Date   

Name YEVANO... in Israel #belarus

Steve Orlen
 

Dear Folks,

When Isaac EPSTEIN and his wife Mere nee POLLACK immigrated >from Slonim in
Grodno to Holyoke, Massachusetts in 1903, they left behind a daughter whose
married name was Anna (Mrs. Robert?) YEVANO...

This fragmented surname was found in Mary's obituary (1935). The rest of
the name is cut off in the copy I have, but it looks like it might end in
-VITZ.

I know that Anna and her children immigrated to Palestine. I don't know the
year. I know that now-deceased members of my family visited them in the
1950's. I don't know if the surname had been changed, or if the children
were female (meaning that the surname might be "lost.")

A genner kindly informed me that the surname means "Greek" or "The Greek
Person."

Two questions:

Would it have been common to find a Jew with a Greek surname in the Pale in
the late 19th century?

Do any of our Israeli genners know anyone who either bears this surname, or
once did?

Hopefully, Steve Orlen
Tucson, Arizona
Temporarily of Houston, TX


documentary film search #belarus

Eileen Price <eileen.price@...>
 

Dear SIG member,

There are two award winning films featuring Dario Gabbai. One is "The Last
Days" which I found at the local library, and the second is "Auswitz-The
Final Witness" which I can't find. The library did a search and couldn't
find it, and I checked Google and could not find a source.

If anyone has seen this film and could let me know where to find it, I would
be most grateful.

Thanks.

Eileen Price
Denver,CO
eileen.price@worldnet.att.net


Belarus SIG #Belarus Name YEVANO... in Israel #belarus

Steve Orlen
 

Dear Folks,

When Isaac EPSTEIN and his wife Mere nee POLLACK immigrated >from Slonim in
Grodno to Holyoke, Massachusetts in 1903, they left behind a daughter whose
married name was Anna (Mrs. Robert?) YEVANO...

This fragmented surname was found in Mary's obituary (1935). The rest of
the name is cut off in the copy I have, but it looks like it might end in
-VITZ.

I know that Anna and her children immigrated to Palestine. I don't know the
year. I know that now-deceased members of my family visited them in the
1950's. I don't know if the surname had been changed, or if the children
were female (meaning that the surname might be "lost.")

A genner kindly informed me that the surname means "Greek" or "The Greek
Person."

Two questions:

Would it have been common to find a Jew with a Greek surname in the Pale in
the late 19th century?

Do any of our Israeli genners know anyone who either bears this surname, or
once did?

Hopefully, Steve Orlen
Tucson, Arizona
Temporarily of Houston, TX


Belarus SIG #Belarus documentary film search #belarus

Eileen Price <eileen.price@...>
 

Dear SIG member,

There are two award winning films featuring Dario Gabbai. One is "The Last
Days" which I found at the local library, and the second is "Auswitz-The
Final Witness" which I can't find. The library did a search and couldn't
find it, and I checked Google and could not find a source.

If anyone has seen this film and could let me know where to find it, I would
be most grateful.

Thanks.

Eileen Price
Denver,CO
eileen.price@worldnet.att.net


Re: Red Star newspaper? #belarus

Elina Smirnova <smirnova-elina@...>
 

Hilary
Red Star was a central newspaper of Ministry of Defendence of the USSR. It
was issiued since January 1924 and wrote about Red Army news also during
WWII.
You may look for the old samples of this newspaper in libraries, or write to
a museum of WWII, or look for a list of people, that worked in that
newspaper
Elina Smirnova

It has been pointed out to me that several countries had newspapers
called,
"Red Star". To clarify, I would be looking for info about the "Red Star"
in Russia, probably around Mogilev or Odessa

To reiterate the original message, a story of one of my relatives says
that
he wrote for the "Red Star" newspaper around WWII. Any possibility of my
researching this, either online or by ground-mail? Or?

His name was Ben HENKIN , his father was Josef GENKIN. Josef was probably
born 1880-1900.


Re: Red Star #belarus

aviram <ajaviram@...>
 

Re: Hilary Henkin's query - "Red Star"

During WWII (and before and after as well) Red Star ("Krasnaya Zvezda") was
the official daily newspaper of the Soviet Army.

Jerry Aviram
Tel-Aviv, Israel


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Red Star newspaper? #belarus

Elina Smirnova <smirnova-elina@...>
 

Hilary
Red Star was a central newspaper of Ministry of Defendence of the USSR. It
was issiued since January 1924 and wrote about Red Army news also during
WWII.
You may look for the old samples of this newspaper in libraries, or write to
a museum of WWII, or look for a list of people, that worked in that
newspaper
Elina Smirnova

It has been pointed out to me that several countries had newspapers
called,
"Red Star". To clarify, I would be looking for info about the "Red Star"
in Russia, probably around Mogilev or Odessa

To reiterate the original message, a story of one of my relatives says
that
he wrote for the "Red Star" newspaper around WWII. Any possibility of my
researching this, either online or by ground-mail? Or?

His name was Ben HENKIN , his father was Josef GENKIN. Josef was probably
born 1880-1900.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Red Star #belarus

aviram <ajaviram@...>
 

Re: Hilary Henkin's query - "Red Star"

During WWII (and before and after as well) Red Star ("Krasnaya Zvezda") was
the official daily newspaper of the Soviet Army.

Jerry Aviram
Tel-Aviv, Israel


Re: Seemingly un-Jewish names in Jewish usage #general

Vivian Kahn
 

Many of my Hungarian Jewish relatives had names that are on Rachel's
list or are similarly Germanic or Hungarian.

Rachel doesn't indicate the context in which she found these names
(e.g. civil records, Jewish records, census records) or whether her
relatives used these name in Hungary or after they emigrated. She
also doesn't indicate whether they also Magyarized their surnames.
My less affluent, more orthodox Hungarian relatives spoke Yiddish at
home and used Yiddish names among family but had a Hungarian name
used outside their immediate circle. For example, my mother has a
cousin she always referred to as Pinchas who identified himself as
Paul to immigration officials and was called Pityu in Hungary. Many
affluent and assimilated Hungarian Jews spoke Hungarian or German at
home and were given Hungarian or German names, rather than Yiddish
names at birth. In the birth records their religious (Hebrew names)
are in parentheses following the Hungarian given name.

Other examples include my father b. Kereszt, Hung. in 1903, who was
named Elemer, a very Hungarian name that is not really a Magyar
version of Elmer. His family spoke Hungarian at home. He could only
understand Yiddish, which my mother spoke at home, because he had
studied German in school. He had a brother born Miksa who was
called Max. Several cousins were named Arpad, another traditional
Magyar man's name with no Anglo counterpart. I've also come across or
have family named Maria (Marika), Ludvik (Lajos), Marta, Frieda
(Fried), Hugo, Kornel (Cornelius).

Vivian Kahn, Hungarian SIG Coordinator

My great great grandmother was a Jew named Maria (LOWY) whose exact
origins I have been unable to pinpoint, but her children were born in
Czechoslovakia and, at the time of the second world war, some of her
relatives lived in Hungary.

The research on this branch of my family has turned up many names I had
not before associated as Jewish, which had led me to wonder if the names
they are now remembered by were those they used in their everyday
professional lives and very different than their Jewish names, which are
now lost. Many of them were business men in German speaking areas and
had what I have considered very Germanic but not necessarily Jewish
names. Here is a list of them- please feel free to correct me if I am
wrong in that assumption.

Leopold
Ludwig
Helene
Anna
Karl
Franzine
Else
Martha
Max
Kamila
Paul
Gina
Hugo
Richard
Frieda
Bruno

Rachel Slansky
Oregon, USA


Re: Seemingly un-Jewish names in Jewish usage #general

Stan Goodman <safeqSPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Fri, 24 Jan 2003 03:46:43 UTC, rachellad@earthlink.net (Rachel
Slansky) opined:

The research on this branch of my family has turned up many names I had
not before associated as Jewish, which had led me to wonder if the names
they are now remembered by were those they used in their everyday
professional lives and very different than their Jewish names, which are
now lost. Many of them were business men in German speaking areas and
had what I have considered very Germanic but not necessarily Jewish
names. Here is a list of them- please feel free to correct me if I am
wrong in that assumption.

Leopold
Probably Leib / Yehuda

Ludwig
Probably Lazar / Eliezer

Helene
Anna
Already Hebrew: Hannah

Karl
Franzine
Else
Probably Esther

Martha
Already Hebrew (actually Aramaic)

Max
Probably Moshe

Kamila
Paul
Gina
Hugo
Richard
Frieda
Bruno
Probably Barukh

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

Please remove the CAPITAL LETTERS >from my address in order to send me
email.


Re: Aunt Chuch #general

Stan Goodman <safeqSPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Fri, 24 Jan 2003 04:09:23 UTC, bobby1st@sprynet.com (Bobby Furst)
opined:

My brother in law had an Aunt Chuch (in the USA). He has no idea what
her real name was. Is this familiar as a pet / diminutive form of a
Yiddish name?
No. It is a diminutive of a Hebrew name: Shoshana.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com
Please remove the CAPITAL LETTERS >from my address in order to send me
email.


Re: Aunt Chuch #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Bobby Furst" wrote
My brother in law had an Aunt Chuch (in the USA). He has no idea what
her real name was. Is this familiar as a pet / diminutive form of a
Yiddish name?

Thanks,
Bobby Furst
Bobby,

This is most probably originated >from Polish "ciocia' [cho chyah] which
means 'aunt'.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Seemingly un-Jewish names in Jewish usage #general

Vivian Kahn
 

Many of my Hungarian Jewish relatives had names that are on Rachel's
list or are similarly Germanic or Hungarian.

Rachel doesn't indicate the context in which she found these names
(e.g. civil records, Jewish records, census records) or whether her
relatives used these name in Hungary or after they emigrated. She
also doesn't indicate whether they also Magyarized their surnames.
My less affluent, more orthodox Hungarian relatives spoke Yiddish at
home and used Yiddish names among family but had a Hungarian name
used outside their immediate circle. For example, my mother has a
cousin she always referred to as Pinchas who identified himself as
Paul to immigration officials and was called Pityu in Hungary. Many
affluent and assimilated Hungarian Jews spoke Hungarian or German at
home and were given Hungarian or German names, rather than Yiddish
names at birth. In the birth records their religious (Hebrew names)
are in parentheses following the Hungarian given name.

Other examples include my father b. Kereszt, Hung. in 1903, who was
named Elemer, a very Hungarian name that is not really a Magyar
version of Elmer. His family spoke Hungarian at home. He could only
understand Yiddish, which my mother spoke at home, because he had
studied German in school. He had a brother born Miksa who was
called Max. Several cousins were named Arpad, another traditional
Magyar man's name with no Anglo counterpart. I've also come across or
have family named Maria (Marika), Ludvik (Lajos), Marta, Frieda
(Fried), Hugo, Kornel (Cornelius).

Vivian Kahn, Hungarian SIG Coordinator

My great great grandmother was a Jew named Maria (LOWY) whose exact
origins I have been unable to pinpoint, but her children were born in
Czechoslovakia and, at the time of the second world war, some of her
relatives lived in Hungary.

The research on this branch of my family has turned up many names I had
not before associated as Jewish, which had led me to wonder if the names
they are now remembered by were those they used in their everyday
professional lives and very different than their Jewish names, which are
now lost. Many of them were business men in German speaking areas and
had what I have considered very Germanic but not necessarily Jewish
names. Here is a list of them- please feel free to correct me if I am
wrong in that assumption.

Leopold
Ludwig
Helene
Anna
Karl
Franzine
Else
Martha
Max
Kamila
Paul
Gina
Hugo
Richard
Frieda
Bruno

Rachel Slansky
Oregon, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Seemingly un-Jewish names in Jewish usage #general

Stan Goodman <safeqSPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Fri, 24 Jan 2003 03:46:43 UTC, rachellad@earthlink.net (Rachel
Slansky) opined:

The research on this branch of my family has turned up many names I had
not before associated as Jewish, which had led me to wonder if the names
they are now remembered by were those they used in their everyday
professional lives and very different than their Jewish names, which are
now lost. Many of them were business men in German speaking areas and
had what I have considered very Germanic but not necessarily Jewish
names. Here is a list of them- please feel free to correct me if I am
wrong in that assumption.

Leopold
Probably Leib / Yehuda

Ludwig
Probably Lazar / Eliezer

Helene
Anna
Already Hebrew: Hannah

Karl
Franzine
Else
Probably Esther

Martha
Already Hebrew (actually Aramaic)

Max
Probably Moshe

Kamila
Paul
Gina
Hugo
Richard
Frieda
Bruno
Probably Barukh

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

Please remove the CAPITAL LETTERS >from my address in order to send me
email.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Aunt Chuch #general

Stan Goodman <safeqSPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Fri, 24 Jan 2003 04:09:23 UTC, bobby1st@sprynet.com (Bobby Furst)
opined:

My brother in law had an Aunt Chuch (in the USA). He has no idea what
her real name was. Is this familiar as a pet / diminutive form of a
Yiddish name?
No. It is a diminutive of a Hebrew name: Shoshana.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com
Please remove the CAPITAL LETTERS >from my address in order to send me
email.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Aunt Chuch #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Bobby Furst" wrote
My brother in law had an Aunt Chuch (in the USA). He has no idea what
her real name was. Is this familiar as a pet / diminutive form of a
Yiddish name?

Thanks,
Bobby Furst
Bobby,

This is most probably originated >from Polish "ciocia' [cho chyah] which
means 'aunt'.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


Re: Diabolical Excel files and Good News Bad News #latvia

Dinberg Donna <donna.dinberg@...>
 

Constance and Martha,

I can give it a try, but only after a current series of several
conferences and meetings I am committed to ... i.e., after Feb. 15.
If not one else picks up the ball before then, I will get in touch
again offlist to discuss.

Please don't send the files until then, however, or my mail will
blow up!

Din.

Donna Dinberg
Librarian, JGS of Ottawa
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Researching:
DINBERG, TRUPIN, MEYEROWITZ, MESNIK, SIMON (all >from Dvinsk area)

-----Original Message-----
From: CWhippman@aol.com [mailto:CWhippman@aol.com]

...snip...
The bad news is that I haven't been able to unite the files
and harmonize some of the differences in formatting that exist.
The 6 or so files files [or most of them] also have a ferocious
protector programme called bin hex which I can't crack.
...snip,,,
Does anyone have the computer skills to unscramble these
files that might be able to help. The files can be transmitted
via email. ...snip...
-----------------------------


Latvia SIG #Latvia RE: Diabolical Excel files and Good News Bad News #latvia

Dinberg Donna <donna.dinberg@...>
 

Constance and Martha,

I can give it a try, but only after a current series of several
conferences and meetings I am committed to ... i.e., after Feb. 15.
If not one else picks up the ball before then, I will get in touch
again offlist to discuss.

Please don't send the files until then, however, or my mail will
blow up!

Din.

Donna Dinberg
Librarian, JGS of Ottawa
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Researching:
DINBERG, TRUPIN, MEYEROWITZ, MESNIK, SIMON (all >from Dvinsk area)

-----Original Message-----
From: CWhippman@aol.com [mailto:CWhippman@aol.com]

...snip...
The bad news is that I haven't been able to unite the files
and harmonize some of the differences in formatting that exist.
The 6 or so files files [or most of them] also have a ferocious
protector programme called bin hex which I can't crack.
...snip,,,
Does anyone have the computer skills to unscramble these
files that might be able to help. The files can be transmitted
via email. ...snip...
-----------------------------


Maria/Mary #general

Dov & Varda <yknow@...>
 

My mp great aunt was named Mary in English. I was a little surprised to find
this out. Of course, in Hebrew, her name was Miriam. The explanation might
be quite simple.

My mgm was named Lizzie until her first day of school. When her teacher
asked her name and she responded, "Lizzie", the wise teacher said, "From
this day on, your name is Elizabeth."

I think this may have happened to a lot of our ancestors.

Varda Epstein
Efrat
Israel


"City Hall" (USC), Poland #general

Michael McTeer <desrx@...>
 

I am at the tailend of a thusfar surprising 'encounter' with a USC in Poland
in a quest for 'current' vital records for my KALKOPF family. In response to
my general inquiry (services, fees, etc.), they responded asking for more
details about the family which I provided as best I could seeking the
children of Aron Isaac KALKOPF and Liba LENCZNER. Of the five KALKOPF
children (Liba had two other daughters by LIEBERMAN and FREYMORGEN), they
found four birth records:

Estera KALKOPF born 08 juni 1904
Chaim Berek KALKOPF born 25 juli
Sura KALKOPF born 10 september 1910
Cutla KALKOPF born 12 october 1912

as well as a possible death record for Aron of 15 November 1919.

Esther is my grandmother (though we have a birthday of 15 Jun). She
immigrated to the US in 1921. The other three siblings I only had
approximate dates for until now. The name Liba gave for Chaim on her
immigration papers was Chambeja. One of these daughters married 1931/1932.
These three children remained in Poland and supposedly died in the camps. I
have yet to find out what became of them as well as their brother, Abram b.
abt 1906.

In supplying this information, I was asked if I wish to make 'application'
for the documents to which I said yes and inquired about the costs. They
responded that they had mailed the copies to the Polish Consul in Los
Angeles without any mention of remittance.

I am just wondering if this is typical?

Michael McTeer
29 Palms, CA USA
desrx@mybluelight.com