Date   

Warsaw Marriages 1937-39 (Glos Gminy) #poland

Baruch Bonen <ibb@...>
 

I found references to my parents marriage (BINSZTOK Izrael Mojzesz and RUBIN Mindla) in Warsaw Marriages 1937-39 (Glos Gminy) Year 1 Vol 6 dated November/December-1937.

I would like to know how can I receive a copy of the document itself.

Can anyone help me on that ?

Thanks.

Baruch Bonen
Israel


JRI Poland #Poland Warsaw Marriages 1937-39 (Glos Gminy) #poland

Baruch Bonen <ibb@...>
 

I found references to my parents marriage (BINSZTOK Izrael Mojzesz and RUBIN Mindla) in Warsaw Marriages 1937-39 (Glos Gminy) Year 1 Vol 6 dated November/December-1937.

I would like to know how can I receive a copy of the document itself.

Can anyone help me on that ?

Thanks.

Baruch Bonen
Israel


First Cousin Marriages and Kidney Disease #general

joeross1220@...
 

Without reading the entire article, I am not sure I agree with the
conclusion that Jews have less genetic disease than Arabs
because of fewer cousin marriages. (I also think it is odd to
reach this conclusion based upon one type of symptom, which could
have a number of causes).

In the "old country" marriages among Jews were frequently
arranged amongst first cousins or uncles and nieces. This is
one of the reasons Jewish genetic diseases moved rapidly
through the Jewish population. This practice ended because
of the transfer of population to the US, Western
Europe and Israel. With accompanying secularization and a
less insulated society, people could meet and marry anyone
they chose, and it was less likely to be a close relative.

Joe Ross


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen First Cousin Marriages and Kidney Disease #general

joeross1220@...
 

Without reading the entire article, I am not sure I agree with the
conclusion that Jews have less genetic disease than Arabs
because of fewer cousin marriages. (I also think it is odd to
reach this conclusion based upon one type of symptom, which could
have a number of causes).

In the "old country" marriages among Jews were frequently
arranged amongst first cousins or uncles and nieces. This is
one of the reasons Jewish genetic diseases moved rapidly
through the Jewish population. This practice ended because
of the transfer of population to the US, Western
Europe and Israel. With accompanying secularization and a
less insulated society, people could meet and marry anyone
they chose, and it was less likely to be a close relative.

Joe Ross


Yizkor Book Project-August 2003 report #poland

Joyce Field
 

August 2003 proved to be a banner month as we added 14 updates and 31
new entries. In this effort we recognize our special volunteers for
August: Max Heffler, Mike Kalt, Sandra Krisch, and Judy Montel.
Without their help, we would not have been able to process these
translations in August.

It is our pleasure also to recognize a special translator, Morris
Gradel, who translated himself or coordinated the translation of 25
chapters >from the Pinkas HaKehillot, Poland, volume 7, which went
online this month. Last year in October he submitted a list of the
chapters he wanted to translate, which he submitted at one time at
the end of July. Our wonderful html team got them online in record
time. Congratulations, Morris.

Nolan Altman contributed the translation of 5 chapters >from this same
volume of the Pinkas HaKehillot. Thank you, Nolan.

Without the generosity and help of all translators and coordinators
of translations to the Yizkor Book Project we could not operate. Our
heartfelt thanks to all of you. Please remember that all the
translations are accessible >from
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html.

Updates:

-Brzeziny, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Gorodenka, Ukraine
-Kurenets, Belarus
-Lida, Belarus
-Molchadz, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Orgeyev, Moldova
-Rzeszow, Poland
-Shchuchin, Belarus
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Telekhany, Belarus
-Volozhin, Belarus
-Zgierz, Poland

New entries:

-Bukowina: "History of the J.N.A.V. Hebronia in Czernowitz,"
Geschichte der Juden, volume 1, pp. 121-123, translated by Jerome
Silverbush.

-Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin:

Bilgoraj
Bobrowniki
Deblin-Irena
Frampol
Gorzkow
Grabowiec
Horodlo
Hrubieszow
Izbica
Jarczow
Jozefow
Komarow
Krasnobrod
Krasnystaw
Krylow
Kurzelow
Laszczow
Losice
Ryki
Stezyca
Szczebrzeszyn
Tarnogora
Tarnogrod
Tomaszow Lubelski
Turobin
Tyszowce
Uchanie
Wysokie
Zamosc
Zelechow

The Yizkor Book Database has also been updated. We now have 1,264
books, 1,059 shtetls, 54 libraries, and 10, 237 call numbers in the
database. Thank you, Martin, for your work on the database. The
URL for the database is http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html.

Our very best wishes for the New Year >from all of us at the Yizkor
Book Project.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
jfield@...
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html


Searching: Norbert Sinaiko or Synajko - Cleveland, Ohio #general

Rsns93
 

Hello -

I am searching for any information regarding an
ancestor >from Warsaw, Poland who immigrated to the
US in about 1908.

Norbert was a musician and he toured around the
United States on the Orpheum circuit. Very little is
known about Norbert except that he was a professional
violinist and in America played as a headliner,
"Norbert, the Russian Violinist" on the old Orpheum
circuit.

He never came to the west coast. In all probability,
he was never married. Norbert died in World War I,
possibly a victim of the flu epidemic.

Norbert Sinaiko (or spelled Synajko in Poland) came back
to the United States on October 1, 1919 on the ship
called the Royal George. His port of departure
was Southhampton, Southhamptonshire, England.
He was 33 years and 3 months old when he arrived in the
US and his place of residence in the US was Cleveland,
Ohio.

Norbert had lived in Cleveland, Ohio >from 1908 to 1919.

Any information that anyone can find on Norbert
in Cleveland or New York would be most appreciated.

Thank you.

Rich Sinykin
Minneapolis, MN
email: rsns93@...


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Yizkor Book Project-August 2003 report #poland

Joyce Field
 

August 2003 proved to be a banner month as we added 14 updates and 31
new entries. In this effort we recognize our special volunteers for
August: Max Heffler, Mike Kalt, Sandra Krisch, and Judy Montel.
Without their help, we would not have been able to process these
translations in August.

It is our pleasure also to recognize a special translator, Morris
Gradel, who translated himself or coordinated the translation of 25
chapters >from the Pinkas HaKehillot, Poland, volume 7, which went
online this month. Last year in October he submitted a list of the
chapters he wanted to translate, which he submitted at one time at
the end of July. Our wonderful html team got them online in record
time. Congratulations, Morris.

Nolan Altman contributed the translation of 5 chapters >from this same
volume of the Pinkas HaKehillot. Thank you, Nolan.

Without the generosity and help of all translators and coordinators
of translations to the Yizkor Book Project we could not operate. Our
heartfelt thanks to all of you. Please remember that all the
translations are accessible >from
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html.

Updates:

-Brzeziny, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Gorodenka, Ukraine
-Kurenets, Belarus
-Lida, Belarus
-Molchadz, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Orgeyev, Moldova
-Rzeszow, Poland
-Shchuchin, Belarus
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Telekhany, Belarus
-Volozhin, Belarus
-Zgierz, Poland

New entries:

-Bukowina: "History of the J.N.A.V. Hebronia in Czernowitz,"
Geschichte der Juden, volume 1, pp. 121-123, translated by Jerome
Silverbush.

-Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin:

Bilgoraj
Bobrowniki
Deblin-Irena
Frampol
Gorzkow
Grabowiec
Horodlo
Hrubieszow
Izbica
Jarczow
Jozefow
Komarow
Krasnobrod
Krasnystaw
Krylow
Kurzelow
Laszczow
Losice
Ryki
Stezyca
Szczebrzeszyn
Tarnogora
Tarnogrod
Tomaszow Lubelski
Turobin
Tyszowce
Uchanie
Wysokie
Zamosc
Zelechow

The Yizkor Book Database has also been updated. We now have 1,264
books, 1,059 shtetls, 54 libraries, and 10, 237 call numbers in the
database. Thank you, Martin, for your work on the database. The
URL for the database is http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html.

Our very best wishes for the New Year >from all of us at the Yizkor
Book Project.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
jfield@...
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: Norbert Sinaiko or Synajko - Cleveland, Ohio #general

Rsns93
 

Hello -

I am searching for any information regarding an
ancestor >from Warsaw, Poland who immigrated to the
US in about 1908.

Norbert was a musician and he toured around the
United States on the Orpheum circuit. Very little is
known about Norbert except that he was a professional
violinist and in America played as a headliner,
"Norbert, the Russian Violinist" on the old Orpheum
circuit.

He never came to the west coast. In all probability,
he was never married. Norbert died in World War I,
possibly a victim of the flu epidemic.

Norbert Sinaiko (or spelled Synajko in Poland) came back
to the United States on October 1, 1919 on the ship
called the Royal George. His port of departure
was Southhampton, Southhamptonshire, England.
He was 33 years and 3 months old when he arrived in the
US and his place of residence in the US was Cleveland,
Ohio.

Norbert had lived in Cleveland, Ohio >from 1908 to 1919.

Any information that anyone can find on Norbert
in Cleveland or New York would be most appreciated.

Thank you.

Rich Sinykin
Minneapolis, MN
email: rsns93@...


Grodno Research Project #poland

Bialystoker
 

Dear Bialygenners:

As I have mentioned before, we will be cooperating with the
Belarus SIG on projects that benefit both groups. It is no
mystery that any Belarus project benefiting Grodno Gubernia
researchers will be of benefit to us. Belarus SIG Coordinator,
Dave Fox, has invited BialyGen to cooperate in an ongoing
project, which Dave described in his Belarus SIG Report from
the DC 2003 Conference. I have quoted a couple of extracts
from this message.
The first is about the Belarus SIG projects:

"In addition, there are other sources that are in
both the Grodno and Minsk archives that should
benefit most Belarus researchers, but which I am
not at liberty to discuss in detail at this time. You
will have to trust me and donate funds to the Belarus
general fund so we can get this project started. In
addition, we are about 35% percent complete on
another project that will benefit not only people
researching families >from Grodno gubernia, but also
people >from other areas in other gubernii. Just as the
Minsk 1912 marriage and divorce registers that are
now on line include information >from people born or
registered in all parts of Belarus, this new database
will also contain place of birth and place of
registration. However, we are short of funds to
complete this project."

This second extract is about the relationship with BialyGen:

"A new research group was formed for Bialystok area
researchers. This area was formerly part of Grodno
gubernia, most of which is now in Belarus, and is now
part of Poland. While the Belarus SIG is not looking for
data >from areas now in Poland, if data for Bialystok is
found among records we are researching in the Grodno
archive, we will either retrieve this data or notify the new
Bialystok Research Group. I spoke with the leader of this
new group, Mark Halpern, and told him that the Belarus
SIG was working on a project that included names from
Bialystok and that he should not duplicate our efforts,
since the data would be made available to him via the
All Country Database through the All Poland Database."

When has a Research Group in its first month of existence been
able to become part of a project that is, as Dave states,
already 35% complete. One of the most important reasons why
BialyGen was formed and the most important goal of the 40 members
who met in Washington was to gain access to Grodno Gubernia
records not available in Poland. This is our first opportunity.

Like almost all research projects, this one also involves outside
costs that must be funded to complete the project. If BialyGen
members are to benefit >from this project, we must also bear some
of the cost. I am asking that BialyGen members contribute.

BialyGen now has been established on JewishGen-erosity. JewishGen
will handle all administrative tasks involved in contributing and
all the funds will be dedicated to BialyGen research projects.
All contributions through JewishGen-erosity are tax deductible in
the US. You will find the BialyGen contributions page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Bialystokrrg.html. The
instructions for online or mail contributions are explained on
this webpage.

For this cooperative project with Belarus SIG, please designate
your contribution to "Grodno Archives Research Projects." You can
read a general description of this initiative by clicking the
link. Contribution are also needed for the BialyGen General Fund,
which will be used for other still unidentified projects.

JewishGen is providing BialyGen with this discussion group, with
a website, and with a means to collect and allocate contributions
that are tax deductible in the US. For this, they only require
that the results of our research, mainly data, reside in
JewishGen databases and other databases hosted on JewishGen. What
a bargain for us. In addition to your contribution to BialyGen
research projects, please also add a contribution to the
JewishGen General Fund, which will help keep all the great
JewishGen resources, including ours, available to Jewish
genealogists worldwide.

Please support our efforts.

Mark Halpern
BialyGen Coordinator


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Grodno Research Project #poland

Bialystoker
 

Dear Bialygenners:

As I have mentioned before, we will be cooperating with the
Belarus SIG on projects that benefit both groups. It is no
mystery that any Belarus project benefiting Grodno Gubernia
researchers will be of benefit to us. Belarus SIG Coordinator,
Dave Fox, has invited BialyGen to cooperate in an ongoing
project, which Dave described in his Belarus SIG Report from
the DC 2003 Conference. I have quoted a couple of extracts
from this message.
The first is about the Belarus SIG projects:

"In addition, there are other sources that are in
both the Grodno and Minsk archives that should
benefit most Belarus researchers, but which I am
not at liberty to discuss in detail at this time. You
will have to trust me and donate funds to the Belarus
general fund so we can get this project started. In
addition, we are about 35% percent complete on
another project that will benefit not only people
researching families >from Grodno gubernia, but also
people >from other areas in other gubernii. Just as the
Minsk 1912 marriage and divorce registers that are
now on line include information >from people born or
registered in all parts of Belarus, this new database
will also contain place of birth and place of
registration. However, we are short of funds to
complete this project."

This second extract is about the relationship with BialyGen:

"A new research group was formed for Bialystok area
researchers. This area was formerly part of Grodno
gubernia, most of which is now in Belarus, and is now
part of Poland. While the Belarus SIG is not looking for
data >from areas now in Poland, if data for Bialystok is
found among records we are researching in the Grodno
archive, we will either retrieve this data or notify the new
Bialystok Research Group. I spoke with the leader of this
new group, Mark Halpern, and told him that the Belarus
SIG was working on a project that included names from
Bialystok and that he should not duplicate our efforts,
since the data would be made available to him via the
All Country Database through the All Poland Database."

When has a Research Group in its first month of existence been
able to become part of a project that is, as Dave states,
already 35% complete. One of the most important reasons why
BialyGen was formed and the most important goal of the 40 members
who met in Washington was to gain access to Grodno Gubernia
records not available in Poland. This is our first opportunity.

Like almost all research projects, this one also involves outside
costs that must be funded to complete the project. If BialyGen
members are to benefit >from this project, we must also bear some
of the cost. I am asking that BialyGen members contribute.

BialyGen now has been established on JewishGen-erosity. JewishGen
will handle all administrative tasks involved in contributing and
all the funds will be dedicated to BialyGen research projects.
All contributions through JewishGen-erosity are tax deductible in
the US. You will find the BialyGen contributions page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Bialystokrrg.html. The
instructions for online or mail contributions are explained on
this webpage.

For this cooperative project with Belarus SIG, please designate
your contribution to "Grodno Archives Research Projects." You can
read a general description of this initiative by clicking the
link. Contribution are also needed for the BialyGen General Fund,
which will be used for other still unidentified projects.

JewishGen is providing BialyGen with this discussion group, with
a website, and with a means to collect and allocate contributions
that are tax deductible in the US. For this, they only require
that the results of our research, mainly data, reside in
JewishGen databases and other databases hosted on JewishGen. What
a bargain for us. In addition to your contribution to BialyGen
research projects, please also add a contribution to the
JewishGen General Fund, which will help keep all the great
JewishGen resources, including ours, available to Jewish
genealogists worldwide.

Please support our efforts.

Mark Halpern
BialyGen Coordinator


Re: The ear as identfier in photographs #general

CHARLOTTEO@...
 

In a message dated 08/28/03 12:31:53 AM, jewishgen@... writes:

<< Subject: The ear as identfier in photographs

From: MBernet@...

Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2003 02:57:47 EDT

X-Message-Number: 5

Michael Bernet answered the original question and asks --

In a message dated 8/27/2003 12:14:49 AM Eastern Daylight Time,

rwfgjf@... writes:


<< At the time that my late parents were preparing to flee Vienna in

1939, their passeport photographs were, so they told me, required

to be taken with the left ear visible. This was apparantly a law

introduced by the nazi authorities. Perhaps the facts below were

the reason for this regulation. >>


Indeed, that is so. The Germans claimed (rightly or wrongly) that the

shape of the ear was a clue to a person's identity. I believe it was

common in much of Europe, to require one visible ear in photographs for

official documents.


Can anyone tell us how correct (or widespread) that assumprion is? Are the

ears more or less symmetrical? Is there a genetic connection to the ear's

shape, so that we could say with some degree of certainty >from comparing

photographs, "Yes, she's probably his sister"?>>


This was Adolf Hitler's input. He put great stock into
the interpretation of ear shapes, rationalizing that
(like finger prints) no two ears were alike. I do not
believe that this pseudo science has been taken
seriously or pursued further.

At the time, all Kennkarten identification pictures had to
show the ear outline clearly.

Charlotte Opfermann


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The ear as identfier in photographs #general

CHARLOTTEO@...
 

In a message dated 08/28/03 12:31:53 AM, jewishgen@... writes:

<< Subject: The ear as identfier in photographs

From: MBernet@...

Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2003 02:57:47 EDT

X-Message-Number: 5

Michael Bernet answered the original question and asks --

In a message dated 8/27/2003 12:14:49 AM Eastern Daylight Time,

rwfgjf@... writes:


<< At the time that my late parents were preparing to flee Vienna in

1939, their passeport photographs were, so they told me, required

to be taken with the left ear visible. This was apparantly a law

introduced by the nazi authorities. Perhaps the facts below were

the reason for this regulation. >>


Indeed, that is so. The Germans claimed (rightly or wrongly) that the

shape of the ear was a clue to a person's identity. I believe it was

common in much of Europe, to require one visible ear in photographs for

official documents.


Can anyone tell us how correct (or widespread) that assumprion is? Are the

ears more or less symmetrical? Is there a genetic connection to the ear's

shape, so that we could say with some degree of certainty >from comparing

photographs, "Yes, she's probably his sister"?>>


This was Adolf Hitler's input. He put great stock into
the interpretation of ear shapes, rationalizing that
(like finger prints) no two ears were alike. I do not
believe that this pseudo science has been taken
seriously or pursued further.

At the time, all Kennkarten identification pictures had to
show the ear outline clearly.

Charlotte Opfermann


Re: how did the Nazis know who was Jewish #general

Basile Ginger <bginger@...>
 

I do not remember having seen on this list a very simple and
efficient method: the (compulsory) self-registering of Jews
as such. This was the case for instance in France: in the
German-occupied part of France (about two thirds of the
territory) the law was enacted on september 27, 1940, and
in the temporarily "free" part, nominally ruled by the
so-called Vichy government, it was enacted on June 2, 1941.
You may read many more details for instance on the pages

http://www.geocities.com/Eureka/Park/3446/udsr87/juif.html (in French), or
on http://levendel.home.sprynet.com/brief.html (in French and
in English).

Of course, for those who did not comply with this law,
there were denunciations, etc.

Basile Ginger, CGJ
(Cercle de Genealogie Juive, International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org

Searching for: GINGER (Yavorov, Brody, Kishinev), BLUMENFELD (Lublin,
Kishinev), PRISMAN (Kretinga, Liepaja), GRINFELD (Brody, Kishinev),
HIRSCHBERG (Jelgava), KLEIN (only >from Odessa
ish


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: how did the Nazis know who was Jewish #general

Basile Ginger <bginger@...>
 

I do not remember having seen on this list a very simple and
efficient method: the (compulsory) self-registering of Jews
as such. This was the case for instance in France: in the
German-occupied part of France (about two thirds of the
territory) the law was enacted on september 27, 1940, and
in the temporarily "free" part, nominally ruled by the
so-called Vichy government, it was enacted on June 2, 1941.
You may read many more details for instance on the pages

http://www.geocities.com/Eureka/Park/3446/udsr87/juif.html (in French), or
on http://levendel.home.sprynet.com/brief.html (in French and
in English).

Of course, for those who did not comply with this law,
there were denunciations, etc.

Basile Ginger, CGJ
(Cercle de Genealogie Juive, International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org

Searching for: GINGER (Yavorov, Brody, Kishinev), BLUMENFELD (Lublin,
Kishinev), PRISMAN (Kretinga, Liepaja), GRINFELD (Brody, Kishinev),
HIRSCHBERG (Jelgava), KLEIN (only >from Odessa
ish


Anyone looking for Florence Goldstein of New York, NY #general

Shawn Weil <weil.17@...>
 

Dear list-

I have received the naturalization papers of Florence
Goldstein - formerly Feige Gittel Rosenblett Buckner -
of New York, NY. She is not the Florence
Goldstein that I was look for, and I'd be happy to
send these papers on to anyone who may be
researching this family.

Husband: Abe
Children: Stanley & Alvin
Born: Kszywze, Poland

Please reply privately-

Shawn Weil
Columbus, OH

WEIL, WAHL, WOHL, ABRAMOWITZ >from Dzikow (Tarnebrzeg), Poland
TELLES, TELEFUS, and FISHERMAN >from Khotin, Ukraine; Israel
BIRNBERG, >from Medzhibozh and Khotin, Ukraine; UK; Argentina;
GOLDER, MOSKOWITZ, LIEBOWITZ, FIBISH >from Romania; Brazil; Israel
BROITMAN, DARISH >from Ukraine; GLANTZ, LAMPERT >from Philadelphia, PA;
http://www.tangerinecrafts.com/Personal/genealogy.htm


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Anyone looking for Florence Goldstein of New York, NY #general

Shawn Weil <weil.17@...>
 

Dear list-

I have received the naturalization papers of Florence
Goldstein - formerly Feige Gittel Rosenblett Buckner -
of New York, NY. She is not the Florence
Goldstein that I was look for, and I'd be happy to
send these papers on to anyone who may be
researching this family.

Husband: Abe
Children: Stanley & Alvin
Born: Kszywze, Poland

Please reply privately-

Shawn Weil
Columbus, OH

WEIL, WAHL, WOHL, ABRAMOWITZ >from Dzikow (Tarnebrzeg), Poland
TELLES, TELEFUS, and FISHERMAN >from Khotin, Ukraine; Israel
BIRNBERG, >from Medzhibozh and Khotin, Ukraine; UK; Argentina;
GOLDER, MOSKOWITZ, LIEBOWITZ, FIBISH >from Romania; Brazil; Israel
BROITMAN, DARISH >from Ukraine; GLANTZ, LAMPERT >from Philadelphia, PA;
http://www.tangerinecrafts.com/Personal/genealogy.htm


old photos #general

John Hoenig
 

Steven Ellner wrote:

I am fortunate to have access to about 20 photographs (portraits) of
relations taken mostly in Slovakia or Hungary, circa 1870's. We don't even
know who half the people are in the photos.
Are photos of this type somewhat commonplace among researchers, or should
I consider them rarities? There is a lot of printed "advertising" on the
photos (see below). Given that I have little information, are these worth
translating >from Hungarian?
Steven,

You don't know how incredibly lucky you are to have
access to those photos. Old photos are one of the
absolute best kinds of record a genealogist can find.
It doesn't matter if you don't know who's in a
photo. Getting the photos is just the first step.

First, you absolutely want to see the photos
personally if at all possible. There may be the name of
a photographer - or his address -
embossed in the edge of the photo and that might not
show up in a copy of the photo. And, there could be
something written faintly. So try to borrow
the photos and study them carefully. Give a number to
each picture, and type a full description of each photo
into the computer. You'll find yourself going
back repeatedly to your database to check information.
Either scan them into your computer or take them to a
drug store or photo store that has a photo copying machine.
For around $7 - $10 you can make an 8.5 x 11" print.
So, you arrange as many photos as you can onto the
glass screen and copy several photos at once. Yes, you
want to translate the material on the back. The cities
are a fantastic clue. If you know your family came
from "Austria" or "Russia" that's pretty useless because
those were awfully big places. If you know a particular
city you can search for your family there. That's feasible.
If you also have an approximate year that's so much
better. Now you know WHEN to look for records. And,
given a year for a photo you can assign an
approximate age to the people in the photos. You can make
a list of all the people you have photos for and a list
of all the known relatives for whom you do not
have photos. Given the ages, dates, and places, you can
eliminate a lot of possibilities and focus in on some
possible identities. And, keep track of who appears
with whom. That's a very important clue.

Now suppose you find someone with the same surname as
your relatives and they're >from the same or a nearby town.
You can show them your photos and see if they recognize
anyone. Even if they can't recognize anyone, it may
turn out that they have the very same photo you have,
or they have a different photo that's clearly the
person in your photo. That almost surely means you're
related. Why else would you have photos of the same
person? I obtained a pile of photos >from a newfound
relative and immediately identified a photo of two
teenage girls. The photo was taken in Saratoga, New York,
in 1898. I knew there had been relatives in
Saratoga Springs and the ages of the daughters matched
those of the two girls in the photo. My guess was soon
confirmed. I also found a photo in that pile of a
young man that had been taken in Minneapolis. I guessed
that the Saratoga Springs relatives, who "disappeared"
around 1911, might have moved to Minnesota and the
young man might have been their son. Sure
enough, when I checked, that's where they were.

I discussed strategies for using photos to find
relatives in an article I just published in the July-August
issue of Family Chronicle.

Good luck hunting. Your work's just begun.

John Hoenig
Williamsburg, VA

searching for FITZER (Stanislau, Brzezany, Czernowitz, New York),
PELLER (Jablonow, New York, Minneapolis), HONIG/HOENIG (Aranyosgyeres,
Cluj, New
York)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen old photos #general

John Hoenig
 

Steven Ellner wrote:

I am fortunate to have access to about 20 photographs (portraits) of
relations taken mostly in Slovakia or Hungary, circa 1870's. We don't even
know who half the people are in the photos.
Are photos of this type somewhat commonplace among researchers, or should
I consider them rarities? There is a lot of printed "advertising" on the
photos (see below). Given that I have little information, are these worth
translating >from Hungarian?
Steven,

You don't know how incredibly lucky you are to have
access to those photos. Old photos are one of the
absolute best kinds of record a genealogist can find.
It doesn't matter if you don't know who's in a
photo. Getting the photos is just the first step.

First, you absolutely want to see the photos
personally if at all possible. There may be the name of
a photographer - or his address -
embossed in the edge of the photo and that might not
show up in a copy of the photo. And, there could be
something written faintly. So try to borrow
the photos and study them carefully. Give a number to
each picture, and type a full description of each photo
into the computer. You'll find yourself going
back repeatedly to your database to check information.
Either scan them into your computer or take them to a
drug store or photo store that has a photo copying machine.
For around $7 - $10 you can make an 8.5 x 11" print.
So, you arrange as many photos as you can onto the
glass screen and copy several photos at once. Yes, you
want to translate the material on the back. The cities
are a fantastic clue. If you know your family came
from "Austria" or "Russia" that's pretty useless because
those were awfully big places. If you know a particular
city you can search for your family there. That's feasible.
If you also have an approximate year that's so much
better. Now you know WHEN to look for records. And,
given a year for a photo you can assign an
approximate age to the people in the photos. You can make
a list of all the people you have photos for and a list
of all the known relatives for whom you do not
have photos. Given the ages, dates, and places, you can
eliminate a lot of possibilities and focus in on some
possible identities. And, keep track of who appears
with whom. That's a very important clue.

Now suppose you find someone with the same surname as
your relatives and they're >from the same or a nearby town.
You can show them your photos and see if they recognize
anyone. Even if they can't recognize anyone, it may
turn out that they have the very same photo you have,
or they have a different photo that's clearly the
person in your photo. That almost surely means you're
related. Why else would you have photos of the same
person? I obtained a pile of photos >from a newfound
relative and immediately identified a photo of two
teenage girls. The photo was taken in Saratoga, New York,
in 1898. I knew there had been relatives in
Saratoga Springs and the ages of the daughters matched
those of the two girls in the photo. My guess was soon
confirmed. I also found a photo in that pile of a
young man that had been taken in Minneapolis. I guessed
that the Saratoga Springs relatives, who "disappeared"
around 1911, might have moved to Minnesota and the
young man might have been their son. Sure
enough, when I checked, that's where they were.

I discussed strategies for using photos to find
relatives in an article I just published in the July-August
issue of Family Chronicle.

Good luck hunting. Your work's just begun.

John Hoenig
Williamsburg, VA

searching for FITZER (Stanislau, Brzezany, Czernowitz, New York),
PELLER (Jablonow, New York, Minneapolis), HONIG/HOENIG (Aranyosgyeres,
Cluj, New
York)


Searchable 1901 Census records on-line #general

Harold Rabbie
 

The official genealogy site of the 1901 Census for England
and Wales is on-line at
http://www.census.pro.gov.uk
It includes records for all the old Jewish neighbourhoods
such as Spitalfields, Whitechapel, and Mile End.

You can search by name, or by address, and see summary
information for each record. Unfortunately, there is
a charge to access the detailed records -
75p (US$1.20) for a document image, and 50p (US$0.80) for
a text record, with a minimum of £5 (US$8) per session.

I found my grandparents with no problem! Now I know where
they lived, and what they did.
--
Harold Zvi Rabbie
Los Gatos, California
http://hzrabbie.home.comcast.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searchable 1901 Census records on-line #general

Harold Rabbie
 

The official genealogy site of the 1901 Census for England
and Wales is on-line at
http://www.census.pro.gov.uk
It includes records for all the old Jewish neighbourhoods
such as Spitalfields, Whitechapel, and Mile End.

You can search by name, or by address, and see summary
information for each record. Unfortunately, there is
a charge to access the detailed records -
75p (US$1.20) for a document image, and 50p (US$0.80) for
a text record, with a minimum of £5 (US$8) per session.

I found my grandparents with no problem! Now I know where
they lived, and what they did.
--
Harold Zvi Rabbie
Los Gatos, California
http://hzrabbie.home.comcast.net