Date   

LaMacaza & Baron de Hirsch land in Quebec #ukraine

Alexandra Vozick Hans <vozick@...>
 

There was a Baron de Hirsch community in the Laurentian Mountains in the
area of La Macaza, Quebec. La Macaza came into being under the umbrella of
the Jewish Colonization Association, founded in Paris by Baron de Hirsch in
1891. La Macaza began at the very end of the 19th century and had as many
as 50 families emigrating there between 1901 and 1918. It is described as
"....750 acres of rocky ground on the shores of Lac Macaza with difficult
access..."

In the early 1920's, three Jewish "hotels" were established in this area:
Rabinovitch's ( Reel Fren's Inn), Westerman's and Kaufman's. These kosher
style rustic hotels provided vacations for summer boarders. They eventually
closed in the 1950's. I have more information about this community if
anyone is interested. Please email me privately: vozick@rcn.com

Alexandra VOZICK HANS
Newton, MA
Seeking: VOZICK/WOZIK, SORKIN, HUBERGRITZ, CHAVKIN
WENER, VALEDNITZKY, MILLMAN


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine LaMacaza & Baron de Hirsch land in Quebec #ukraine

Alexandra Vozick Hans <vozick@...>
 

There was a Baron de Hirsch community in the Laurentian Mountains in the
area of La Macaza, Quebec. La Macaza came into being under the umbrella of
the Jewish Colonization Association, founded in Paris by Baron de Hirsch in
1891. La Macaza began at the very end of the 19th century and had as many
as 50 families emigrating there between 1901 and 1918. It is described as
"....750 acres of rocky ground on the shores of Lac Macaza with difficult
access..."

In the early 1920's, three Jewish "hotels" were established in this area:
Rabinovitch's ( Reel Fren's Inn), Westerman's and Kaufman's. These kosher
style rustic hotels provided vacations for summer boarders. They eventually
closed in the 1950's. I have more information about this community if
anyone is interested. Please email me privately: vozick@rcn.com

Alexandra VOZICK HANS
Newton, MA
Seeking: VOZICK/WOZIK, SORKIN, HUBERGRITZ, CHAVKIN
WENER, VALEDNITZKY, MILLMAN


kiev record office #ukraine

Michael Scott
 

Has anyone had dealings with any office in Kiev dealing with
births/deaths/ marriages between 1880 and 1914 ?

I would like to hear of experiences whether successful or not.
Addresses would also be appreciated.

Michael Scott

London , England
Searching for Wasserman (Kiev), Feldman (Kiev)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine kiev record office #ukraine

Michael Scott
 

Has anyone had dealings with any office in Kiev dealing with
births/deaths/ marriages between 1880 and 1914 ?

I would like to hear of experiences whether successful or not.
Addresses would also be appreciated.

Michael Scott

London , England
Searching for Wasserman (Kiev), Feldman (Kiev)


Budapest Brick Wall #hungary

A Michelsohn <a_michelsohn@...>
 

I am up against the proverbial brick wall. If anyone
can help, it would be a lifesaver!

My grandmother Vera (or Veronica) SOMOGYI, born Jan.
13, 1901, was >from Budapest. In October 1944 she was
rounded up by the Nyilasok and presumably taken to
Auschwitz, where she perished. (Another theory is she
died on the death march to one of the camps, as there
is no record of her at Auschwitz -- my brother just
went there last month.)

As my mother was 3 years old at the time and an only
child, she soon lost touch with most of the Somogyi
family, especially since her father, Gyula KOMLOS died
in the early 1950s when she was only 10 years old. She
was subsequently adopted by her stepmother, and
essentially became part of her new mother's HAUPT
family.

A cousin of my mother's whom she contacted on a recent
visit to Budapest told her that Vera's father Joszef
had changed the family name to Somogyi from
RECHNITZER, probably sometime in the late 1800s.
Vera's mother was Janka SCHONFELD. They had 4
daughters, one of whom was Agnes. THIS IS ALL that we
know of my mother's biological family!

(>from one internet site, I no longer remember which, I
discovered that the bulk of Rechnitzers in Hungary in
the early part of the 19th century were based in
Somogy province. So that's the only clue I have as to
family origins.)

Questions: Can anyone recommend how to proceed with
research on the Somogyi/Rechnitzer line?

Also, how do I begin to research my grandfather Gyula
Komlos? The only thing I know of him was his father
was Lipot KLEIN (later changed family name to Komlos),
and his mother's maiden name was supposedly also
Klein. Gyula's Jewish name was Hertzke Yitzchak.

I'm at a loss at how to proceed, as I'm led to believe
this family has long-standing Hungarian roots. Aside
from one distant cousin, and her own children, my
mother, a Holocaust survivor and an orphan since
childhood, has no family connections anywhere
whatsoever. I would so love to help her find out
something about her own history and even locate some
family. Any and all suggestions will be most
appreciated.

Adina



__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Send your FREE holiday greetings online!
http://greetings.yahoo.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary Budapest Brick Wall #hungary

A Michelsohn <a_michelsohn@...>
 

I am up against the proverbial brick wall. If anyone
can help, it would be a lifesaver!

My grandmother Vera (or Veronica) SOMOGYI, born Jan.
13, 1901, was >from Budapest. In October 1944 she was
rounded up by the Nyilasok and presumably taken to
Auschwitz, where she perished. (Another theory is she
died on the death march to one of the camps, as there
is no record of her at Auschwitz -- my brother just
went there last month.)

As my mother was 3 years old at the time and an only
child, she soon lost touch with most of the Somogyi
family, especially since her father, Gyula KOMLOS died
in the early 1950s when she was only 10 years old. She
was subsequently adopted by her stepmother, and
essentially became part of her new mother's HAUPT
family.

A cousin of my mother's whom she contacted on a recent
visit to Budapest told her that Vera's father Joszef
had changed the family name to Somogyi from
RECHNITZER, probably sometime in the late 1800s.
Vera's mother was Janka SCHONFELD. They had 4
daughters, one of whom was Agnes. THIS IS ALL that we
know of my mother's biological family!

(>from one internet site, I no longer remember which, I
discovered that the bulk of Rechnitzers in Hungary in
the early part of the 19th century were based in
Somogy province. So that's the only clue I have as to
family origins.)

Questions: Can anyone recommend how to proceed with
research on the Somogyi/Rechnitzer line?

Also, how do I begin to research my grandfather Gyula
Komlos? The only thing I know of him was his father
was Lipot KLEIN (later changed family name to Komlos),
and his mother's maiden name was supposedly also
Klein. Gyula's Jewish name was Hertzke Yitzchak.

I'm at a loss at how to proceed, as I'm led to believe
this family has long-standing Hungarian roots. Aside
from one distant cousin, and her own children, my
mother, a Holocaust survivor and an orphan since
childhood, has no family connections anywhere
whatsoever. I would so love to help her find out
something about her own history and even locate some
family. Any and all suggestions will be most
appreciated.

Adina



__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Send your FREE holiday greetings online!
http://greetings.yahoo.com


Re: Manchester localities #general

cfpottins2 <cfpottins2@...>
 

Just to correct and hopefully clarify a few points (unfortunately I don't
have a street map to hand but hope this will do).:
Cheetham is an area of Manchester, just north of the city centre. Cheetham
Hill Road and Bury New Road are two of the main roads radiating >from the
town centre, Cheetham Hill Road is on the brow of a hill, and Bury New
Road starts in the valley below it to the west, and runs through
Strangeways. (Strangeways prison is on ground sloping down to the west,
between the two main roads). Strangeways is a district around and below the
prison of that name, but mostly within Cheetham. So a street could easily
run between Strangewys and Cheetham and beconsidered in both.
Most of the Manchester Jewish community lived around these neighbourhoods a
century ago. My father spent his boyhood in "the Buildings", low-cost
apartments near Strangeways prison, and my mother lived in Perkin Street
near Bury New Road (and possibly over the boundary in Salford, though also
considered as Strangeways). Both went to Southall Street school. There
were still three synagogues at the bottom of Cheetham Hill rd. when I was
a kid, one of my friends was bar mitzvah at one of these, the English
synagogue I think it was called. The Sefardi (or "Spanish and Portuguese"
as it was called) is now the Jewish museum, as mentioned. But already by
the 1950s the main Sefardi community was centred in south Manchester. Many
were Syrian and Lebanese textile merchants originally. Strangeways had a
synagogue that had been badly bombed in World War II, a big popular Jewish
deli and cafe, and a lot of Jewish clothing factories, warehouses etc.
Also the original Talmud-Torah (now commemorated by a Torah Street!)
If you travelled up Bury New Road then turned right into Waterloo Rd., you
reached Hightown - not to be confused with the place near Liverpool of the
same name, but another part of the Cheetham parliamentary constituency,
bordering on Salford's Higher Broughton area. Both Hightown and Broughton
had substantial Jewish communities when I was a kid, that's where I grew
up, and went to cheder. Birch Street was one of the little streets off
Waterloo Road that were all named after trees, and had many Jewish
residents. There was a shul on Elm Street. Novelist Louis Golding invented
a "Magnolia Street" based on these streets for the name of his novel.
Hightown had three Jewish family bakers - Needoff, Tobias, and Bookbinders.
The Bookbinder family had moved to Broughton Park, but the kids still went
to neighbourhood schools. Brian Bookbinder had a band called "the
Chapters", available for weddings and bar mitzvahs, Tony Bookbinder whom I
knew at school became a drummer with Billy J.Kramer and the Dakotas, his
"little sister Elaine" also made her name in the music business, but as
Elke Brooks.
Waterloo Road climbed uphill to join Cheetham Hill Road and the start of
Cheetham Hill Village, which had long ceased to be a village of course, but
had (and still has) lots of shops, and the offices these days of one of
Manchester's two Jewish weekly newspapers. If someone was going shopping
they would either be going to Town (the city centre) or "on the Village".
Manchester's main Jewish school, the King David, started out at the bottom
of Waterloo Rd., near Strangeways, later moving to new buildings just where
Cheetham Hill Rd. became Bury Old Rd., and near the junction with Middleton
Rd. and Leicester Rd. - both suburban areas that Jewish people had moved
to. By the 1960s, the character of both Cheetham and Hightown changed as a
result both of Jewish migration to outer suburbs and Manchester city
council housing programmes which "decanted" people on to estates elsewhere
(such as Hulme, south of the city centre) while demolishing and clearing
the old neighbourhoods for building new housing. Those, often elderly
people who could not afford to buy places found themselves rehoused in
places remote >from familiar shops, community institutions and their old
neighbours. Hightown ceased to exist - I doubt if it is even on the maps.
Cheetham is nowadays associated with street crime, drugs and guns. But as
an old buddy of mine >from school and cheder says, "You can take us out of
Hightown, but you won't get Hightown out of us".

Charlie Pottins


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Manchester localities #general

cfpottins2 <cfpottins2@...>
 

Just to correct and hopefully clarify a few points (unfortunately I don't
have a street map to hand but hope this will do).:
Cheetham is an area of Manchester, just north of the city centre. Cheetham
Hill Road and Bury New Road are two of the main roads radiating >from the
town centre, Cheetham Hill Road is on the brow of a hill, and Bury New
Road starts in the valley below it to the west, and runs through
Strangeways. (Strangeways prison is on ground sloping down to the west,
between the two main roads). Strangeways is a district around and below the
prison of that name, but mostly within Cheetham. So a street could easily
run between Strangewys and Cheetham and beconsidered in both.
Most of the Manchester Jewish community lived around these neighbourhoods a
century ago. My father spent his boyhood in "the Buildings", low-cost
apartments near Strangeways prison, and my mother lived in Perkin Street
near Bury New Road (and possibly over the boundary in Salford, though also
considered as Strangeways). Both went to Southall Street school. There
were still three synagogues at the bottom of Cheetham Hill rd. when I was
a kid, one of my friends was bar mitzvah at one of these, the English
synagogue I think it was called. The Sefardi (or "Spanish and Portuguese"
as it was called) is now the Jewish museum, as mentioned. But already by
the 1950s the main Sefardi community was centred in south Manchester. Many
were Syrian and Lebanese textile merchants originally. Strangeways had a
synagogue that had been badly bombed in World War II, a big popular Jewish
deli and cafe, and a lot of Jewish clothing factories, warehouses etc.
Also the original Talmud-Torah (now commemorated by a Torah Street!)
If you travelled up Bury New Road then turned right into Waterloo Rd., you
reached Hightown - not to be confused with the place near Liverpool of the
same name, but another part of the Cheetham parliamentary constituency,
bordering on Salford's Higher Broughton area. Both Hightown and Broughton
had substantial Jewish communities when I was a kid, that's where I grew
up, and went to cheder. Birch Street was one of the little streets off
Waterloo Road that were all named after trees, and had many Jewish
residents. There was a shul on Elm Street. Novelist Louis Golding invented
a "Magnolia Street" based on these streets for the name of his novel.
Hightown had three Jewish family bakers - Needoff, Tobias, and Bookbinders.
The Bookbinder family had moved to Broughton Park, but the kids still went
to neighbourhood schools. Brian Bookbinder had a band called "the
Chapters", available for weddings and bar mitzvahs, Tony Bookbinder whom I
knew at school became a drummer with Billy J.Kramer and the Dakotas, his
"little sister Elaine" also made her name in the music business, but as
Elke Brooks.
Waterloo Road climbed uphill to join Cheetham Hill Road and the start of
Cheetham Hill Village, which had long ceased to be a village of course, but
had (and still has) lots of shops, and the offices these days of one of
Manchester's two Jewish weekly newspapers. If someone was going shopping
they would either be going to Town (the city centre) or "on the Village".
Manchester's main Jewish school, the King David, started out at the bottom
of Waterloo Rd., near Strangeways, later moving to new buildings just where
Cheetham Hill Rd. became Bury Old Rd., and near the junction with Middleton
Rd. and Leicester Rd. - both suburban areas that Jewish people had moved
to. By the 1960s, the character of both Cheetham and Hightown changed as a
result both of Jewish migration to outer suburbs and Manchester city
council housing programmes which "decanted" people on to estates elsewhere
(such as Hulme, south of the city centre) while demolishing and clearing
the old neighbourhoods for building new housing. Those, often elderly
people who could not afford to buy places found themselves rehoused in
places remote >from familiar shops, community institutions and their old
neighbours. Hightown ceased to exist - I doubt if it is even on the maps.
Cheetham is nowadays associated with street crime, drugs and guns. But as
an old buddy of mine >from school and cheder says, "You can take us out of
Hightown, but you won't get Hightown out of us".

Charlie Pottins


Re: Boston, Mass. #general

Alan Radack <alrack@...>
 

Alas, there was no simple name change to explain its disappearance.
Barton Street along with much of the West End of Boston including Poplar
and Chambers Streets were razed as part an an urban renewal process
following WW2.

Alan Radack, Swampscott, MA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Boston, Mass. #general

Alan Radack <alrack@...>
 

Alas, there was no simple name change to explain its disappearance.
Barton Street along with much of the West End of Boston including Poplar
and Chambers Streets were razed as part an an urban renewal process
following WW2.

Alan Radack, Swampscott, MA


Ukranian name 'Yurko' #general

serge grinberg <ser_grin@...>
 

Hi, I have a death certificate for a relative. I'm told his Yiddish name
was Aaron. In Ukranian the first name is written as "Yurko". Is this a
reasonable equivalent?

Thanks for any help!
Serge Grinberg.

Researching:
GRINBERG/ROSENZWEIG/ZAZULIA/TEPET in (Ulanov,Salnitsa, Odessa) Ukraine
ROSENZWEIG/ROSENZWAIG in Argentina and Uruguay
BLECHER/DEUTSCH/TSEKINOVSKY/REMPEL in (Kalarash,Kishinev, Pereval) Moldova
BLECHER/DEUTSCH in New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ukranian name 'Yurko' #general

serge grinberg <ser_grin@...>
 

Hi, I have a death certificate for a relative. I'm told his Yiddish name
was Aaron. In Ukranian the first name is written as "Yurko". Is this a
reasonable equivalent?

Thanks for any help!
Serge Grinberg.

Researching:
GRINBERG/ROSENZWEIG/ZAZULIA/TEPET in (Ulanov,Salnitsa, Odessa) Ukraine
ROSENZWEIG/ROSENZWAIG in Argentina and Uruguay
BLECHER/DEUTSCH/TSEKINOVSKY/REMPEL in (Kalarash,Kishinev, Pereval) Moldova
BLECHER/DEUTSCH in New York


Re: Nedd help with a name #galicia

lilian schorr <lilianschorr@...>
 

Dear knowledgeable genners,

I have found my grandmother giving birth to a baby girl by the name of
Neche, in Szczerzec in 1889. My grandfather was Benzion Schor (now it is
the first time I find it written with one "r") and Beile Mischel who was
from Rozwadow.
I knew my father had an elder sister by the name of Selma. Can anyone
inform What name is Polish, what is Yiddish, and if Neche could be Selma?
If not I have found an aunt I never knew of.
Thank you very much in advance for your cooperation,

Lilian Schorr Landes
lilianschorr@elsitio.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Nedd help with a name #general

lilian schorr <lilianschorr@...>
 

Dear knowledgeable genners,

I have found my grandmother giving birth to a baby girl by the name of
Neche, in Szczerzec in 1889. My grandfather was Benzion Schor (now it is
the first time I find it written with one "r") and Beile Mischel who was
from Rozwadow.
I knew my father had an elder sister by the name of Selma. Can anyone
inform What name is Polish, what is Yiddish, and if Neche could be Selma?
If not I have found an aunt I never knew of.
Thank you very much in advance for your cooperation,

Lilian Schorr Landes
lilianschorr@elsitio.net


Re: origins of the last name SABA #general

Leah Aharoni
 

This is a guess but it might be related to Shabo (or Sabato) - a last name
that appears among the Jews of Aleppo, Syria. May be it has something to do
with Shabbat?

Leah


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: origins of the last name SABA #general

Leah Aharoni
 

This is a guess but it might be related to Shabo (or Sabato) - a last name
that appears among the Jews of Aleppo, Syria. May be it has something to do
with Shabbat?

Leah


Re: Origins of surname MASON #general

NutraMom <nutramom@...>
 

My Grandfather, Max Meisenberg, was >from Zhitomir. The name was changed to
Mason in the USA.
Sincerely,
Karen Lefkowitz
Monsey, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Origins of surname MASON #general

NutraMom <nutramom@...>
 

My Grandfather, Max Meisenberg, was >from Zhitomir. The name was changed to
Mason in the USA.
Sincerely,
Karen Lefkowitz
Monsey, NY


Multiple Surnames in Lublin Records #poland

RobinnM@...
 

Dear JRI-Poland Researchers:

Aaron Slotnik asked about the occurance of two surname fields in Lublin Early
Records found in the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland database. He said:

This phenomenon may be present in other town's records as well, but I
noticed it for Lublin. A possible ancestor Herszek Moszkowicz CZOLADNIK
had
a son Abram (HONIGFELD) CZOLADNIK in 1814. There are 2 columns in the
records, Surname and Surname2. The same parents had additional children,
but the CZOLADNIK was dropped and only the HONIGFELD remains. Does
anyone
have an explanation for this? Is it a peculiarity of the translation or is
something else going on? Thanks in advance for your thoughts.

Aaron Slotnik
Chicago, IL
When I entered the Lublin Birth records (1810-1825) I noticed a couple
things. One was that 80% of the records already contained permanent
surnames, but they were used only inside the records, not in the indexes. So
I extracted them where I believed I was looking at a permanent surname and
not an occupation - but sometimes it was hard to tell which I was looking
at... so I extracted the word anyway. In this case, I wasn't sure whether
CZOLADNIK would prove to be a surname or an occupation.

However, there was another interesting phenomenon that happened in Lublin...

Poland was partitioned several times in the late 18th and early 19th
centuries, split between Prussia and the Russian Tzar. In 1815, it was
repartitioned, and a funny thing is observable in the Lublin records. First,
there is a sudden drop in recorded vital events (births, deaths and
marriages) in 1814 or 1815. Secondly, families seemingly disappear in 1815
and magically reappear in 1817 or 1818... with a different surname! In many
cases, I saw compound names simply reversing themselves... like SZTEINFINKEL
turning into FINKELSZTEJN... but in other cases, the names were totally
different. I can only assume that this had to do with the repartition of
Poland, but it seems to make sense.

In some cases a "v" was used to show that the family was "also known as" and
the entry looked like this: SZTEINFINKEL -v- FINKELSZTEJN. The early
Lubliners were certainly keeping me hopping!

While extracting the surnames, I also extracted the addresses (house
numbers). When I had finished extracting all the births, I played with the
data to see if I could match some early records (without surnames) to later
records (containing surnames). Any guesses I made were entered in the
database with parentheses to show that they were extrapolation rather than
data viewed in the record. So, in Aaron's example, it appeared to me >from
the data that the CZOLADNIK family may have also been using the name
HONIGFELD at some point.

It was very important to make these guesses... why? Because data cannot be
included in the JRI-Poland database unless it has a permanent surname. So,
in this case, my work paid off and Aaron has another record to consider for
inclusion in his research!

I'm very glad that Aaron asked the question, and I hope others will take the
time and trouble to extrapolate surnames for the early records... but please
remember, that a guess should be entered with parentheses...

If you are interested in the Lublin area, particularly the city of Lublin,
please contact me privately. I'd love to tell you about my personal goal...
to get all the Lublin Jewish records >from January 1, 1810 through March 16,
1942 on-line on the JRI-Poland database... we're five years into the project,
and very far along!

Best wishes and happy hunting!

Robinn Magid, Kensington, California
Lublin Archives Project Coordinator and
Lublin Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland

RobinnM@aol.com


JRI Poland #Poland Multiple Surnames in Lublin Records #poland

RobinnM@...
 

Dear JRI-Poland Researchers:

Aaron Slotnik asked about the occurance of two surname fields in Lublin Early
Records found in the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland database. He said:

This phenomenon may be present in other town's records as well, but I
noticed it for Lublin. A possible ancestor Herszek Moszkowicz CZOLADNIK
had
a son Abram (HONIGFELD) CZOLADNIK in 1814. There are 2 columns in the
records, Surname and Surname2. The same parents had additional children,
but the CZOLADNIK was dropped and only the HONIGFELD remains. Does
anyone
have an explanation for this? Is it a peculiarity of the translation or is
something else going on? Thanks in advance for your thoughts.

Aaron Slotnik
Chicago, IL
When I entered the Lublin Birth records (1810-1825) I noticed a couple
things. One was that 80% of the records already contained permanent
surnames, but they were used only inside the records, not in the indexes. So
I extracted them where I believed I was looking at a permanent surname and
not an occupation - but sometimes it was hard to tell which I was looking
at... so I extracted the word anyway. In this case, I wasn't sure whether
CZOLADNIK would prove to be a surname or an occupation.

However, there was another interesting phenomenon that happened in Lublin...

Poland was partitioned several times in the late 18th and early 19th
centuries, split between Prussia and the Russian Tzar. In 1815, it was
repartitioned, and a funny thing is observable in the Lublin records. First,
there is a sudden drop in recorded vital events (births, deaths and
marriages) in 1814 or 1815. Secondly, families seemingly disappear in 1815
and magically reappear in 1817 or 1818... with a different surname! In many
cases, I saw compound names simply reversing themselves... like SZTEINFINKEL
turning into FINKELSZTEJN... but in other cases, the names were totally
different. I can only assume that this had to do with the repartition of
Poland, but it seems to make sense.

In some cases a "v" was used to show that the family was "also known as" and
the entry looked like this: SZTEINFINKEL -v- FINKELSZTEJN. The early
Lubliners were certainly keeping me hopping!

While extracting the surnames, I also extracted the addresses (house
numbers). When I had finished extracting all the births, I played with the
data to see if I could match some early records (without surnames) to later
records (containing surnames). Any guesses I made were entered in the
database with parentheses to show that they were extrapolation rather than
data viewed in the record. So, in Aaron's example, it appeared to me >from
the data that the CZOLADNIK family may have also been using the name
HONIGFELD at some point.

It was very important to make these guesses... why? Because data cannot be
included in the JRI-Poland database unless it has a permanent surname. So,
in this case, my work paid off and Aaron has another record to consider for
inclusion in his research!

I'm very glad that Aaron asked the question, and I hope others will take the
time and trouble to extrapolate surnames for the early records... but please
remember, that a guess should be entered with parentheses...

If you are interested in the Lublin area, particularly the city of Lublin,
please contact me privately. I'd love to tell you about my personal goal...
to get all the Lublin Jewish records >from January 1, 1810 through March 16,
1942 on-line on the JRI-Poland database... we're five years into the project,
and very far along!

Best wishes and happy hunting!

Robinn Magid, Kensington, California
Lublin Archives Project Coordinator and
Lublin Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland

RobinnM@aol.com