Date   

Town Names (Toponyms) as Surnames #general

Dov & Varda <yknow@...>
 

Sally Bruckheimer wrote: >Usually someone took a town name as a surname when
they had moved >from that town to a nearby one.>

This is only one of many scenarios that could cause someone to take a town
name as a surname, thus I believe that, 'sometimes', is more apt than,
'usually'. Toponyms as surnames might be clues, but they also might not be
clues.

For example, many times names were given arbitrarily. My husband's family,
for instance, chose the name EPSTEIN, apropos of nothing at all. Another
example of arbitrary naming occurs in a cousin's line. His grandfather was a
Yeshiva student in Hebron, but apparently the Russians had a very long arm,
and all the students with Russian passports were required to take surnames.
The assignment of names was done through a process of lots. A big fur hat,
known as a streimel, was filled with pieces of folded paper, containing
surnames. My cousin's grandfather pulled the surname: KREISSBAUM. Thus, my
cousin felt it was no insult to his heritage to Hebraicize said surname to
KEHAT. Though KREISSBAUM is not a toponym, it was given to my cousin's
grandfather as arbitrarily as my husband's ancestor took the town name
EPSTEIN. A friend's great grandfather sent each of his many sons to
different cities, adjuring them to take different surnames so as to avoid
conscription. Thus my friend has no relatives with his surname: ABRAHAMS, is
not related to other ABRAHAMS, and he has no idea what surnames his cousins
chose or where they went to live. Only the legend remains.

There are other reasons for one to choose a toponym. When the authorities
compelled residents of a given area to take surnames, they often chose the
name of the shtetl in which they lived. They didn't have to move to choose
their town name as their surname. It is equally unlikely that someone was
moving at the time authorities caused this same person to adopt a surname.

For these reasons, the conclusion to Sally's hypothesis, >It is the same way
that someone in the US might say Sam >from Cleveland to differentiate among
the different Sam's working in a place.> does not necessarily follow.

There might be several citizens in a given shtetl who moved there >from the
same, neighboring shtetl. Giving them all the same toponym as surname
doesn't really help their neighbors to distinguish them >from each other, and
yet quite often, this is precisely what did happen: several people would
move >from the same given shtetl, to the same new shtetl. There would have to
be very few people using the same toponym, or only one person using it, to
make it a valid method of distinguishing one person >from another.

Sally wrote:> If Winowski is found in Poland, then it is not likely
shortened >from Klewinowski-if you have seen much Polish, shortening words
was not a high priority there. > It is true that to my American eyes, Polish
looks unwieldy, but unless Sally knows something that I do not, that is no
proof that they tended not to shorten names. I would be interested to hear
her source for this. I do know that I once explored the idea that the
comedian Jan MURRAY was related to me, based on the fact that his original
surname was JANOFSKY- my mpggm’s maiden surname. Though I knew that there
were over 50 towns in Eastern Europe with the name of Janow, I didn’t think
it would hurt to find out if I was related to Jan. I made contact with
MURRAY’s grandson, who found out >from Jan that the surname was JANKOWSKI
before it was JANOFSKY. Here is a case of a Polish sounding name that was
shortened, albeit once the family moved to the good ole USA.

As for Sally's assertion:>Like BRUCKHEIMER could be someone from
Bruckheim-but there is no Bruckheim.> BRUCKHEIMER is likely someone who
lived in a house located near a bridge and there is nothing about the name
that suggests it sounds like a town. However, if Sally knew what town her
family lived in and knew that at the time they lived in that town, there was
one bridge and a house right near it, she might have a house location. But,
heck (!), then again, maybe not.

Varda Epstein
Efrat
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Town Names (Toponyms) as Surnames #general

Dov & Varda <yknow@...>
 

Sally Bruckheimer wrote: >Usually someone took a town name as a surname when
they had moved >from that town to a nearby one.>

This is only one of many scenarios that could cause someone to take a town
name as a surname, thus I believe that, 'sometimes', is more apt than,
'usually'. Toponyms as surnames might be clues, but they also might not be
clues.

For example, many times names were given arbitrarily. My husband's family,
for instance, chose the name EPSTEIN, apropos of nothing at all. Another
example of arbitrary naming occurs in a cousin's line. His grandfather was a
Yeshiva student in Hebron, but apparently the Russians had a very long arm,
and all the students with Russian passports were required to take surnames.
The assignment of names was done through a process of lots. A big fur hat,
known as a streimel, was filled with pieces of folded paper, containing
surnames. My cousin's grandfather pulled the surname: KREISSBAUM. Thus, my
cousin felt it was no insult to his heritage to Hebraicize said surname to
KEHAT. Though KREISSBAUM is not a toponym, it was given to my cousin's
grandfather as arbitrarily as my husband's ancestor took the town name
EPSTEIN. A friend's great grandfather sent each of his many sons to
different cities, adjuring them to take different surnames so as to avoid
conscription. Thus my friend has no relatives with his surname: ABRAHAMS, is
not related to other ABRAHAMS, and he has no idea what surnames his cousins
chose or where they went to live. Only the legend remains.

There are other reasons for one to choose a toponym. When the authorities
compelled residents of a given area to take surnames, they often chose the
name of the shtetl in which they lived. They didn't have to move to choose
their town name as their surname. It is equally unlikely that someone was
moving at the time authorities caused this same person to adopt a surname.

For these reasons, the conclusion to Sally's hypothesis, >It is the same way
that someone in the US might say Sam >from Cleveland to differentiate among
the different Sam's working in a place.> does not necessarily follow.

There might be several citizens in a given shtetl who moved there >from the
same, neighboring shtetl. Giving them all the same toponym as surname
doesn't really help their neighbors to distinguish them >from each other, and
yet quite often, this is precisely what did happen: several people would
move >from the same given shtetl, to the same new shtetl. There would have to
be very few people using the same toponym, or only one person using it, to
make it a valid method of distinguishing one person >from another.

Sally wrote:> If Winowski is found in Poland, then it is not likely
shortened >from Klewinowski-if you have seen much Polish, shortening words
was not a high priority there. > It is true that to my American eyes, Polish
looks unwieldy, but unless Sally knows something that I do not, that is no
proof that they tended not to shorten names. I would be interested to hear
her source for this. I do know that I once explored the idea that the
comedian Jan MURRAY was related to me, based on the fact that his original
surname was JANOFSKY- my mpggm’s maiden surname. Though I knew that there
were over 50 towns in Eastern Europe with the name of Janow, I didn’t think
it would hurt to find out if I was related to Jan. I made contact with
MURRAY’s grandson, who found out >from Jan that the surname was JANKOWSKI
before it was JANOFSKY. Here is a case of a Polish sounding name that was
shortened, albeit once the family moved to the good ole USA.

As for Sally's assertion:>Like BRUCKHEIMER could be someone from
Bruckheim-but there is no Bruckheim.> BRUCKHEIMER is likely someone who
lived in a house located near a bridge and there is nothing about the name
that suggests it sounds like a town. However, if Sally knew what town her
family lived in and knew that at the time they lived in that town, there was
one bridge and a house right near it, she might have a house location. But,
heck (!), then again, maybe not.

Varda Epstein
Efrat
Israel


New data on ROSENBAUM from Kassel #germany

Lee Markiewicz <leemark@...>
 

I have been enlightened by the city archives of Kassel on some relatives of
my ROSENBAUM line...I found out that my 3th great grandfather Loeb ROSENBAUM
(my 2nd great grandfather died in Warburg where he raise a family) had a
brother Aron who had a large family in Kassel.

The city archives informed me that one of the line emigrated to England on
Dec. 10th, 1902. His name was Arthur ROSENBAUM and he was born May 9th,
1880.

He was the same age was my great grandpa and they would have been 2nd
cousins. I am very very fascinated by the idea that there is possibly
surviving ROSENBAUM relations in England. Our assumption was everyone was
wiped out in the war. My great grandpa was the last male ROSENBAUM so the
name ended with my grandma for that line.

Can anyone help me or give me suggestions on pursuing possible descendants
in England?

Lee Markiewicz Endicott, NY Leemark@stny.rr.com

Researching: Germany: [Check the SIG archives for these - Moderator]
ROSENBAUM - Hannover, Warburg, Kassel
BONWITT - Hannover, Rodenberg, other
JACOBOWITZ - Lautenberg, Prussia (now Lidzbark, Poland);
HOFFMEYER - Dransfeld, Warburg
LOEWENHEIM & HAMMERSCHLAG - Mielenhausen, Kreis Hannoversch-Münden;
BERLINER - Rodenberg, Hannover
Austrian period Galicia: GERBER - Stanislowow, Tysmieniczany; FIFFER - same towns


German SIG #Germany New data on ROSENBAUM from Kassel #germany

Lee Markiewicz <leemark@...>
 

I have been enlightened by the city archives of Kassel on some relatives of
my ROSENBAUM line...I found out that my 3th great grandfather Loeb ROSENBAUM
(my 2nd great grandfather died in Warburg where he raise a family) had a
brother Aron who had a large family in Kassel.

The city archives informed me that one of the line emigrated to England on
Dec. 10th, 1902. His name was Arthur ROSENBAUM and he was born May 9th,
1880.

He was the same age was my great grandpa and they would have been 2nd
cousins. I am very very fascinated by the idea that there is possibly
surviving ROSENBAUM relations in England. Our assumption was everyone was
wiped out in the war. My great grandpa was the last male ROSENBAUM so the
name ended with my grandma for that line.

Can anyone help me or give me suggestions on pursuing possible descendants
in England?

Lee Markiewicz Endicott, NY Leemark@stny.rr.com

Researching: Germany: [Check the SIG archives for these - Moderator]
ROSENBAUM - Hannover, Warburg, Kassel
BONWITT - Hannover, Rodenberg, other
JACOBOWITZ - Lautenberg, Prussia (now Lidzbark, Poland);
HOFFMEYER - Dransfeld, Warburg
LOEWENHEIM & HAMMERSCHLAG - Mielenhausen, Kreis Hannoversch-Münden;
BERLINER - Rodenberg, Hannover
Austrian period Galicia: GERBER - Stanislowow, Tysmieniczany; FIFFER - same towns


Re: Sedziscow, Galizien #galicia

NFatouros@...
 

In a message dated 5/8/04 12:45:31 PM, isai8v10@actcom.co.il writes:

<< A Vienna record lists "Sedziscow, Galizien" as a birthplace for a woman
whom we definitely expected to have been born in East Galicia.

My first instinct was that this is a German spelling of Zydachow (4923
2408). ShtetlSeker gives only one result in Ukraine - Chocieszow (5143
2448) - but many in Poland, none of which means anything to me.

Is there someplace obvious that a German speaker would have been
referring to?

Israel Pickholtz>>


According to my earlier edition of "Where We Once Walked" (WWOW) Sedziszow
(Seciszow Malopolski, Sendeshov, Sendishev, Sendziszov Shendeshov) is 82
kilometers west northwest of Przemysl.

But WWOW is a second entry for a "Sedziszow" which is near Jedrzejow, 62
kiloters north of Krakow.

My old Columbia-Lippencott Gazetteer has but one entry for a Sedziszow and
this one is in Rzeszow province.

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
BELKOWSKY,BIELKOWSKY, BILKOWSKI, Odessa,St. Petersburg,Berdichev,
Kiev;ROTHSTEIN, Kremenchug;FRASCH,Kiev;LIBERMAN,Moscow;FELDMAN, Pinsk;
SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets;LEVY, WEIL, Mulhouse; SAS/SASS,Podwolochisk;
RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Podwolochisk, RADOMYSL?; BEHAM, Salok, Kharkov;
WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Sedziscow, Galizien #galicia

NFatouros@...
 

In a message dated 5/8/04 12:45:31 PM, isai8v10@actcom.co.il writes:

<< A Vienna record lists "Sedziscow, Galizien" as a birthplace for a woman
whom we definitely expected to have been born in East Galicia.

My first instinct was that this is a German spelling of Zydachow (4923
2408). ShtetlSeker gives only one result in Ukraine - Chocieszow (5143
2448) - but many in Poland, none of which means anything to me.

Is there someplace obvious that a German speaker would have been
referring to?

Israel Pickholtz>>


According to my earlier edition of "Where We Once Walked" (WWOW) Sedziszow
(Seciszow Malopolski, Sendeshov, Sendishev, Sendziszov Shendeshov) is 82
kilometers west northwest of Przemysl.

But WWOW is a second entry for a "Sedziszow" which is near Jedrzejow, 62
kiloters north of Krakow.

My old Columbia-Lippencott Gazetteer has but one entry for a Sedziszow and
this one is in Rzeszow province.

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
BELKOWSKY,BIELKOWSKY, BILKOWSKI, Odessa,St. Petersburg,Berdichev,
Kiev;ROTHSTEIN, Kremenchug;FRASCH,Kiev;LIBERMAN,Moscow;FELDMAN, Pinsk;
SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets;LEVY, WEIL, Mulhouse; SAS/SASS,Podwolochisk;
RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Podwolochisk, RADOMYSL?; BEHAM, Salok, Kharkov;
WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.


WATTMANN #galicia

Georges Rosenfeld <rosenfeld@...>
 

During several generations members of my Schipper family worked for Baron
Wattmann, a converted Jew and his descendants. Wattmann lived in Vienna but
had as well a Palais in Ruda Rozaniecka, Eastern Galicia. In this area he
owned large forests and several saw-mills. He employed mainly jews as
supervisors, as cashers, as bookkeepers etc.

Here are the facts I know about the Wattmann:
During my trip to Poland I was in Ruda Rozaniecka and visited the Palais,
a wonderful pink manor in a large park. Today it is a psychiatric hospital
but a wing is still used in Summer by Wattmann >from Warsaw.
The saw-mill in Ruda is still exploited, as part of a timber manufacturing
group. The Wattmann family is still involved in this business.

In Vienna's inhabitants index a Wattmann-Maelcamp Beaulieu Hugo (Freiherr
von, Rittmeister a.D.), landowner, living at Vienna VIII Hamerlingsplatz 2,
was registrered >from 1919 to 1942. I have no idea if this Wattmann is
related with those in Rawa Rozaniecka.

In Vienna a street is named after Wattmann, a physician during the 18th
century.

Does anybody have information about the Wattmanns >from Ruda? I would be
interested as well in information about Ruda Rozaniecka and its surrounding
(Narol, Doliny, Rawa Ruska ...).

Thank you in advance

Georges Rosenfeld
Neuchatel / Switzerland

Researching:
Rosenfeld >from Tarnow, Bobowa, Grybow, Stryj
Carl (Charles) Rosenfeld >from New York
Isidor Rosenfeld >from Saint Louis/ Missouri
Schipper >from Narol, Doliny, Rawa Ruska
Lermer >from Nowy Targ, Buszkowice, Przemysl
Kanfer >from Delatyn
Tocker >from Buszkowice


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia WATTMANN #galicia

Georges Rosenfeld <rosenfeld@...>
 

During several generations members of my Schipper family worked for Baron
Wattmann, a converted Jew and his descendants. Wattmann lived in Vienna but
had as well a Palais in Ruda Rozaniecka, Eastern Galicia. In this area he
owned large forests and several saw-mills. He employed mainly jews as
supervisors, as cashers, as bookkeepers etc.

Here are the facts I know about the Wattmann:
During my trip to Poland I was in Ruda Rozaniecka and visited the Palais,
a wonderful pink manor in a large park. Today it is a psychiatric hospital
but a wing is still used in Summer by Wattmann >from Warsaw.
The saw-mill in Ruda is still exploited, as part of a timber manufacturing
group. The Wattmann family is still involved in this business.

In Vienna's inhabitants index a Wattmann-Maelcamp Beaulieu Hugo (Freiherr
von, Rittmeister a.D.), landowner, living at Vienna VIII Hamerlingsplatz 2,
was registrered >from 1919 to 1942. I have no idea if this Wattmann is
related with those in Rawa Rozaniecka.

In Vienna a street is named after Wattmann, a physician during the 18th
century.

Does anybody have information about the Wattmanns >from Ruda? I would be
interested as well in information about Ruda Rozaniecka and its surrounding
(Narol, Doliny, Rawa Ruska ...).

Thank you in advance

Georges Rosenfeld
Neuchatel / Switzerland

Researching:
Rosenfeld >from Tarnow, Bobowa, Grybow, Stryj
Carl (Charles) Rosenfeld >from New York
Isidor Rosenfeld >from Saint Louis/ Missouri
Schipper >from Narol, Doliny, Rawa Ruska
Lermer >from Nowy Targ, Buszkowice, Przemysl
Kanfer >from Delatyn
Tocker >from Buszkowice


Tarnow Archive - New JRI-Poland project! #galicia

Howard Fink <know_how@...>
 

I am pleased to announce the availability of vital records for
towns in the Tarnow Archives beyond those years that were filmed
by the Mormons. These new records generally cover the years
1870 - 1900, with some more recent records. The towns included in
the Tarnow Polish State Archives
Project are:

Czchow Dabrowa Szczucin Tarnow Wosnicz Zabno

Most of the Tarnow indices (about twenty-three thousand) have
already been typed in by volunteers working >from lists that we
acquired >from the Polish State Archives. This is information that
is not available through the LDS films. A list of the surnames
appearing in this data can now be viewed at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/tarnow_surn.htm

Information for the other towns must be entered by workers that
we pay at the Polish State Archives. Work there has begun on
Dabrowa, and the other towns will follow. The index for each town
will be made available in the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
web database only after its target amount has been raised, but
qualifying donors will receive their own copy via email once they
sign a database sharing agreement; they will not have to wait
until the index becomes available on-line. Once
these are on the web site you will be able to order photocopies,
sent directly >from the Polish State Archives (for a fee).


By town, this is what is needed:

Czchow - $150 for 729 Birth records ($50 to qualify)

Dabrowa - $800 for 3869 Birth records ($100 to qualify)

Szczucin - $450 for 2158 records ($100 to qualify)

Tarnow - $1700 for about 24,000 records ($100 to qualify)

Wosnicz - $140 for 641 records ($65 to qualify)

Zabno - $250 for 1104 records ($50 to qualify)

More details on the records available for these towns are at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psatarnow.htm

Remember, even before funding is complete it is possible to order
records >from the Polish State Archives for any record that
appears in an index. This capability, and the entire index file
in a spreadsheet file, are available to qualifying contributors.

The Galician record indices contained in the JRI-Poland database
would not be accessible to researchers without our host,
JewishGen. In addition to your contribution to the JRI-Poland
Tarnow Project that supports indexing of the records, we hope you
will also give to JewishGen to help defray the cost of
maintaining these records. An easily accessible contribution form
is available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/AGAD.html>.]

Donations to JRI-Poland are tax-deductible for US taxpayers as
JRI-Poland has received 501(c)(3) status >from the IRS. Donations
may be made by check, VISA or MasterCard. Please indicate the
Tarnow PSA project, and your town(s) of interest. All of the
information on how to make a donation can be found at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/visa.htm

Thank you for making any contribution that you can to help us
provide this family information to you and others, including
support to our host, JewishGen.

Howard Fink
Acton, Massachusetts
know_How@speakeasy.net
Tarnow Archive Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Tarnow Archive - New JRI-Poland project! #galicia

Howard Fink <know_how@...>
 

I am pleased to announce the availability of vital records for
towns in the Tarnow Archives beyond those years that were filmed
by the Mormons. These new records generally cover the years
1870 - 1900, with some more recent records. The towns included in
the Tarnow Polish State Archives
Project are:

Czchow Dabrowa Szczucin Tarnow Wosnicz Zabno

Most of the Tarnow indices (about twenty-three thousand) have
already been typed in by volunteers working >from lists that we
acquired >from the Polish State Archives. This is information that
is not available through the LDS films. A list of the surnames
appearing in this data can now be viewed at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/tarnow_surn.htm

Information for the other towns must be entered by workers that
we pay at the Polish State Archives. Work there has begun on
Dabrowa, and the other towns will follow. The index for each town
will be made available in the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
web database only after its target amount has been raised, but
qualifying donors will receive their own copy via email once they
sign a database sharing agreement; they will not have to wait
until the index becomes available on-line. Once
these are on the web site you will be able to order photocopies,
sent directly >from the Polish State Archives (for a fee).


By town, this is what is needed:

Czchow - $150 for 729 Birth records ($50 to qualify)

Dabrowa - $800 for 3869 Birth records ($100 to qualify)

Szczucin - $450 for 2158 records ($100 to qualify)

Tarnow - $1700 for about 24,000 records ($100 to qualify)

Wosnicz - $140 for 641 records ($65 to qualify)

Zabno - $250 for 1104 records ($50 to qualify)

More details on the records available for these towns are at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psatarnow.htm

Remember, even before funding is complete it is possible to order
records >from the Polish State Archives for any record that
appears in an index. This capability, and the entire index file
in a spreadsheet file, are available to qualifying contributors.

The Galician record indices contained in the JRI-Poland database
would not be accessible to researchers without our host,
JewishGen. In addition to your contribution to the JRI-Poland
Tarnow Project that supports indexing of the records, we hope you
will also give to JewishGen to help defray the cost of
maintaining these records. An easily accessible contribution form
is available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/AGAD.html>.]

Donations to JRI-Poland are tax-deductible for US taxpayers as
JRI-Poland has received 501(c)(3) status >from the IRS. Donations
may be made by check, VISA or MasterCard. Please indicate the
Tarnow PSA project, and your town(s) of interest. All of the
information on how to make a donation can be found at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/visa.htm

Thank you for making any contribution that you can to help us
provide this family information to you and others, including
support to our host, JewishGen.

Howard Fink
Acton, Massachusetts
know_How@speakeasy.net
Tarnow Archive Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland


Sedziscow, Galizien #galicia

Israel P <isai8v10@...>
 

A Vienna record lists "Sedziscow, Galizien" as a birthplace for a woman
whom we definitely expected to have been born in East Galicia.

My first instinct was that this is a German spelling of Zydachow (4923
2408). ShtetlSeker gives only one result in Ukraine - Chocieszow (5143
2448) - but many in Poland, none of which means anything to me.

Is there someplace obvious that a German speaker would have been
referring to?

Israel Pickholtz


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Sedziscow, Galizien #galicia

Israel P <isai8v10@...>
 

A Vienna record lists "Sedziscow, Galizien" as a birthplace for a woman
whom we definitely expected to have been born in East Galicia.

My first instinct was that this is a German spelling of Zydachow (4923
2408). ShtetlSeker gives only one result in Ukraine - Chocieszow (5143
2448) - but many in Poland, none of which means anything to me.

Is there someplace obvious that a German speaker would have been
referring to?

Israel Pickholtz


Yiddish Name: Minda Udel #general

Mountain Club Landlord <mclub_apts@...>
 

Hello can someone tell me / translate the name Minda Udel into english
please? Also the name Tsirl Sheyna? I was told that kids were named after
dead relatives ie. Grandparents, but does this hold true for the
yiddish/jewish names too? What about the middle name? Any comments on naming
tradition in the late 1800's please...

Thanks.

Cindy Rosengarten

Researching:
ROSENGARTEN, SLONIM/SLONIN, POMERLAN, POMARLEN, BLEIWEISS, FINE, SCHWARZ,
RUDNITZSKY

Towns: Dorohoi Romania, Streshin Bessarb., Homel - Mogilev Gub.

MODERATOR NOTE: A good tool to use when searching for given name
equivalents is the JewishGen Given Names database (GNDBs) by Professor G. L.
Esterson located at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames

Naming tradition was discussed on this list in the past. If you go to
the JewishGen Discussion Group Archives at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~archpop > and search for
"naming tradition", you will find some useful information.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yiddish Name: Minda Udel #general

Mountain Club Landlord <mclub_apts@...>
 

Hello can someone tell me / translate the name Minda Udel into english
please? Also the name Tsirl Sheyna? I was told that kids were named after
dead relatives ie. Grandparents, but does this hold true for the
yiddish/jewish names too? What about the middle name? Any comments on naming
tradition in the late 1800's please...

Thanks.

Cindy Rosengarten

Researching:
ROSENGARTEN, SLONIM/SLONIN, POMERLAN, POMARLEN, BLEIWEISS, FINE, SCHWARZ,
RUDNITZSKY

Towns: Dorohoi Romania, Streshin Bessarb., Homel - Mogilev Gub.

MODERATOR NOTE: A good tool to use when searching for given name
equivalents is the JewishGen Given Names database (GNDBs) by Professor G. L.
Esterson located at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames

Naming tradition was discussed on this list in the past. If you go to
the JewishGen Discussion Group Archives at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~archpop > and search for
"naming tradition", you will find some useful information.


Re: Receipt of Jewish Vital Records of Quebec #general

Bud484BG@...
 

This is a follow-up to my April 9th posting regarding my request for copies
of the records >from the Drouin Microfilm Indexing Project of Jewish Vital
Records of Quebec.

I want to let all of you who were interested know that I did receive email
apologies and explanations for the delayed response which was understandable.
In the end, the records and additional information I received were worth the
wait.

HavIng read the Avotaynu Summer 2002 article on the Indexing of the Jewish
Vital Records of Quebec 1841-1942, I am in awe of the efforts of Ruth and
Stanley Diamond and do appreciate all of the work involved in putting this
together.

By the way, with the ROSNER surname printout I received >from Alan Greenberg,
I have just sent in my request for 4 additional records and my Montreal ROSNER
tree is growing!!

Regards to all.

Beatrice Markel
Redondo Beach, California


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Receipt of Jewish Vital Records of Quebec #general

Bud484BG@...
 

This is a follow-up to my April 9th posting regarding my request for copies
of the records >from the Drouin Microfilm Indexing Project of Jewish Vital
Records of Quebec.

I want to let all of you who were interested know that I did receive email
apologies and explanations for the delayed response which was understandable.
In the end, the records and additional information I received were worth the
wait.

HavIng read the Avotaynu Summer 2002 article on the Indexing of the Jewish
Vital Records of Quebec 1841-1942, I am in awe of the efforts of Ruth and
Stanley Diamond and do appreciate all of the work involved in putting this
together.

By the way, with the ROSNER surname printout I received >from Alan Greenberg,
I have just sent in my request for 4 additional records and my Montreal ROSNER
tree is growing!!

Regards to all.

Beatrice Markel
Redondo Beach, California


Re: Yiddish name Farla #general

Jeff Kingsley <jking3@...>
 

Speaking of names that Cantors don't know, my mother in law claims her
Jewish name is Farla or Farle, I've asked her if she means Perl but she says
it's Farla, name in English is Florence. Has anyone ever heard of this
name?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish name Farla #general

Jeff Kingsley <jking3@...>
 

Speaking of names that Cantors don't know, my mother in law claims her
Jewish name is Farla or Farle, I've asked her if she means Perl but she says
it's Farla, name in English is Florence. Has anyone ever heard of this
name?


Re: Yiddish name Shayva #general

Martin Miller <millerm@...>
 

We genealogists sure have our work cut out for us.

Our young cousin is Chone Gutel, named for his grandfather. When he went to
Hebrew school, they too told his mother no such name. I had to pull out the
family tree to show that the earliest recorded Gutel in the family was born
in 1813, and we have a record. There are several men named Chone in the
family, who were nicknamed Honey, but no ancestral Chone. So we know we're
missing someone >from the tree.

Their are several Zlatas in our extended families, all known as Lottie.

Martin Miller in Syracuse, New York
mailto:millerm@mailbox.syr.edu
http://web.syr.edu/~millerm/index.htm

-----Original Message-----
From: Myra Shalet [mailto:gramaw@aol.comnojunk]
Sent: Saturday, May 08, 2004 11:37 AM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: Re: Yiddish name Shayva
My great-aunt's name was also Shayva. I always assumed it was short for
Batsheva, but it could also be short for Elisheva...... But is
*is* a name! My mother's name was Zlata and I was also told by a young rabbi
that > there was no such name.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Yiddish name Shayva #general

Martin Miller <millerm@...>
 

We genealogists sure have our work cut out for us.

Our young cousin is Chone Gutel, named for his grandfather. When he went to
Hebrew school, they too told his mother no such name. I had to pull out the
family tree to show that the earliest recorded Gutel in the family was born
in 1813, and we have a record. There are several men named Chone in the
family, who were nicknamed Honey, but no ancestral Chone. So we know we're
missing someone >from the tree.

Their are several Zlatas in our extended families, all known as Lottie.

Martin Miller in Syracuse, New York
mailto:millerm@mailbox.syr.edu
http://web.syr.edu/~millerm/index.htm

-----Original Message-----
From: Myra Shalet [mailto:gramaw@aol.comnojunk]
Sent: Saturday, May 08, 2004 11:37 AM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: Re: Yiddish name Shayva
My great-aunt's name was also Shayva. I always assumed it was short for
Batsheva, but it could also be short for Elisheva...... But is
*is* a name! My mother's name was Zlata and I was also told by a young rabbi
that > there was no such name.