Date   

Occupation in Trade Directory #warsaw #poland

Peter Lebensold
 

By working backwards (and because I am trying to put off doing my "real" job!), I can help
a little with the first of George Mason's questions: "I have found a possible relative of
mine in the All Poland Business Directory of 1923. His name is listed in an
occupation/business section titled, "Agenturowo-komisowe domy" and, under his name is the
description, "dom handlowy". Can anybody tell me what type of occupation or business is
being described here?"

Looking at the 1923 Polish Trade Directory (on the U.S. Library of Congress website at ...

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=gdc3&fileName=scd0001_20020613002popage.db )

... "Agenturowo-komisowe domy" is listed in the Polish-language index (Page 20 of Dzial
[Section?] 1, online Image 55) as appearing at Page 2 of Dzial II. Turning next to the
English-language index (Page 91 of Dzial I, online Image 126), the only listing for Page 2
is translated as "Agencies and Consignees". The French translation (Page 46, online Image
#81) may be a bit more helpful: "Representants et negociants commissionaires" - or,
literally, "Representatives and negotiators on commission" - essentially what we'd call
today a commissioned sales rep.

On page 98 of Dzial II (online Image 297) - at the top of column 3, "Domy handlowe" is
translated into English as "Commercial Agencies". No hint anywhere, sadly, of what sort
of goods were being sold. Has George checked the advertisements in the directory?

As to the second of his questions ("Does anyone know of a directory or registry for Warsaw
in the 1925-1935 era that indicates who lived at what address?"): That is something I
would dearly love to find myself. (Maybe someone could take on the task of keying in one
of the available telephone directories, so that it might then be street-name searchable?)

Peter Lebensold,
Toronto

============================================
PREFERRED EMAIL ADDRESS: peter@lebensold.com
Phone: 416-485-0883 Fax: 416-485-1996
Alternative email address: lebensold@sympatico.ca


names on Warsaw Birth records #warsaw #poland

Elizabeth Jackson
 

Thank you to the many, many people who responded to my
recent quiry regarding the names KLEPFISZ and GUTENTAG
on Warsaw birth records. There have been so many
responses sent to me personally, that I regret I have
not been able to respond to all individually, but
please know that I appreciate every response I have
received.

I am summarizing these responses here for general
interest.

The general consensus of these responses is that
GUTENTAG is the mother's maiden names.

Other responses indicated that:
1. the parents' marriage might only have been a
religious one, not a civil one, hence the mother's
maiden name used as child's surname.

2. "While not common, depending on the year, the city,
the individual registrar they sometimes didn't
recognize Jewish marriages and listed the children as
illegitimate and hence the mother's maiden name."

3. If marriages were deemed illegitimate in civil law-
ie they were religious synagogue marriages then the
children took the MAIDEN name of their mother which
must have been Klepfisz. Very common situation in
Poland and also in the Hapsburg Empire..

I also appreciated the following information:
First of all, don't get by all the funny things that
the Poles do at the end of most Polish substantives in
genetive form, The names in those records are: Reica
and Minol Klepfisz, the children of Majer and Feiga
Gutentag. Don't bother about the other forms of those
names [Reicy, Minola, Majera, Faigi, Klepfisza]

Once again, thanks to all who responded to my quiry.

Elizabeth Jackson
Murfreesboro Tennessee


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Occupation in Trade Directory #warsaw #poland

Peter Lebensold
 

By working backwards (and because I am trying to put off doing my "real" job!), I can help
a little with the first of George Mason's questions: "I have found a possible relative of
mine in the All Poland Business Directory of 1923. His name is listed in an
occupation/business section titled, "Agenturowo-komisowe domy" and, under his name is the
description, "dom handlowy". Can anybody tell me what type of occupation or business is
being described here?"

Looking at the 1923 Polish Trade Directory (on the U.S. Library of Congress website at ...

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=gdc3&fileName=scd0001_20020613002popage.db )

... "Agenturowo-komisowe domy" is listed in the Polish-language index (Page 20 of Dzial
[Section?] 1, online Image 55) as appearing at Page 2 of Dzial II. Turning next to the
English-language index (Page 91 of Dzial I, online Image 126), the only listing for Page 2
is translated as "Agencies and Consignees". The French translation (Page 46, online Image
#81) may be a bit more helpful: "Representants et negociants commissionaires" - or,
literally, "Representatives and negotiators on commission" - essentially what we'd call
today a commissioned sales rep.

On page 98 of Dzial II (online Image 297) - at the top of column 3, "Domy handlowe" is
translated into English as "Commercial Agencies". No hint anywhere, sadly, of what sort
of goods were being sold. Has George checked the advertisements in the directory?

As to the second of his questions ("Does anyone know of a directory or registry for Warsaw
in the 1925-1935 era that indicates who lived at what address?"): That is something I
would dearly love to find myself. (Maybe someone could take on the task of keying in one
of the available telephone directories, so that it might then be street-name searchable?)

Peter Lebensold,
Toronto

============================================
PREFERRED EMAIL ADDRESS: peter@lebensold.com
Phone: 416-485-0883 Fax: 416-485-1996
Alternative email address: lebensold@sympatico.ca


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland names on Warsaw Birth records #warsaw #poland

Elizabeth Jackson
 

Thank you to the many, many people who responded to my
recent quiry regarding the names KLEPFISZ and GUTENTAG
on Warsaw birth records. There have been so many
responses sent to me personally, that I regret I have
not been able to respond to all individually, but
please know that I appreciate every response I have
received.

I am summarizing these responses here for general
interest.

The general consensus of these responses is that
GUTENTAG is the mother's maiden names.

Other responses indicated that:
1. the parents' marriage might only have been a
religious one, not a civil one, hence the mother's
maiden name used as child's surname.

2. "While not common, depending on the year, the city,
the individual registrar they sometimes didn't
recognize Jewish marriages and listed the children as
illegitimate and hence the mother's maiden name."

3. If marriages were deemed illegitimate in civil law-
ie they were religious synagogue marriages then the
children took the MAIDEN name of their mother which
must have been Klepfisz. Very common situation in
Poland and also in the Hapsburg Empire..

I also appreciated the following information:
First of all, don't get by all the funny things that
the Poles do at the end of most Polish substantives in
genetive form, The names in those records are: Reica
and Minol Klepfisz, the children of Majer and Feiga
Gutentag. Don't bother about the other forms of those
names [Reicy, Minola, Majera, Faigi, Klepfisza]

Once again, thanks to all who responded to my quiry.

Elizabeth Jackson
Murfreesboro Tennessee


Re: Finding mailing addresses #general

DVORAHSV@...
 

Wendy,
If you have phone numbers for those folks, I think the good 'ol phone company now
provides addresses on request, don't they? Try calling directory assistance and
ask for the address...

Deborah Schafer
Greenfield Massaschusetts
Searching in Bessarabia (Moldova) and Ukraine: SCHAFER, RAPOPORT, RISELES or
ROJZELES

In a message dated 3/30/2004 "Wendygriswold" <wendygriswold@erols.com> wrote:

Hi, cousins.

With a lot of help and support >from the genners, I have recently discovered
several of my father's first cousins. Apparently they did not know about
each other because their parents grew up on opposite coasts and there was no
contact.

Through sources like MyFamily.com I've found phone numbers and cities of
residence, but I'd like to contact them by letter rather than by calling.

Does anyone have experience with paying sites like MyFamily.com for the info
on mailing addresses? Or is there a better way? Are these
sites legit? And if they can get the info, why can't I?

All advice welcome. I'm sure I'm missing something obvious.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Finding mailing addresses #general

DVORAHSV@...
 

Wendy,
If you have phone numbers for those folks, I think the good 'ol phone company now
provides addresses on request, don't they? Try calling directory assistance and
ask for the address...

Deborah Schafer
Greenfield Massaschusetts
Searching in Bessarabia (Moldova) and Ukraine: SCHAFER, RAPOPORT, RISELES or
ROJZELES

In a message dated 3/30/2004 "Wendygriswold" <wendygriswold@erols.com> wrote:

Hi, cousins.

With a lot of help and support >from the genners, I have recently discovered
several of my father's first cousins. Apparently they did not know about
each other because their parents grew up on opposite coasts and there was no
contact.

Through sources like MyFamily.com I've found phone numbers and cities of
residence, but I'd like to contact them by letter rather than by calling.

Does anyone have experience with paying sites like MyFamily.com for the info
on mailing addresses? Or is there a better way? Are these
sites legit? And if they can get the info, why can't I?

All advice welcome. I'm sure I'm missing something obvious.


Ruben Benevolent Society- NYC #general

sjsh110@...
 

I am searching for any info on the *Ruben Benevolent Society*. It was a burial
society in New York City during the 1920's and '30s. They owned land in
Washington Cemetery in Brooklyn and was basically German-owned.

Some of the founders were Samuel SIMON, Mendel HYMAN, Morris HOCHMAN. It
was such a large piece of land that two marble pillars, with names engraved
stood at the entrance, connected by a wrought iron sign. The cemetery says it is
now extinct, and has no further information.

Sue Horwitz
West Bloomfield, Mi
sjsh110@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ruben Benevolent Society- NYC #general

sjsh110@...
 

I am searching for any info on the *Ruben Benevolent Society*. It was a burial
society in New York City during the 1920's and '30s. They owned land in
Washington Cemetery in Brooklyn and was basically German-owned.

Some of the founders were Samuel SIMON, Mendel HYMAN, Morris HOCHMAN. It
was such a large piece of land that two marble pillars, with names engraved
stood at the entrance, connected by a wrought iron sign. The cemetery says it is
now extinct, and has no further information.

Sue Horwitz
West Bloomfield, Mi
sjsh110@aol.com


Tradition of naming babies as a tool in genealogy research #general

Yehuda Berman <ybberman@...>
 

1. Nathan is a Hebrew name in its own right and not the English version
of Nachum, a different name. Incidentally, my Czech-born mother-in-law was
called “Chumi” as a girl, short for Nechama, but her official name is
Aurelia and her friends call her Rella.

2. My own old-fashioned, European-born parents had no problem adopting
what they called “Minhag America” (American custom) and naming me after both
my grandmothers, using the first letters of their names. They would have
been shocked to have been called Reform.

3. In both the Ashkenazi and Sefardi customs a child is never named after
a living parent, because there is the possibility that when one was called
the other would answer and that would be a violation of the commandment to
“honor your mother and your father”. However Sefardim don’t see any
possibility of mix-up between a child and its grandparent, so they name
children in honor of living grandparents. Ashkenazim, on the other hand,
extended the ban on naming children after living parents to all living
persons.

Yehuda Berman, Israel
Born in the U.S.A.


A new discussion of Jewish naming traditions was started recently ….,
specifically about the girl's name of Nachamki…… I was among the
participants who sent this Digest comments to that effect.
...
Since Nathan is the English version of Nachum, and Nachum is the
masculine version of Nachama, it is possible that Ms. Goldberg should be
looking for a "Nathana." >>>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Tradition of naming babies as a tool in genealogy research #general

Yehuda Berman <ybberman@...>
 

1. Nathan is a Hebrew name in its own right and not the English version
of Nachum, a different name. Incidentally, my Czech-born mother-in-law was
called “Chumi” as a girl, short for Nechama, but her official name is
Aurelia and her friends call her Rella.

2. My own old-fashioned, European-born parents had no problem adopting
what they called “Minhag America” (American custom) and naming me after both
my grandmothers, using the first letters of their names. They would have
been shocked to have been called Reform.

3. In both the Ashkenazi and Sefardi customs a child is never named after
a living parent, because there is the possibility that when one was called
the other would answer and that would be a violation of the commandment to
“honor your mother and your father”. However Sefardim don’t see any
possibility of mix-up between a child and its grandparent, so they name
children in honor of living grandparents. Ashkenazim, on the other hand,
extended the ban on naming children after living parents to all living
persons.

Yehuda Berman, Israel
Born in the U.S.A.


A new discussion of Jewish naming traditions was started recently ….,
specifically about the girl's name of Nachamki…… I was among the
participants who sent this Digest comments to that effect.
...
Since Nathan is the English version of Nachum, and Nachum is the
masculine version of Nachama, it is possible that Ms. Goldberg should be
looking for a "Nathana." >>>


webfamily website #general

David Kravitz
 

Can anyone throw any light on the websoite www.webfamily.org.uk? The site
contains thousands of names giving date of birth and date of death. Under
Kravitz there is a listing for my late wife giving both birth and death
dates (year only) plus her full name and not many people knew her first
name. Digging into the website yields few clues, they refuse to give details
of who contributed the data and the listings are sparse suggesting no
official sources. It also has links to all the usual well-known genealogy
sites.

David Kravitz
Bournemouth, England
(emails with attachments should be sent to
david_kravitz@lycos.co.uk)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen webfamily website #general

David Kravitz
 

Can anyone throw any light on the websoite www.webfamily.org.uk? The site
contains thousands of names giving date of birth and date of death. Under
Kravitz there is a listing for my late wife giving both birth and death
dates (year only) plus her full name and not many people knew her first
name. Digging into the website yields few clues, they refuse to give details
of who contributed the data and the listings are sparse suggesting no
official sources. It also has links to all the usual well-known genealogy
sites.

David Kravitz
Bournemouth, England
(emails with attachments should be sent to
david_kravitz@lycos.co.uk)


April meeting of the JGS of Bergen County, New Jersey #general

Edward Rosenbaum <erosenbaum@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Bergen County will be having its next
meeting on Sunday, April 18th. Arnie Lang will talk about Searching
Ellis Island Online Records. The main meeting starts at 2PM and is held
at the JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly. The JCC of the Palisades is
located at 401 East Clinton Avenue in Tenafly. Their phone number is
201-569-7900.

Meetings start with a schmooze session at 12:30 at the offices of
Avotaynu in Bergenfield. Avotaynu has a 400-book library about Jewish
genealogy and the Holocaust which you can browse. The purpose of the
schmooze session is to ask questions about that can advance your
personal research. Do you have any brick walls that are slowing your
research? Perhaps other members of JGSBCNJ can help you. If you are
interested in attending the schmooze session, please call the offices of
Avotaynu (201-387-7200) a few days before to insure that that there has
not been change in plans.

If you need directions, go to our homepage at
http://erosenbaum.netfirms.com/jgsbc/

* * * About Arnie Lang * * *
20 million immigrants passed through Ellis Island between 1892 and 1924.
A large number of these were Jewish families, coming >from Eastern Europe
and other areas of Europe. The arrival records of these immigrants at
Ellis Island are available on the internet, but locating them can be
very difficult. Mr Lang will provide general background on the
immigration process. However, his talk will emphasize searching those
Ellis-Island online arrival records to locate your Ancestor's
immigration records. He will illustrate what these records can show you
about your immigrant family and how to locate the records using
available unique search techniques.

Arnold Lang has 20 years of genealogical research experience and is
currently the president of the Genealogical Society of Bergen County,
N.J. He made his first presentation on "Using Ship Passenger Lists and
Naturalization Records" to that Society 8 years ago. At that time he
also established his award-winning website on the Internet entitled:
"Research Guide to Immigration and Ship Passenger Lists". Since then, he
has been making presentations at genealogical societies and at various
libraries throughout New Jersey and New York. He also teaches classes on
this and other subjects, including "Searching Ellis Island Online
Records", "Using Family Tree Maker", "Census Records", etc.

* * * Upcoming meetings * * *
June 13: Gary Mokotoff, co-owner of Avotaynu and a member of JGSBCNJ,
will discuss some very exciting books that Avotaynu will be publishing
in 2004.

September 12: Linda Cantor and Lucille Gudis will speak about their
trip to Ukraine.

* * * Membership * * *
January marked the beginning of our new membership year. If you are not
already a member for 2003, please consider joining. If you have been a
member in the past, please renew your membership. Membership in the JGS
of Bergen County entitles you to submit questions to our 'ask the
experts' column of our newsletter, "The Gatherers". In addition,
members can borrow selected books and tapes >from our 400 book library.
Please start your membership by mailing a tax deductible check for $20
($25 for couples) to JGS of Bergen County
c/o Edward Rosenbaum
135 Chestnut Ridge Road
Montvale, NJ 07645

Or if you wish to pay by credit card, please go to
http://erosenbaum.netfirms.com/jgsbc/, and click on "Membership information".
* * *

Sincerely,
Edward L. Rosenbaum
JGS of Bergen County, NJ

About the JGS of Bergen county

We are an organization of Jewish genealogists who are enjoying the
growing pastime of tracing our families' roots back to the Old Country
and collecting records of our family, some of them hundreds of years
old. The Jewish Genealogical Society of Bergen County is one of over 70
member organizations of the International Association of Jewish
Genealogical Societies.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen April meeting of the JGS of Bergen County, New Jersey #general

Edward Rosenbaum <erosenbaum@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Bergen County will be having its next
meeting on Sunday, April 18th. Arnie Lang will talk about Searching
Ellis Island Online Records. The main meeting starts at 2PM and is held
at the JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly. The JCC of the Palisades is
located at 401 East Clinton Avenue in Tenafly. Their phone number is
201-569-7900.

Meetings start with a schmooze session at 12:30 at the offices of
Avotaynu in Bergenfield. Avotaynu has a 400-book library about Jewish
genealogy and the Holocaust which you can browse. The purpose of the
schmooze session is to ask questions about that can advance your
personal research. Do you have any brick walls that are slowing your
research? Perhaps other members of JGSBCNJ can help you. If you are
interested in attending the schmooze session, please call the offices of
Avotaynu (201-387-7200) a few days before to insure that that there has
not been change in plans.

If you need directions, go to our homepage at
http://erosenbaum.netfirms.com/jgsbc/

* * * About Arnie Lang * * *
20 million immigrants passed through Ellis Island between 1892 and 1924.
A large number of these were Jewish families, coming >from Eastern Europe
and other areas of Europe. The arrival records of these immigrants at
Ellis Island are available on the internet, but locating them can be
very difficult. Mr Lang will provide general background on the
immigration process. However, his talk will emphasize searching those
Ellis-Island online arrival records to locate your Ancestor's
immigration records. He will illustrate what these records can show you
about your immigrant family and how to locate the records using
available unique search techniques.

Arnold Lang has 20 years of genealogical research experience and is
currently the president of the Genealogical Society of Bergen County,
N.J. He made his first presentation on "Using Ship Passenger Lists and
Naturalization Records" to that Society 8 years ago. At that time he
also established his award-winning website on the Internet entitled:
"Research Guide to Immigration and Ship Passenger Lists". Since then, he
has been making presentations at genealogical societies and at various
libraries throughout New Jersey and New York. He also teaches classes on
this and other subjects, including "Searching Ellis Island Online
Records", "Using Family Tree Maker", "Census Records", etc.

* * * Upcoming meetings * * *
June 13: Gary Mokotoff, co-owner of Avotaynu and a member of JGSBCNJ,
will discuss some very exciting books that Avotaynu will be publishing
in 2004.

September 12: Linda Cantor and Lucille Gudis will speak about their
trip to Ukraine.

* * * Membership * * *
January marked the beginning of our new membership year. If you are not
already a member for 2003, please consider joining. If you have been a
member in the past, please renew your membership. Membership in the JGS
of Bergen County entitles you to submit questions to our 'ask the
experts' column of our newsletter, "The Gatherers". In addition,
members can borrow selected books and tapes >from our 400 book library.
Please start your membership by mailing a tax deductible check for $20
($25 for couples) to JGS of Bergen County
c/o Edward Rosenbaum
135 Chestnut Ridge Road
Montvale, NJ 07645

Or if you wish to pay by credit card, please go to
http://erosenbaum.netfirms.com/jgsbc/, and click on "Membership information".
* * *

Sincerely,
Edward L. Rosenbaum
JGS of Bergen County, NJ

About the JGS of Bergen county

We are an organization of Jewish genealogists who are enjoying the
growing pastime of tracing our families' roots back to the Old Country
and collecting records of our family, some of them hundreds of years
old. The Jewish Genealogical Society of Bergen County is one of over 70
member organizations of the International Association of Jewish
Genealogical Societies.


Tradition of naming babies as a tool in genealogy research #general

HeyJudy123@...
 

A new discussion of Jewish naming traditions was started recently by
Maureen Goldberg, specifically about the girl's name of Nackamki. I think that it
now has been well-settled that this particular name must have been a nickname
for, or misspelling of, Nachama. I was among the participants who sent this
Digest comments to that effect.

This forum's ever-alert and capable Sally Bruckheimer, however, has
pointed out the ambiguity of my saying that,

"Among American Reform Jews (and please note that I do mean Reform, as
distinct >from families who are more observant and traditional) the custom always
has been to try and keep the opening sound of the original first name.
Therefore, 'Nachama' might become 'Nancy' or 'Natalie.' Or it might become
something completely unrelated."

I could have explained this concept more thoroughly. We all understand
that it is the tradition of Ashkenazic Jews to name babies after deceased loved
ones. This is a broad-based custom throughout the Diaspora, applying equally
to all Ashkenazic (but not Sephardic) Jews. I was not implying that only
Reform Jews follow this naming tradition.

Still, what I should have said was that, in the later part of the 20th
Century, among American Reform Jews, the custom always has been to try and keep
only the opening sound of the original first name, as opposed to using the
original foreign name in its complete form. For one example, "Rochel" became
"Rose," "Rose" became "Ronda," "Ronda" is becoming... "Rachel?"

Though I am, myself, named in memory of my paternal grandfather, it has
been my own anecdotal observation that more observant Jews rarely cross gender
lines in naming.

Additionally--and, again, this is my own anecdotal observation--it is rare
to find an observant Jew who has changed the name of deceased person being
memorialized when naming a new baby. Therefore, "Nachama" usually would be kept
as "Nachama," rather than being modernized to a "more American" version of
the name.

Nonetheless, on three separate occasions, I have met American-Jewish women
named Nathana, Jacoba and Davida, which only clouds these naming waters more
murkily. Since Nathan is the English version of Nachum, and Nachum is the
masculine version of Nachama, it is possible that Ms. Goldberg should be looking
for a "Nathana."

My own extremely assimilated cousins no longer bother even with adapting
the child's English name >from the name of the deceased loved one. My little
cousin, Justin, was named for our mutual uncle, Sidney, Shlomo in the Hebrew.
Justy's Hebrew name is, indeed, "Shlomo," used at his bris and his Bar Mitzvah
and, if he marries a Jewish girl, it will be used again for significant life
passages later to come.

And, for future generations, this new naming habit will make Jewish
genealogy research even more difficult.

Judy Segal,
NYC

SEGAL, SIMON, ROGOFF, KORN, ROBBINS (perhaps RABINOWITZ) WECHSLER of
Lithuania (Shavli, Upyna), Vilna, Ilya in the former Vil. Gub., now Belarus, St.
Petersburg, Paris, Britain incl'g London & Dublin, NY; BAYERN, HERSHKOWITZ (all
spell'g) ROSENBERG, KOHN, HABER, RAPOPPORT of Budapest, Austria, former Hungary,
then Czechoslovakia, now Slovakia (probably Kosice, Huncovce), NY,
SCHWARTZBERG (all spell'g) of Kishinev, first Ukraine, now Moldava, Canada, NY.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Tradition of naming babies as a tool in genealogy research #general

HeyJudy123@...
 

A new discussion of Jewish naming traditions was started recently by
Maureen Goldberg, specifically about the girl's name of Nackamki. I think that it
now has been well-settled that this particular name must have been a nickname
for, or misspelling of, Nachama. I was among the participants who sent this
Digest comments to that effect.

This forum's ever-alert and capable Sally Bruckheimer, however, has
pointed out the ambiguity of my saying that,

"Among American Reform Jews (and please note that I do mean Reform, as
distinct >from families who are more observant and traditional) the custom always
has been to try and keep the opening sound of the original first name.
Therefore, 'Nachama' might become 'Nancy' or 'Natalie.' Or it might become
something completely unrelated."

I could have explained this concept more thoroughly. We all understand
that it is the tradition of Ashkenazic Jews to name babies after deceased loved
ones. This is a broad-based custom throughout the Diaspora, applying equally
to all Ashkenazic (but not Sephardic) Jews. I was not implying that only
Reform Jews follow this naming tradition.

Still, what I should have said was that, in the later part of the 20th
Century, among American Reform Jews, the custom always has been to try and keep
only the opening sound of the original first name, as opposed to using the
original foreign name in its complete form. For one example, "Rochel" became
"Rose," "Rose" became "Ronda," "Ronda" is becoming... "Rachel?"

Though I am, myself, named in memory of my paternal grandfather, it has
been my own anecdotal observation that more observant Jews rarely cross gender
lines in naming.

Additionally--and, again, this is my own anecdotal observation--it is rare
to find an observant Jew who has changed the name of deceased person being
memorialized when naming a new baby. Therefore, "Nachama" usually would be kept
as "Nachama," rather than being modernized to a "more American" version of
the name.

Nonetheless, on three separate occasions, I have met American-Jewish women
named Nathana, Jacoba and Davida, which only clouds these naming waters more
murkily. Since Nathan is the English version of Nachum, and Nachum is the
masculine version of Nachama, it is possible that Ms. Goldberg should be looking
for a "Nathana."

My own extremely assimilated cousins no longer bother even with adapting
the child's English name >from the name of the deceased loved one. My little
cousin, Justin, was named for our mutual uncle, Sidney, Shlomo in the Hebrew.
Justy's Hebrew name is, indeed, "Shlomo," used at his bris and his Bar Mitzvah
and, if he marries a Jewish girl, it will be used again for significant life
passages later to come.

And, for future generations, this new naming habit will make Jewish
genealogy research even more difficult.

Judy Segal,
NYC

SEGAL, SIMON, ROGOFF, KORN, ROBBINS (perhaps RABINOWITZ) WECHSLER of
Lithuania (Shavli, Upyna), Vilna, Ilya in the former Vil. Gub., now Belarus, St.
Petersburg, Paris, Britain incl'g London & Dublin, NY; BAYERN, HERSHKOWITZ (all
spell'g) ROSENBERG, KOHN, HABER, RAPOPPORT of Budapest, Austria, former Hungary,
then Czechoslovakia, now Slovakia (probably Kosice, Huncovce), NY,
SCHWARTZBERG (all spell'g) of Kishinev, first Ukraine, now Moldava, Canada, NY.


Discussion Group Archives #general

Steve Orlen
 

Dear Newer Cousins,

For those of you fairly new to this site: when you have a question - say
about Castle Gardens - it's often a good idea to check through the
Discussion Group Archives. Many of our questions have already been answered
therein.

Best of luck with your searching!

Steve Orlen
Tucson, Arizona

MODERATOR'S NOTE:

The JewishGen Discussion Group Archives are located at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~archpop >

The JewishGen SIG Lists Archive is located at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~sigspop


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Discussion Group Archives #general

Steve Orlen
 

Dear Newer Cousins,

For those of you fairly new to this site: when you have a question - say
about Castle Gardens - it's often a good idea to check through the
Discussion Group Archives. Many of our questions have already been answered
therein.

Best of luck with your searching!

Steve Orlen
Tucson, Arizona

MODERATOR'S NOTE:

The JewishGen Discussion Group Archives are located at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~archpop >

The JewishGen SIG Lists Archive is located at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~sigspop


Mihalyfalva #general

Susanna Vendel <svendel@...>
 

There is a town called Ermihalyfalva or Valea lui Mihai quite near
the town Oradea or Nagyvarad in the present Romania.

It is located in Transylvania and it belonged to Hungary during different
periods of time. People used to call it Mihalyfalva.

Susanna Vendel, Stockholm


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Mihalyfalva #general

Susanna Vendel <svendel@...>
 

There is a town called Ermihalyfalva or Valea lui Mihai quite near
the town Oradea or Nagyvarad in the present Romania.

It is located in Transylvania and it belonged to Hungary during different
periods of time. People used to call it Mihalyfalva.

Susanna Vendel, Stockholm