Date   

Snitkov / Snitkowo / Snitko - ShtetLinks Page in Process! #belarus

Michelle Frager <lulu_brooks@...>
 

Dear SIG members:

JewishGen’s ShtetLinks has given permission for a Snitkov Page! It's
expected to launch in January with information then ready. After
that, it will be updated as new information comes in.

Everyone with a link to Snitkov/Snitkowo/Snitko is urged to join the
‘team' by contributing information.

Snitkov etc. is a former Podolia shtetl, now sometimes known as
Snitkiv, a Ukrainian town. It is located east of Kaminets-Podolsk and
southwest of Vinnitsa and Zhmerinka, at 48-48/27-38. (Sorry, can’t
do degrees and minutes.) With those coordinates, you will find it at
Mapquest, http://www.mapquest.com , where you can see it in relation
to other towns.

The existence of this page will make a difference. Like many smaller
shtetlech, there's not very much Snitkov material out there in one
place, and especially not in English. Researchers can be and are
frazzled. So this page will consolidate as much information as
possible, starting with English-language materials and hopefully,
moving over time into translations of non-English resources. And in
addition to research resources, will be the family and family-based
information we are sitting on, the simple things, the basic things we
may not even realize can fill out the sparse picture.

Some examples of possible contributions:
=The memories you were exposed to, of immigrant grandparents or other
family members who lived there
=Recorded or transcribed memoirs of Snitkov ancestors, by them or
others
=Photos of these ancestors or relatives
=Your Snitkov family names
=Non-relative Snitkov names appearing in research done on your
Snitkov family
=Historic or historical materials:
(papers, passports, school records, vital records, etc., >from the
Snitkov years; or news clippings referencing them - obituaries, early
20th century Yiddish newspapers and so on.)
=Old maps
=Cemetery burials information in the Snitkov area and overseas
(landsmanschaften plots, actual names, officials, etc.)
=Whatever else you can think of that's Snitkov-based.

Whether it’s a few sentences, a few pages, or some pictures, if you
have information about Snitkov or its former inhabitants,please
donate it and help make this a special site. [Some HTML assistance
may not be amiss, either.]

Your contribution to the page will establish a lasting accessible
tribute to, and resource on, our ancestral shtetl and our ancestors.

You can reach me at: <lulu_brooks@yahoo.com>. I look forward to
hearing >from my lands-men and -women.

Michelle Frager
lulu_brooks@yahoo.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus Snitkov / Snitkowo / Snitko - ShtetLinks Page in Process! #belarus

Michelle Frager <lulu_brooks@...>
 

Dear SIG members:

JewishGen’s ShtetLinks has given permission for a Snitkov Page! It's
expected to launch in January with information then ready. After
that, it will be updated as new information comes in.

Everyone with a link to Snitkov/Snitkowo/Snitko is urged to join the
‘team' by contributing information.

Snitkov etc. is a former Podolia shtetl, now sometimes known as
Snitkiv, a Ukrainian town. It is located east of Kaminets-Podolsk and
southwest of Vinnitsa and Zhmerinka, at 48-48/27-38. (Sorry, can’t
do degrees and minutes.) With those coordinates, you will find it at
Mapquest, http://www.mapquest.com , where you can see it in relation
to other towns.

The existence of this page will make a difference. Like many smaller
shtetlech, there's not very much Snitkov material out there in one
place, and especially not in English. Researchers can be and are
frazzled. So this page will consolidate as much information as
possible, starting with English-language materials and hopefully,
moving over time into translations of non-English resources. And in
addition to research resources, will be the family and family-based
information we are sitting on, the simple things, the basic things we
may not even realize can fill out the sparse picture.

Some examples of possible contributions:
=The memories you were exposed to, of immigrant grandparents or other
family members who lived there
=Recorded or transcribed memoirs of Snitkov ancestors, by them or
others
=Photos of these ancestors or relatives
=Your Snitkov family names
=Non-relative Snitkov names appearing in research done on your
Snitkov family
=Historic or historical materials:
(papers, passports, school records, vital records, etc., >from the
Snitkov years; or news clippings referencing them - obituaries, early
20th century Yiddish newspapers and so on.)
=Old maps
=Cemetery burials information in the Snitkov area and overseas
(landsmanschaften plots, actual names, officials, etc.)
=Whatever else you can think of that's Snitkov-based.

Whether it’s a few sentences, a few pages, or some pictures, if you
have information about Snitkov or its former inhabitants,please
donate it and help make this a special site. [Some HTML assistance
may not be amiss, either.]

Your contribution to the page will establish a lasting accessible
tribute to, and resource on, our ancestral shtetl and our ancestors.

You can reach me at: <lulu_brooks@yahoo.com>. I look forward to
hearing >from my lands-men and -women.

Michelle Frager
lulu_brooks@yahoo.com


Researching Jablonow, Peczenizyn, Tekucza #general

John Hoenig
 

I am gathering information about several shtetlach southwest of Kolomea in
Eastern Galicia with the goal of eventually putting together a shtetl-
link. The shetlach of interest are: Jablonow, Peczenizyn, Tekucza and
Stopchatov . (Please be aware that there were 4 shetlach in Eastern
Galicia called Jablonow.)

If you have any information about these villages or any of the people who
ever lived there, I would dearly love to hear >from you. Photographs would
especially be of interest.

So far, I have collected gravestone data >from two landsmanschaft cemetery
plots, a description in Yiddish of how one woman survived the war in
Jablonow, two wedding photographs, pictures of the wooden shul that burned
down in World War I, and about 500 records of people >from Jablonow gleaned
from passenger manifests, naturalization papers, vital records (>from
outside of Jablonow), business directories, etc.

John Hoenig
Williamsburg, VA

MODERATOR NOTE: We encourage you to prepare a ShtetLinks page for this
area, or one for each shtetl. Before you progress too far, though, please
read the information in the ShtetLinks portion of the JewishGen site on how
to create a ShtetLinks site. You will find lots of helpful information
there: http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/documentation/writing.htm


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Researching Jablonow, Peczenizyn, Tekucza #general

John Hoenig
 

I am gathering information about several shtetlach southwest of Kolomea in
Eastern Galicia with the goal of eventually putting together a shtetl-
link. The shetlach of interest are: Jablonow, Peczenizyn, Tekucza and
Stopchatov . (Please be aware that there were 4 shetlach in Eastern
Galicia called Jablonow.)

If you have any information about these villages or any of the people who
ever lived there, I would dearly love to hear >from you. Photographs would
especially be of interest.

So far, I have collected gravestone data >from two landsmanschaft cemetery
plots, a description in Yiddish of how one woman survived the war in
Jablonow, two wedding photographs, pictures of the wooden shul that burned
down in World War I, and about 500 records of people >from Jablonow gleaned
from passenger manifests, naturalization papers, vital records (>from
outside of Jablonow), business directories, etc.

John Hoenig
Williamsburg, VA

MODERATOR NOTE: We encourage you to prepare a ShtetLinks page for this
area, or one for each shtetl. Before you progress too far, though, please
read the information in the ShtetLinks portion of the JewishGen site on how
to create a ShtetLinks site. You will find lots of helpful information
there: http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/documentation/writing.htm


Alan LEIBOWITZ #general

godfrey marcus <glmarcus@...>
 

Does anyone know the new e-mail of bigal@cheerful.com.
His name is Alan Leibowitz. This address appeared in
a Romania site. He was in New York.
Godfrey Marcus


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Alan LEIBOWITZ #general

godfrey marcus <glmarcus@...>
 

Does anyone know the new e-mail of bigal@cheerful.com.
His name is Alan Leibowitz. This address appeared in
a Romania site. He was in New York.
Godfrey Marcus


Re: Silversmith #ciechanow #poland

Robert Mayers <mayersnyc@...>
 

Lyle,
I have no idea, but this is a very interesting history and wish you well.
One thing you might do is go to the Mormon Center near Lincoln Center in
Manhnattan and ask them to obtain the micofilm records for births, deaths
and marriages in Ciechanow. I suggest that when they get this information
you go with a Polish speaking person and read the films to see what the
true spellings of your family name was and whether there is information on
their vocation. Good luck.

Bob Mayers
ram39@cornell.edu


[Original Message]
From: <Lyle11230@aol.com>
To: Ciechanow Research Group <ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Date: 11/14/03 10:42:07 PM
Subject: Silversmith

This list is supported by JewishGen. Please show
your appreciation and support by visiting
http://www.jewishgen.org/Jewishgen-erosity/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
My great grandfather was Abraham Silversmith (1854-1930) of
Ciechanow. He married Sara Leah Ducyminer of nearby Pryzasnys (Prushnitz).
His father's first name was Simcha.

According to the metal plaque on the gate of the Ciechanow society at
Mt. Lebanon cemetery in Queens, Abraham was the President of the Ciechanow
Society in New York. The inscription on his tombstone in the Ciechanow
plot at Bayside, Queens, states that he was very proud to have reached this
position.

Abraham was a shoemaker, and came to the United States in 1887 after
he had been in the Russian Army.

The Ciechanow Yizkor books indicates that there were goldsmiths in
Ciechanow, and artisans and craftsmen but thre is no mention of
silversmiths. The archival records for marriages list 3 Silversmiths
getting married but no one who I could identify by their own or their
parents' names. In the US today, the names Goldsmith, Silverman, and
Silverstein are very common, but only about 100 people have the name
Silversmith (derived >from Zylberschmidt and Zilbersmit, and similar Polish
spellings), and some of these are Navajo Indians. In Ciechanow, the name
Silversmith seems to be fairly common, while outside the town the name is
virtually nonexistent. I have not been able to find out how the Ciechanow
Silversmiths got or chose their name, since silversmithing appears to have
been nonexistent. Does anyone have any ideas or information?

LYLE SILVERSMITH
BROOKLYN NY


---
To post to the Ciechanow Research discussion group, send your message to:
<ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org>

This research group (ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org

You are currently subscribed to ciechanow as: [ram39@cornell.edu]
To unsubscribe send email to leave-ciechanow-70252N@lyris.jewishgen.org


#Ciechanow #Poland RE: Silversmith #ciechanow #poland

Robert Mayers <mayersnyc@...>
 

Lyle,
I have no idea, but this is a very interesting history and wish you well.
One thing you might do is go to the Mormon Center near Lincoln Center in
Manhnattan and ask them to obtain the micofilm records for births, deaths
and marriages in Ciechanow. I suggest that when they get this information
you go with a Polish speaking person and read the films to see what the
true spellings of your family name was and whether there is information on
their vocation. Good luck.

Bob Mayers
ram39@cornell.edu


[Original Message]
From: <Lyle11230@aol.com>
To: Ciechanow Research Group <ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Date: 11/14/03 10:42:07 PM
Subject: Silversmith

This list is supported by JewishGen. Please show
your appreciation and support by visiting
http://www.jewishgen.org/Jewishgen-erosity/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
My great grandfather was Abraham Silversmith (1854-1930) of
Ciechanow. He married Sara Leah Ducyminer of nearby Pryzasnys (Prushnitz).
His father's first name was Simcha.

According to the metal plaque on the gate of the Ciechanow society at
Mt. Lebanon cemetery in Queens, Abraham was the President of the Ciechanow
Society in New York. The inscription on his tombstone in the Ciechanow
plot at Bayside, Queens, states that he was very proud to have reached this
position.

Abraham was a shoemaker, and came to the United States in 1887 after
he had been in the Russian Army.

The Ciechanow Yizkor books indicates that there were goldsmiths in
Ciechanow, and artisans and craftsmen but thre is no mention of
silversmiths. The archival records for marriages list 3 Silversmiths
getting married but no one who I could identify by their own or their
parents' names. In the US today, the names Goldsmith, Silverman, and
Silverstein are very common, but only about 100 people have the name
Silversmith (derived >from Zylberschmidt and Zilbersmit, and similar Polish
spellings), and some of these are Navajo Indians. In Ciechanow, the name
Silversmith seems to be fairly common, while outside the town the name is
virtually nonexistent. I have not been able to find out how the Ciechanow
Silversmiths got or chose their name, since silversmithing appears to have
been nonexistent. Does anyone have any ideas or information?

LYLE SILVERSMITH
BROOKLYN NY


---
To post to the Ciechanow Research discussion group, send your message to:
<ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org>

This research group (ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org

You are currently subscribed to ciechanow as: [ram39@cornell.edu]
To unsubscribe send email to leave-ciechanow-70252N@lyris.jewishgen.org


Re: Silversmith #ciechanow #poland

robinson <rrobinson13@...>
 

The Polish name for silversmith is zlotnik. The same for a goldsmith. Gold
in Polish is zloto. Silver is, srebro. I don't think it made any difference
which metal the artisan worked with. In German it would be Goldschmied or
Silberschmied. Either way, the profession did exist.
Rita R., Ontario, Canada
Yesterday is history, for us it is a mystery.

----- Original Message -----
From: <Lyle11230@aol.com>
To: "Ciechanow Research Group" <ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, November 14, 2003 10:34 PM
Subject: Silversmith


This list is supported by JewishGen. Please show
your appreciation and support by visiting
http://www.jewishgen.org/Jewishgen-erosity/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
My great grandfather was Abraham Silversmith (1854-1930) of Ciechanow.
He married Sara Leah Ducyminer of nearby Pryzasnys (Prushnitz). His
father's first name was Simcha.

According to the metal plaque on the gate of the Ciechanow society at
Mt. Lebanon cemetery in Queens, Abraham was the President of the Ciechanow
Society in New York. The inscription on his tombstone in the Ciechanow plot
at Bayside, Queens, states that he was very proud to have reached this
position.

Abraham was a shoemaker, and came to the United States in 1887 after
he had been in the Russian Army.

The Ciechanow Yizkor books indicates that there were goldsmiths in
Ciechanow, and artisans and craftsmen but thre is no mention of
silversmiths. The archival records for marriages list 3 Silversmiths
getting married but no one who I could identify by their own or their
parents' names. In the US today, the names Goldsmith, Silverman, and
Silverstein are very common, but only about 100 people have the name
Silversmith (derived >from Zylberschmidt and Zilbersmit, and similar Polish
spellings), and some of
these are Navajo Indians. In Ciechanow, the name Silversmith seems to be
fairly common, while outside the town the name is virtually nonexistent. I
have not been able to find out how the Ciechanow Silversmiths got or chose
their name, since silversmithing appears to have been nonexistent. Does
anyone have any ideas or information?

LYLE SILVERSMITH
BROOKLYN NY


---
To post to the Ciechanow Research discussion group, send your message to:
<ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org>

This research group (ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org

You are currently subscribed to ciechanow as: [rrobinson13@cogeco.ca]
To unsubscribe send email to leave-ciechanow-786903D@lyris.jewishgen.org


#Ciechanow #Poland Re: Silversmith #ciechanow #poland

robinson <rrobinson13@...>
 

The Polish name for silversmith is zlotnik. The same for a goldsmith. Gold
in Polish is zloto. Silver is, srebro. I don't think it made any difference
which metal the artisan worked with. In German it would be Goldschmied or
Silberschmied. Either way, the profession did exist.
Rita R., Ontario, Canada
Yesterday is history, for us it is a mystery.

----- Original Message -----
From: <Lyle11230@aol.com>
To: "Ciechanow Research Group" <ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, November 14, 2003 10:34 PM
Subject: Silversmith


This list is supported by JewishGen. Please show
your appreciation and support by visiting
http://www.jewishgen.org/Jewishgen-erosity/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
My great grandfather was Abraham Silversmith (1854-1930) of Ciechanow.
He married Sara Leah Ducyminer of nearby Pryzasnys (Prushnitz). His
father's first name was Simcha.

According to the metal plaque on the gate of the Ciechanow society at
Mt. Lebanon cemetery in Queens, Abraham was the President of the Ciechanow
Society in New York. The inscription on his tombstone in the Ciechanow plot
at Bayside, Queens, states that he was very proud to have reached this
position.

Abraham was a shoemaker, and came to the United States in 1887 after
he had been in the Russian Army.

The Ciechanow Yizkor books indicates that there were goldsmiths in
Ciechanow, and artisans and craftsmen but thre is no mention of
silversmiths. The archival records for marriages list 3 Silversmiths
getting married but no one who I could identify by their own or their
parents' names. In the US today, the names Goldsmith, Silverman, and
Silverstein are very common, but only about 100 people have the name
Silversmith (derived >from Zylberschmidt and Zilbersmit, and similar Polish
spellings), and some of
these are Navajo Indians. In Ciechanow, the name Silversmith seems to be
fairly common, while outside the town the name is virtually nonexistent. I
have not been able to find out how the Ciechanow Silversmiths got or chose
their name, since silversmithing appears to have been nonexistent. Does
anyone have any ideas or information?

LYLE SILVERSMITH
BROOKLYN NY


---
To post to the Ciechanow Research discussion group, send your message to:
<ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org>

This research group (ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org

You are currently subscribed to ciechanow as: [rrobinson13@cogeco.ca]
To unsubscribe send email to leave-ciechanow-786903D@lyris.jewishgen.org


Snitkov / Snitkowo / Snitko - ShtetLinks Page in Process! #romania

Michelle Frager <lulu_brooks@...>
 

Dear SIG members:

JewishGen’s ShtetLinks has given permission for a Snitkov Page! It's
expected to launch in January with information then ready. After
that, it will be updated as new information comes in.

Everyone with a link to Snitkov/Snitkowo/Snitko is urged to join the
‘team' by contributing information.

Snitkov etc. is a former Podolia shtetl, now sometimes known as
Snitkiv, a Ukrainian town. It is located east of Kaminets-Podolsk and
southwest of Vinnitsa and Zhmerinka, at 48-48/27-38. (Sorry, can’t
do degrees and minutes.) With those coordinates, you will find it at
Mapquest, http://www.mapquest.com , where you can see it in relation
to other towns.

The existence of this page will make a difference. Like many smaller
shtetlech, there's not very much Snitkov material out there in one
place, and especially not in English. Researchers can be and are
frazzled. So this page will consolidate as much information as
possible, starting with English-language materials and hopefully,
moving over time into translations of non-English resources. And in
addition to research resources, will be the family and family-based
information we are sitting on, the simple things, the basic things we
may not even realize can fill out the sparse picture.

Some examples of possible contributions:
=The memories you were exposed to, of immigrant grandparents or other
family members who lived there
=Recorded or transcribed memoirs of Snitkov ancestors, by them or
others
=Photos of these ancestors or relatives
=Your Snitkov family names
=Non-relative Snitkov names appearing in research done on your
Snitkov family
=Historic or historical materials:
(papers, passports, school records, vital records, etc., >from the
Snitkov years; or news clippings referencing them - obituaries, early
20th century Yiddish newspapers and so on.)
=Old maps
=Cemetery burials information in the Snitkov area and overseas
(landsmanschaften plots, actual names, officials, etc.)
=Whatever else you can think of that's Snitkov-based.

Whether it’s a few sentences, a few pages, or some pictures, if you
have information about Snitkov or its former inhabitants,please
donate it and help make this a special site. [Some HTML assistance
may not be amiss, either.]

Your contribution to the page will establish a lasting accessible
tribute to, and resource on, our ancestral shtetl and our ancestors.

You can reach me at: lulu_brooks@yahoo.com. I look forward to
hearing >from my lands-men and -women.

Michelle Frager
lulu_brooks@yahoo.com


Romania SIG #Romania Snitkov / Snitkowo / Snitko - ShtetLinks Page in Process! #romania

Michelle Frager <lulu_brooks@...>
 

Dear SIG members:

JewishGen’s ShtetLinks has given permission for a Snitkov Page! It's
expected to launch in January with information then ready. After
that, it will be updated as new information comes in.

Everyone with a link to Snitkov/Snitkowo/Snitko is urged to join the
‘team' by contributing information.

Snitkov etc. is a former Podolia shtetl, now sometimes known as
Snitkiv, a Ukrainian town. It is located east of Kaminets-Podolsk and
southwest of Vinnitsa and Zhmerinka, at 48-48/27-38. (Sorry, can’t
do degrees and minutes.) With those coordinates, you will find it at
Mapquest, http://www.mapquest.com , where you can see it in relation
to other towns.

The existence of this page will make a difference. Like many smaller
shtetlech, there's not very much Snitkov material out there in one
place, and especially not in English. Researchers can be and are
frazzled. So this page will consolidate as much information as
possible, starting with English-language materials and hopefully,
moving over time into translations of non-English resources. And in
addition to research resources, will be the family and family-based
information we are sitting on, the simple things, the basic things we
may not even realize can fill out the sparse picture.

Some examples of possible contributions:
=The memories you were exposed to, of immigrant grandparents or other
family members who lived there
=Recorded or transcribed memoirs of Snitkov ancestors, by them or
others
=Photos of these ancestors or relatives
=Your Snitkov family names
=Non-relative Snitkov names appearing in research done on your
Snitkov family
=Historic or historical materials:
(papers, passports, school records, vital records, etc., >from the
Snitkov years; or news clippings referencing them - obituaries, early
20th century Yiddish newspapers and so on.)
=Old maps
=Cemetery burials information in the Snitkov area and overseas
(landsmanschaften plots, actual names, officials, etc.)
=Whatever else you can think of that's Snitkov-based.

Whether it’s a few sentences, a few pages, or some pictures, if you
have information about Snitkov or its former inhabitants,please
donate it and help make this a special site. [Some HTML assistance
may not be amiss, either.]

Your contribution to the page will establish a lasting accessible
tribute to, and resource on, our ancestral shtetl and our ancestors.

You can reach me at: lulu_brooks@yahoo.com. I look forward to
hearing >from my lands-men and -women.

Michelle Frager
lulu_brooks@yahoo.com


Re: Galician AGAD marriage indices question #galicia

Gershon bi-Kroke <gershon_gp@...>
 

Usually,
they should list both the parents of the bride and the groom, as well as
their occupation and place they lived.

Best regards,

Grzegorz Gembala
Krakow, Poland

Denise Azbill napisa3:

Has anyone ordered marriage indices through the AGAD project >from before
1877? Are the parents of the bride and groom shown? I found one of
interest, but only want to order it if the groom's parents' names are
listed. This record is >from Borschow, >from 1858.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Galician AGAD marriage indices question #general

Gershon bi-Kroke <gershon_gp@...>
 

Usually,
they should list both the parents of the bride and the groom, as well as
their occupation and place they lived.

Best regards,

Grzegorz Gembala
Krakow, Poland

Denise Azbill napisa3:

Has anyone ordered marriage indices through the AGAD project >from before
1877? Are the parents of the bride and groom shown? I found one of
interest, but only want to order it if the groom's parents' names are
listed. This record is >from Borschow, >from 1858.


Father Irving(Israel) Krinsky #general

RoniKrinsky28 <ronikrinsky28@...>
 

I am looking for anyone who might have known my father Irving Krinsky. On
some documents he is listed as Israel. He was born on April 5, 1901 in
Wolkaviska and came to the US through Ellis Island in 1917. His father is
Isaac Krinsky and his mother is Mollie(Malka) Beckenstein(maiden name)
Krinsky.

In the 1920 census the family is listed as living on 101-107 Delancey
Street, NYC on the lower East Side. They lived with 3 other sons, George,
William, and Rubin.

At a later time they lived on 182 South 3rd Street, Brooklyn, NY
(Williamsburgh).

He married Lena Rossen and then lived in Williamsburgh. One address is 226
Rodney Street.

He was in the silk business which was located at 31 East 28th Street.

Thank you.

Please respond to:
RoniKrinsky@aol.com

Roni Krinsky


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Father Irving(Israel) Krinsky #general

RoniKrinsky28 <ronikrinsky28@...>
 

I am looking for anyone who might have known my father Irving Krinsky. On
some documents he is listed as Israel. He was born on April 5, 1901 in
Wolkaviska and came to the US through Ellis Island in 1917. His father is
Isaac Krinsky and his mother is Mollie(Malka) Beckenstein(maiden name)
Krinsky.

In the 1920 census the family is listed as living on 101-107 Delancey
Street, NYC on the lower East Side. They lived with 3 other sons, George,
William, and Rubin.

At a later time they lived on 182 South 3rd Street, Brooklyn, NY
(Williamsburgh).

He married Lena Rossen and then lived in Williamsburgh. One address is 226
Rodney Street.

He was in the silk business which was located at 31 East 28th Street.

Thank you.

Please respond to:
RoniKrinsky@aol.com

Roni Krinsky


Boxing - Lower East Side #general

S Morochnick <bodiam@...>
 

Would anyone know of a good resouce for Jewish Boxers in the Lower East
Side, Manhattan during the 1920's -30's? My grandfather and one of his
brothers boxed in a building called the "Christen Dora House" (spelling
uncertain). I understand the building housed the NYC Welfare Department in
the 1950's and 60's.

Thanks,
Stephen Morochnick


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Boxing - Lower East Side #general

S Morochnick <bodiam@...>
 

Would anyone know of a good resouce for Jewish Boxers in the Lower East
Side, Manhattan during the 1920's -30's? My grandfather and one of his
brothers boxed in a building called the "Christen Dora House" (spelling
uncertain). I understand the building housed the NYC Welfare Department in
the 1950's and 60's.

Thanks,
Stephen Morochnick


finding friends/relatives thru Israel Radio #general

Charutz <yairharu@...>
 

I hope that some of you out there can help me. I have heard that there is a
program on one of the channels of Israel Radio where people try to trace
friends or relatives with whom they have lost contact at some point in time.
This even includes people who try to trace people who may have survived the
Holocaust and have been "missing" for fifty years or more.

I do not know what the success rate of the program is, but I do believe that
there have been occasional successes.

My question is, do any of you know of this program? At which times and on
what station does it appear? This information would be very useful to me and
maybe even to orher Israelis involved in genealogical researches.

TIA

Chaim Charutz
yairharu@zahav.net.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen finding friends/relatives thru Israel Radio #general

Charutz <yairharu@...>
 

I hope that some of you out there can help me. I have heard that there is a
program on one of the channels of Israel Radio where people try to trace
friends or relatives with whom they have lost contact at some point in time.
This even includes people who try to trace people who may have survived the
Holocaust and have been "missing" for fifty years or more.

I do not know what the success rate of the program is, but I do believe that
there have been occasional successes.

My question is, do any of you know of this program? At which times and on
what station does it appear? This information would be very useful to me and
maybe even to orher Israelis involved in genealogical researches.

TIA

Chaim Charutz
yairharu@zahav.net.il