Date   

Phone directory look-up in Montreal: WALDSTEIN/WOODSTONE #general

GiltripM@...
 

I have been told that some of my WALDSTEIN ancestors immigrated to
Montreal, Canada and may have changed their name to WOODSTONE. I have not
been successful trying to locate either of these names in any on-line
directory and was wondering if someone who has access to a Montreal phone
directory could check these names for me.

Thanks.....Please respond privately.

Marjorie SHORT
N.Chelmsford, MA
USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Phone directory look-up in Montreal: WALDSTEIN/WOODSTONE #general

GiltripM@...
 

I have been told that some of my WALDSTEIN ancestors immigrated to
Montreal, Canada and may have changed their name to WOODSTONE. I have not
been successful trying to locate either of these names in any on-line
directory and was wondering if someone who has access to a Montreal phone
directory could check these names for me.

Thanks.....Please respond privately.

Marjorie SHORT
N.Chelmsford, MA
USA


Re: Ostrowiec #poland

Hadassah Lipsius <kesher@...>
 

What perfect timing for this question! I assume that you are referring to
Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski. I am currently working on the PSA order for the
Starachowice Branch Archives. Yes, contrary to some other internet sources
there are registers for Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski in the PSA. Jeff Geizhals
is the Archive Coordinator and the webpage for this project will be going
on-line shortly.

JRI-Poland's Warsaw team has just collected the index pages >from the PSA.
For Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski they provided the following:

Births- 1850-1866, 1868-1889
Marriages - 1826-1829, 1835-1849
Deaths - 1826-1833, 1835-1892

We are looking for volunteers to do the data entry on the Polish language
indices. You can contact me if you are willing and able.

We have not determined yet the qualifying contribution amount but donations
of any size are gratefully accepted, and donations to JRI-Poland are
tax-deductible for US taxpayers.

Donations can be accepted by check, VISA or MasterCard! Please earmark
your
contribution for the "Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski PSA Project.

Mail checks to:

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
c/o Sheila Salo
5607 Greenleaf Rd
Cheverly, MD 20785
USA

Visa and MasterCard contributions may be phoned to Sheila at (301)
341-1261.
Or print out the form at: http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/visa.htm by
clicking on the VISA Card and fax or mail it to Sheila. The fax number is
also (301) 341-1261. (8:00 AM to 8:00 PM Eastern time only, please.) For
selected countries, JRI-Poland is able to accept bank drafts in a donor's
local currency. Please check the JRI-Poland contributions web page for the

list of countries. If your country is not on the list, and you do not wish


to pay by credit card, please contact JRI-Poland Treasurer, Sheila Salo,
for
further help. The web site address is:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/contrib-non-us.htm

Thanks for your help in this important work.

<Hello Marcelo,

My people (BROCHSZTAJN) were >from Ostrowiec. I visited the city in 1999.
There is no Jewish community, of course. There is what is left of the
Jewish
cemetery, composed of broken stones in piles, with some standing in random
order. It appears well cared for. There is an old synagogue then painted
on
its exterior, a bright coat of orange-goldish paint. It was at one time a
cinema after the Jews were taken. There are records in the USC, but these
records of the Jewish community stop in 1942.

I can provide you a photo of the cemetery.

Harry>


JRI Poland #Poland RE: Ostrowiec #poland

Hadassah Lipsius <kesher@...>
 

What perfect timing for this question! I assume that you are referring to
Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski. I am currently working on the PSA order for the
Starachowice Branch Archives. Yes, contrary to some other internet sources
there are registers for Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski in the PSA. Jeff Geizhals
is the Archive Coordinator and the webpage for this project will be going
on-line shortly.

JRI-Poland's Warsaw team has just collected the index pages >from the PSA.
For Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski they provided the following:

Births- 1850-1866, 1868-1889
Marriages - 1826-1829, 1835-1849
Deaths - 1826-1833, 1835-1892

We are looking for volunteers to do the data entry on the Polish language
indices. You can contact me if you are willing and able.

We have not determined yet the qualifying contribution amount but donations
of any size are gratefully accepted, and donations to JRI-Poland are
tax-deductible for US taxpayers.

Donations can be accepted by check, VISA or MasterCard! Please earmark
your
contribution for the "Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski PSA Project.

Mail checks to:

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
c/o Sheila Salo
5607 Greenleaf Rd
Cheverly, MD 20785
USA

Visa and MasterCard contributions may be phoned to Sheila at (301)
341-1261.
Or print out the form at: http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/visa.htm by
clicking on the VISA Card and fax or mail it to Sheila. The fax number is
also (301) 341-1261. (8:00 AM to 8:00 PM Eastern time only, please.) For
selected countries, JRI-Poland is able to accept bank drafts in a donor's
local currency. Please check the JRI-Poland contributions web page for the

list of countries. If your country is not on the list, and you do not wish


to pay by credit card, please contact JRI-Poland Treasurer, Sheila Salo,
for
further help. The web site address is:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/contrib-non-us.htm

Thanks for your help in this important work.

<Hello Marcelo,

My people (BROCHSZTAJN) were >from Ostrowiec. I visited the city in 1999.
There is no Jewish community, of course. There is what is left of the
Jewish
cemetery, composed of broken stones in piles, with some standing in random
order. It appears well cared for. There is an old synagogue then painted
on
its exterior, a bright coat of orange-goldish paint. It was at one time a
cinema after the Jews were taken. There are records in the USC, but these
records of the Jewish community stop in 1942.

I can provide you a photo of the cemetery.

Harry>


Re: Name "IRAM"? #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

Leslie Weinberg wrote:

Can anyone tell me what country the name IRAM might have originated?
Great-grandmother seems to have been named "Schewa Iram" - doesn't sound
very Polish to me, or Jewish, for that matter. Leslie
Nor to me. It's certainly an uncommon name.
But the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland database has a birth record for
Moses Chaim, the son of Schmul IRAM, born in Kolomyya
in 1878, and a marriage for Aron IRAM ? (I suppose the question mark
indicates that the transcriber was uncertain of the spelling) >from Mlawa
in 1881. And the Bukowsk Yiskor book at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sanok/San579.html >
mentions a Menashe IRAM >from Sanok.

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca

Vancouver, BC, Canada

MODERATOR NOTE: You can find the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Name "IRAM"? #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

Leslie Weinberg wrote:

Can anyone tell me what country the name IRAM might have originated?
Great-grandmother seems to have been named "Schewa Iram" - doesn't sound
very Polish to me, or Jewish, for that matter. Leslie
Nor to me. It's certainly an uncommon name.
But the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland database has a birth record for
Moses Chaim, the son of Schmul IRAM, born in Kolomyya
in 1878, and a marriage for Aron IRAM ? (I suppose the question mark
indicates that the transcriber was uncertain of the spelling) >from Mlawa
in 1881. And the Bukowsk Yiskor book at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sanok/San579.html >
mentions a Menashe IRAM >from Sanok.

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca

Vancouver, BC, Canada

MODERATOR NOTE: You can find the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/


Success story: Paris/France/FRESCO/ROYERE #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

At last, my Paris/France/FRESCO/ROYERE search has ended--and happily.
After several years of searching, and several years of receiving help >from
many people, I found my cousin, and received a letter >from her today. I
am happy to retire this search and move on to other exciting searchers!

Dan

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Springfield, Ohio USA

Turkey: KAZEZ-KAZES, ALHADEF-ELHADEF, FRESKO-FRESCO, HABIB, DEVIDAS-DE VIDAS
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/dk/elh-kaz-fre.html

MODERATOR NOTE:
Sharing success is one of the best ways of helping
others to keep on researching since it demonstrates
that with persistence and a little bit of luck it is
possible to make those wonderful connections and in
many cases connect with family long separated, or
even previously unknown.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Success story: Paris/France/FRESCO/ROYERE #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

At last, my Paris/France/FRESCO/ROYERE search has ended--and happily.
After several years of searching, and several years of receiving help >from
many people, I found my cousin, and received a letter >from her today. I
am happy to retire this search and move on to other exciting searchers!

Dan

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Springfield, Ohio USA

Turkey: KAZEZ-KAZES, ALHADEF-ELHADEF, FRESKO-FRESCO, HABIB, DEVIDAS-DE VIDAS
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/dk/elh-kaz-fre.html

MODERATOR NOTE:
Sharing success is one of the best ways of helping
others to keep on researching since it demonstrates
that with persistence and a little bit of luck it is
possible to make those wonderful connections and in
many cases connect with family long separated, or
even previously unknown.


Re: Name "IRAM"? #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

Schewa is short for Bat Sheva, the name of King Solomon's mother.
Ida

Can anyone tell me what country the name IRAM might have originated?
Great-grandmother seems to have been named "Schewa Iram" - doesn't sound
very Polish to me, or Jewish, for that matter. Leslie


Re: Pisha Paysha Hand Game Remembered #galicia

steve e <stevee21nospam@...>
 

That is strange - I remember Pisha Paysha as a card game that my
grandmother used to play with me - don't ask me how it was played - that
time is longer ago than I really want to admit. The game you are
referring to was called Cat's Cradle when I was growing up in New York -
and I never played because I never felt comfortable with it.

Steve
Houston

<snip>
the game my grandmother taught us called (phonetically), "pisha
paysha", in which a string is tied, creating a circle. The
circle is tautly placed outside both upright hands which
face each other. <snip>
How does this relate to genealogy? I suspect this game
was known by different names which may identify the
geographic region in which it was played. "Pisha paysha"
was probably played in eastern Galicia, since my
grandmother came >from Drohobycz. If she learned it in her
childhood, then the game was played in the 1890s.


Pisha Paysha #general

Paula Eisenstein Baker
 

I know the string game Carole is describing, but it wasn't called "Pisha
paysha" in my family!

"Pisha paysha" was a two-person card game, whose rules, alas, I don't
remember, but my father played it and had learned it >from his mother
(born in Kovno ca. 1880).

Paula Eisenstein Baker
Houston, TX

<snip>

I suspect this game was known by different names which may identify the
geographic region in which it was played. "Pisha paysha"
was probably played in eastern Galicia, since my
grandmother came >from Drohobycz. If she learned it in her
childhood, then the game was played in the 1890s.
Do any other Genners recall this game? By what name did
you know it? >from what geographic region did those who
played it come?


Re: Pisha Paysha Hand Game Remembered #galicia

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybruc@...>
 

It is Cat's Cradle, Yiddish style. I never knew it as
a 'Jewish' game, but it is a common enough game in the
US and, I think, most of the world.

I've seen it played in Africa on National Geographic.

Sally Bruckheimer
Harrison, NY


Re: Pisha Paysha Hand Game Remembered #galicia

Shaul and Aviva Ceder <ceder@...>
 

In "The Joys of Yiddish", Leo Rosten described how he had puzzled over the
origin of the name of "Pisha Paysha", until he had opened up a book on card
games published in England, and at random came to the page describing a
game called "Pitch and Patience" (sometimes called "Peace and Patience").
It doesn't seem to bear much relationship to the hand game described by
Carole (though it does tally with Rosten's description), but it seems to
limit the likelihood that it was actually known in Eastern Europe.

Shaul Ceder
Jerusalem, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Name "IRAM"? #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

Schewa is short for Bat Sheva, the name of King Solomon's mother.
Ida

Can anyone tell me what country the name IRAM might have originated?
Great-grandmother seems to have been named "Schewa Iram" - doesn't sound
very Polish to me, or Jewish, for that matter. Leslie


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: Pisha Paysha Hand Game Remembered #general

steve e <stevee21nospam@...>
 

That is strange - I remember Pisha Paysha as a card game that my
grandmother used to play with me - don't ask me how it was played - that
time is longer ago than I really want to admit. The game you are
referring to was called Cat's Cradle when I was growing up in New York -
and I never played because I never felt comfortable with it.

Steve
Houston

<snip>
the game my grandmother taught us called (phonetically), "pisha
paysha", in which a string is tied, creating a circle. The
circle is tautly placed outside both upright hands which
face each other. <snip>
How does this relate to genealogy? I suspect this game
was known by different names which may identify the
geographic region in which it was played. "Pisha paysha"
was probably played in eastern Galicia, since my
grandmother came >from Drohobycz. If she learned it in her
childhood, then the game was played in the 1890s.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pisha Paysha #general

Paula Eisenstein Baker
 

I know the string game Carole is describing, but it wasn't called "Pisha
paysha" in my family!

"Pisha paysha" was a two-person card game, whose rules, alas, I don't
remember, but my father played it and had learned it >from his mother
(born in Kovno ca. 1880).

Paula Eisenstein Baker
Houston, TX

<snip>

I suspect this game was known by different names which may identify the
geographic region in which it was played. "Pisha paysha"
was probably played in eastern Galicia, since my
grandmother came >from Drohobycz. If she learned it in her
childhood, then the game was played in the 1890s.
Do any other Genners recall this game? By what name did
you know it? >from what geographic region did those who
played it come?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Pisha Paysha Hand Game Remembered #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybruc@...>
 

It is Cat's Cradle, Yiddish style. I never knew it as
a 'Jewish' game, but it is a common enough game in the
US and, I think, most of the world.

I've seen it played in Africa on National Geographic.

Sally Bruckheimer
Harrison, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Pisha Paysha Hand Game Remembered #general

Shaul and Aviva Ceder <ceder@...>
 

In "The Joys of Yiddish", Leo Rosten described how he had puzzled over the
origin of the name of "Pisha Paysha", until he had opened up a book on card
games published in England, and at random came to the page describing a
game called "Pitch and Patience" (sometimes called "Peace and Patience").
It doesn't seem to bear much relationship to the hand game described by
Carole (though it does tally with Rosten's description), but it seems to
limit the likelihood that it was actually known in Eastern Europe.

Shaul Ceder
Jerusalem, Israel


Re: Pisha Paysha Hand Game Remembered #galicia

Dick@...
 

Carole Glick recalled a string game perhaps >from eastern Galicia, called
"Pisha Paysha".

In my Litvak (Suwalk Gubeniya) family, the name "Pisha Paysha" referred to
a card game in which the object was to give away all your cards by forming
ascending or descending sequences. I was always told that the name of the
game was not Yiddish at all, but was a corruption of "Peace and Patience",
certainly a requirement for this nearly interminable game.

If the name really does derive >from English, and is used in two families
from widely divergent geographic origins to refer to two very different
games, its significance for genealogical purposes is likely to be minimal
to nonexistent.

Too bad!

Dick Plotz
Providence RI USA


Re: Names Keep Changing - GRAN, IRAM, APRIL #general

Bev Potter <basha@...>
 

Leslie and Genners -

While the grouping of these three names appears to be confusing, It's
important in situations like this, if at all possible, to take your
information >from the original documents.

That is, look at the handwriting.

The letter "G" written in script by someone of Russian or German culture
of that time, tended to appear as the letters "Oj" or "Aj". (Remember, I'm
talking script here.)

Those two characters followed by "r" - might lead someone to read "Apr".
So APRIL does not strike me as such a bizarre jump >from GRAN, although I'm
inclined to think that it is a mis-read of the true name.

As for the IRAM, I'm not sure whether that was obtained >from the original
Tyczyn birth record or whether it was an interpretation by some kind
volunteer who indexed the birth record. But, again I believe it to be a
closer "relative" to GRAN than APRIL.

I'd be interested in seeing the script writing of all three of these
names, if possible.

Bev Potter
Boulder, Co.

Researching: GORODNITZKY, PADEROSKY, PADERESKY, BEDERSKY,SPEVACK,
NALEBOFF, NOLOBOFF, NALEBOTSKY, DEITCHMAN, SCHULMAN, AIDELMAN

From: "Leslie Weinberg" <lbw@nyc.rr.com>

Imagine my surprise when I discovered that my maternal great-
grandmother's maiden name was listed as "GRAN" on my grandparents'
marriage certificate, when the whole family had always been told it
was "APRIL". Now I find that the name is listed as "IRAM" on the Tyczyn
birth records. I have, at least, found my grandfather's birth and three
of his siblings, and at long last the first name, at least, of the
sister who stayed behind and whose son got to Israel in the late 30s.
However, I'm stymied at this point and do not know how to proceed with
research on the last name! I have been trying to locate this nephew,
who might still be alive, but I don't know whether to list his
grandmother's maiden name as APRIL, GRAN, or IRAM.
Does anyone have any idea on how I might unravel this mess? Leslie