Date   

try this website - Jewish Encyclopedia 1906 #lithuania

Harvey Kaplan <harvey@...>
 

Try www.JewishEncyclopedia.com

This website contains the complete contents of the 12-volume Jewish
Encyclopedia, which was originally published between 1901-1906. The Jewish
Encyclopedia, which recently became part of the public domain, contains
over 15,000 articles and illustrations.

Although it dates >from 1906, it is a great snapshot of pre-war life in
Eastern Europe.


Harvey Kaplan

Glasgow, Scotland


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania try this website - Jewish Encyclopedia 1906 #lithuania

Harvey Kaplan <harvey@...>
 

Try www.JewishEncyclopedia.com

This website contains the complete contents of the 12-volume Jewish
Encyclopedia, which was originally published between 1901-1906. The Jewish
Encyclopedia, which recently became part of the public domain, contains
over 15,000 articles and illustrations.

Although it dates >from 1906, it is a great snapshot of pre-war life in
Eastern Europe.


Harvey Kaplan

Glasgow, Scotland


Taverns, Taxation and Bibliographical Sources #lithuania

H. Elliott Lipschultz <adoniram@...>
 

Geoffrey Hosking, Russia and the Russians: A History (Cambridge: Belknap
Press of Harvard University Press, 2001) - p. 12 - Discusses a 16th century
increase in the number of taverns was a concern of the Church - "promoted
licentious and immoral behavior sometimes associated with pagan
celebrations."

Yet the state did not have an interest in limiting intoxicating drink. Reason - Alexander I in the early 19th Century "No other major source of revenue enters the treasury so regularly, punctually, and easily as the revenue >from the liquor farm; indeed its regular receipt on a fixed date each month greatly eases the task of finding cash for other expenditures."

While in the 18th century, liquor tax was 50% of the treasury's indirect tax revenue, for most of the 19th century it was 1/3. A footnote indicates: R.E.F. Smith and David Christian, Bread and Salt: Social and Economic History of Food and Drink in Russia (Cambridge University Press, 1984). David Moon, The Russian Peasantry, 1600-1930; World the Peasants Made (Longman, 1999). Paul Robert MaGocsi, A History of Ukraine (University of Washington Press, Seattle, 1997, chapters 10-12.
Norman Davies, God's Playground: History of Poland, Vol. 1 Columbia
University Press, 1982.

During the 16th Century Jews move into Poland-Lithuania protected by the
Poland-Lithuanian Crown, serving for the convenience of the szlachta who offered patronage, employment as tavenkeepers.

Geoffrey Hosking - p. 258 - notes that The Jewish Statute of 1804 confirmed their right of self-government in the local commune or kahal, though insisting it be separated >from the religious establishment, the rabbinate. Jews were allowed to attend Russian schools or to found their own, to open commercial and manufacturing establishments, and to buy and lease land in the Pale. On the other hand, they were barred >from the liquor trade, which had been a major source of income for them in Poland...." footnote: John Doyle Klier, Russia Gathers Her Jews: Origin of the Jewish Question in Russia 1772-1825 (Dekalb: Northern Illinois Univrsity Press, 1986).

H. Elliott Lipschultz
adoniram@taxhistoryfoundation.org


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Taverns, Taxation and Bibliographical Sources #lithuania

H. Elliott Lipschultz <adoniram@...>
 

Geoffrey Hosking, Russia and the Russians: A History (Cambridge: Belknap
Press of Harvard University Press, 2001) - p. 12 - Discusses a 16th century
increase in the number of taverns was a concern of the Church - "promoted
licentious and immoral behavior sometimes associated with pagan
celebrations."

Yet the state did not have an interest in limiting intoxicating drink. Reason - Alexander I in the early 19th Century "No other major source of revenue enters the treasury so regularly, punctually, and easily as the revenue >from the liquor farm; indeed its regular receipt on a fixed date each month greatly eases the task of finding cash for other expenditures."

While in the 18th century, liquor tax was 50% of the treasury's indirect tax revenue, for most of the 19th century it was 1/3. A footnote indicates: R.E.F. Smith and David Christian, Bread and Salt: Social and Economic History of Food and Drink in Russia (Cambridge University Press, 1984). David Moon, The Russian Peasantry, 1600-1930; World the Peasants Made (Longman, 1999). Paul Robert MaGocsi, A History of Ukraine (University of Washington Press, Seattle, 1997, chapters 10-12.
Norman Davies, God's Playground: History of Poland, Vol. 1 Columbia
University Press, 1982.

During the 16th Century Jews move into Poland-Lithuania protected by the
Poland-Lithuanian Crown, serving for the convenience of the szlachta who offered patronage, employment as tavenkeepers.

Geoffrey Hosking - p. 258 - notes that The Jewish Statute of 1804 confirmed their right of self-government in the local commune or kahal, though insisting it be separated >from the religious establishment, the rabbinate. Jews were allowed to attend Russian schools or to found their own, to open commercial and manufacturing establishments, and to buy and lease land in the Pale. On the other hand, they were barred >from the liquor trade, which had been a major source of income for them in Poland...." footnote: John Doyle Klier, Russia Gathers Her Jews: Origin of the Jewish Question in Russia 1772-1825 (Dekalb: Northern Illinois Univrsity Press, 1986).

H. Elliott Lipschultz
adoniram@taxhistoryfoundation.org


Lithuanian notary #lithuania

Herbert Lazerow
 

< My great-great grandfather, Jacob(?) Berbachek >from Vilna owned a saloon and was a notary public in Lithuania. How was this possible?>

In most of the Russian Empire, making and selling liquor was
reserved to the nobility. They commonly leased that right for a specific
location on a calendar year basis, often to Jews. They were called
shenks, and the people who actually operated them were shenkers.
(Imagine moving your family >from one shenk to another on 1 January
as one lease expired and another began!)

As to the notary part, that is more doubtful. All of continental
Europe's legal systems are based on the legal system of the Roman
Empire, each with many modifications. The officer that we know as
a notary public, a person authorized to administer oaths and to cer-
tify the identity of a person who signed documents, did not exist in
those systems. The notary there was a much more important person.
Wills and important contracts, such as those for marriage and for
the transfer of real estate, were executed before (and usually prepared
by) a notary. The notary would give one copy of the document to each
of the parties, and bind one copy into his notary book for the year
as a permanent record.

I do not know whether a Jew could be a notary in Lithuania.
As a legal matter, it may depend on the year. As a practical matter,
it is unlikely that the entire Russian Empire adhered in every respect
to the laws promulgated >from St Petersburg.

Bert
Herbert Lazerow
lazer@sandiego.edu


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Lithuanian notary #lithuania

Herbert Lazerow
 

< My great-great grandfather, Jacob(?) Berbachek >from Vilna owned a saloon and was a notary public in Lithuania. How was this possible?>

In most of the Russian Empire, making and selling liquor was
reserved to the nobility. They commonly leased that right for a specific
location on a calendar year basis, often to Jews. They were called
shenks, and the people who actually operated them were shenkers.
(Imagine moving your family >from one shenk to another on 1 January
as one lease expired and another began!)

As to the notary part, that is more doubtful. All of continental
Europe's legal systems are based on the legal system of the Roman
Empire, each with many modifications. The officer that we know as
a notary public, a person authorized to administer oaths and to cer-
tify the identity of a person who signed documents, did not exist in
those systems. The notary there was a much more important person.
Wills and important contracts, such as those for marriage and for
the transfer of real estate, were executed before (and usually prepared
by) a notary. The notary would give one copy of the document to each
of the parties, and bind one copy into his notary book for the year
as a permanent record.

I do not know whether a Jew could be a notary in Lithuania.
As a legal matter, it may depend on the year. As a practical matter,
it is unlikely that the entire Russian Empire adhered in every respect
to the laws promulgated >from St Petersburg.

Bert
Herbert Lazerow
lazer@sandiego.edu


A New Year's Message from LitvakSIG #lithuania

Litvaks@...
 

In the midst of our celebration of the High Holy Days, we personally are
grateful for all that LitvakSIG been able to accomplish this past year. We are grateful for the support and devotion of our wonderful LitvakSIG District Coordinators. We are grateful for all the wonderful cooperation that we enjoy with the Lithuanian Archives, the Genealogical Society of Utah, and the many other sources >from which we are able to obtain information to create our databases. We are grateful to the translators, who do such a wonderful job for us. And, as an independent organization, separate >from JewishGen, we are grateful for Michael Tobias' magic which allows those databases to become searchable, and JewishGen for hosting us on their incredible website.

This year, we will need to look at some new ways of getting the needed
financial support for the work of LitvakSIG. Very shortly, we will be
posting a questionnaire on the Digest, soliciting your input. Currently, we are asking that all our users make a donation to the very best of their
financial ability. Consider scheduling a monthly deduction >from your credit card if this works best for you.

LitvakSIG's policy has been that a donation $100 to a District (Uyezd) of
interest to you will entitle you to an Excel spreadsheet of of the
translated records received for that District six months to one year prior to their appearance in the ALD. An Excel spreadsheet will allow you to
manipulate the data and search in a variety of ways not available via the
website. For a single $100 donation to LitvakSIG, you will receive information >from many, many records, plus you will be able tell the Archives exactly which file, fond, and number pertains to your request for copies of the specific record you want >from them. This can be a valuable time saver, and end up costing you less for copies of the original documents.

Please consider how LitvakSIG has helped your research, and in honor of the New Year, contribute as generously as you can.

Contributions to LitvakSIG http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak/donor.htm by check or credit card are tax-deductible as provided by law. Mail contributions to LITVAKSIG, inc., Department 77-9253, Chicago, IL
60678-9253.

In addition, because JewishGen provides the infrastructure for LitvakSIG's
All-Lithuania Database, website and discussion group, we hope you will
consider a donation to JewishGen as well to help with the cost of these features as wellas the other services that JewishGen provides us all.

On behalf of LitvakSIG, our very best wishes for a healthy, happy and
peaceful New Year.

L'Shana Tova -

Davida Noyek Handler, President

Carol Coplin Baker, Research Groups Coordinator
Judy Baston, Moderator
Judi Caplan, Online Journal Editor
Ernie Fine, Technical Advisor/Webmaster
Richard H. Hoffman, Treasurer
Maria Krane, Vital Records Outreach Coordinator
Elliott Lipschultz, Finance
Jeff Miller, Board Member


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania A New Year's Message from LitvakSIG #lithuania

Litvaks@...
 

In the midst of our celebration of the High Holy Days, we personally are
grateful for all that LitvakSIG been able to accomplish this past year. We are grateful for the support and devotion of our wonderful LitvakSIG District Coordinators. We are grateful for all the wonderful cooperation that we enjoy with the Lithuanian Archives, the Genealogical Society of Utah, and the many other sources >from which we are able to obtain information to create our databases. We are grateful to the translators, who do such a wonderful job for us. And, as an independent organization, separate >from JewishGen, we are grateful for Michael Tobias' magic which allows those databases to become searchable, and JewishGen for hosting us on their incredible website.

This year, we will need to look at some new ways of getting the needed
financial support for the work of LitvakSIG. Very shortly, we will be
posting a questionnaire on the Digest, soliciting your input. Currently, we are asking that all our users make a donation to the very best of their
financial ability. Consider scheduling a monthly deduction >from your credit card if this works best for you.

LitvakSIG's policy has been that a donation $100 to a District (Uyezd) of
interest to you will entitle you to an Excel spreadsheet of of the
translated records received for that District six months to one year prior to their appearance in the ALD. An Excel spreadsheet will allow you to
manipulate the data and search in a variety of ways not available via the
website. For a single $100 donation to LitvakSIG, you will receive information >from many, many records, plus you will be able tell the Archives exactly which file, fond, and number pertains to your request for copies of the specific record you want >from them. This can be a valuable time saver, and end up costing you less for copies of the original documents.

Please consider how LitvakSIG has helped your research, and in honor of the New Year, contribute as generously as you can.

Contributions to LitvakSIG http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak/donor.htm by check or credit card are tax-deductible as provided by law. Mail contributions to LITVAKSIG, inc., Department 77-9253, Chicago, IL
60678-9253.

In addition, because JewishGen provides the infrastructure for LitvakSIG's
All-Lithuania Database, website and discussion group, we hope you will
consider a donation to JewishGen as well to help with the cost of these features as wellas the other services that JewishGen provides us all.

On behalf of LitvakSIG, our very best wishes for a healthy, happy and
peaceful New Year.

L'Shana Tova -

Davida Noyek Handler, President

Carol Coplin Baker, Research Groups Coordinator
Judy Baston, Moderator
Judi Caplan, Online Journal Editor
Ernie Fine, Technical Advisor/Webmaster
Richard H. Hoffman, Treasurer
Maria Krane, Vital Records Outreach Coordinator
Elliott Lipschultz, Finance
Jeff Miller, Board Member


Researching a name change #general

HENKEN9@...
 

Genners,

For some, there may be a relatively easy source to check on a name
change. My mgf was naturalized in April, 1915, in the Eastern District
Federal Court in Brooklyn. In the section of the petition titled
"Order of Court Admitting Petitioner", there is a second paragraph
that allows for a name change.

My other gf was naturalized almost exactly one year later to the date,
but in Brooklyn Supreme Court. The forms >from both courts are very
similar but not exact duplicates. The Brooklyn Petition, at least that
part which I copied, does not include the name change option. And it
certainly does not appear in Admitting section. Since it would seem
like an opportune time to file such a change, I wonder if the Brooklyn
court required it to be a separate action. If so, I would conduct such
research in the same time frame as the naturalization petition.

Regards,

Ty Henken
Centennial, Colo.
Henken9@aol.com

HENKEN,SMOLINSKY>Vitebsk; POLCHINIKOFF/POLTINIKOW>Gomel, Mogilev;
PECKEL>Ushachi, Vitebsk; LEVIN,LEVITT>Cherven, Minsk; WOLODARSKY>
Riga,Svetlovodsk,Kherson,Astrahkan; INTRELEGATOR>Siauliai, Kaunas;
GUTMAN>Jaunjelgava, Latvia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Researching a name change #general

HENKEN9@...
 

Genners,

For some, there may be a relatively easy source to check on a name
change. My mgf was naturalized in April, 1915, in the Eastern District
Federal Court in Brooklyn. In the section of the petition titled
"Order of Court Admitting Petitioner", there is a second paragraph
that allows for a name change.

My other gf was naturalized almost exactly one year later to the date,
but in Brooklyn Supreme Court. The forms >from both courts are very
similar but not exact duplicates. The Brooklyn Petition, at least that
part which I copied, does not include the name change option. And it
certainly does not appear in Admitting section. Since it would seem
like an opportune time to file such a change, I wonder if the Brooklyn
court required it to be a separate action. If so, I would conduct such
research in the same time frame as the naturalization petition.

Regards,

Ty Henken
Centennial, Colo.
Henken9@aol.com

HENKEN,SMOLINSKY>Vitebsk; POLCHINIKOFF/POLTINIKOW>Gomel, Mogilev;
PECKEL>Ushachi, Vitebsk; LEVIN,LEVITT>Cherven, Minsk; WOLODARSKY>
Riga,Svetlovodsk,Kherson,Astrahkan; INTRELEGATOR>Siauliai, Kaunas;
GUTMAN>Jaunjelgava, Latvia


Abraham I. JACOBS Info Found; Now Searching for Robert L. Kushnick #general

rlberliner@...
 

Joseph Jacobs and Robert L. Kushnick were Executors of the Estate
of Abraham Jacobs. If Mr. Kushnick's name is familiar to anyone,
please contact me privately. Joseph Jacobs was possibly Abraham's
grandson.

Many, many thanks with deep appreciation to all who viewed VM-1734
and VM-1735. Additional deep appreciation to Carol Rombo Rider who
informed me that she had helped copy the funeral home information
for the Jewish History Museum in Baltimore.

I contacted them and have received a copy of the funeral home records.
This information has given the full name of Abraham's mother as Leah
Glassman and his father as J. Jacobs.

The funeral was ordered by Mollie Jacobs for the Estate of Abraham I.
Jacobs.

Thank you Chuck Weinstein for writing . . . The father's name is
almost certainly Zorach J. Jacobs. Zorach is a Biblical name (a
grandson of Jacob). . .The Death Certificate, as you will recall,
showed the father to be Zorach S-or-J. Jacobs. FYI, Abraham's
tombstone shows Avraham Yitzhak ben Yakov. So we definitely seem to
have Zorach Jacob Jacobs.

I can't help wondering if the Jacobs name is because of his being
"a grandson of Jacob" as there were no surnames in Poland/Russia
during that period of time.

My search continues, however. Please let me know privately if the
descendants of Robert L. Kushnick are in your family and if so, how
I may contact them.

Again, my sincere appreciation to all of you. I hope I missed no one
in my personal responses.

May we all be blessed with A Peaceful, Happy & Healthy New Year!

Sincerely,
Rachelle Leaf Berliner
Savannah, GA
rlberliner@aol.com or rlberliner@comcast.net
Searching: *ISLER/EICHLER/EHRLICH/JACOBS/GOLDSTEIN (>from Poznan or
Posen, Poland/Prussia/Germany/Russia to London to Baltimore)
* Additional search Names in U.S. - HELLMAN, LEVY, COHEN, Sam FINE,
Raymond FINE, KAHANOW, LEAF (the 7 Jacobs sisters married names)


Re: Current value of $3000 in 1898 #general

Michael F. Simon <mfsimon@...>
 

This Web site < http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/bu2/inflateCPI.html > is
an inflation calculator >from 1913 to 1999. It may give you some
idea of the relative magnitude of the immigrant's "fortune."

Mike Simon


Wrong link in Zolkiewka posting #general

Kirsten Gradel <kmgradel@...>
 

A couple of days ago I posted an announcement about the PSA indices
for Zolkiewka 1881-98. I gave a link for the PSA surname list, but
it doesn't work - and the surname list doesn't seem to be posted yet
on Jewish Records Indexing - Poland's web page.

I have the list on my computer and those who are interested in knowing
whether "their" names occur on the list and with what frequency are
welcome to contact me.

Kirsten Gradel
Nyborg, Denmark
Zamosc Archive Project Coordinator
CO-OP Zolkiewka
Town leader Gorzkow, Wysokie and Zolkiewka
kmgradel@dadlnet.dk


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Abraham I. JACOBS Info Found; Now Searching for Robert L. Kushnick #general

rlberliner@...
 

Joseph Jacobs and Robert L. Kushnick were Executors of the Estate
of Abraham Jacobs. If Mr. Kushnick's name is familiar to anyone,
please contact me privately. Joseph Jacobs was possibly Abraham's
grandson.

Many, many thanks with deep appreciation to all who viewed VM-1734
and VM-1735. Additional deep appreciation to Carol Rombo Rider who
informed me that she had helped copy the funeral home information
for the Jewish History Museum in Baltimore.

I contacted them and have received a copy of the funeral home records.
This information has given the full name of Abraham's mother as Leah
Glassman and his father as J. Jacobs.

The funeral was ordered by Mollie Jacobs for the Estate of Abraham I.
Jacobs.

Thank you Chuck Weinstein for writing . . . The father's name is
almost certainly Zorach J. Jacobs. Zorach is a Biblical name (a
grandson of Jacob). . .The Death Certificate, as you will recall,
showed the father to be Zorach S-or-J. Jacobs. FYI, Abraham's
tombstone shows Avraham Yitzhak ben Yakov. So we definitely seem to
have Zorach Jacob Jacobs.

I can't help wondering if the Jacobs name is because of his being
"a grandson of Jacob" as there were no surnames in Poland/Russia
during that period of time.

My search continues, however. Please let me know privately if the
descendants of Robert L. Kushnick are in your family and if so, how
I may contact them.

Again, my sincere appreciation to all of you. I hope I missed no one
in my personal responses.

May we all be blessed with A Peaceful, Happy & Healthy New Year!

Sincerely,
Rachelle Leaf Berliner
Savannah, GA
rlberliner@aol.com or rlberliner@comcast.net
Searching: *ISLER/EICHLER/EHRLICH/JACOBS/GOLDSTEIN (>from Poznan or
Posen, Poland/Prussia/Germany/Russia to London to Baltimore)
* Additional search Names in U.S. - HELLMAN, LEVY, COHEN, Sam FINE,
Raymond FINE, KAHANOW, LEAF (the 7 Jacobs sisters married names)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Current value of $3000 in 1898 #general

Michael F. Simon <mfsimon@...>
 

This Web site < http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/bu2/inflateCPI.html > is
an inflation calculator >from 1913 to 1999. It may give you some
idea of the relative magnitude of the immigrant's "fortune."

Mike Simon


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Wrong link in Zolkiewka posting #general

Kirsten Gradel <kmgradel@...>
 

A couple of days ago I posted an announcement about the PSA indices
for Zolkiewka 1881-98. I gave a link for the PSA surname list, but
it doesn't work - and the surname list doesn't seem to be posted yet
on Jewish Records Indexing - Poland's web page.

I have the list on my computer and those who are interested in knowing
whether "their" names occur on the list and with what frequency are
welcome to contact me.

Kirsten Gradel
Nyborg, Denmark
Zamosc Archive Project Coordinator
CO-OP Zolkiewka
Town leader Gorzkow, Wysokie and Zolkiewka
kmgradel@dadlnet.dk


Istanbul? #ukraine

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

My grandmother was born in present Ukraine and my father was born in
Istanbul. In working on the marriage records of Istanbul, I see many
Ashkenzi names--including many that I know were common in Ukraine.
Perhaps, then, this will be of interest to a few of you:


The effort to record the index marriage records of Istanbul/Constantinople
is now 50% complete, with a total of over 12,000 marriages. Each marriage
record includes groom's name, groom's father's name, bride's name, bride's
father's name, Hebrew/Solitreo reference number, and year. Here is a
search engine for approximately 6,000 of these marriages:

http://radomskopoland.com/istanbul2/

Note:

o The Soundex feature at the site above is not yet "airtight"!
o Where the date is missing in the results, it is between 1886 and 1899.

The site above includes some unproofed material. Please do not visit the
site if you are looking for a perfect, finished, or complete set of
materials. I offer this search engine only because it may be of some value
to people with roots in Istanbul/Constantinople; and, surely, some of these
people don't want to wait a year or two until the entire project is
finished!

P.S. Here is a complete list of all surnames we have found in all of the
records now finished, including unproofed records:

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/ist-marr/surnames.html

Here is what a typical index page looks like:

http://www4.wittenberg.edu/academics/music/kazez/ist-marr-sam.jpg

And here is what some typical Hebrew/Solitreo marriage pages look like:

Pick any item in this directory:
http://www4.wittenberg.edu/academics/music/kazez/Ist/

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Springfield, Ohio USA

Turkey: KAZEZ-KAZES, ALHADEF-ELHADEF, FRESKO-FRESCO, HABIB, DEVIDAS-DE VIDAS
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/dk/elh-kaz-fre.html
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/missing/fresco.html
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/missing/kazez.html


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Istanbul? #ukraine

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

My grandmother was born in present Ukraine and my father was born in
Istanbul. In working on the marriage records of Istanbul, I see many
Ashkenzi names--including many that I know were common in Ukraine.
Perhaps, then, this will be of interest to a few of you:


The effort to record the index marriage records of Istanbul/Constantinople
is now 50% complete, with a total of over 12,000 marriages. Each marriage
record includes groom's name, groom's father's name, bride's name, bride's
father's name, Hebrew/Solitreo reference number, and year. Here is a
search engine for approximately 6,000 of these marriages:

http://radomskopoland.com/istanbul2/

Note:

o The Soundex feature at the site above is not yet "airtight"!
o Where the date is missing in the results, it is between 1886 and 1899.

The site above includes some unproofed material. Please do not visit the
site if you are looking for a perfect, finished, or complete set of
materials. I offer this search engine only because it may be of some value
to people with roots in Istanbul/Constantinople; and, surely, some of these
people don't want to wait a year or two until the entire project is
finished!

P.S. Here is a complete list of all surnames we have found in all of the
records now finished, including unproofed records:

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/ist-marr/surnames.html

Here is what a typical index page looks like:

http://www4.wittenberg.edu/academics/music/kazez/ist-marr-sam.jpg

And here is what some typical Hebrew/Solitreo marriage pages look like:

Pick any item in this directory:
http://www4.wittenberg.edu/academics/music/kazez/Ist/

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Springfield, Ohio USA

Turkey: KAZEZ-KAZES, ALHADEF-ELHADEF, FRESKO-FRESCO, HABIB, DEVIDAS-DE VIDAS
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/dk/elh-kaz-fre.html
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/missing/fresco.html
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/missing/kazez.html


Re: Jews from Brailov (Brayliv, Brailiv) #ukraine

Leon Koll <napobo3@...>
 

I am researching Brailov because my gggfather Abram
POTOK (POTOKER) lived there.
I've put very brief info on this webpage:
http://capital.lk.net/~leonkoll/potok/

Any kind of cooperation on Brailov research is
welcome.

Leon Koll
Yehud, Israel


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Jews from Brailov (Brayliv, Brailiv) #ukraine

Leon Koll <napobo3@...>
 

I am researching Brailov because my gggfather Abram
POTOK (POTOKER) lived there.
I've put very brief info on this webpage:
http://capital.lk.net/~leonkoll/potok/

Any kind of cooperation on Brailov research is
welcome.

Leon Koll
Yehud, Israel