Date   

Issy Schamrock #southafrica

apexsa <apexsa@...>
 

My mom in law is searching for a person she met around 1953 in Durban at
the Empress Hotel. The gentleman in question said his name was Issy
Schamrock. He was accompanied by his parents at the time. He was living
in Johannesburg at the time.

If anyone knows of this person and /or how to contact him, please email
me privately at apexsa@global.co.za

Many thanks

Shana Mink Katz


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Issy Schamrock #southafrica

apexsa <apexsa@...>
 

My mom in law is searching for a person she met around 1953 in Durban at
the Empress Hotel. The gentleman in question said his name was Issy
Schamrock. He was accompanied by his parents at the time. He was living
in Johannesburg at the time.

If anyone knows of this person and /or how to contact him, please email
me privately at apexsa@global.co.za

Many thanks

Shana Mink Katz


Reunion of ex-residents or their descendants of Bethal, Transvaal #southafrica

eligold@...
 

Shtetl-Connections and the Chief Rabbi Harris Community Centre (CRHCC) are
planning to hold a reunion of Jewish families and desendants who were former
residents of Bethal going as far back as 1905. The tentative date is Sunday
9 March 2003 and times 09h00 for 09h30 until 12h30. Venue is the Chief
Rabbi Harris Community Centre, Great Park Synagogue, Glenhove Road,
Houghton, Johannesburg

The event, which promises to be very exciting will take the form of:

- A computer-aided presentation in the Auditorium showing photographs of
Bethal of old and some of its history and the achievements of its Jewish
sons and Daughters.
- An address by Rabbi Moshe Silberhaft - the Country Communities Rabbi
- Update by the SA Friends of Beth Hatefutsoth Country Communities
Project(speaker to be confirmed)

Tea and Coffee with Litvak confectionery will be served and you will have
ample chance to network with ex-Bethalites.

If you or your ancestors came >from Bethal or >from towns in the district
like - Amersfoort, Badplaas, Breyten, Carolina, Davel, Hendrina, Morgenzon,
Ermelo, Vandyksdrift, Estancia, Kriel, Ogies, Kendal, Trichardt, Kinross and
Evander, please e-Mail me at eligold@virtual-ventures.co.za. In order that
we reach as many people as possible, please forward this e-Mail to any
ex-Bethalites you may have the e-Mail addresses of or advise them by phone
or fax should they not have e-Mail.

A nominal fee of R45 per person will be levied to help defray venue and
catering expenses.

To book call Hazel Cohen on (011)728-8088 or Ilana Balabanoff on
(011)728-8152
or e-Mail hazelc@greatpark.co.za


Eli Goldstein
Johannesburg
South Africa


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Reunion of ex-residents or their descendants of Bethal, Transvaal #southafrica

eligold@...
 

Shtetl-Connections and the Chief Rabbi Harris Community Centre (CRHCC) are
planning to hold a reunion of Jewish families and desendants who were former
residents of Bethal going as far back as 1905. The tentative date is Sunday
9 March 2003 and times 09h00 for 09h30 until 12h30. Venue is the Chief
Rabbi Harris Community Centre, Great Park Synagogue, Glenhove Road,
Houghton, Johannesburg

The event, which promises to be very exciting will take the form of:

- A computer-aided presentation in the Auditorium showing photographs of
Bethal of old and some of its history and the achievements of its Jewish
sons and Daughters.
- An address by Rabbi Moshe Silberhaft - the Country Communities Rabbi
- Update by the SA Friends of Beth Hatefutsoth Country Communities
Project(speaker to be confirmed)

Tea and Coffee with Litvak confectionery will be served and you will have
ample chance to network with ex-Bethalites.

If you or your ancestors came >from Bethal or >from towns in the district
like - Amersfoort, Badplaas, Breyten, Carolina, Davel, Hendrina, Morgenzon,
Ermelo, Vandyksdrift, Estancia, Kriel, Ogies, Kendal, Trichardt, Kinross and
Evander, please e-Mail me at eligold@virtual-ventures.co.za. In order that
we reach as many people as possible, please forward this e-Mail to any
ex-Bethalites you may have the e-Mail addresses of or advise them by phone
or fax should they not have e-Mail.

A nominal fee of R45 per person will be levied to help defray venue and
catering expenses.

To book call Hazel Cohen on (011)728-8088 or Ilana Balabanoff on
(011)728-8152
or e-Mail hazelc@greatpark.co.za


Eli Goldstein
Johannesburg
South Africa


Re: Moses an Egyptian Name? #general

Michael McTeer <desrx@...>
 

Not that I have any idea of what I am talking about, but the Revised
English Bible has the following footnotes for Exodus 2:10: "Moses: Heb.
Mosheh", "drew: Heb ver Mashah".

Michael McTeer
desrx@mybluelight.com


Re: Jewish names #hungary

Don and Debby (Gincig) Painter <painter@...>
 

Having both Jewish and non-Jewish family, I am a bit confused by this
thread.

Many of the names I see listed as "Jewish" seem to have their origins
from the Bible. But in the bible names such as Peter, Paul, John, Mary
and even Jesus were names used during that period and were they not all
Jewish at that time? Agreeably, over time, certain names have been
synonymous with one religion or the other like those I've just
mentioned. But having said that, we must also keep in mind that some
religious groups such the Quakers and the Amish often used/use
traditional biblical names. For example, the genealogy of my
sister-in-law's family (she is not Jewish) such names as Elias/Eliaz,
Moses, Benjamin, Abraham, Daniel, and Solomon.

Then there is my Jewish family which includes "national" names from
Germany, France, Paraguay, and Poland such as Johanna, Herman, Olga,
Henri, Emilio, and Rosa. All of which came >from religious families and
never came to the US or Canada.

Keep in mind that are many reasons why a child will be named what they
are named: nationality, depth of religiousness, attitude of the time,
family, or in honor of someone outside the family who may not be Jewish.
Born into the religion, the child will be Jewish no matter what he/she
is named. To quote a famous saying: "What is in a name? A rose by
another name is still a rose."

And please, no heated responses this is just one person's personal
opinion.

Thank you,
Debby Gincig Painter


Re: Obtaining mental health records of a deceased family member #general

Jeff Hecht <jeff@...>
 

Much to my surprise, I was able to obtain similar records >from the New
York State mental hospital where my great-grandmother died in 1929
(>from dementia, probably Alzheimer's disease). I second the comment
that they can be very useful. -- Jeff Hecht

Maggie Linz wrote:


We were fortunate to learn that my husband's great-aunt had been
hospitalized for manic-depression at a psychiatric clinic in Jena,
Thueringen. I wrote and asked if her records were still available (not
really believing they could still exist)and explained we were trying to
find out the names of her husband and child, so we could learn their
fates. [clipped]

These records include letters >from family members and are a real treasure.
Although we have only had some of the documents translated so far, my
husband has learned more about his grandmother's family than he ever
learned >from his grandmother or father. I would encourage others to make
the effort to obtain such records.


"Christian Name" #general

Rachel Slansky
 

Add the confusion that "christian name" is the common English-language
term for first-name . . .
I don't think it's used much in the US; I can't remember ever hearing it
rather than "first name".
I hear it quite often, but I do must of my research in the US on
non-Jewish family members.

Rachel Slansky


Re: nomenclature "Christian name"; first name #general

Dan Goodman <dsgood@...>
 

I've certainly heard the term "Christian name" for given name, many
times, but it is not used as often now as in the past, at least not where
I would run across it. I am writing now, however, to suggest that the
term "given name" be used here instead of "first name". The meaning is
clearer. In some cultures, most notably Chinese, the family name is
placed, in common usage, before the given name. Although I would hazard
a guess that few, if any, Kaifeng Jews take part in this list, the term
"given name" is nonetheless more exact.

Hungarians also put the family name first, I believe. And I'd be
surprised if there were no-one of Hungarian Jewish ancestry here.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Moses an Egyptian Name? #general

Michael McTeer <desrx@...>
 

Not that I have any idea of what I am talking about, but the Revised
English Bible has the following footnotes for Exodus 2:10: "Moses: Heb.
Mosheh", "drew: Heb ver Mashah".

Michael McTeer
desrx@mybluelight.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jewish names #general

Don and Debby (Gincig) Painter <painter@...>
 

Having both Jewish and non-Jewish family, I am a bit confused by this
thread.

Many of the names I see listed as "Jewish" seem to have their origins
from the Bible. But in the bible names such as Peter, Paul, John, Mary
and even Jesus were names used during that period and were they not all
Jewish at that time? Agreeably, over time, certain names have been
synonymous with one religion or the other like those I've just
mentioned. But having said that, we must also keep in mind that some
religious groups such the Quakers and the Amish often used/use
traditional biblical names. For example, the genealogy of my
sister-in-law's family (she is not Jewish) such names as Elias/Eliaz,
Moses, Benjamin, Abraham, Daniel, and Solomon.

Then there is my Jewish family which includes "national" names from
Germany, France, Paraguay, and Poland such as Johanna, Herman, Olga,
Henri, Emilio, and Rosa. All of which came >from religious families and
never came to the US or Canada.

Keep in mind that are many reasons why a child will be named what they
are named: nationality, depth of religiousness, attitude of the time,
family, or in honor of someone outside the family who may not be Jewish.
Born into the religion, the child will be Jewish no matter what he/she
is named. To quote a famous saying: "What is in a name? A rose by
another name is still a rose."

And please, no heated responses this is just one person's personal
opinion.

Thank you,
Debby Gincig Painter


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Obtaining mental health records of a deceased family member #general

Jeff Hecht <jeff@...>
 

Much to my surprise, I was able to obtain similar records >from the New
York State mental hospital where my great-grandmother died in 1929
(>from dementia, probably Alzheimer's disease). I second the comment
that they can be very useful. -- Jeff Hecht

Maggie Linz wrote:


We were fortunate to learn that my husband's great-aunt had been
hospitalized for manic-depression at a psychiatric clinic in Jena,
Thueringen. I wrote and asked if her records were still available (not
really believing they could still exist)and explained we were trying to
find out the names of her husband and child, so we could learn their
fates. [clipped]

These records include letters >from family members and are a real treasure.
Although we have only had some of the documents translated so far, my
husband has learned more about his grandmother's family than he ever
learned >from his grandmother or father. I would encourage others to make
the effort to obtain such records.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen "Christian Name" #general

Rachel Slansky
 

Add the confusion that "christian name" is the common English-language
term for first-name . . .
I don't think it's used much in the US; I can't remember ever hearing it
rather than "first name".
I hear it quite often, but I do must of my research in the US on
non-Jewish family members.

Rachel Slansky


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: nomenclature "Christian name"; first name #general

Dan Goodman <dsgood@...>
 

I've certainly heard the term "Christian name" for given name, many
times, but it is not used as often now as in the past, at least not where
I would run across it. I am writing now, however, to suggest that the
term "given name" be used here instead of "first name". The meaning is
clearer. In some cultures, most notably Chinese, the family name is
placed, in common usage, before the given name. Although I would hazard
a guess that few, if any, Kaifeng Jews take part in this list, the term
"given name" is nonetheless more exact.

Hungarians also put the family name first, I believe. And I'd be
surprised if there were no-one of Hungarian Jewish ancestry here.


Interesting central Europe website #general

Leslie Popelka
 

I wanted to pass on information about this excellent site:which
documents Jewish life in central and eastern Europe.
http://www.centropa.org/mainpage/main.asp. It was recently discussed
on National Public Radio.
(http://www.npr.org/display_pages/features/feature_942309.html).

Leslie Rodman Popelka
St. Louis, MO

RODMAN, Minsk, Vilna, Boston, Chicago, MORDKOV/MIKELL, Voroshilovka
(Ukraine), Chicago, BINISMAN Krasnoye (Ukraine), Chicago,
VICHNEY/VISHNICK, Kovno


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Interesting central Europe website #general

Leslie Popelka
 

I wanted to pass on information about this excellent site:which
documents Jewish life in central and eastern Europe.
http://www.centropa.org/mainpage/main.asp. It was recently discussed
on National Public Radio.
(http://www.npr.org/display_pages/features/feature_942309.html).

Leslie Rodman Popelka
St. Louis, MO

RODMAN, Minsk, Vilna, Boston, Chicago, MORDKOV/MIKELL, Voroshilovka
(Ukraine), Chicago, BINISMAN Krasnoye (Ukraine), Chicago,
VICHNEY/VISHNICK, Kovno


Mormon posthumous "conversion" of Jews #unitedkingdom

Chaim freedman
 

Despite undertakings by the Mormons that Jews whose families have no Mormon
connections will not be included in the International Genealogical Index, I
was appalled to discover that my wife's late grandfather Rabbi Isaac Jacob
Super (1881 Latvia-1961 Australia) was included. He was a prominent rabbi in
Melbourne,
Australia. After correspondence with the Mormons, they removed his name.

I then decided to do a check of other Australian rabbis and found Rabbi
Joseph Abrahams (1855 England-1938 Australia), Av Beit Din in Melbourne for
several decades,
also appeared, despite the fact that he had no children, and so no
theoretical descendant might have performed a Mormon conversion ceremony
upon him. Coincidentally (or perhaps not) he lived out his retirement in the
home of Rabbi Super.

I have written to the Mormons for clarification, suggesting that random Jews
have been selected for Mormon ceremonies.

I bring this to the attention of Jewish genealogists and suggest they check
their relatives for similar situations.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel
email: chaimjan@zahav.net.il

MODERATOR NOTE: Whilst this posting does not follow the guidelines of subject matter relevant to JCR-UK it has been allowed as a one off. No further emails on this subject will be posted to the discussion group.


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Mormon posthumous "conversion" of Jews #unitedkingdom

Chaim freedman
 

Despite undertakings by the Mormons that Jews whose families have no Mormon
connections will not be included in the International Genealogical Index, I
was appalled to discover that my wife's late grandfather Rabbi Isaac Jacob
Super (1881 Latvia-1961 Australia) was included. He was a prominent rabbi in
Melbourne,
Australia. After correspondence with the Mormons, they removed his name.

I then decided to do a check of other Australian rabbis and found Rabbi
Joseph Abrahams (1855 England-1938 Australia), Av Beit Din in Melbourne for
several decades,
also appeared, despite the fact that he had no children, and so no
theoretical descendant might have performed a Mormon conversion ceremony
upon him. Coincidentally (or perhaps not) he lived out his retirement in the
home of Rabbi Super.

I have written to the Mormons for clarification, suggesting that random Jews
have been selected for Mormon ceremonies.

I bring this to the attention of Jewish genealogists and suggest they check
their relatives for similar situations.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel
email: chaimjan@zahav.net.il

MODERATOR NOTE: Whilst this posting does not follow the guidelines of subject matter relevant to JCR-UK it has been allowed as a one off. No further emails on this subject will be posted to the discussion group.


Re: Surname SCHMAUS / SMAUS #general

Udi Cain
 

Daniel Gee asked:

A friend is seeking information about her surname which is SMAUS.
I believe her family may have hailed >from Germany whewas SCHMAUS.
One branch escaped the ward and settled in London, England.
I have checked the FTJP for this name and have found nothing.
Does this name mean anything to anyone?
Also can anyone sugges what the name may have derived from?
In my new book about Jewish families and communities in Posen province
Prussia, I quote Rabbi Dr. Aaron Heppner, who wrote about a SAMOSZ from
Kampen, and I also quote Rabbi Dr. Louis Lewin who wrote about Rabbi SAMOSZ
from Brody.
Best regards,
Udi Cain, Jerusalem.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Surname SCHMAUS / SMAUS #general

Udi Cain
 

Daniel Gee asked:

A friend is seeking information about her surname which is SMAUS.
I believe her family may have hailed >from Germany whewas SCHMAUS.
One branch escaped the ward and settled in London, England.
I have checked the FTJP for this name and have found nothing.
Does this name mean anything to anyone?
Also can anyone sugges what the name may have derived from?
In my new book about Jewish families and communities in Posen province
Prussia, I quote Rabbi Dr. Aaron Heppner, who wrote about a SAMOSZ from
Kampen, and I also quote Rabbi Dr. Louis Lewin who wrote about Rabbi SAMOSZ
from Brody.
Best regards,
Udi Cain, Jerusalem.