Date   

HOEXTER - GE > ZA #germany

Adam Yamey <adamandlopa@...>
 

I am addressing this to both GerSIG and South Africa SIG.

Leo GINSBERG(1845-1895) married Louise HOEXTER(1850-1906). I am fairly
sure that they lived in Germany. Louise had a brother Gustav HOEXTER who
was a medical doctor in Rouxville, in the Orange Free State of South
Africa. During the Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902), Dr Gustav HOEXTER looked
after boer women, interned by the British. This is all that I know about
the Hoexter family.

Can anyone please give me more information about this family?

Adam Yamey, London, UK <adamandlopa@yahoo.co.uk>


German SIG #Germany HOEXTER - GE > ZA #germany

Adam Yamey <adamandlopa@...>
 

I am addressing this to both GerSIG and South Africa SIG.

Leo GINSBERG(1845-1895) married Louise HOEXTER(1850-1906). I am fairly
sure that they lived in Germany. Louise had a brother Gustav HOEXTER who
was a medical doctor in Rouxville, in the Orange Free State of South
Africa. During the Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902), Dr Gustav HOEXTER looked
after boer women, interned by the British. This is all that I know about
the Hoexter family.

Can anyone please give me more information about this family?

Adam Yamey, London, UK <adamandlopa@yahoo.co.uk>


What is Schwacha? #germany

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Gersiggers,
I have just been advised of the existence of marriage registers for the
town of Lezajsk, Poland, formerly part of Galicia, Austro-Hungary.

The archives tell me these records are written in the German language, and
refer to it as Schwacha.

Can any of you knowledgeable people tell me what this means, and explain
the implications of translating records in this "tongue"?

I thank you in advance for your responses, and request private replies,
unless the moderator feels theses replies are pertinent for posting to
the GerSig Discussion Group.

Eden Joachim Pomona, New York esjoachim@optonline.net

MOD NOTE: I've not heard of this term before and assume that other members
haven't either. If you get what seems to be an authoritative definition
of the term "Schwacha" and explaination for it's usage in that context
please let the Forum know. MOD1


German SIG #Germany What is Schwacha? #germany

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Gersiggers,
I have just been advised of the existence of marriage registers for the
town of Lezajsk, Poland, formerly part of Galicia, Austro-Hungary.

The archives tell me these records are written in the German language, and
refer to it as Schwacha.

Can any of you knowledgeable people tell me what this means, and explain
the implications of translating records in this "tongue"?

I thank you in advance for your responses, and request private replies,
unless the moderator feels theses replies are pertinent for posting to
the GerSig Discussion Group.

Eden Joachim Pomona, New York esjoachim@optonline.net

MOD NOTE: I've not heard of this term before and assume that other members
haven't either. If you get what seems to be an authoritative definition
of the term "Schwacha" and explaination for it's usage in that context
please let the Forum know. MOD1


November 16, 2003 JGSNY Meeting #general

Gloria Berkenstat <gitl_leah@...>
 

On Sunday, November 16th, 2003 at 2 pm, the Jewish
Genealogical Society of New York will present Mark
Halpern, Board member of Jewish Records
Indexing-Poland, a project to index Jewish vital
record in Poland, and Coordinator of JRI-Poland’s AGAD
Archive effort. He will discuss what genealogical
researchers can and cannot find in the AGAD (The
Central Archives of Historical Records in Warsaw) and
in the Przemysl and Rzeszow branches of the Polish
State Archives. It is estimated that there are close
to two million records of interest to Jewish
genealogists with roots in Galicia, the region of
Poland that was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire at
the end of the 19th Century. His talk will include an
explanation of the information found in the Galician
records and an identification of the records of most
genealogical value. He will also discuss the issue of
Jewish religious/civil marriages and the status of the
children born of these marriages.

The meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of New
York take place in the Center for Jewish History
located at 15 West 16th Street between 5th and 6th
Avenues. The Center’s Genealogy Institute will be
open >from 12:30 to 2:00 on November 16th for
networking with other researchers and access to
resource materials and computers.

For more information contact the Jewish Genealogical
Society at info@jgsny.org or call 212-294-8326.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
New York, NY
JGSNY Program Vice President


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen November 16, 2003 JGSNY Meeting #general

Gloria Berkenstat <gitl_leah@...>
 

On Sunday, November 16th, 2003 at 2 pm, the Jewish
Genealogical Society of New York will present Mark
Halpern, Board member of Jewish Records
Indexing-Poland, a project to index Jewish vital
record in Poland, and Coordinator of JRI-Poland’s AGAD
Archive effort. He will discuss what genealogical
researchers can and cannot find in the AGAD (The
Central Archives of Historical Records in Warsaw) and
in the Przemysl and Rzeszow branches of the Polish
State Archives. It is estimated that there are close
to two million records of interest to Jewish
genealogists with roots in Galicia, the region of
Poland that was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire at
the end of the 19th Century. His talk will include an
explanation of the information found in the Galician
records and an identification of the records of most
genealogical value. He will also discuss the issue of
Jewish religious/civil marriages and the status of the
children born of these marriages.

The meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of New
York take place in the Center for Jewish History
located at 15 West 16th Street between 5th and 6th
Avenues. The Center’s Genealogy Institute will be
open >from 12:30 to 2:00 on November 16th for
networking with other researchers and access to
resource materials and computers.

For more information contact the Jewish Genealogical
Society at info@jgsny.org or call 212-294-8326.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
New York, NY
JGSNY Program Vice President


family HELLE #general

Sigbert Helle <news@...>
 

Dear genealogists,

I'm looking for the surname HELLE (not Heller).
I try to collect information about this surname which has several origins
in Germany, Norway and other countries.
Most parts of the family seems to be christian (cath. and prot.).
But I have two hints for a jewish origin of this name:
Abraham Helle, jewish doctor in Frankfurt/Main in the 17th century
and "Max Helle, Minsk, age 25, Russian Hebrew, 01. Okt. 1902, Pretoria
(ship)>from Hamburg" (list of Immigrants in Ellis Island/NY and a
corresponding information in Hamburg)

Could anyone help me with information about this name today in Israel or
other jewish societies?
My collected information of about 1.500 Helle and relateds is to seen here:

www.in-der-helle.de

Yours
Sigbert


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen family HELLE #general

Sigbert Helle <news@...>
 

Dear genealogists,

I'm looking for the surname HELLE (not Heller).
I try to collect information about this surname which has several origins
in Germany, Norway and other countries.
Most parts of the family seems to be christian (cath. and prot.).
But I have two hints for a jewish origin of this name:
Abraham Helle, jewish doctor in Frankfurt/Main in the 17th century
and "Max Helle, Minsk, age 25, Russian Hebrew, 01. Okt. 1902, Pretoria
(ship)>from Hamburg" (list of Immigrants in Ellis Island/NY and a
corresponding information in Hamburg)

Could anyone help me with information about this name today in Israel or
other jewish societies?
My collected information of about 1.500 Helle and relateds is to seen here:

www.in-der-helle.de

Yours
Sigbert


GRINBERG #general

Natalie Spencer Carroll
 

Does anyone have information about Maria GRINBERG (not the pianist) who
lived in Grudziad before the war in 1939? I am also looking for
information about Mr. Grinberg.

Maria was a Holocaust survivor. She may be my great aunt. I got her name
from the 'registration of Holocaust survivors' with the help of laudergen.
Without Mr. Grinberg's first name the search maybe difficult. Thank you
for any help.

Gerald I Simon


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen GRINBERG #general

Natalie Spencer Carroll
 

Does anyone have information about Maria GRINBERG (not the pianist) who
lived in Grudziad before the war in 1939? I am also looking for
information about Mr. Grinberg.

Maria was a Holocaust survivor. She may be my great aunt. I got her name
from the 'registration of Holocaust survivors' with the help of laudergen.
Without Mr. Grinberg's first name the search maybe difficult. Thank you
for any help.

Gerald I Simon


Pittsburgh resources- cemetery rosters (Harris B. Barnett query) #general

Pweinthal@...
 

Dear Mr. Sarasky,

In this internet age, we tend to over-rely on electronic sources of
information. The bulk of the world's published information is still in
books and in libraries. Pittsburgh's Carnegie Library has a special
department called the Pennsylvania Room. The collection contains vast
amounts of genealogically relevant materials such as newspaper obituary
microfilms, vital record indexes, and more. One of the resources I
examined there were books listing graves in area cemeteries. Many were
compiled by local historians and genealogical societies. Among these
treasures was a roster of graves found in the West View Cemetery in Ross
Township. This is where my family's Rodef Shalom congregation has owned
plots for over a century. The JewishGen website hosts a cemetery project
which lists Jewish burial locations all over the country. This can help
you locate other congregation burial sites around Pittsburgh. But wouldn't
it be easier to look for an obituary or to order a copy of his death
certificate for $4?

I've never heard of this Rauh database you mention. It may be an aid, but
can't be as significant as the lodestone of the Carnegie collection.
You'll find a wealth of material there, plus leads to other area
collections! May I suggest you explore the library's on-line card catalog
and then send the librarian a letter or an email outlining your research
request?

Good luck with your hunt for Harris B. Barnett!

Pat Weinthal
(formerly of Pittsburgh, PA)
Boston, MA

WEINTHAL DEU >NL>UK>USA, AUS, ZAF,ARG
WAJNTAL, WAINTAL DEU>P>USA,FR,B,ARG,BR
ARNHEIM DEU>USA

<"Arnold Sarasky" <asarasky@earthlink.net>

<I am trying to locate the cemetery in which Harris B. Barnett, who died
on March 10, 1910, is buried... I believe that he is buried in a cemetery
in the Pittsburgh, PA area which was his residence. It may be in one of
the cemeteries in the Millvale area... the Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz Museum has advised me that its cemetery data base does not contain
any pertinent information. That data base, however, is not complete....>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pittsburgh resources- cemetery rosters (Harris B. Barnett query) #general

Pweinthal@...
 

Dear Mr. Sarasky,

In this internet age, we tend to over-rely on electronic sources of
information. The bulk of the world's published information is still in
books and in libraries. Pittsburgh's Carnegie Library has a special
department called the Pennsylvania Room. The collection contains vast
amounts of genealogically relevant materials such as newspaper obituary
microfilms, vital record indexes, and more. One of the resources I
examined there were books listing graves in area cemeteries. Many were
compiled by local historians and genealogical societies. Among these
treasures was a roster of graves found in the West View Cemetery in Ross
Township. This is where my family's Rodef Shalom congregation has owned
plots for over a century. The JewishGen website hosts a cemetery project
which lists Jewish burial locations all over the country. This can help
you locate other congregation burial sites around Pittsburgh. But wouldn't
it be easier to look for an obituary or to order a copy of his death
certificate for $4?

I've never heard of this Rauh database you mention. It may be an aid, but
can't be as significant as the lodestone of the Carnegie collection.
You'll find a wealth of material there, plus leads to other area
collections! May I suggest you explore the library's on-line card catalog
and then send the librarian a letter or an email outlining your research
request?

Good luck with your hunt for Harris B. Barnett!

Pat Weinthal
(formerly of Pittsburgh, PA)
Boston, MA

WEINTHAL DEU >NL>UK>USA, AUS, ZAF,ARG
WAJNTAL, WAINTAL DEU>P>USA,FR,B,ARG,BR
ARNHEIM DEU>USA

<"Arnold Sarasky" <asarasky@earthlink.net>

<I am trying to locate the cemetery in which Harris B. Barnett, who died
on March 10, 1910, is buried... I believe that he is buried in a cemetery
in the Pittsburgh, PA area which was his residence. It may be in one of
the cemeteries in the Millvale area... the Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz Museum has advised me that its cemetery data base does not contain
any pertinent information. That data base, however, is not complete....>


Re: Given Name Boruch #galicia

Lowell and/or Betty Nigoff <killshot@...>
 

My father in law, Ben Zuckerman, was born Boruch Tsukerman (or Zukerman),
on 27th of November 1900 (10th or 11th of December 1900, according to
Gregorian calendar) in Feodosia (a city in Crimea), in the family of Abram
and Leah Tsukerman (Zukerman) >from Ekaterinoslav (a city in Ukraine). This
found >from a copy of his official birth record.

My wife and brother in law had always thought his name was Benjamin.

Lowell Nigoff
Lexington, Kentucky USA
 
Researching,
ALTSHULER (Rogachev, Belarus) GORELICK (Rogachev, Belarus - Kiev, Ukraine)
KACHKA, KACZKA, KACZE (Stepan, [Wolyn Volhynia] Poland-Russia?)
NIGOFF, UNIGOFSKY, UNIEGOVSKII, CHERNIGOVSKY, TCHERNIGOVSKY (Vohlynia,
Ukraine)
MAISEL  (Ekaterinoslav, Ukraine)
ZUCKERMAN, TZUCKERMAN (Feodosia, Ekaterinoslav, Ukraine)

To see my family tree go to
http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/n/i/g/Lowell-Nigoff/index.html?Welcome=1065264103

Eden Joachim wrote:

Can anyone tell me if William was a name adopted by men born Boruch in
that part of the world, in the time frame involved?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Given Name Boruch #general

Lowell and/or Betty Nigoff <killshot@...>
 

My father in law, Ben Zuckerman, was born Boruch Tsukerman (or Zukerman),
on 27th of November 1900 (10th or 11th of December 1900, according to
Gregorian calendar) in Feodosia (a city in Crimea), in the family of Abram
and Leah Tsukerman (Zukerman) >from Ekaterinoslav (a city in Ukraine). This
found >from a copy of his official birth record.

My wife and brother in law had always thought his name was Benjamin.

Lowell Nigoff
Lexington, Kentucky USA
 
Researching,
ALTSHULER (Rogachev, Belarus) GORELICK (Rogachev, Belarus - Kiev, Ukraine)
KACHKA, KACZKA, KACZE (Stepan, [Wolyn Volhynia] Poland-Russia?)
NIGOFF, UNIGOFSKY, UNIEGOVSKII, CHERNIGOVSKY, TCHERNIGOVSKY (Vohlynia,
Ukraine)
MAISEL  (Ekaterinoslav, Ukraine)
ZUCKERMAN, TZUCKERMAN (Feodosia, Ekaterinoslav, Ukraine)

To see my family tree go to
http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/n/i/g/Lowell-Nigoff/index.html?Welcome=1065264103

Eden Joachim wrote:

Can anyone tell me if William was a name adopted by men born Boruch in
that part of the world, in the time frame involved?


Re: Percentage of Jews with Polish heritage #general

Alexander Sharon
 

In reply to "Lilli Sprintz" query about the percentage of the Jews with
Polish heritage.

I believe that the correct classification of the Jews with Polish heritage
should be identified with the Jews >from the Polish lands, or even more
precisely, Poland-Lithuanian Commonwealth lands, which have been converted
to the Pale territory during the Russian Empire rule.

With the expulsion of Jews >from the Western Europe and the increased need
for the colonization of the Polish Commonwealth territories, which has been
accomplished by immigrant Jews, largest percentage of the European Jews
was in fact residing on the Polish lands. Till the mid of the 17th century
those were the safest and most prosperous for Jewish people place in all
Europe.

Following mid 17century Cossacks pogroms, remigration occurred to the west
and south of the European continent, remaining of the Jews were residing on
the lands that became ~150 years later incorporated by the Russian and
Austrian crowns.

Prior to WWII, Poland has the largest Jewish population in Europe, and what
we classified as Ukrainian, Russian, Lithuanian or Belarusian Jewry, within
pre war Poland or USSR was in fact the Jewry of the Polish lands.

A good example of the Jewry Polish land origin could be traced to the
statistics of the Jewish Gen Family Finder which can be found in the
introduction section to JGFF:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html

As of Sept 30, 2003, the JGFF contained over 326,000 entries, submitted by
over 66,000 Jewish genealogists worldwide. The database contains over
88,000 different surnames, and nearly 20,000 ancestral town names.

The combined percentage of queries for Poland, Ukraine, Belarus, Lithuania
and Russia is 53.5%.

Not counted in the above is the percentage of queries for USA and Canada
which at the 20% level represents also large portion of Jews that have from
the Polish lands.

One can add to those calculations large percentage of Polish Lands origin
Jewry of Israel, South America, Australia and South Africa.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Percentage of Jews with Polish heritage #general

Alexander Sharon
 

In reply to "Lilli Sprintz" query about the percentage of the Jews with
Polish heritage.

I believe that the correct classification of the Jews with Polish heritage
should be identified with the Jews >from the Polish lands, or even more
precisely, Poland-Lithuanian Commonwealth lands, which have been converted
to the Pale territory during the Russian Empire rule.

With the expulsion of Jews >from the Western Europe and the increased need
for the colonization of the Polish Commonwealth territories, which has been
accomplished by immigrant Jews, largest percentage of the European Jews
was in fact residing on the Polish lands. Till the mid of the 17th century
those were the safest and most prosperous for Jewish people place in all
Europe.

Following mid 17century Cossacks pogroms, remigration occurred to the west
and south of the European continent, remaining of the Jews were residing on
the lands that became ~150 years later incorporated by the Russian and
Austrian crowns.

Prior to WWII, Poland has the largest Jewish population in Europe, and what
we classified as Ukrainian, Russian, Lithuanian or Belarusian Jewry, within
pre war Poland or USSR was in fact the Jewry of the Polish lands.

A good example of the Jewry Polish land origin could be traced to the
statistics of the Jewish Gen Family Finder which can be found in the
introduction section to JGFF:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html

As of Sept 30, 2003, the JGFF contained over 326,000 entries, submitted by
over 66,000 Jewish genealogists worldwide. The database contains over
88,000 different surnames, and nearly 20,000 ancestral town names.

The combined percentage of queries for Poland, Ukraine, Belarus, Lithuania
and Russia is 53.5%.

Not counted in the above is the percentage of queries for USA and Canada
which at the 20% level represents also large portion of Jews that have from
the Polish lands.

One can add to those calculations large percentage of Polish Lands origin
Jewry of Israel, South America, Australia and South Africa.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB, Canada


1930s Vienna & Paris #general

ldashman@...
 

Dear Genners,
For anyone interested in what it was like to grow up in Vienna, then live
in Paris in 1938-39, I highly recommend "Under Swastika and the French
Flag", a memoir published earlier this year. The author, Oscar Scherzer,
was born in Hamburg of Polish parents, who moved the family to Vienna in
1922, where two of his mother's brothers were well-established attorneys
and a third owned a men's tailoring shop.

The majority of the book takes place between 1937 and 1939, and describes
Mr. Scherzer's daily experiences as a teenager in Vienna -- in love, in
school, in a middle-class family -- and his subsequent escape to Paris and
then New York as the Nazis expanded their influence and harassments.

The detail is quite remarkable because Mr. Scherzer wrote down his memories
immediately after his adventures and also includes letters >from his mother
and others left in Vienna.

Best wishes,
Lisa Dashman
Croton-on-Hudson, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1930s Vienna & Paris #general

ldashman@...
 

Dear Genners,
For anyone interested in what it was like to grow up in Vienna, then live
in Paris in 1938-39, I highly recommend "Under Swastika and the French
Flag", a memoir published earlier this year. The author, Oscar Scherzer,
was born in Hamburg of Polish parents, who moved the family to Vienna in
1922, where two of his mother's brothers were well-established attorneys
and a third owned a men's tailoring shop.

The majority of the book takes place between 1937 and 1939, and describes
Mr. Scherzer's daily experiences as a teenager in Vienna -- in love, in
school, in a middle-class family -- and his subsequent escape to Paris and
then New York as the Nazis expanded their influence and harassments.

The detail is quite remarkable because Mr. Scherzer wrote down his memories
immediately after his adventures and also includes letters >from his mother
and others left in Vienna.

Best wishes,
Lisa Dashman
Croton-on-Hudson, NY


"We_Remember Jewish Wyszkow" website and Yizkor Book #poland

Howard Orenstein
 

Earlier this year, I discovered that some of the photos on the "We
Remember Jewish Wyszkow" web page, part of Ada Holtzman's extensive "We
Remember" website, also appear in "Sefer Wyszkow," the Yizkor Book of Wyszkow, (edited by David Shtokfish). "Sefer" was published in Israel (Tel Aviv) in 1964, by the Association of Former Residents of Wishkow in Israel andAbroad. The book is in Yiddish and Hebrew.

Pages 41-43 of "Sefer," which are in Yiddish, were written by Israel
Granat and contain two photos ("A" and "J") that appear on the "We Remember Jewish Wyszkow" website. My cousin, Abraham Holland, graciously volunteered to translate the pages into English.

So, please visit "We Remember Jewish Wyszkow":

www.zchor.org/wyszkow/wyszkow.htm

The actual translation by Abraham Holland is a separate html document
which has a link on the "We Remember Jewish Wyszkow" website:

www.zchor.org/wyszkow/vr.html

Ada Holtzman deserves a lot of the credit for putting this together on
her website:

www.zchor.org
--
Howard B. Orenstein, Ph.D.
McDaniel College
horenstein@mcdaniel.edu


JRI Poland #Poland "We_Remember Jewish Wyszkow" website and Yizkor Book #poland

Howard Orenstein
 

Earlier this year, I discovered that some of the photos on the "We
Remember Jewish Wyszkow" web page, part of Ada Holtzman's extensive "We
Remember" website, also appear in "Sefer Wyszkow," the Yizkor Book of Wyszkow, (edited by David Shtokfish). "Sefer" was published in Israel (Tel Aviv) in 1964, by the Association of Former Residents of Wishkow in Israel andAbroad. The book is in Yiddish and Hebrew.

Pages 41-43 of "Sefer," which are in Yiddish, were written by Israel
Granat and contain two photos ("A" and "J") that appear on the "We Remember Jewish Wyszkow" website. My cousin, Abraham Holland, graciously volunteered to translate the pages into English.

So, please visit "We Remember Jewish Wyszkow":

www.zchor.org/wyszkow/wyszkow.htm

The actual translation by Abraham Holland is a separate html document
which has a link on the "We Remember Jewish Wyszkow" website:

www.zchor.org/wyszkow/vr.html

Ada Holtzman deserves a lot of the credit for putting this together on
her website:

www.zchor.org
--
Howard B. Orenstein, Ph.D.
McDaniel College
horenstein@mcdaniel.edu