Date   

Re: Does anyone have info on Wilkomiez? #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"mdbank" <mdbank@comcast.net> wrote

I know it is a town in the Ukraine during the late 1800s but I have been
unable to find out anything else.
Wilkomir (Polish: Wielkomierz) is known currently as Ukmerge, Lithuania

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta


Re: Any other index for Boston arrivals besides NARA microfilm? #general

Doug Cohen
 

there are some cards at the Mass state archives -- but I don't think
they're available on line. these are the ones >from which the NARA
microfilms were made. if you go to the archives and request names and
years, they'll look them up and give you anything resembling what you're
looking for. i don't know what they'll do if you call them. It's the
Mass. State Archives next door to the JFK Library in Boston.

Doug Cohen
Lexington, MA
DMC@dmcohen.com

"Fran Segall" <FranSegall@comcast.net> wrote in message
Dear Genners,

Does anyone know of any source of index records (by name/soundex) to
early 1900 Boston arrivals other than the NARA microfilm index? I have
tried to use the NARA index, but those particular microfilmed cards are
practically illegible - at least to me! Even with a magnifying reader and
a magnifying glass, they're microscopic - and much of the print is too
faint to make out anyway!

I have too wide a range of years to start looking through the individual
manifests for the name KLETZEL. Any suggestions would be greatly
appreciated!


Re: Roszyszc Wolhyn, Sokol #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Irv Kramer" wrote in message
Dear Genners,
I am in need of a little help regarding the place of residence of my
family. Manifest's and other documents list two references to where they
where >from listed as Sokol, Roszyszc Wolhyn, Russia. I also found 2
where it listed them >from Sokola, Roszyszc Wolhyn. This is my
grandfathers side.

On my grandmothers side they are listed >from Sekula, Sokal, Soklia and
from Sohny, Wolhyn. All of this on different documents. I have located
on the map Wolhyn which is spelled Volhynia, Roszyszc is in Ukraine and is
spelled Rozyce on the maps. Sokol is 9.6 miles north of Rozyce.
I have been trying to find out if they are one and the same and cannot
nail it down. Could anyone suggest where I might find some more
information that might help me?.
Irv,

In Polish town name was known as Sokul (exactly as it written without any
special Polish tails, broken 'ell's and other ornaments) near Rozyszcze,
Violin (or Woodlyn, Violin). Town had just below thousand residents (1921
general census) with 162 Jewish souls (re WOW gazetteer). Currently town
is known as Skolt, Violin Province, Ukraine and if you check Stateside it
will show town coordinates: 5103 2520. Soil is another known alternative
name of this stet.

Near by Rozyszcze (currently known as Rosette) was a large Jewish stet with
Jewish population of 3,500 souls (WOW source). Since official polish 1921
statistics shown general population of 3,200 people - it makes Jewish
population 110% (!). What is another unusual item about Roziszcze is
amount of the holy places.

1929 Poland Business Directory lists usually amount of churches in each
town carefully not noticing synagogues. It always as the law lists RC and
in Galicia, Roman Greek churches. In Rozishche, authors of the Business
Directory have identify the following:

one Roman Catholic, one Greek Orthodox, one Evangelic (Protestant), one
Baptist churches and one Synagogue.

Since town population was 110% Jewish, it a real puzzler, how they manage
to get all the other denominations ?

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta, Canada


NYC Birth Records (c. 1900) - Question #general

Shawn Weil <weil.17@...>
 

List and Friends-

I have a question about NYC Birth Records c. 1900.

My GGreatgrandmother had 9 children, 8 of which survived to adulthood.
Family lore says that the child who passed away before his time was run
over in the streets of the Lower East Side by a beer wagon, while my
grandfather was supposed to be supervising. However, my grandfather was
the youngest of the 8 siblings that survived, and he wouldn't have been
older than 3 years old himself. I doubt the family story, and would like
corroboration in documentation.

I am trying to figure out when this missing sibling was born and killed.
Here are my clues.
1) The 1900 census does not indicate that a child passed away.
2) The 1910 census does indicate the passing of a child.
3) I know that siblings were born 6/1899, 8/11/1901, 7/28/1903
*4) NYC Birth Certificates >from 1901 and 1903 seem to indicate that the
child was born in 1902. However, I do not know if I am interpreting the
questions correctly.

In NYC Birth records of this era, there are two questions that seem
pertinent to my mystery:
- Number of Previous Children
- How Many Now Living (in all)

The answers in the 1901 Certificate:
- Number of Previous Children: 6
- How Many Now Living (in all): 7
(Does this mean that all of her children are living?)

The answers in the 1903 Certificate:
- Number of Previous Children: 8
- How Many Now Living (in all): 8
(Does this mean that a child has passed away?)

Now, I would interpret the first question to reflect the number of
successful pregnancies that the mother had had before(and not including)
the birth of the current child I would interpret the second question to
reflect the number of children that are currently living, including the
current child.

Is this the correct interpretation? Was this the interpretation at the
time, or was the ambiguity interpreted differently by the individuals
filling out the forms? What does this say about the missing child, if
anything?

Any illumination would be appreciated.

Shawn Weil
Columbus, OH

PS - I am far >from NYC to go through the index of births at the municipal
archives. I've gone through the one on-line, but because they do not
indicate the names of the parents, I can only finger possible matches.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Does anyone have info on Wilkomiez? #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"mdbank" <mdbank@comcast.net> wrote

I know it is a town in the Ukraine during the late 1800s but I have been
unable to find out anything else.
Wilkomir (Polish: Wielkomierz) is known currently as Ukmerge, Lithuania

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Any other index for Boston arrivals besides NARA microfilm? #general

Doug Cohen
 

there are some cards at the Mass state archives -- but I don't think
they're available on line. these are the ones >from which the NARA
microfilms were made. if you go to the archives and request names and
years, they'll look them up and give you anything resembling what you're
looking for. i don't know what they'll do if you call them. It's the
Mass. State Archives next door to the JFK Library in Boston.

Doug Cohen
Lexington, MA
DMC@dmcohen.com

"Fran Segall" <FranSegall@comcast.net> wrote in message
Dear Genners,

Does anyone know of any source of index records (by name/soundex) to
early 1900 Boston arrivals other than the NARA microfilm index? I have
tried to use the NARA index, but those particular microfilmed cards are
practically illegible - at least to me! Even with a magnifying reader and
a magnifying glass, they're microscopic - and much of the print is too
faint to make out anyway!

I have too wide a range of years to start looking through the individual
manifests for the name KLETZEL. Any suggestions would be greatly
appreciated!


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Roszyszc Wolhyn, Sokol #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Irv Kramer" wrote in message
Dear Genners,
I am in need of a little help regarding the place of residence of my
family. Manifest's and other documents list two references to where they
where >from listed as Sokol, Roszyszc Wolhyn, Russia. I also found 2
where it listed them >from Sokola, Roszyszc Wolhyn. This is my
grandfathers side.

On my grandmothers side they are listed >from Sekula, Sokal, Soklia and
from Sohny, Wolhyn. All of this on different documents. I have located
on the map Wolhyn which is spelled Volhynia, Roszyszc is in Ukraine and is
spelled Rozyce on the maps. Sokol is 9.6 miles north of Rozyce.
I have been trying to find out if they are one and the same and cannot
nail it down. Could anyone suggest where I might find some more
information that might help me?.
Irv,

In Polish town name was known as Sokul (exactly as it written without any
special Polish tails, broken 'ell's and other ornaments) near Rozyszcze,
Violin (or Woodlyn, Violin). Town had just below thousand residents (1921
general census) with 162 Jewish souls (re WOW gazetteer). Currently town
is known as Skolt, Violin Province, Ukraine and if you check Stateside it
will show town coordinates: 5103 2520. Soil is another known alternative
name of this stet.

Near by Rozyszcze (currently known as Rosette) was a large Jewish stet with
Jewish population of 3,500 souls (WOW source). Since official polish 1921
statistics shown general population of 3,200 people - it makes Jewish
population 110% (!). What is another unusual item about Roziszcze is
amount of the holy places.

1929 Poland Business Directory lists usually amount of churches in each
town carefully not noticing synagogues. It always as the law lists RC and
in Galicia, Roman Greek churches. In Rozishche, authors of the Business
Directory have identify the following:

one Roman Catholic, one Greek Orthodox, one Evangelic (Protestant), one
Baptist churches and one Synagogue.

Since town population was 110% Jewish, it a real puzzler, how they manage
to get all the other denominations ?

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen NYC Birth Records (c. 1900) - Question #general

Shawn Weil <weil.17@...>
 

List and Friends-

I have a question about NYC Birth Records c. 1900.

My GGreatgrandmother had 9 children, 8 of which survived to adulthood.
Family lore says that the child who passed away before his time was run
over in the streets of the Lower East Side by a beer wagon, while my
grandfather was supposed to be supervising. However, my grandfather was
the youngest of the 8 siblings that survived, and he wouldn't have been
older than 3 years old himself. I doubt the family story, and would like
corroboration in documentation.

I am trying to figure out when this missing sibling was born and killed.
Here are my clues.
1) The 1900 census does not indicate that a child passed away.
2) The 1910 census does indicate the passing of a child.
3) I know that siblings were born 6/1899, 8/11/1901, 7/28/1903
*4) NYC Birth Certificates >from 1901 and 1903 seem to indicate that the
child was born in 1902. However, I do not know if I am interpreting the
questions correctly.

In NYC Birth records of this era, there are two questions that seem
pertinent to my mystery:
- Number of Previous Children
- How Many Now Living (in all)

The answers in the 1901 Certificate:
- Number of Previous Children: 6
- How Many Now Living (in all): 7
(Does this mean that all of her children are living?)

The answers in the 1903 Certificate:
- Number of Previous Children: 8
- How Many Now Living (in all): 8
(Does this mean that a child has passed away?)

Now, I would interpret the first question to reflect the number of
successful pregnancies that the mother had had before(and not including)
the birth of the current child I would interpret the second question to
reflect the number of children that are currently living, including the
current child.

Is this the correct interpretation? Was this the interpretation at the
time, or was the ambiguity interpreted differently by the individuals
filling out the forms? What does this say about the missing child, if
anything?

Any illumination would be appreciated.

Shawn Weil
Columbus, OH

PS - I am far >from NYC to go through the index of births at the municipal
archives. I've gone through the one on-line, but because they do not
indicate the names of the parents, I can only finger possible matches.


Re: Crash course need to read Search database -RTR #belarus

Joyce Weaver <joyweave@...>
 

David,
The existence of this census is very exciting to me as my grandparents left Wisoke-Litovsk
in Brest uezd in 1900-1902. However, I have no clue as to how to get the information
contained in it. Is there someone or some organization doing look-ups in the 1897
census? Knowing that it exists is only a first step if we can't access the information it
contains.

Joy Weaver

"David M. Fox" wrote:

If you look at http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/grodno_archives.htm, you

will see that the 1897 census for Brest uezd shtetls can be found in fond
100, opis 1, delo 66 through 109 of the Grodno branch of the NHAB. This
inventory was done by Dimytri Panov and indicates the existence of the 1897
Russian census for portions of what was Grodno gubernia in 1897.
POLAND (Krasnik, Zaklikow, Lublin): Blumberg, Fogiel, Rozenel./
BELARUS (Wisoke-Litovsk, Brest, Grodno): Feinberg, Vilner, Greenberg, Petruskitz, Deibach.


Belarus SIG #Belarus RE: Crash course need to read Search database -RTR #belarus

Joyce Weaver <joyweave@...>
 

David,
The existence of this census is very exciting to me as my grandparents left Wisoke-Litovsk
in Brest uezd in 1900-1902. However, I have no clue as to how to get the information
contained in it. Is there someone or some organization doing look-ups in the 1897
census? Knowing that it exists is only a first step if we can't access the information it
contains.

Joy Weaver

"David M. Fox" wrote:

If you look at http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/grodno_archives.htm, you

will see that the 1897 census for Brest uezd shtetls can be found in fond
100, opis 1, delo 66 through 109 of the Grodno branch of the NHAB. This
inventory was done by Dimytri Panov and indicates the existence of the 1897
Russian census for portions of what was Grodno gubernia in 1897.
POLAND (Krasnik, Zaklikow, Lublin): Blumberg, Fogiel, Rozenel./
BELARUS (Wisoke-Litovsk, Brest, Grodno): Feinberg, Vilner, Greenberg, Petruskitz, Deibach.


Lifshitz family names : Aug 2002 website update #belarus

Harris Gleckman <gleckman@...>
 

LIFSHITZ family name : Are we connected ?

Progress Report : August 20, 2002


new Website address : benchpost.com/famtree/lifshitz (without the usual=

www. in the front)

Some 90 separate Lifshitz family researchers have sent along informatio=
n
for the Lifshitz family website. In last few months, ten new entries we=
re
added, three family groups have been linked together, and the site move=
d to
benchpost.com/famtree/lifshitz to have more space.

Researchers on the Lifshitz and all its variations are invited to explo=
re
this site. The new site really has four entry points:

The short family histories sent in by other Lifshitz researcher=
s and
a first name index to the oldest members of these families.

a geographic listing of Lifshitz shtetls and a series of connect=
ed
tables for grouping the various shtetls in sub-regions .

various Lifshitz related extracts >from the Ellis Island database=
, the
Polish Jewish Indexing Project, and the JewishGen Family Finder index ;=
and


a yahoo Lifshitz family listserver at
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Lifshitz/ established by Anthony Jackson

The Lifshitz family website now also has
An expanded set of notes on alternative versions of the origin o=
f the
name of Lifshitz.
Two Lifshitz related coats of arms
7An extract of the Polish Jewish Records files on the Lifshitz fa=
mily
names by gubernia [ shtetl name and (appx distribution of Lifshitz name=
s by
gubernia) Galicia 37%; Grodno 11% ; Lomza 10% ; Warszawa 9% ; Kalisz 8%=
;
Plock 8% ; Keilce 4% ; Radom 4%; Lublin 3%; Suwalki 3%; Siedlce 2%
=B7An extract >from the Ellis Island database on the Lifshitz family=
name
sorted by shtetl
=B7An extract >from the Slutzk, Belarus burials sites database on th=
e
Lifshitz family name in chronological order .and
=B7An initial collection of some of the famous and infamous Lifshit=
z
personalities in history, based on Michael Lipschutz's efforts

Please email your additions and corrections to gleckman@un.org
Harris Gleckman, great grandson of Hoshea Lifshitz of
Horodok and Iveniec, Poland (now Belarus)








=


Belarus SIG #Belarus Lifshitz family names : Aug 2002 website update #belarus

Harris Gleckman <gleckman@...>
 

LIFSHITZ family name : Are we connected ?

Progress Report : August 20, 2002


new Website address : benchpost.com/famtree/lifshitz (without the usual=

www. in the front)

Some 90 separate Lifshitz family researchers have sent along informatio=
n
for the Lifshitz family website. In last few months, ten new entries we=
re
added, three family groups have been linked together, and the site move=
d to
benchpost.com/famtree/lifshitz to have more space.

Researchers on the Lifshitz and all its variations are invited to explo=
re
this site. The new site really has four entry points:

The short family histories sent in by other Lifshitz researcher=
s and
a first name index to the oldest members of these families.

a geographic listing of Lifshitz shtetls and a series of connect=
ed
tables for grouping the various shtetls in sub-regions .

various Lifshitz related extracts >from the Ellis Island database=
, the
Polish Jewish Indexing Project, and the JewishGen Family Finder index ;=
and


a yahoo Lifshitz family listserver at
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Lifshitz/ established by Anthony Jackson

The Lifshitz family website now also has
An expanded set of notes on alternative versions of the origin o=
f the
name of Lifshitz.
Two Lifshitz related coats of arms
7An extract of the Polish Jewish Records files on the Lifshitz fa=
mily
names by gubernia [ shtetl name and (appx distribution of Lifshitz name=
s by
gubernia) Galicia 37%; Grodno 11% ; Lomza 10% ; Warszawa 9% ; Kalisz 8%=
;
Plock 8% ; Keilce 4% ; Radom 4%; Lublin 3%; Suwalki 3%; Siedlce 2%
=B7An extract >from the Ellis Island database on the Lifshitz family=
name
sorted by shtetl
=B7An extract >from the Slutzk, Belarus burials sites database on th=
e
Lifshitz family name in chronological order .and
=B7An initial collection of some of the famous and infamous Lifshit=
z
personalities in history, based on Michael Lipschutz's efforts

Please email your additions and corrections to gleckman@un.org
Harris Gleckman, great grandson of Hoshea Lifshitz of
Horodok and Iveniec, Poland (now Belarus)








=


Re: Chassidic dress #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

Bernard Rosinsky wrote:
I have pictures of family members at the turn of the 20th century (some
end of 19th century). I know that it is possible to categorize a
tradiional jew by his clothing: Is he a Chassid or a Mitnaged and if a
Chassid, what group he belonged to. Is there a reference book that can
help me determine where I should categorize my ancestor?
Can I deduce more facts >from just a picture?
In general, you can deduce little >from such a picture. Traditional dress
in Russia, for instance, was virtually identical among both chasidim and
misnagdim. And in Lithuania, the dress was somewhat different >from in
Russia, but there again, chassidim and traditional misnagdim dressed
nearly alike. Ditto for Poland, and for Galicia, Hungary, etc.
The one thing I have heard is that chassidic men generally button their
coats right-over-left (for kabbalistic reasons) while misnagdim most
commonly do it left-over-right.

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
http://www.math.ubc.ca/~israel
Vancouver, BC, Canada


Help with the name of a Ukranian town #general

krippens@...
 

Hello Genners!

At least I think it is a Ukranian town. One of my grandfathers hailed
from *Macev* transliterated >from Yiddish, *Matzew* on my grandmother's
ship registry, and something like *Macievitsky* in Russian, according to
refusenik era emigres >from the same family. Its the latter name that I
need help with, as to the correct town name and its spelling. It should
be somewhere near Chernovitsy (or Chernivitsi as on MapQuest). I saw the
town on a WW1 era map when I researched it 20 years ago, but have no
idea if the town still exists. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,

Karen Jo Rippens


Help locating a town #general

krippens@...
 

Hello Genners!

I am looking for a town, which I think sounds like *Bulbul*. Does anyone
have a clue where this might be? I think we can narrow the possibilities
to Russia and Ukraine, and Poland on the outside.

All help will be much appreciated.

Karen Jo Rippens


Re: Help on Yiddish names into English diminutives #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

Alex Bender <alemik@pacbell.net> wrote:

I know that Sarah's sisters' names in this country were Mary and Ida. I am
pretty sure that she only had two sisters, although I'm not certain.
My question concerns Yiddish *equivalents* of these names. I recently
found a picture (which belonged to Sarah) on which there is Yiddish on
the back. Translated, it is addressed to *Mera* and is >from *Dina.* Do
these Yiddish names in any way match up to the English names of Sarah,
Ida, or Mary? If so, which ones?

*Mera* is very likely to be Mary. None of the names is particularly
related to Dina, as far as I know.

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
http://www.math.ubc.ca/~israel
Vancouver, BC, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Chassidic dress #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

Bernard Rosinsky wrote:
I have pictures of family members at the turn of the 20th century (some
end of 19th century). I know that it is possible to categorize a
tradiional jew by his clothing: Is he a Chassid or a Mitnaged and if a
Chassid, what group he belonged to. Is there a reference book that can
help me determine where I should categorize my ancestor?
Can I deduce more facts >from just a picture?
In general, you can deduce little >from such a picture. Traditional dress
in Russia, for instance, was virtually identical among both chasidim and
misnagdim. And in Lithuania, the dress was somewhat different >from in
Russia, but there again, chassidim and traditional misnagdim dressed
nearly alike. Ditto for Poland, and for Galicia, Hungary, etc.
The one thing I have heard is that chassidic men generally button their
coats right-over-left (for kabbalistic reasons) while misnagdim most
commonly do it left-over-right.

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
http://www.math.ubc.ca/~israel
Vancouver, BC, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help with the name of a Ukranian town #general

krippens@...
 

Hello Genners!

At least I think it is a Ukranian town. One of my grandfathers hailed
from *Macev* transliterated >from Yiddish, *Matzew* on my grandmother's
ship registry, and something like *Macievitsky* in Russian, according to
refusenik era emigres >from the same family. Its the latter name that I
need help with, as to the correct town name and its spelling. It should
be somewhere near Chernovitsy (or Chernivitsi as on MapQuest). I saw the
town on a WW1 era map when I researched it 20 years ago, but have no
idea if the town still exists. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,

Karen Jo Rippens


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help locating a town #general

krippens@...
 

Hello Genners!

I am looking for a town, which I think sounds like *Bulbul*. Does anyone
have a clue where this might be? I think we can narrow the possibilities
to Russia and Ukraine, and Poland on the outside.

All help will be much appreciated.

Karen Jo Rippens


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Help on Yiddish names into English diminutives #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

Alex Bender <alemik@pacbell.net> wrote:

I know that Sarah's sisters' names in this country were Mary and Ida. I am
pretty sure that she only had two sisters, although I'm not certain.
My question concerns Yiddish *equivalents* of these names. I recently
found a picture (which belonged to Sarah) on which there is Yiddish on
the back. Translated, it is addressed to *Mera* and is >from *Dina.* Do
these Yiddish names in any way match up to the English names of Sarah,
Ida, or Mary? If so, which ones?

*Mera* is very likely to be Mary. None of the names is particularly
related to Dina, as far as I know.

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
http://www.math.ubc.ca/~israel
Vancouver, BC, Canada