Date   
Refugees in Switzerland #general

Cory Streisinger <corys@...>
 

My great-grandmother fled Munich in 1940 and was a refugee in Lugano,
Switzerland during World War II. I recently learned that the Swiss national
archive has the police files for Jewish refugees who sheltered in
Switzerland -- there were approximately 22,000. I wrote to the archive and
promptly received my great-grandmother's application for temporary Swiss
identity papers as well as about ten pages of correspondence to and from
various government officials about her status.

In case others are interested in this resource, the address is:

Schweizerisches Bundesarchiv
Archivstrasse 24
CH-3003 Bern
Switzerland

A note of caution: the documents I received included some in German, some
in Italian, some in French, and some in all three languages.

Cory Streisinger
Portland, Oregon
corys@...

Poland: Krakow and Czestochowa and Janow #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

Please help me understand the relationship among these three towns around
1800: Krakow and Czestochowa and Janow.

A confusing sentence >from the history of Janow (provided to me by the
current mayor of Janow) mentions that these three towns were somewhat
linked:

1765 The census of the Jewish population in the province of Krakow (which
was made in Janow and Czestochowa) shows there are 623 Jews in both
cities; half of them lived in Janow.
My great great grandfather, Josek Hersz Englander, died in 1886. A variety
of documents provide these details:

father: Jochim
mother: Ruchla
child: Josek Hersz Englander (born about 1808; died 1886)

Now I have found this birth record:

http://www4.wittenberg.edu/academics/music/kazez/1228.krakow72.jpg
Larger version--
http://www4.wittenberg.edu/academics/music/kazez/1228.krakow150.jpg

It is suspiciously close to the information for my great great grandfather!

I have noticed that Krakow had many Englanders around 1800 to 1850. I am
now trying to understand if Janow and Krakow had some type of physical or
cultural or other closeness around 1809 that should make me link these two
towns and make me presume that scan above is really the birth record for my
great great grandfather.

Please let me know if you know anything--especially about the town of Krakow
in the early 1800s.

Dan
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/englander/

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
Springfield, Ohio USA
Czestochowa-Przyrow-Mstow-Janow-Plawno-Radomsko-Piotrkow--Krakow??
TALMAN, ENGLANDER, JURKIEWICZ, STRAUSBERG, KIFER, BRODA, ZYLBERBERG

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Refugees in Switzerland #general

Cory Streisinger <corys@...>
 

My great-grandmother fled Munich in 1940 and was a refugee in Lugano,
Switzerland during World War II. I recently learned that the Swiss national
archive has the police files for Jewish refugees who sheltered in
Switzerland -- there were approximately 22,000. I wrote to the archive and
promptly received my great-grandmother's application for temporary Swiss
identity papers as well as about ten pages of correspondence to and from
various government officials about her status.

In case others are interested in this resource, the address is:

Schweizerisches Bundesarchiv
Archivstrasse 24
CH-3003 Bern
Switzerland

A note of caution: the documents I received included some in German, some
in Italian, some in French, and some in all three languages.

Cory Streisinger
Portland, Oregon
corys@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Poland: Krakow and Czestochowa and Janow #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

Please help me understand the relationship among these three towns around
1800: Krakow and Czestochowa and Janow.

A confusing sentence >from the history of Janow (provided to me by the
current mayor of Janow) mentions that these three towns were somewhat
linked:

1765 The census of the Jewish population in the province of Krakow (which
was made in Janow and Czestochowa) shows there are 623 Jews in both
cities; half of them lived in Janow.
My great great grandfather, Josek Hersz Englander, died in 1886. A variety
of documents provide these details:

father: Jochim
mother: Ruchla
child: Josek Hersz Englander (born about 1808; died 1886)

Now I have found this birth record:

http://www4.wittenberg.edu/academics/music/kazez/1228.krakow72.jpg
Larger version--
http://www4.wittenberg.edu/academics/music/kazez/1228.krakow150.jpg

It is suspiciously close to the information for my great great grandfather!

I have noticed that Krakow had many Englanders around 1800 to 1850. I am
now trying to understand if Janow and Krakow had some type of physical or
cultural or other closeness around 1809 that should make me link these two
towns and make me presume that scan above is really the birth record for my
great great grandfather.

Please let me know if you know anything--especially about the town of Krakow
in the early 1800s.

Dan
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/englander/

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
Springfield, Ohio USA
Czestochowa-Przyrow-Mstow-Janow-Plawno-Radomsko-Piotrkow--Krakow??
TALMAN, ENGLANDER, JURKIEWICZ, STRAUSBERG, KIFER, BRODA, ZYLBERBERG

Re: Origins of surname MASON #general

Hilary Henkin <hilary@...>
 

Dear Mark,
You're probably right that the name originally wasn't MASON.

Much of the time, you can find the original name on the immigration
passenger lists. This may not be true is if another family member came
over first, changed their name, and instructed the followers to use the
new name. But even when that happened, frequently a relative in the old
country (noted on the manifest), might have the original name.

If you have an idea of where your grandfather immigrated to, you can
search for his passenger list. Much has been written on this forum
about the availability and search processes; search the discussion group
archives and InfoFiles for details.

If you have no idea where he arrived, you might be able to guess, based
on where he lived. (This makes an assumption he settled near the port
he arrived at, not always true.)

If he became a US citizen, you can also try to get a copy of his
naturalization papers. By 1914, they usually asked where, when, and
under what name, the applicant arrived in the US. Again, for more
details, search the discussion group archives and InfoFiles.

For further guidance, you might consider joining your local Jewish
Genealogy group, if one is in your area.

Good luck in your search!

Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, Georgia USA
Searching Today: Descendants of a woman KATZ >from Ekaterinoslav, who
married a man ROSENBERG in the later part of the last century, and
immigrated in NYC.

Manchester localities #general

LeslieReich <lreich@...>
 

A recent query was posted : -

"I was wondering if anyone can help me regarding certain
streets and sections of Manchester, England between 1900
and 1920 approximately.

I have found possible family leaving 37 Julia St. Cheetham,
Manchester (1914). I found definite family leaving 6 (or 61) Julia St.
Strangeways, Manchester (1921).

Coincidence of same street, but different section?? OR is
this the same place??

Also, is Stanley St. of Cheetham in the same area?
What about Bury New Rd.?
Birch St. in Hightown? ..."


Bury New Road (a main traffic artery A56) runs through the
Strangeways district, which is in Cheetham Manchester.

Julia St (once residential slum, now commercial) runs off Bury New Rd.

Stanley St (nr Redbank) is about half a mile away.

Birch St in Hightown, about quarter of a mile further used to be off
or near Waterloo Rd. A large number ot streets named after trees used
to exist in this area, but ceased to be in a major redevelopment
about 30 years ago. A Manchester author, Louis Golding, wrote an
acclaimed novel, "Magnolia St" sited in this area.

Leslie Reich, Salford, UK

Re: On-Line Passenger Indexes; St. Albans Lists #general

David Roodman <droodle2@...>
 

NARA also has a good article on the St. Albans list:

http://www.nara.gov/publications/prologue/stalbans.html

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Origins of surname MASON #general

Hilary Henkin <hilary@...>
 

Dear Mark,
You're probably right that the name originally wasn't MASON.

Much of the time, you can find the original name on the immigration
passenger lists. This may not be true is if another family member came
over first, changed their name, and instructed the followers to use the
new name. But even when that happened, frequently a relative in the old
country (noted on the manifest), might have the original name.

If you have an idea of where your grandfather immigrated to, you can
search for his passenger list. Much has been written on this forum
about the availability and search processes; search the discussion group
archives and InfoFiles for details.

If you have no idea where he arrived, you might be able to guess, based
on where he lived. (This makes an assumption he settled near the port
he arrived at, not always true.)

If he became a US citizen, you can also try to get a copy of his
naturalization papers. By 1914, they usually asked where, when, and
under what name, the applicant arrived in the US. Again, for more
details, search the discussion group archives and InfoFiles.

For further guidance, you might consider joining your local Jewish
Genealogy group, if one is in your area.

Good luck in your search!

Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, Georgia USA
Searching Today: Descendants of a woman KATZ >from Ekaterinoslav, who
married a man ROSENBERG in the later part of the last century, and
immigrated in NYC.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Manchester localities #general

LeslieReich <lreich@...>
 

A recent query was posted : -

"I was wondering if anyone can help me regarding certain
streets and sections of Manchester, England between 1900
and 1920 approximately.

I have found possible family leaving 37 Julia St. Cheetham,
Manchester (1914). I found definite family leaving 6 (or 61) Julia St.
Strangeways, Manchester (1921).

Coincidence of same street, but different section?? OR is
this the same place??

Also, is Stanley St. of Cheetham in the same area?
What about Bury New Rd.?
Birch St. in Hightown? ..."


Bury New Road (a main traffic artery A56) runs through the
Strangeways district, which is in Cheetham Manchester.

Julia St (once residential slum, now commercial) runs off Bury New Rd.

Stanley St (nr Redbank) is about half a mile away.

Birch St in Hightown, about quarter of a mile further used to be off
or near Waterloo Rd. A large number ot streets named after trees used
to exist in this area, but ceased to be in a major redevelopment
about 30 years ago. A Manchester author, Louis Golding, wrote an
acclaimed novel, "Magnolia St" sited in this area.

Leslie Reich, Salford, UK

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: On-Line Passenger Indexes; St. Albans Lists #general

David Roodman <droodle2@...>
 

NARA also has a good article on the St. Albans list:

http://www.nara.gov/publications/prologue/stalbans.html

Drzewica Records #general

debjkay <debjkay@...>
 

Drzewica records for the period before 1872 were kept in the town of
Opoczno--they are designated in the records as being >from Drzewica.

Opoczno records are available >from FHC's for the period >from 1826-1860
(#719131-719137) and 1866-1887. There are likely to be later records for
Drzewica residents.

Debra J. Kay
debjkay@...
Simi Valley,CA

KARMIN family - East Europe #general

moshe karmin <mkarmin@...>
 

Hello!

My name is Moshe Karmin, and I research my family roots.

>from the information we already know, our GF Jacob Karmin, was born around
1870 in the town of Grajewo, north east Poland now, Russia at that time,
Lomza gubernia.

By searching JRI-Poland database, we found many Karmin's who where living
in that area, in radius of app. 20 miles. The towns are: Szczuczyn
(Stuzin), Lomza, Suwalki, & Bialystock.

All this towns close location leads to the conclusion that all Karmin >from
this area should be first or second grade relatives/family.

By cross checking the EIDB database,we found two brothers of our GF who
arrived to the USA. the names are: Max Karmin, arrived on 1908, at the age
of 22, and Judke Karmin arrived on 1912, at the age of 22. >from EIDB
database, we learn that Max Karmin lived on 169th, 4 Ave, New York.

Additional names that are on EIDB, and we think belong to the Family group
are:
Moische Karmin >from Stuzin, arrived 1902, age 36.
Mendel karmin >from Stuzin, arrived 1900, age 22.
Nochim Karmin >from Suwalki, arrived 1922, age 49.

Most of east-Europian immigrant who came to north America, could speak only
Yiddish, and sometime the immigration clerks misspell the last name, and
turn it to: Carmen, Karman, Kermen, Etc. By cross check the JRI-Poland and
Eidb databases, we came to definate conclusion that all misspelled are >from
the same source: Karmin, specially when it concerns people and families who
came >from Lomza gubernia - Grajewo\ Lomza\ Stuzin\ Suwalki.

We are looking for descendants related to a/m, with highlight on Max &
Judke Karmin Who as far as we know, lived in NYC around the 1920.

Any possible information will be highly appreciated.

Moshe Karmin, Rishon Lezion - Israel
E-Mail: mkarmin@...

Leaving Mother Russia #general

irvjs@...
 

The story that I heard >from my father, Israel Schiffres, who was born in
Grodno (Russia) in 1898, was that while the Germans were occupying Grodno in
1917 (during World War I), he received permission to move (immigrate?) to
Cologne (Koln). Does anyone know what kind of papers were required and
whether it was common, or easy, for Jews to leave war-torn Russia for Germany?
Also, I believe he told me that he had no passport until he married my
mother (Lea Speier-Holstein) in 1926. He was then required to obtain a
passport and had a choice of applying for a "Bolshevik" Soviet passport or a
Polish one (Grodno was by then in Poland.) He chose the latter, and the
passport was issued to I. SZYFRES, a spelling that he never used although it
was our "legal" name until we became American Citizens and reverted to the
Schiffres spelling. Has anyone heard of Jews being given such a choice of
citizenship?

Irwin J. SCHIFFRES
Rochester, NY
Searching HOLSTEIN or SPEIER-HOLSTEIN (Neuenbrunslar, Gensungen), SPEIER
or SPEYER (Hof or Hoof), KAHN (Alsace, Belgium), SCHIFFRES/SHIFRES/SZYFRES
(Grodno), HALPERN/GALPERN (Grodno)

New e-mail address #general

SY PEARLMAN <pearlman@...>
 

I can now be found at: pearlman@... Do not send to any other
e-mail address. Thanks, Sy Pearlman

MODERATOR NOTE: Please remember to change your address for subscriptions
and the JGFF, if you have not already done so.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Drzewica Records #general

debjkay <debjkay@...>
 

Drzewica records for the period before 1872 were kept in the town of
Opoczno--they are designated in the records as being >from Drzewica.

Opoczno records are available >from FHC's for the period >from 1826-1860
(#719131-719137) and 1866-1887. There are likely to be later records for
Drzewica residents.

Debra J. Kay
debjkay@...
Simi Valley,CA

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen KARMIN family - East Europe #general

moshe karmin <mkarmin@...>
 

Hello!

My name is Moshe Karmin, and I research my family roots.

>from the information we already know, our GF Jacob Karmin, was born around
1870 in the town of Grajewo, north east Poland now, Russia at that time,
Lomza gubernia.

By searching JRI-Poland database, we found many Karmin's who where living
in that area, in radius of app. 20 miles. The towns are: Szczuczyn
(Stuzin), Lomza, Suwalki, & Bialystock.

All this towns close location leads to the conclusion that all Karmin >from
this area should be first or second grade relatives/family.

By cross checking the EIDB database,we found two brothers of our GF who
arrived to the USA. the names are: Max Karmin, arrived on 1908, at the age
of 22, and Judke Karmin arrived on 1912, at the age of 22. >from EIDB
database, we learn that Max Karmin lived on 169th, 4 Ave, New York.

Additional names that are on EIDB, and we think belong to the Family group
are:
Moische Karmin >from Stuzin, arrived 1902, age 36.
Mendel karmin >from Stuzin, arrived 1900, age 22.
Nochim Karmin >from Suwalki, arrived 1922, age 49.

Most of east-Europian immigrant who came to north America, could speak only
Yiddish, and sometime the immigration clerks misspell the last name, and
turn it to: Carmen, Karman, Kermen, Etc. By cross check the JRI-Poland and
Eidb databases, we came to definate conclusion that all misspelled are >from
the same source: Karmin, specially when it concerns people and families who
came >from Lomza gubernia - Grajewo\ Lomza\ Stuzin\ Suwalki.

We are looking for descendants related to a/m, with highlight on Max &
Judke Karmin Who as far as we know, lived in NYC around the 1920.

Any possible information will be highly appreciated.

Moshe Karmin, Rishon Lezion - Israel
E-Mail: mkarmin@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Leaving Mother Russia #general

irvjs@...
 

The story that I heard >from my father, Israel Schiffres, who was born in
Grodno (Russia) in 1898, was that while the Germans were occupying Grodno in
1917 (during World War I), he received permission to move (immigrate?) to
Cologne (Koln). Does anyone know what kind of papers were required and
whether it was common, or easy, for Jews to leave war-torn Russia for Germany?
Also, I believe he told me that he had no passport until he married my
mother (Lea Speier-Holstein) in 1926. He was then required to obtain a
passport and had a choice of applying for a "Bolshevik" Soviet passport or a
Polish one (Grodno was by then in Poland.) He chose the latter, and the
passport was issued to I. SZYFRES, a spelling that he never used although it
was our "legal" name until we became American Citizens and reverted to the
Schiffres spelling. Has anyone heard of Jews being given such a choice of
citizenship?

Irwin J. SCHIFFRES
Rochester, NY
Searching HOLSTEIN or SPEIER-HOLSTEIN (Neuenbrunslar, Gensungen), SPEIER
or SPEYER (Hof or Hoof), KAHN (Alsace, Belgium), SCHIFFRES/SHIFRES/SZYFRES
(Grodno), HALPERN/GALPERN (Grodno)

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New e-mail address #general

SY PEARLMAN <pearlman@...>
 

I can now be found at: pearlman@... Do not send to any other
e-mail address. Thanks, Sy Pearlman

MODERATOR NOTE: Please remember to change your address for subscriptions
and the JGFF, if you have not already done so.

Re: Nedd help with a name #galicia

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 12/27/2001 11:28:39 PM Eastern Standard Time,
israel@... writes:

<< I don't know about Neche, but Selma is of Celtic origin and I
think it would be unlikely to be found in 19th century Poland.
Presumably she adopted this name when she came to America. AFAIK
there is no relation between this and Neche, >>

==My dictionary says Selma is of Greek origin. It is a fairly common name
in Europe and found quite frequently among Jews. My guess is it often has
someething to do with Shlomit/Shulamit/Salame or masculine names like
Salomon or Zelig.

Neche is one of many names derived >from the Hebrew Nechama (consolation)
equivalent to the male Menachem (often rendered Mendel).

Parents give whatever names they want to their children; the latter can pick
up a new name wheneever they want to go to the trouble. Immigration is as
good a time as any. Names cannot be "translated."

Michael Bernet, New York

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Nedd help with a name #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 12/27/2001 11:28:39 PM Eastern Standard Time,
israel@... writes:

<< I don't know about Neche, but Selma is of Celtic origin and I
think it would be unlikely to be found in 19th century Poland.
Presumably she adopted this name when she came to America. AFAIK
there is no relation between this and Neche, >>

==My dictionary says Selma is of Greek origin. It is a fairly common name
in Europe and found quite frequently among Jews. My guess is it often has
someething to do with Shlomit/Shulamit/Salame or masculine names like
Salomon or Zelig.

Neche is one of many names derived >from the Hebrew Nechama (consolation)
equivalent to the male Menachem (often rendered Mendel).

Parents give whatever names they want to their children; the latter can pick
up a new name wheneever they want to go to the trouble. Immigration is as
good a time as any. Names cannot be "translated."

Michael Bernet, New York