Date   

Re : Concentration camp #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

Robert Spunberg asked : It is my understanding that there was only
one concentration camp liberated by the king of Sweden. Does anyone
know which one that was?

Maybe you want to tell about the best known concentration camp in
France : Drancy. It was liberated by Raoul NORDLING, who was the
Swedish Consul in Paris.
--
Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


Looking for help in Santiago, Chile #general

Meyer Denn <meyersdenn@...>
 

Dear Fellow-Jgenners,

I am searching for relatives in Santiago, Chile. Is there anybody out there
in Jewishgen land in Chile who could help me locate these relatives in
Santiago?

Please contact me privately.

Thank you.

Meyer Denn
Los Angeles, CA
meyersdenn@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re : Concentration camp #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

Robert Spunberg asked : It is my understanding that there was only
one concentration camp liberated by the king of Sweden. Does anyone
know which one that was?

Maybe you want to tell about the best known concentration camp in
France : Drancy. It was liberated by Raoul NORDLING, who was the
Swedish Consul in Paris.
--
Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for help in Santiago, Chile #general

Meyer Denn <meyersdenn@...>
 

Dear Fellow-Jgenners,

I am searching for relatives in Santiago, Chile. Is there anybody out there
in Jewishgen land in Chile who could help me locate these relatives in
Santiago?

Please contact me privately.

Thank you.

Meyer Denn
Los Angeles, CA
meyersdenn@...


Re: Historic weather in New Orleans #general

L. <sscarlett30@...>
 

Try the link below, maybe if you contact them they can help you.
Or at least put you in the right direction.
http://www.srh.noaa.gov/lix/html/history.htm

Lara Clark
Houston, Texas

LRROBBINS@... wrote:

Good morning. Is there a way to learn about the weather conditions when
our family first came to the US at New Orleans, 4 November 1851? Did the
newspapers cover this on a routine basis? Is there an on-line source? I
know this is not a major question but I am wondering. Thanks for the help.

Leonard

Leonard Robbins
Cleveland, TX


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Historic weather in New Orleans #general

L. <sscarlett30@...>
 

Try the link below, maybe if you contact them they can help you.
Or at least put you in the right direction.
http://www.srh.noaa.gov/lix/html/history.htm

Lara Clark
Houston, Texas

LRROBBINS@... wrote:

Good morning. Is there a way to learn about the weather conditions when
our family first came to the US at New Orleans, 4 November 1851? Did the
newspapers cover this on a routine basis? Is there an on-line source? I
know this is not a major question but I am wondering. Thanks for the help.

Leonard

Leonard Robbins
Cleveland, TX


SLOBODKIN #general

Gayle Schlissel Riley <Key2pst@...>
 

Oleg,( >from Minsk) told me at the DC conf. that someone had approached
him regarding the SLOBODKIN name and he told them to contact me but no
one has come forward..SO who ever you are I am waiting..Response
privately..Gayle riley >from San Gabriel, Ca


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SLOBODKIN #general

Gayle Schlissel Riley <Key2pst@...>
 

Oleg,( >from Minsk) told me at the DC conf. that someone had approached
him regarding the SLOBODKIN name and he told them to contact me but no
one has come forward..SO who ever you are I am waiting..Response
privately..Gayle riley >from San Gabriel, Ca


Re: The SEGAL name and Levites #general

Udi Cain
 

Nick Landau news@... wrote:

You might wish to look at this explanation >from the Segal Organisation
(sic) which I found on the web.

http://www.segal.org/name/index.html

=In that web page I found another explanation which relates to the Hebrew
word "segol" (the color violet/purpel):
"It may have been a reference to the Levite color. This
explanation may be consistent with the other explanations, having been
intended as something of a pun in addition to the acronyms."

If I can recall, the ancient Hebrew word for violet was: "argaman".
The color was made out of winkles.
So it should have been: ARGAL / ARGAMAL (Argaman Levi) rather than SEGAL
:-))

Now to try and be more serious:
Just like the guilds which started to appear during the Medieval, the
Jewish "guilds" were of tailors [the importance of the Jewish tailors was
Because of the prohibition of sha'atnez (mixing incompatible threads -
wool and linen), special strictness had to be observed].
The "guild" of the Levis, was actually a virtual guild, people who kept the
tradition of being Levis, and got ready to serve in the new coming temple,
right after the entry of the Messiah.
The Messiah was on his way, and almost appeared in gaps of about hundred
years, but it turned to be fake, or better, none.
The crusaders made a lot of harm to the Jewish communities of Europe, but
from the other hand the desire and belief that the Messiah is coming soon,
increased...
So the Levies started getting ready and called their "guild" SEGAL.

If you decide to pore electronic "cold water" on me, but please make sure
that it will not include ice :-))

Best regards,
Udi Cain, Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The SEGAL name and Levites #general

Udi Cain
 

Nick Landau news@... wrote:

You might wish to look at this explanation >from the Segal Organisation
(sic) which I found on the web.

http://www.segal.org/name/index.html

=In that web page I found another explanation which relates to the Hebrew
word "segol" (the color violet/purpel):
"It may have been a reference to the Levite color. This
explanation may be consistent with the other explanations, having been
intended as something of a pun in addition to the acronyms."

If I can recall, the ancient Hebrew word for violet was: "argaman".
The color was made out of winkles.
So it should have been: ARGAL / ARGAMAL (Argaman Levi) rather than SEGAL
:-))

Now to try and be more serious:
Just like the guilds which started to appear during the Medieval, the
Jewish "guilds" were of tailors [the importance of the Jewish tailors was
Because of the prohibition of sha'atnez (mixing incompatible threads -
wool and linen), special strictness had to be observed].
The "guild" of the Levis, was actually a virtual guild, people who kept the
tradition of being Levis, and got ready to serve in the new coming temple,
right after the entry of the Messiah.
The Messiah was on his way, and almost appeared in gaps of about hundred
years, but it turned to be fake, or better, none.
The crusaders made a lot of harm to the Jewish communities of Europe, but
from the other hand the desire and belief that the Messiah is coming soon,
increased...
So the Levies started getting ready and called their "guild" SEGAL.

If you decide to pore electronic "cold water" on me, but please make sure
that it will not include ice :-))

Best regards,
Udi Cain, Jerusalem


Re: Wilno Ancestry #general

Avrohom Krauss <krauss@...>
 

Molly <mzeman@...> wrote:

< I have some names and places and would appreciate any
advice I'd like to know if the names might be Jewish. Names are as
follows: Stanley SIENKIEWICZ; Josie LIWRECOMA(corva?); Joseph
Sienkiewicz; Vincent SYSKA; Sofia of Sophie Syska; Katharine KIOZIOT;
ZEMAN ( >from Szymanski, Szymansky?) Certificates all say location is
Russia/Poland together, obituary says Wilno, Poland. Thank you, Molly
Zeman >

The name "ZEMAN" may be Jewish, as I know a Jewish family by that name. In
Yiddish "tsin" means "tin". TSINMAN (or TSIMAN which could be written
Zeman) would mean "tin man" or someone who works with metal (not as in
the Wizard of Oz <BG>). See Beider's Dictionary of Jewish Surnames >from
The Russian Empire, p 588. However, it may have nothing to do with this
and may not be a Jewish name in the case in question. Rather, it may be a
geographic name related to the forementioned place Szymanski.
SZYMAN=Zeman. If so, it may or may not be a Jewish name.I think it's
worth exploring a possible Jewish origin, but extrapolating Jewishness
>from this alone without any other evidence would not be convincing.

Avrohom Krauss
Telz-Stone Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Wilno Ancestry #general

Avrohom Krauss <krauss@...>
 

Molly <mzeman@...> wrote:

< I have some names and places and would appreciate any
advice I'd like to know if the names might be Jewish. Names are as
follows: Stanley SIENKIEWICZ; Josie LIWRECOMA(corva?); Joseph
Sienkiewicz; Vincent SYSKA; Sofia of Sophie Syska; Katharine KIOZIOT;
ZEMAN ( >from Szymanski, Szymansky?) Certificates all say location is
Russia/Poland together, obituary says Wilno, Poland. Thank you, Molly
Zeman >

The name "ZEMAN" may be Jewish, as I know a Jewish family by that name. In
Yiddish "tsin" means "tin". TSINMAN (or TSIMAN which could be written
Zeman) would mean "tin man" or someone who works with metal (not as in
the Wizard of Oz <BG>). See Beider's Dictionary of Jewish Surnames >from
The Russian Empire, p 588. However, it may have nothing to do with this
and may not be a Jewish name in the case in question. Rather, it may be a
geographic name related to the forementioned place Szymanski.
SZYMAN=Zeman. If so, it may or may not be a Jewish name.I think it's
worth exploring a possible Jewish origin, but extrapolating Jewishness
>from this alone without any other evidence would not be convincing.

Avrohom Krauss
Telz-Stone Israel


Re: Given names Izidor and Israel #hungary

kingfisher <dominique.greenbaum.NO_SPAM@...>
 

Hello Mary
I'm french and one of my great grand-father came >from Latvia .
His name was Israel but he was also called Isidore.
Dominique GREENBAUM
France

I suppose I just want confirmation of the fact that an ancestor with the
Hebrew name of Israel could be the same person as one with the given
name of Izidor. >from what I've gleaned >from the internet it seems that
Izidor is actually a Greek name. So is it likely/probable a Jewish male
named Israel >from Slovakia born in 1875 would have used Izidor as his
secular name?

Mary Blumenstein
Melbourne, Australia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Given names Izidor and Israel #general

kingfisher <dominique.greenbaum.NO_SPAM@...>
 

Hello Mary
I'm french and one of my great grand-father came >from Latvia .
His name was Israel but he was also called Isidore.
Dominique GREENBAUM
France

I suppose I just want confirmation of the fact that an ancestor with the
Hebrew name of Israel could be the same person as one with the given
name of Izidor. >from what I've gleaned >from the internet it seems that
Izidor is actually a Greek name. So is it likely/probable a Jewish male
named Israel >from Slovakia born in 1875 would have used Izidor as his
secular name?

Mary Blumenstein
Melbourne, Australia


I need help from a Litvak expert please! #general

Rica Goldberg
 

Dear All

My husband's grandfather Isaac GOLDBERG came to Manchester, England >from
Lithuania a year or two before 1900. He was followed by his brother
Philip. Descendants of Isaac's sister who went to CapeTown said the
family was >from Abolnik which today is called Vabalninkas.

However, my husband said that his late father (the second eldest of his
family) said the family name was not really GOLDBERG but SHLUZITEL (sound
only) but the present day descendants of Philip say that as far as they
knew it was Schlesinger or Shelenger or similar.

I have recently found present-day descendants of family called SHLUZITEL
from Birzai which I am told is near to Vabalninkas and I am waiting for
more details.

My question is:- can someone who is knowledgeable throw some light on the
surname SHLUZITEL and its origins. To me is sounds Yiddish. Does any
know what it means? And what further advice would they give?

Rica B Goldberg
Manchester, England

Still researching:-

KAMINSKY (KAMENSHCHIK) >from Yanova (Jonava)and Zeimiai nr Kovno, Lithuania
2) Norron Eliazar, Harris, Joseph & Sarah DIAMOND >from Kovno Gubernia,
Lithuania 3)  Newman, Emmanuel, Rachel & Esther LEVY and their parents
Chana & Yehuda LEWIN >from KROSNIEWICE in Poland  4)  Isaac & Rebecca
COHEN  >from Poland 5) Chaim & Rebecca ESTRY (nee GROSSMAN)  a glazier >from
Poland 6)  GOLDBERG (possibly SCHELSINGER OR SCHELINGER or SCHLUZITEL)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen I need help from a Litvak expert please! #general

Rica Goldberg
 

Dear All

My husband's grandfather Isaac GOLDBERG came to Manchester, England >from
Lithuania a year or two before 1900. He was followed by his brother
Philip. Descendants of Isaac's sister who went to CapeTown said the
family was >from Abolnik which today is called Vabalninkas.

However, my husband said that his late father (the second eldest of his
family) said the family name was not really GOLDBERG but SHLUZITEL (sound
only) but the present day descendants of Philip say that as far as they
knew it was Schlesinger or Shelenger or similar.

I have recently found present-day descendants of family called SHLUZITEL
from Birzai which I am told is near to Vabalninkas and I am waiting for
more details.

My question is:- can someone who is knowledgeable throw some light on the
surname SHLUZITEL and its origins. To me is sounds Yiddish. Does any
know what it means? And what further advice would they give?

Rica B Goldberg
Manchester, England

Still researching:-

KAMINSKY (KAMENSHCHIK) >from Yanova (Jonava)and Zeimiai nr Kovno, Lithuania
2) Norron Eliazar, Harris, Joseph & Sarah DIAMOND >from Kovno Gubernia,
Lithuania 3)  Newman, Emmanuel, Rachel & Esther LEVY and their parents
Chana & Yehuda LEWIN >from KROSNIEWICE in Poland  4)  Isaac & Rebecca
COHEN  >from Poland 5) Chaim & Rebecca ESTRY (nee GROSSMAN)  a glazier >from
Poland 6)  GOLDBERG (possibly SCHELSINGER OR SCHELINGER or SCHLUZITEL)


Re: Ira #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Group,

I can no longer hold myself back on this topic, although I'm writing
with a smile.

Ira indeed is a Hebrew name. It is mentioned a total of 6 times in the
Tanach (in II Samuel 20:26, 23:26, and 23:38, and in I Chronicles 11:28,
11:40, and 27:9. I believe that there were two men by this name, but I on
that I defer to others who know more than I do about this period of Jewish
genealogy.

Although I have never encountered the name Ira in Jewish genealogical
records of nineteenth century Europe, that doesn't mean it was never used,
although I think I'm more likely than most people to have noticed this
name.

If a Jewish person in Europe had been named Ira, then that also should
have been their Hebrew name (pronounced Eerah and spelled
ayin-yud-resh-alef, as Udi Cain has already mentioned), not Uri, Ari,
Aryeh, Yitzchak, or any of dozens of other names. I believe that it is
much more likely that Ira was a guessed backtranslation of another Hebrew
name (like all the Tillies and Morrises seen as parents' names on death
certificates of those who immigrated and have also spawned guessing games
as to their Hebrew names) than as a secular name in Europe. If it was
used at all, I think it must have been very rare, although again I defer
to experts about this later period of Jewish genealogy.

Ira is not an "American" name, and judging >from its steadily declining
popularity as a given name in the U.S. in every decade of the 20th
century, it's no longer accurate to describe it as "modern" either. It
may be as common in the U.S. 100 years hence as it was in Eastern Europe
100 years ago.

I never thought my name could generate so much discussion by others --
you all flatter me very much.

Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


Re: Given names Izidor and Israel #hungary

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 8/3/2003 11:12:58 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
mary@... writes:

<< I suppose I just want confirmation of the fact that an ancestor with the
Hebrew name of Israel could be the same person as one with the given
name of Izidor. >from what I've gleaned >from the internet it seems that
Izidor is actually a Greek name. So is it likely/probable a Jewish male
named Israel >from Slovakia born in 1875 would have used Izidor as his
secular name? >>

==Absolutely. Jews in many countries of Europe were forced to
use "German" first names for civil regitration and usage. Austria (which
ruled over Slovakia) had been the first country to make this demand. Other
Jews in Europe adopted a not-so-Jewish first name for civil purposes
because a Jewish first name often led to discrimination and worse in the
Christian world at the time.

==So many Yitzhaks (Isaac), Yisraels (Israel) and Yeshayahus (Isaiah)
chose Isidore as their first name (or had it chosen for them by their
fathers) that non-Jews shunned it and Isidore became a perjoreative
nickname for Jews in general.

As for Greek names, many of the most prominent rabbis of the Holy Land
between about 200 BCE and 300 CE had greek names. This included many of
the scholars cited in the Mishna and Gemara. Jewish kings had Greek
names. Alexander is a common "Hebrew" name.

The Kalonymos family of Lucca, Italy, brought rabbinical authority to
Germany and France under Charlemagne and were leaders of Judaic poetry,
thought and authority for five centuries; the name still exists as a
Hebrew name (though there is a parallel Hebrew name, Shem-Tov) commony
rendered as Kalman.

Isidore actually means "gift of [the Egyptian god] Isis" just as Theodore,
another popular "Jewish" name at that time (cf. Theodor Herzl, founder of
modern Zionism) meant "gift of [generic] god"

An appropriate Hebrew equivalet of Theodor or Isidore would be Nathan,
Nathaniel, Natanya, Natanyahu. Matan, Matityahu (Matthew) etc. all of
which mean more or less "Gift of God."

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Ira #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Group,

I can no longer hold myself back on this topic, although I'm writing
with a smile.

Ira indeed is a Hebrew name. It is mentioned a total of 6 times in the
Tanach (in II Samuel 20:26, 23:26, and 23:38, and in I Chronicles 11:28,
11:40, and 27:9. I believe that there were two men by this name, but I on
that I defer to others who know more than I do about this period of Jewish
genealogy.

Although I have never encountered the name Ira in Jewish genealogical
records of nineteenth century Europe, that doesn't mean it was never used,
although I think I'm more likely than most people to have noticed this
name.

If a Jewish person in Europe had been named Ira, then that also should
have been their Hebrew name (pronounced Eerah and spelled
ayin-yud-resh-alef, as Udi Cain has already mentioned), not Uri, Ari,
Aryeh, Yitzchak, or any of dozens of other names. I believe that it is
much more likely that Ira was a guessed backtranslation of another Hebrew
name (like all the Tillies and Morrises seen as parents' names on death
certificates of those who immigrated and have also spawned guessing games
as to their Hebrew names) than as a secular name in Europe. If it was
used at all, I think it must have been very rare, although again I defer
to experts about this later period of Jewish genealogy.

Ira is not an "American" name, and judging >from its steadily declining
popularity as a given name in the U.S. in every decade of the 20th
century, it's no longer accurate to describe it as "modern" either. It
may be as common in the U.S. 100 years hence as it was in Eastern Europe
100 years ago.

I never thought my name could generate so much discussion by others --
you all flatter me very much.

Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Given names Izidor and Israel #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 8/3/2003 11:12:58 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
mary@... writes:

<< I suppose I just want confirmation of the fact that an ancestor with the
Hebrew name of Israel could be the same person as one with the given
name of Izidor. >from what I've gleaned >from the internet it seems that
Izidor is actually a Greek name. So is it likely/probable a Jewish male
named Israel >from Slovakia born in 1875 would have used Izidor as his
secular name? >>

==Absolutely. Jews in many countries of Europe were forced to
use "German" first names for civil regitration and usage. Austria (which
ruled over Slovakia) had been the first country to make this demand. Other
Jews in Europe adopted a not-so-Jewish first name for civil purposes
because a Jewish first name often led to discrimination and worse in the
Christian world at the time.

==So many Yitzhaks (Isaac), Yisraels (Israel) and Yeshayahus (Isaiah)
chose Isidore as their first name (or had it chosen for them by their
fathers) that non-Jews shunned it and Isidore became a perjoreative
nickname for Jews in general.

As for Greek names, many of the most prominent rabbis of the Holy Land
between about 200 BCE and 300 CE had greek names. This included many of
the scholars cited in the Mishna and Gemara. Jewish kings had Greek
names. Alexander is a common "Hebrew" name.

The Kalonymos family of Lucca, Italy, brought rabbinical authority to
Germany and France under Charlemagne and were leaders of Judaic poetry,
thought and authority for five centuries; the name still exists as a
Hebrew name (though there is a parallel Hebrew name, Shem-Tov) commony
rendered as Kalman.

Isidore actually means "gift of [the Egyptian god] Isis" just as Theodore,
another popular "Jewish" name at that time (cf. Theodor Herzl, founder of
modern Zionism) meant "gift of [generic] god"

An appropriate Hebrew equivalet of Theodor or Isidore would be Nathan,
Nathaniel, Natanya, Natanyahu. Matan, Matityahu (Matthew) etc. all of
which mean more or less "Gift of God."

Michael Bernet, New York