Date   

Origins of surname MASON #general

Mark Mason <dilbonzo@...>
 

Hi,

I have ancestors >from the Kiev area. My g-grandfather is Morris Mason and
came over >from the Kiev area in 1914 or so. His mother's maiden name is
Polevoy. That is all I know. So I am wondering what his father's name
was, or his original last name.

I doubt it is Mason. Maybe something similar to Mason in Russian, or
Yiddish or something. Maybe it was not his last name at all, but his
profession might have been a Mason, or stone mason or something and it just
got changed to that. I don't know.

If anyone out there knows Masons, and what their original names were,
especially in the Kiev area, I would love to hear >from you about possible
translations to look up and try and find.

Maybe then I would find a Polevoy that married that Mason equivalent name
in the later 1800's in the Kiev area.

Thank you,

Mark Mason


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Origins of surname MASON #general

Mark Mason <dilbonzo@...>
 

Hi,

I have ancestors >from the Kiev area. My g-grandfather is Morris Mason and
came over >from the Kiev area in 1914 or so. His mother's maiden name is
Polevoy. That is all I know. So I am wondering what his father's name
was, or his original last name.

I doubt it is Mason. Maybe something similar to Mason in Russian, or
Yiddish or something. Maybe it was not his last name at all, but his
profession might have been a Mason, or stone mason or something and it just
got changed to that. I don't know.

If anyone out there knows Masons, and what their original names were,
especially in the Kiev area, I would love to hear >from you about possible
translations to look up and try and find.

Maybe then I would find a Polevoy that married that Mason equivalent name
in the later 1800's in the Kiev area.

Thank you,

Mark Mason


Re: On-Line Passenger Indexes; St. Albans Lists #general

Dolph Klein <kledolph@...>
 

Monica, Many thanks for consolidating such valuable information.

I recently went through NARA's microfilms on the St. Albans Lists and was
successful in finding relatives who entered the U.S. via Quebec. For a
comprehensive description of the scope of the St. Albans Lists and how they
can be accessed, see:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~holdenclan/albans.htm

Dolph Klein
Chapel Hill, NC

The Canadian crossings (St. Albans Lists) are also indexed for
1895-1954,and available on microfilm. I'm not sure about West Coast ports.
Monica Leonards
Glenside, PA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: On-Line Passenger Indexes; St. Albans Lists #general

Dolph Klein <kledolph@...>
 

Monica, Many thanks for consolidating such valuable information.

I recently went through NARA's microfilms on the St. Albans Lists and was
successful in finding relatives who entered the U.S. via Quebec. For a
comprehensive description of the scope of the St. Albans Lists and how they
can be accessed, see:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~holdenclan/albans.htm

Dolph Klein
Chapel Hill, NC

The Canadian crossings (St. Albans Lists) are also indexed for
1895-1954,and available on microfilm. I'm not sure about West Coast ports.
Monica Leonards
Glenside, PA


GNDB Hints & Kinks 1: Given Names Data Bases & Yiddish dialects #general

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Dear Genners,

The purpose of this "Hints & Kinks" posting is to help you solve problems
associated with the state of development of the specific GNDB data base you
want to use.

The new set of 15 Given Names Data Bases provides excellent opportunities
to find additional given names which may appear for your ancestors in
various European archival documents. Since this is an on-going project, we
are updating the data bases and text files periodically (the next update
will be posted next month.) This factor has implications for how you might
want to use other GNDBs if the one for your particular European country of
interest is less developed than that of some other countries.

You can visit the URL <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/> and
examine the large table there which summarizes the state of development of
each European country's project in terms of a number of project phases and
foreign-country vernacular names. This table is updated when new names are
added to the data bases. Here is a short summary, breaking up the European
countries into three approximate-development groups:

Advanced: Belarus, Lithuania, Poland
Medium: Galicia, Germany, Holland, Hungary, Latvia, Ukraine
Elementary: Denmark, France, Prussia, Romania, Russia, Sweden

"Elementary" means that the data base has a set of basic legal names plus a
sometimes small number of other European Jewish names added. "Medium"
means that certain project phases are well advanced, while others are not,
and that some foreign vernacular names may be present. "Advanced " means
that the number and quality of European Jewish names is good to excellent,
and that the number of foreign vernacular names is medium to good.

Now, what does this mean to you, if your particular country of interest is
not in the "Advanced" category? Here is one thing that you can do,
depending on the Yiddish dialect spoken in your European country.

There were four main Yiddish dialects in 19th-century Europe: Western,
Polish/Galician, Litvish, and Ukraine:

Western: Denmark, France, Germany, Holland, Hungary, Prussia, West Romania,
Sweden
Polish: Poland, West Galicia
Litvish: Belarus, Latvia, Lithuania, Suwalk Gubernya, Northeastern Ukraine
Ukraine: East Galicia, East Romania, Ukraine (except northeastern)

Those countries where Western Yiddish was spoken actually used a number of
somewhat different sub-dialects of "Western" Yiddish; the other three
dialects were much more uniformly spoken in their countries. Due to
migrations within Europe, there was some redistribution of Yiddish
dialects. To a certain extent, however, the different cultures of the Jews
and their choices of given names reflected the Yiddish dialect they
spoke. You can visit the following page in the JewishGen Given Names Data
Base web site to obtain more regional
details: <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/geografc.htm> .

The upshot is, for example, that if you are researching in France
("Elementary") where the data base is somewhat sparse, you might also
consider searching in the German data base ("Medium") -- it is adjacent to
France, both countries spoke "Western" Yiddish, they handed a part of their
boundary areas back and forth a few times, and you might just find some
additional names that apply to your research. Similar thinking applies to
other European country pairs where the two were adjacent and spoke the same
Yiddish dialect.

Similarly, by examining the data bases of the "Big Three" (Belarus,
Lithuania, Poland), you may get good ideas about other names that you have
seen but not considered for your ancestors. A lot of the given names
throughout Europe were well-shared among all of the countries, even though
specific countries had their own preferences for some names. Furthermore,
the basic set of Hebrew names used to initiate each country's data base
represents quite well the common choice by all regions of this small set of
names, followed by the addition of other preferred names.

Future "Hints & Kinks" will deal with how to use the Input Form to maximize
the efficiency of your name searches.

Good luck with your research.

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen GNDB Hints & Kinks 1: Given Names Data Bases & Yiddish dialects #general

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Dear Genners,

The purpose of this "Hints & Kinks" posting is to help you solve problems
associated with the state of development of the specific GNDB data base you
want to use.

The new set of 15 Given Names Data Bases provides excellent opportunities
to find additional given names which may appear for your ancestors in
various European archival documents. Since this is an on-going project, we
are updating the data bases and text files periodically (the next update
will be posted next month.) This factor has implications for how you might
want to use other GNDBs if the one for your particular European country of
interest is less developed than that of some other countries.

You can visit the URL <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/> and
examine the large table there which summarizes the state of development of
each European country's project in terms of a number of project phases and
foreign-country vernacular names. This table is updated when new names are
added to the data bases. Here is a short summary, breaking up the European
countries into three approximate-development groups:

Advanced: Belarus, Lithuania, Poland
Medium: Galicia, Germany, Holland, Hungary, Latvia, Ukraine
Elementary: Denmark, France, Prussia, Romania, Russia, Sweden

"Elementary" means that the data base has a set of basic legal names plus a
sometimes small number of other European Jewish names added. "Medium"
means that certain project phases are well advanced, while others are not,
and that some foreign vernacular names may be present. "Advanced " means
that the number and quality of European Jewish names is good to excellent,
and that the number of foreign vernacular names is medium to good.

Now, what does this mean to you, if your particular country of interest is
not in the "Advanced" category? Here is one thing that you can do,
depending on the Yiddish dialect spoken in your European country.

There were four main Yiddish dialects in 19th-century Europe: Western,
Polish/Galician, Litvish, and Ukraine:

Western: Denmark, France, Germany, Holland, Hungary, Prussia, West Romania,
Sweden
Polish: Poland, West Galicia
Litvish: Belarus, Latvia, Lithuania, Suwalk Gubernya, Northeastern Ukraine
Ukraine: East Galicia, East Romania, Ukraine (except northeastern)

Those countries where Western Yiddish was spoken actually used a number of
somewhat different sub-dialects of "Western" Yiddish; the other three
dialects were much more uniformly spoken in their countries. Due to
migrations within Europe, there was some redistribution of Yiddish
dialects. To a certain extent, however, the different cultures of the Jews
and their choices of given names reflected the Yiddish dialect they
spoke. You can visit the following page in the JewishGen Given Names Data
Base web site to obtain more regional
details: <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/geografc.htm> .

The upshot is, for example, that if you are researching in France
("Elementary") where the data base is somewhat sparse, you might also
consider searching in the German data base ("Medium") -- it is adjacent to
France, both countries spoke "Western" Yiddish, they handed a part of their
boundary areas back and forth a few times, and you might just find some
additional names that apply to your research. Similar thinking applies to
other European country pairs where the two were adjacent and spoke the same
Yiddish dialect.

Similarly, by examining the data bases of the "Big Three" (Belarus,
Lithuania, Poland), you may get good ideas about other names that you have
seen but not considered for your ancestors. A lot of the given names
throughout Europe were well-shared among all of the countries, even though
specific countries had their own preferences for some names. Furthermore,
the basic set of Hebrew names used to initiate each country's data base
represents quite well the common choice by all regions of this small set of
names, followed by the addition of other preferred names.

Future "Hints & Kinks" will deal with how to use the Input Form to maximize
the efficiency of your name searches.

Good luck with your research.

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Samuel Weingard in Phoenix, AZ #general

Steve Cohen <scohen@...>
 

Dear Jewishgenners,

I am seeking the last living child of Jennie and Jacob Weingard, Samuel
Weingard of Ostrow Mazowiecka, Poland. He was born in or near Fall River,
Massachusetts, and had 5 known siblings: Sally Kravetz, Mollie Beatus,
Irving Weingard, Murry Weingard, and Louis Weingard. In the early 1970s he
lived in Canoga Park, California, and >from the late 1970s till now he has
lived somewhere in or near Phoenix, Arizona. I expect he would be in his
upper 80s to low 90s in age by now. His last surviving sibling, Sally
Kravetz, died in Newport, Rhode Island in November. Based on obituaries
from the 1970s through now, I know he is in the Phoenix, AZ area.
anybirthday.com does not list him
whowhere.com does not list him

Perhaps there is some kind Jewishgenner >from Canoga Park or the Phoenix
area who can contact him for me, or tell me how to reach him.

My great-grandmother, Jennie Schwartzberg Cooperman, may have been his
mother's sister or 1st cousin.

Please contact me privately.

Thanks,

Stephen Cohen


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Samuel Weingard in Phoenix, AZ #general

Steve Cohen <scohen@...>
 

Dear Jewishgenners,

I am seeking the last living child of Jennie and Jacob Weingard, Samuel
Weingard of Ostrow Mazowiecka, Poland. He was born in or near Fall River,
Massachusetts, and had 5 known siblings: Sally Kravetz, Mollie Beatus,
Irving Weingard, Murry Weingard, and Louis Weingard. In the early 1970s he
lived in Canoga Park, California, and >from the late 1970s till now he has
lived somewhere in or near Phoenix, Arizona. I expect he would be in his
upper 80s to low 90s in age by now. His last surviving sibling, Sally
Kravetz, died in Newport, Rhode Island in November. Based on obituaries
from the 1970s through now, I know he is in the Phoenix, AZ area.
anybirthday.com does not list him
whowhere.com does not list him

Perhaps there is some kind Jewishgenner >from Canoga Park or the Phoenix
area who can contact him for me, or tell me how to reach him.

My great-grandmother, Jennie Schwartzberg Cooperman, may have been his
mother's sister or 1st cousin.

Please contact me privately.

Thanks,

Stephen Cohen


Re: Internment on the Isle of Man #general

Harold Pollins <snillop@...>
 

Just a few corrections to Gunther Steinberg's account.
1. Internment did not take place until the early summer of 1940 following
the German invasion of Norway, Belgium, Holland and France.
2. Only a small number of men were shipped abroad and this stopped after
one ship was torpedoed.
3. While many refugees joined the Pioneer Corps (and had done so before
internment) many others then went on to join ordinary army units, a number
getting killed in action.

.Harold Pollins
Oxford

<Shortly after Britain declared war on Germany in September 1939,all men of
German and Austrian birth were interned, with most or all being sent to the
Isle of Man. Within a short period, those of prime military age, 18-30-35,
were shipped overseas for internment, some to Canada some to Australia.
The British felt they had little time to find out who was an enemy alien
and who was a pro-British immigrant for some time there after. The older
immigrants, mostly German and Austrian Jews were released after background
checks, and went back to their work, when possible. However, if they had
been employed in a defense industry, they were forced to find alternate
employment. Many of the younger ones who were not sent to overseas
internment, and those that became old enough to serve, ended up in the
Pioneer Corps in Britain.>

Does anyone have any information about German Jews living inEngland during
WWII who were interned on the Isle of Man because they were enemy aliens.
My father, Gerhard Rosenstein, spent some time there.

Sylvia Jacobs
Moorestown, NJ
Gunther Steinberg


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Internment on the Isle of Man #general

Harold Pollins <snillop@...>
 

Just a few corrections to Gunther Steinberg's account.
1. Internment did not take place until the early summer of 1940 following
the German invasion of Norway, Belgium, Holland and France.
2. Only a small number of men were shipped abroad and this stopped after
one ship was torpedoed.
3. While many refugees joined the Pioneer Corps (and had done so before
internment) many others then went on to join ordinary army units, a number
getting killed in action.

.Harold Pollins
Oxford

<Shortly after Britain declared war on Germany in September 1939,all men of
German and Austrian birth were interned, with most or all being sent to the
Isle of Man. Within a short period, those of prime military age, 18-30-35,
were shipped overseas for internment, some to Canada some to Australia.
The British felt they had little time to find out who was an enemy alien
and who was a pro-British immigrant for some time there after. The older
immigrants, mostly German and Austrian Jews were released after background
checks, and went back to their work, when possible. However, if they had
been employed in a defense industry, they were forced to find alternate
employment. Many of the younger ones who were not sent to overseas
internment, and those that became old enough to serve, ended up in the
Pioneer Corps in Britain.>

Does anyone have any information about German Jews living inEngland during
WWII who were interned on the Isle of Man because they were enemy aliens.
My father, Gerhard Rosenstein, spent some time there.

Sylvia Jacobs
Moorestown, NJ
Gunther Steinberg


Searching for descendents of KLIBANOS from Subotch / Subacius Lithuania #lithuania

Chaim Luria <chaim@...>
 

Ivan and Michail KLIBANOS arrived in New York on October 16, 1906 from
Subotch/Subacius Lithuania at age 26 and 21 repectively. If any of their
descendents have information on Subotch please contact me privately.

Regards,

Chaim Luria
Jerusalem


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Searching for descendents of KLIBANOS from Subotch / Subacius Lithuania #lithuania

Chaim Luria <chaim@...>
 

Ivan and Michail KLIBANOS arrived in New York on October 16, 1906 from
Subotch/Subacius Lithuania at age 26 and 21 repectively. If any of their
descendents have information on Subotch please contact me privately.

Regards,

Chaim Luria
Jerusalem


Stanislawow (Ivano Frankivsk) Yizkor Book #galicia

Susannah R. Juni <sjuni@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

Here's an update on the JewishGen project to translate the Stanislawow
(Ivano Frankivsk) Yizkor Book.

Thanks to the generous donations of some of you, we are now in the process
of translating the first chapter, "History of the Jewish People in
Stanislawow" by N.M. Gelber (58 pages). Unfortunately, our fundraising to
complete the entire book is still far >from our goal. We really need your
help at this time to ensure that we'll be able to complete this
translation. We continue to ask for donations in the $300 range, although
donations of any amount ($25, $50, $80, whatever you can) would be greatly
appreciated.

Despite the fact that hundreds of Jewish genealogists are actively
reasearching this city, only ten individuals have made cash donations to
date. I'd like to see that number grow, regardless of the dollar amount of
each individual donation. Please help us now. You can really make a
difference. We'll all benefit >from this translation, but I'd like to
encourage everyone to do their fair share, depending on your financial
ability at this time. Let's show the world that Jewish Stanislawowers are here!

You can see the complete current status of this translation project at any
time by going to:

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stanislawow-arim/stanislawow-arim.html


Take a look at the Table of Contents and the Index, which are at the above
referenced site, and whet your appetite! The index of this book is chock
full of individual names. We still need funds to cover the translation cost
for 317 additional pages. These pages are densely printed, with a lot of
text on each page, so the cost per page is higher than average. Of course,
the amount of data on each page is also greater than average. To donate
funds, please click on the link below, and designate the Ivano-Frankivsk
Yizkor Book:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/yizkortrans.html

JewishGen, Inc. is a non-profit 501(c) 3 organization; therefore, you may
be able to claim an income tax deduction for any donations, depending on
your personal tax situation. You may wish to consider tithing an additional
amount at the same time to JewishGen's General Fund, which provides all of
the expensive computer equipment and technical support for this project at
no charge. Due to the unique arrangements with this copyright holder, it
will become much more expensive in the future if we don't move forward to
complete this translation now.

Thank you for your interest! Best wishes to all for a sweet new year with
peace in the world.

Zaat gezint!
Susannah R. Juni


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Stanislawow (Ivano Frankivsk) Yizkor Book #galicia

Susannah R. Juni <sjuni@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

Here's an update on the JewishGen project to translate the Stanislawow
(Ivano Frankivsk) Yizkor Book.

Thanks to the generous donations of some of you, we are now in the process
of translating the first chapter, "History of the Jewish People in
Stanislawow" by N.M. Gelber (58 pages). Unfortunately, our fundraising to
complete the entire book is still far >from our goal. We really need your
help at this time to ensure that we'll be able to complete this
translation. We continue to ask for donations in the $300 range, although
donations of any amount ($25, $50, $80, whatever you can) would be greatly
appreciated.

Despite the fact that hundreds of Jewish genealogists are actively
reasearching this city, only ten individuals have made cash donations to
date. I'd like to see that number grow, regardless of the dollar amount of
each individual donation. Please help us now. You can really make a
difference. We'll all benefit >from this translation, but I'd like to
encourage everyone to do their fair share, depending on your financial
ability at this time. Let's show the world that Jewish Stanislawowers are here!

You can see the complete current status of this translation project at any
time by going to:

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stanislawow-arim/stanislawow-arim.html


Take a look at the Table of Contents and the Index, which are at the above
referenced site, and whet your appetite! The index of this book is chock
full of individual names. We still need funds to cover the translation cost
for 317 additional pages. These pages are densely printed, with a lot of
text on each page, so the cost per page is higher than average. Of course,
the amount of data on each page is also greater than average. To donate
funds, please click on the link below, and designate the Ivano-Frankivsk
Yizkor Book:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/yizkortrans.html

JewishGen, Inc. is a non-profit 501(c) 3 organization; therefore, you may
be able to claim an income tax deduction for any donations, depending on
your personal tax situation. You may wish to consider tithing an additional
amount at the same time to JewishGen's General Fund, which provides all of
the expensive computer equipment and technical support for this project at
no charge. Due to the unique arrangements with this copyright holder, it
will become much more expensive in the future if we don't move forward to
complete this translation now.

Thank you for your interest! Best wishes to all for a sweet new year with
peace in the world.

Zaat gezint!
Susannah R. Juni


Bolekhov Yizkor Book #galicia

Susannah R. Juni <sjuni@...>
 

Our translation project continues!

Thanks to the generous donations of many of you, we have completed the
translation of the major chapter by Dr. M. Hendel, "Maskilim and Haskalah
(Enlightenment) Movement in Bolekhov in the 19th Century" (35 pages). This
newest chapter should be of interest to anyone researching the region of

Galicia, not only in Bolekhov itself. Bolekhov is in the area near Ivano
Frankivsk (Stanislawow) which was in Eastern Galicia. It tells a
fascinating story of the history of Jewish schools in the region including
mention of the major leaders of the Haskala movement who were >from
Bolekhov, and also discusses some of the controversies which stirred the
political and educational spheres of our ancestors.

You can see the complete current status of this translation project at any
time by going to:

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bolekhov/bolekhov.html

The next major sections which are now in process of translation contain the
10 articles written by Yonah (Yoyne) Ashel-Ellendman under the heading
"Daily Life," pages 219-241, plus other articles >from that section on pp.
261-263, and pp. 267-277. Translations are noted on the website as "in
process" only when we have funding or if someone is acting as a translator
as a donation.

Unfortunately, we're still a bit away >from our goal of completing the book.
Accordng to my calculations, we currently lack funding for only 67 pages,
assuming that everyone who has volunteered to translate sections at no cost
is able to complete their sections. At our very reasonable rate per page,
we are short by about $1,000.

Every little bit helps. If you haven't contributed yet, this would be a
good time. Perhaps you'd like to review the table of contents on the web
page and select a particular chapter or article to fund. Of course, general
donations to the project are welcomed. To donate funds, please click on the
link below, and designate the Bolekhov Yizkor Book:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/yizkortrans.html

JewishGen, Inc. is a non-profit 501(c) 3 organization; therefore, you may
be able to claim an income tax deduction for any donations, depending on
your personal tax situation. You may wish to consider tithing an additional
amount at the same time to JewishGen's General Fund, which provides all of
the expensive computer equipment and technical support for this project at
no charge.

Lastly, we still need volunteers to help with scanning the illustrations in
the book for posting on the web site. If you're interested in helping,
please email me at <sjuni@compuserve.com>.

Thank you for your interest!

Zaat gezint!
Susannah R. Juni


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Bolekhov Yizkor Book #galicia

Susannah R. Juni <sjuni@...>
 

Our translation project continues!

Thanks to the generous donations of many of you, we have completed the
translation of the major chapter by Dr. M. Hendel, "Maskilim and Haskalah
(Enlightenment) Movement in Bolekhov in the 19th Century" (35 pages). This
newest chapter should be of interest to anyone researching the region of

Galicia, not only in Bolekhov itself. Bolekhov is in the area near Ivano
Frankivsk (Stanislawow) which was in Eastern Galicia. It tells a
fascinating story of the history of Jewish schools in the region including
mention of the major leaders of the Haskala movement who were >from
Bolekhov, and also discusses some of the controversies which stirred the
political and educational spheres of our ancestors.

You can see the complete current status of this translation project at any
time by going to:

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bolekhov/bolekhov.html

The next major sections which are now in process of translation contain the
10 articles written by Yonah (Yoyne) Ashel-Ellendman under the heading
"Daily Life," pages 219-241, plus other articles >from that section on pp.
261-263, and pp. 267-277. Translations are noted on the website as "in
process" only when we have funding or if someone is acting as a translator
as a donation.

Unfortunately, we're still a bit away >from our goal of completing the book.
Accordng to my calculations, we currently lack funding for only 67 pages,
assuming that everyone who has volunteered to translate sections at no cost
is able to complete their sections. At our very reasonable rate per page,
we are short by about $1,000.

Every little bit helps. If you haven't contributed yet, this would be a
good time. Perhaps you'd like to review the table of contents on the web
page and select a particular chapter or article to fund. Of course, general
donations to the project are welcomed. To donate funds, please click on the
link below, and designate the Bolekhov Yizkor Book:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/yizkortrans.html

JewishGen, Inc. is a non-profit 501(c) 3 organization; therefore, you may
be able to claim an income tax deduction for any donations, depending on
your personal tax situation. You may wish to consider tithing an additional
amount at the same time to JewishGen's General Fund, which provides all of
the expensive computer equipment and technical support for this project at
no charge.

Lastly, we still need volunteers to help with scanning the illustrations in
the book for posting on the web site. If you're interested in helping,
please email me at <sjuni@compuserve.com>.

Thank you for your interest!

Zaat gezint!
Susannah R. Juni


FELDHERR, ZUGHAFT - Rzeszow, Lancut #galicia

Peter Jassem <jassep@...>
 

I am now interested in two more names in addition to those I have listed in
FamilyFinder.

1. FELDHERR

I learned that Uszer JASSEM married Dwoire, maiden name FELDHERR, they lived
in Rzeszow and had children Breindel b. 1881, Liebe Serke b. 1882 and Wolf
b. 1886.

2. ZUGHAFT

Two documents of Louis JASSEM, who came to America in 1892 show his parents'
names as Markus JASSEM and Helen, maiden name CUKAFT or Chaje, maiden name
ZUKHAFT. Correct spelling of this surname is ZUGHAFT.

The Jassems used to live mostly in the Rzeszow/Lancut area in 19th century.

Peter Jassem
Toronto, Canada


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia FELDHERR, ZUGHAFT - Rzeszow, Lancut #galicia

Peter Jassem <jassep@...>
 

I am now interested in two more names in addition to those I have listed in
FamilyFinder.

1. FELDHERR

I learned that Uszer JASSEM married Dwoire, maiden name FELDHERR, they lived
in Rzeszow and had children Breindel b. 1881, Liebe Serke b. 1882 and Wolf
b. 1886.

2. ZUGHAFT

Two documents of Louis JASSEM, who came to America in 1892 show his parents'
names as Markus JASSEM and Helen, maiden name CUKAFT or Chaje, maiden name
ZUKHAFT. Correct spelling of this surname is ZUGHAFT.

The Jassems used to live mostly in the Rzeszow/Lancut area in 19th century.

Peter Jassem
Toronto, Canada


The Galitzianer: Call for Town Updates, Etc. #galicia

Edward Goldstein <Edward.TheG@...>
 

The next issue of The Galitzianer will be published in February.

This is a call to town leaders, historians, et. al., to provide
updates and other articles regarding their towns. The contents of all
articles should be limited to matters of genealogical research
interest. Each article should cover a single town or, when
appropriate, a single administrative district. I would discourage you
from including organizational matters, calls for financial support,
and the like.

Articles will be edited as necessary for style, space constraints,
overlap with other articles, and our publication policies. If
requested, copies of edited articles will be provided prior to
publication for the authors' approval.

Please submit articles in the form of word processing files
(preferably in Word format) attached to an email. Where that is not
feasible, please email me to make other arrangements.

I need to receive all material by 15 January to permit proper
editing, layout and production.

Thank you for your cooperation.

Edward Goldstein
Editor, The Galitzianer
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--


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia The Galitzianer: Call for Town Updates, Etc. #galicia

Edward Goldstein <Edward.TheG@...>
 

The next issue of The Galitzianer will be published in February.

This is a call to town leaders, historians, et. al., to provide
updates and other articles regarding their towns. The contents of all
articles should be limited to matters of genealogical research
interest. Each article should cover a single town or, when
appropriate, a single administrative district. I would discourage you
from including organizational matters, calls for financial support,
and the like.

Articles will be edited as necessary for style, space constraints,
overlap with other articles, and our publication policies. If
requested, copies of edited articles will be provided prior to
publication for the authors' approval.

Please submit articles in the form of word processing files
(preferably in Word format) attached to an email. Where that is not
feasible, please email me to make other arrangements.

I need to receive all material by 15 January to permit proper
editing, layout and production.

Thank you for your cooperation.

Edward Goldstein
Editor, The Galitzianer
--
--