Date   

Re: Jewish Officers in WW I German military #germany

NG <shil_haif@...>
 

I would like to hear some comments or suggestions about the eligibility of
Jews to be officers in the German military. Both my grandfathers received
Iron Crosses Second Class as many Jewish soldiers did, but they were not
officers. I have no experience researching Jewish officers and would like
some information on the subject. Thank you.

Carol Davidson Baird Solana Beach, CA sbaird@weber.ucsd.edu


I wanted to comment on this posting. My father told me t that he too was in
the cavalry during WW1 and towards the end of the war after there was a
rebellion (?) in the army he was appointed an officer. I also know he got a
medal, I sitll have it. But I have no records except photos of his time in
the army and therefore have no idea if he was a substitue officer or
a "real one". I would be ver interested to hear more about this if anyone
has more info.

Nurit Gillath Haifa, Israel shil_haif@int.gov.il


German SIG #Germany Re: Jewish Officers in WW I German military #germany

NG <shil_haif@...>
 

I would like to hear some comments or suggestions about the eligibility of
Jews to be officers in the German military. Both my grandfathers received
Iron Crosses Second Class as many Jewish soldiers did, but they were not
officers. I have no experience researching Jewish officers and would like
some information on the subject. Thank you.

Carol Davidson Baird Solana Beach, CA sbaird@weber.ucsd.edu


I wanted to comment on this posting. My father told me t that he too was in
the cavalry during WW1 and towards the end of the war after there was a
rebellion (?) in the army he was appointed an officer. I also know he got a
medal, I sitll have it. But I have no records except photos of his time in
the army and therefore have no idea if he was a substitue officer or
a "real one". I would be ver interested to hear more about this if anyone
has more info.

Nurit Gillath Haifa, Israel shil_haif@int.gov.il


Jewish officers in the German army during the First World War #germany

Yekkey@...
 

I am fairly sure there were at least some Jewish officers in the German army
during the First World War, because one is said to have passed up Hitler for a
promotion saying he had no leadership potential.

Dan Nussbaum


German SIG #Germany Jewish officers in the German army during the First World War #germany

Yekkey@...
 

I am fairly sure there were at least some Jewish officers in the German army
during the First World War, because one is said to have passed up Hitler for a
promotion saying he had no leadership potential.

Dan Nussbaum


Re: German Jews in the military. #germany

Willie Glaser
 

The web site "Memorials and plaques of Bavarian -Jewish soldiers" should
provide answers.

http://www.historiker.de/projekte/hdbg/kriegsgraeber/english

Willie Glaser, St.Laurent Quebec, Canada


German SIG #Germany Re: German Jews in the military. #germany

Willie Glaser
 

The web site "Memorials and plaques of Bavarian -Jewish soldiers" should
provide answers.

http://www.historiker.de/projekte/hdbg/kriegsgraeber/english

Willie Glaser, St.Laurent Quebec, Canada


Re: German Jews in the Military - WW 1 #germany

Gunther Steinberg <beagun27@...>
 

There seems to have been a great variation, perhaps even by military
districts, on the potential for Jews to become officers in the German army
in WW I. My uncle, a lawyer, did eventually become one, but that was
because he had been baptized/converted, expressly for the purpose of
minimizing discrimination when he had to start serving his normal service
in 1912.

My father-in-law, also a lawyer, became a high ranking non-commissioned
officer in WW I, but was not considered for the officer corps.

Anti-semitism was pronounced in the German Army Officer Corps >from time
immemorial.

Most Jews, including my father, who were in the German WW I army did their
bit and took it for granted that even with higher education, a commission
was usually out of the question; unless you had very good connections!

Gunther Steinberg Portola Valley CA mail to:beagun27@covad.net


German SIG #Germany RE: German Jews in the Military - WW 1 #germany

Gunther Steinberg <beagun27@...>
 

There seems to have been a great variation, perhaps even by military
districts, on the potential for Jews to become officers in the German army
in WW I. My uncle, a lawyer, did eventually become one, but that was
because he had been baptized/converted, expressly for the purpose of
minimizing discrimination when he had to start serving his normal service
in 1912.

My father-in-law, also a lawyer, became a high ranking non-commissioned
officer in WW I, but was not considered for the officer corps.

Anti-semitism was pronounced in the German Army Officer Corps >from time
immemorial.

Most Jews, including my father, who were in the German WW I army did their
bit and took it for granted that even with higher education, a commission
was usually out of the question; unless you had very good connections!

Gunther Steinberg Portola Valley CA mail to:beagun27@covad.net


Re: Abbreviation "D. Oest" #germany

Oliver Bryk <oliverbryk@...>
 

Robert Rosenbaum wrote:
"On a couple Viennese residence declarations (Meldezettel) >from the year
1919, the space for place of birth (Geburtsort und -land) says "Wien D.
=D6st." What does this 'D' stand for?
On other declarations I find "N. =D6st," which is easy enough to
identify as Nieder=F6sterreich, but this 'D' has me stumped."
REPLY:
Without having seen this particular script myself, I suspect that what
you are reading is actually "O. Oest." which stands for Ober-Oesterreich
(Upper Austria).

Oliver Bryk, Cloverdale, California


German SIG #Germany Re: Abbreviation "D. Oest" #germany

Oliver Bryk <oliverbryk@...>
 

Robert Rosenbaum wrote:
"On a couple Viennese residence declarations (Meldezettel) >from the year
1919, the space for place of birth (Geburtsort und -land) says "Wien D.
=D6st." What does this 'D' stand for?
On other declarations I find "N. =D6st," which is easy enough to
identify as Nieder=F6sterreich, but this 'D' has me stumped."
REPLY:
Without having seen this particular script myself, I suspect that what
you are reading is actually "O. Oest." which stands for Ober-Oesterreich
(Upper Austria).

Oliver Bryk, Cloverdale, California


Re: Abbreviation "D. Oest." #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Robert Rosenbaum schrieb:
On a couple Viennese residence declarations (Meldezettel) >from the year
1919, the space for place of birth (Geburtsort und -land) says "Wien D.
Öst." What does this 'D' stand for?
Dear Robert,
"D. Oest." stands for "Deutsch-Oesterreich" which was the official name
for the state that was left >from the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy after all
the rest of the non-German-Speaking parts had seceded and the Allies of
the First World War did not allow it to join Germany: German-Austria.

You can also see this name on postage stamps of the time. It was valid
from 1919 up to 1938.
Even in the Dachau files of 1938 the prisoners >from Austrian territory
after the Anschluss were described as "DOe", i.e. Deutsch-Oesterreich,
at least until the Nazis renamed the former Austrian territory "Ostmark".

After 1945 the Austrians tried to distance themselves >from anything
German, they dropped the "Deutsch-" and became the "Republik
Oesterreich" ("Republic of Austria"). This distancing >from German in
1945 went so far that the subject "German" in school was not allowed to
be called German (Deutsch) in the state schools - it was named
"Unterrichtssprache" ("Language of Instruction"). After a while this
idea disappeared ... With kind regards

Fritz Neubauer (who attended school during the "Unterrichtssprache"-time
in Austria), in North-German exile


German SIG #Germany Re: Abbreviation "D. Oest." #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Robert Rosenbaum schrieb:
On a couple Viennese residence declarations (Meldezettel) >from the year
1919, the space for place of birth (Geburtsort und -land) says "Wien D.
Öst." What does this 'D' stand for?
Dear Robert,
"D. Oest." stands for "Deutsch-Oesterreich" which was the official name
for the state that was left >from the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy after all
the rest of the non-German-Speaking parts had seceded and the Allies of
the First World War did not allow it to join Germany: German-Austria.

You can also see this name on postage stamps of the time. It was valid
from 1919 up to 1938.
Even in the Dachau files of 1938 the prisoners >from Austrian territory
after the Anschluss were described as "DOe", i.e. Deutsch-Oesterreich,
at least until the Nazis renamed the former Austrian territory "Ostmark".

After 1945 the Austrians tried to distance themselves >from anything
German, they dropped the "Deutsch-" and became the "Republik
Oesterreich" ("Republic of Austria"). This distancing >from German in
1945 went so far that the subject "German" in school was not allowed to
be called German (Deutsch) in the state schools - it was named
"Unterrichtssprache" ("Language of Instruction"). After a while this
idea disappeared ... With kind regards

Fritz Neubauer (who attended school during the "Unterrichtssprache"-time
in Austria), in North-German exile


look up requests and general advice #general

Annemarie Jutel <jutel@...>
 

Should anyone be following up Melanie Greenberg's suggestion to look for
naturalization papers in Chicago, could they take a look and see if
David Drozdowitz, immigrated in 1871 or in 1979 (depending on which
census you look at), is in the index? He may be accompanied by mother
and father Philip and Rosa (immigrated 1870 according to the 1900
census).

Also, I wonder if anyone can help me with David's cousin, Samuel
DROZDOWITZ. I am having troubles with the legibility of on-line census
records and cannot read his immigration date. He can be found in the
1910 census in Indianapolis (Marion County, Center Township,
Supervisor's district 7, enumeration district #142, Ward 8, Sheet #2A).
Will anyone have access to a hard copy, or a higher resolution digital
version?

And finally, may I ask how I will, once I have exact dates, use that
information to locate these folks on passenger lists? I have read the
page on the Jewgen website, but feel at a loss, given that I will never
have an exact date, only a year. How then does one operate? Do you
scan all the passenger lists in that year? Are there indexes by year
and by name?

Many thanks for your help.

Annemarie Jutel
Dunedin, NZ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen look up requests and general advice #general

Annemarie Jutel <jutel@...>
 

Should anyone be following up Melanie Greenberg's suggestion to look for
naturalization papers in Chicago, could they take a look and see if
David Drozdowitz, immigrated in 1871 or in 1979 (depending on which
census you look at), is in the index? He may be accompanied by mother
and father Philip and Rosa (immigrated 1870 according to the 1900
census).

Also, I wonder if anyone can help me with David's cousin, Samuel
DROZDOWITZ. I am having troubles with the legibility of on-line census
records and cannot read his immigration date. He can be found in the
1910 census in Indianapolis (Marion County, Center Township,
Supervisor's district 7, enumeration district #142, Ward 8, Sheet #2A).
Will anyone have access to a hard copy, or a higher resolution digital
version?

And finally, may I ask how I will, once I have exact dates, use that
information to locate these folks on passenger lists? I have read the
page on the Jewgen website, but feel at a loss, given that I will never
have an exact date, only a year. How then does one operate? Do you
scan all the passenger lists in that year? Are there indexes by year
and by name?

Many thanks for your help.

Annemarie Jutel
Dunedin, NZ


Re: SCHLESINGER Genealogy/DNA #general

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

John Hruszovsky wrote:

We are still trying to locate information on the surname Schlesinger which
goes back to Czechoslovakia in the late 1800's. One of our proven
relation was living on a "Schlesinger Majer" near Nove' Mesto,nad Va'hom,
Czechoslovakia (near Piestany) and conceived my Grandfather. We have no
name nor proof of a father to him, but it was rumoured that it was the
owner of the farm, a Mr.Schlesinger.
I have yet to come across any Schlesinger researchers anywhere that have
this lineage as well, so I'm reaching for straws now :(
[much deleted]

I was thinking of some sort of DNA testing to either prove or disprove
that we came >from the Schlesinger lineage - at least then we'd know what
to pursue. I know there are many DNA testings going on throughout the
world to prove lineages -- does anyone know if there is such testing
going on with any Schlesingers? We have been at a brick wall on this for
a couple years and feel like it's now our only hope to see if this is the
lineage we need to pursue or not.
Dear John:

If only it were *any* other name! SCHLESINGER was the single most
common name among Jews in Silesia (just north of the border). This is
not surprising, as the name means "Silesian." In 1812, there were over
80 SCHLESINGER households in Silesia. I don't have figures for Bohemia
or Moravia, but the name was common elsewhere too.

Without at least a given name for your SCHLESINGER, you'd be better off
searching haystacks for needles. Are there any land-ownership records
available?

Best of luck,
Roger LUSTIG
Princeton, NJ
Researching Gliwice & other towns in Upper Silesia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: SCHLESINGER Genealogy/DNA #general

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

John Hruszovsky wrote:

We are still trying to locate information on the surname Schlesinger which
goes back to Czechoslovakia in the late 1800's. One of our proven
relation was living on a "Schlesinger Majer" near Nove' Mesto,nad Va'hom,
Czechoslovakia (near Piestany) and conceived my Grandfather. We have no
name nor proof of a father to him, but it was rumoured that it was the
owner of the farm, a Mr.Schlesinger.
I have yet to come across any Schlesinger researchers anywhere that have
this lineage as well, so I'm reaching for straws now :(
[much deleted]

I was thinking of some sort of DNA testing to either prove or disprove
that we came >from the Schlesinger lineage - at least then we'd know what
to pursue. I know there are many DNA testings going on throughout the
world to prove lineages -- does anyone know if there is such testing
going on with any Schlesingers? We have been at a brick wall on this for
a couple years and feel like it's now our only hope to see if this is the
lineage we need to pursue or not.
Dear John:

If only it were *any* other name! SCHLESINGER was the single most
common name among Jews in Silesia (just north of the border). This is
not surprising, as the name means "Silesian." In 1812, there were over
80 SCHLESINGER households in Silesia. I don't have figures for Bohemia
or Moravia, but the name was common elsewhere too.

Without at least a given name for your SCHLESINGER, you'd be better off
searching haystacks for needles. Are there any land-ownership records
available?

Best of luck,
Roger LUSTIG
Princeton, NJ
Researching Gliwice & other towns in Upper Silesia


Re: Route Kishinev to Chicago 1884-7 #general

rokoco1@...
 

Dear Genners,

I believe I have written to everyone personally, but just in case I missed
someone:
A great big thank you to all of you who helped me. I really appreciate you
taking your personal time to respond to me.

Several of you suggested Baltimore, MD, some suggested Galveston, TX and
many of you suggested Canada. I also received sugestions to get dec of
intent, but I believe my KOVISHANSKY died before this could be applied
for. I am also faced with the problem that they came so early (1884-70.)

Jewishgen members are a great group of people.

All the best,

Bobbi Cohen
San Diego, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Route Kishinev to Chicago 1884-7 #general

rokoco1@...
 

Dear Genners,

I believe I have written to everyone personally, but just in case I missed
someone:
A great big thank you to all of you who helped me. I really appreciate you
taking your personal time to respond to me.

Several of you suggested Baltimore, MD, some suggested Galveston, TX and
many of you suggested Canada. I also received sugestions to get dec of
intent, but I believe my KOVISHANSKY died before this could be applied
for. I am also faced with the problem that they came so early (1884-70.)

Jewishgen members are a great group of people.

All the best,

Bobbi Cohen
San Diego, CA


Re: Latvian topics at IAJGS conference #latvia

martha <martha@...>
 


Could transcriptions of the presentations be made available to those
unable to attend the conference? Could they be posted on the Latvia
SIG homepage, for example? I, fyi, am particularly interested in
Martha Lev-Zion's remarks.

--Matt Singer
Philadelphia
Thanks, Matt. I am sorry that you cannot join us! There are tapes
available of all presentations at the conference. Judging >from last
year's quality, the tapes have very good speech quality. More than
likely, my talk will be published in our Newsletter, which is
available for formal members of the SIG [i.e. registered,paid, voting
members].

Warm regards, Martha
--
Martha Levinson Lev-Zion, Ph.D.
President, SIG Latvia


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Latvian topics at IAJGS conference #latvia

martha <martha@...>
 


Could transcriptions of the presentations be made available to those
unable to attend the conference? Could they be posted on the Latvia
SIG homepage, for example? I, fyi, am particularly interested in
Martha Lev-Zion's remarks.

--Matt Singer
Philadelphia
Thanks, Matt. I am sorry that you cannot join us! There are tapes
available of all presentations at the conference. Judging >from last
year's quality, the tapes have very good speech quality. More than
likely, my talk will be published in our Newsletter, which is
available for formal members of the SIG [i.e. registered,paid, voting
members].

Warm regards, Martha
--
Martha Levinson Lev-Zion, Ph.D.
President, SIG Latvia