be
sure you ask for the Mokotoff soundex name search which will find all the
various spellings that may have been used. Then click on the "search"
button. This will hopefully bring up lots of sources for your name and you
will see them listed. It is set out so that the name of the database is set
out on the left and if you click this area you will come up with the general
information. Access to the documents is on the right hand side and refers to
how many documents there are. Click where it says how many documents there
are and these will immediately come up and you can scan through them. If you
have anymore problems don't be shy, just ask. Its our job to make it
understandable and I am so sorry you have had this difficulty.
Can you let me know how you get on.
Best always in your searches, Constance


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: In Search of the Joffe Family Source #latvia

CWhippman@...
 

In a message dated 3/27/01 12:13:56 PM GMT Daylight Time,
acme100@attglobal.net writes:

When I click on the name of a Database, all I get is
general information in most cases, followed by the obligatory thank-yous
to the people to donated time, money & translations.
I'm a novice at this, so treat me as such & use one syllable words!
Thank you so much.
Adrienne Creed Mendelson
Chevy Chase, MD
West Bloomfield, MI
Hi, thank you so much for raising this problem. You are not alone! The way
to access the database is to go
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/latvia
Then take the cursor and scan right down to the bottom of the entry page.
That is where you find the space to type in the name you are searching. Be
sure you ask for the Mokotoff soundex name search which will find all the
various spellings that may have been used. Then click on the "search"
button. This will hopefully bring up lots of sources for your name and you
will see them listed. It is set out so that the name of the database is set
out on the left and if you click this area you will come up with the general
information. Access to the documents is on the right hand side and refers to
how many documents there are. Click where it says how many documents there
are and these will immediately come up and you can scan through them. If you
have anymore problems don't be shy, just ask. Its our job to make it
understandable and I am so sorry you have had this difficulty.
Can you let me know how you get on.
Best always in your searches, Constance


To phone to Riga #latvia

Sergei Komarov <komarov_sergei@...>
 

I mean that I need programm seems like programm www.dialpad.com
When I phone to US I use www.dialpad.com (very useful phone-programm to make free calling to or >from US), but I need other programm
servicing in Riga like "dialpad" in US.
Thank you. Sergei.

My search: Iosif Gellerman/Gegerman(changed the name)1919 y.b.
in Riga, died 1989 in N.Y.(US)
or his families.

komarov_sergei@mail.ru

Moderator Note: Sergei this newsgroup
is for genealogy and we can discuss the names
you are searching.
The computer software problem will need
to be answered on the newsgroup that
deals with computer software questions.
I will not post any further questions about
the software.
If anyone wishes to communicate privately
about the software contact Sergei at his E-mail
address


Latvia SIG #Latvia To phone to Riga #latvia

Sergei Komarov <komarov_sergei@...>
 

I mean that I need programm seems like programm www.dialpad.com
When I phone to US I use www.dialpad.com (very useful phone-programm to make free calling to or >from US), but I need other programm
servicing in Riga like "dialpad" in US.
Thank you. Sergei.

My search: Iosif Gellerman/Gegerman(changed the name)1919 y.b.
in Riga, died 1989 in N.Y.(US)
or his families.

komarov_sergei@mail.ru

Moderator Note: Sergei this newsgroup
is for genealogy and we can discuss the names
you are searching.
The computer software problem will need
to be answered on the newsgroup that
deals with computer software questions.
I will not post any further questions about
the software.
If anyone wishes to communicate privately
about the software contact Sergei at his E-mail
address


ViewMate Re: FHL Records #general

Willie46 <willie46@...>
 

I hope you all will agree with me that ViewMate is a great tool
that JewishGen has provided for our use. Kudos go to Josef Herz
and Bernard Kouchel for their leadership.

For those who use ViewMate, I think it would be a kind gesture to
make a donation to JewishGen in honor of the person providing the
help.

Mark Halpern
West Conshohocken, PA, USA

sallybru@wdcunet.net wrote:

No, they won't be translating the world's records into English -
what would a Swede say, "Translate everything into Swedish"?

That is what ViewMate is for. Post a copy of the record on
ViewMate and get it translated! Presto!


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate Re: FHL Records #general

Willie46 <willie46@...>
 

I hope you all will agree with me that ViewMate is a great tool
that JewishGen has provided for our use. Kudos go to Josef Herz
and Bernard Kouchel for their leadership.

For those who use ViewMate, I think it would be a kind gesture to
make a donation to JewishGen in honor of the person providing the
help.

Mark Halpern
West Conshohocken, PA, USA

sallybru@wdcunet.net wrote:

No, they won't be translating the world's records into English -
what would a Swede say, "Translate everything into Swedish"?

That is what ViewMate is for. Post a copy of the record on
ViewMate and get it translated! Presto!