Date   

May meeting of the JGS of Bergen County, New Jersey #general

Edward Rosenbaum <erosenbaum@...>
 

Just a quick reminder... The Jewish Genealogical Society of Bergen
County will be having its next meeting on Sunday, May 16th. The topic
will be part 1 of our 'Back to Basics' seminar, where we will discuss
how to begin your research, how to use U.S. census records, and will
watch the movie 'How To Trace Your Jewish Roots', by Arthur Kurzweil.
The main meeting starts at 2PM and is held at the JCC on the Palisades
in Tenafly. The JCC of the Palisades is located at 401 East Clinton
Avenue in Tenafly. Their phone number is 201-569-7900.

There will be no 12:30 schmooze session this month.

If you need directions, go to our homepage at
http://erosenbaum.netfirms.com/jgsbc/

*** Upcoming meetings ***
June 13: Gary Mokotoff, co-owner of Avotaynu and a member of JGSBCNJ,
will discuss some very exciting books that Avotaynu will be publishing
in 2004.

September 12: Linda Cantor and Lucille Gudis will speak about their
trip to Ukraine.

*** Membership ***
January marked the beginning of our new membership year. If you are not
already a member for 2003, please consider joining. If you have been a
member in the past, please renew your membership. Membership in the JGS
of Bergen County entitles you to submit questions to our 'ask the
experts' column of our newsletter, 'The Gatherers'. In addition,
members can borrow selected books and tapes >from our 400 book library.
Please start your membership by mailing a tax deductible check for $20
($25 for couples) to

JGS of Bergen County=
c/o Edward Rosenbaum
135 Chestnut Ridge Road
Montvale, NJ 07645

Or if you wish to pay by credit card, please go to
http://erosenbaum.netfirms.com/jgsbc/, and click on 'Membership
information'.
***

Sincerely,
Edward L. Rosenbaum
JGS of Bergen County, NJ

About the JGS of Bergen county

We are an organization of Jewish genealogists who are enjoying the
growing pastime of tracing our families' roots back to the Old Country
and collecting records of our family, some of them hundreds of years
old. The Jewish Genealogical Society of Bergen County is one of over 70
member organizations of the International Association of Jewish
Genealogical Societies.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen May meeting of the JGS of Bergen County, New Jersey #general

Edward Rosenbaum <erosenbaum@...>
 

Just a quick reminder... The Jewish Genealogical Society of Bergen
County will be having its next meeting on Sunday, May 16th. The topic
will be part 1 of our 'Back to Basics' seminar, where we will discuss
how to begin your research, how to use U.S. census records, and will
watch the movie 'How To Trace Your Jewish Roots', by Arthur Kurzweil.
The main meeting starts at 2PM and is held at the JCC on the Palisades
in Tenafly. The JCC of the Palisades is located at 401 East Clinton
Avenue in Tenafly. Their phone number is 201-569-7900.

There will be no 12:30 schmooze session this month.

If you need directions, go to our homepage at
http://erosenbaum.netfirms.com/jgsbc/

*** Upcoming meetings ***
June 13: Gary Mokotoff, co-owner of Avotaynu and a member of JGSBCNJ,
will discuss some very exciting books that Avotaynu will be publishing
in 2004.

September 12: Linda Cantor and Lucille Gudis will speak about their
trip to Ukraine.

*** Membership ***
January marked the beginning of our new membership year. If you are not
already a member for 2003, please consider joining. If you have been a
member in the past, please renew your membership. Membership in the JGS
of Bergen County entitles you to submit questions to our 'ask the
experts' column of our newsletter, 'The Gatherers'. In addition,
members can borrow selected books and tapes >from our 400 book library.
Please start your membership by mailing a tax deductible check for $20
($25 for couples) to

JGS of Bergen County=
c/o Edward Rosenbaum
135 Chestnut Ridge Road
Montvale, NJ 07645

Or if you wish to pay by credit card, please go to
http://erosenbaum.netfirms.com/jgsbc/, and click on 'Membership
information'.
***

Sincerely,
Edward L. Rosenbaum
JGS of Bergen County, NJ

About the JGS of Bergen county

We are an organization of Jewish genealogists who are enjoying the
growing pastime of tracing our families' roots back to the Old Country
and collecting records of our family, some of them hundreds of years
old. The Jewish Genealogical Society of Bergen County is one of over 70
member organizations of the International Association of Jewish
Genealogical Societies.


Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando - Meeting Monday, May 17, 2004 at 7:30 P.M. #general

Doris & Don Frank <dofrank@...>
 

Genealogists to Learn About Non-urban Jews

Much has been written about the Jews in the big cities in America, but what
about immigrants who chose other ways of life? Come to the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando's (JGSGO) meeting on May 17th and
learn about "Non-Urban Jewish immigrants: Farmers, Cowboys and Small Town
Jews," to be discussed by professional genealogist Gladys Friedman Paulin,
CGRS. *

from the 17th century to the present, some Jews in America have purchased
land, traded with Indians, homesteaded and even raised cattle. The talk
will provide some examples of each, including several Jewish farm colonies
in the west as well as in New Jersey!

You will also hear the story of Deadwood, South Dakota, a town with a very
Jewish history. The evening will include a discussion of resources to
discover if your ancestor obtained government land, as well as how to find
the records.

The speaker for the evening, Gladys Friedman Paulin, CGRS, is a favorite of
the genealogy group. She states that her interest in family history goes
back to her teens, and she has been actively pursuing her research since
1990. Paulin has been involved with genealogy on many levels. She is vice
president of the Genealogical Speakers Guild, past president of the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando, former director of the
International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies, and the Central
Florida Genealogical Society. She is active in the Association of
Professional Genealogists and is a director of the National Institute
Genealogical Research Alumni Association.

Gladys Friedman Paulin, CGRS, is a graduate of Cornell University and she
has attended the National Institute for Genealogical Research and the
Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research. She has spoken at many
state and national conferences. Gladys has contributed articles for
genealogical publications, and presently publishes a surname family
newsletter with a circulation of more than 650 households.

The monthly JGSGO meetings are now held at 7:30 p.m. at the Congregation of
Liberal Judaism, 928 Malone Dr., Orlando, just off Lee Road. Meetings are
open, and the community is invited to attend. For additional information,
please phone Doris at 407-323-9728. We look forward to welcoming you on May
17th.

* CGRS, Certified Genealogical Records Specialist, is a Service Mark of the
Board for Certification of Genealogists and used under license by
Board-certified persons who meet program standards and periodic rigorous
evaluations.


Drew Smith & George G. Morgan at JGS Tampa Bay meeting 5-16-04 #general

Mark
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay
Meeting, Sunday, May 16, 2004

Drew Smith To Speak on
"How To Do Genealogy Without Guilt"
Also: George G. Morgan will present "New Developments at the Tampa Library"

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay will meet on Sunday May 16 at
2:00 P.M. at Gulf Coast Jewish Family Services, 14041 Icot Blvd.,
Clearwater, Florida. Drew Smith is an instructor for the School of Library
and Information Science at USF in Tampa, where he teaches a graduate-level
course for library science students on genealogical librarian-ship. He
previously taught undergraduate-level courses in library/Internet research
and web page design. Mr. Smith will speak on "How To Do Genealogy Without
Guilt".

Drew Smith is a founding member of the group, "Librarians Serving
Genealogists", and he serves as its listowner and webmaster. He writes the
"Cybrarian" column for the quarterly Genealogical Computing, as well as
wrote the biweekly Digital Genealogy column for the Ancestry.com web site.
He has served as the leader of the Genealogy and Local History Interest
Group of the Florida Library Association. Mr. Smith has been working on his
personal genealogy since 1992.

The Tampa Library has made a commitment to upgrade their genealogy section
to make it the most extensive collection around. George G. Morgan is in
charge of collecting the data to see what people want in this collection.
He wants to make sure that the Jewish community and our genealogy needs are
well represented in this new collection. He will be asking our members what
we would like to see in the collection. This can include books, microfilm,
fiche, databases and more. He says ask and yea may receive. He explained
that this is not to be in competition with any other collection but to
enhance the quality of genealogy in our area. Mr. Morgan, an avid
genealogist and a published author in the field of genealogy, is president
of Aha! Seminars, Inc. and he served as a member of the senior staff of the
Genealogy Forum for America Online. Mr. Morgan has been an adjunct
instructor with the School of Library and Information Science at the
University of South Florida in Tampa, where he taught courses in
"Introduction to the Internet" and "Web Page Design and Management. He is
the editor of the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) monthly online
newsletter, the Delegate Digest. Mr. Morgan is the author of the book, The
Genealogy Forum on America Online: The Official User's Guide, published by
Ancestry.com. Mr. Morgan also has a new book released titled "How to do
Everything With Your Genealogy."

The Jewish Genealogical Society's library and research resources, including
both printed materials and computer access, along with guided assistance and
information exchange >from experienced researchers will be available to
participants at the meeting. Our library is growing and is quickly becoming
one of the most important reasons to come to the meetings. Many of the
items in the library are impossible to find in the local libraries, and if
they are reference only elsewhere, they can not be gotten through
inter-library loans.

*Back by popular demand*: Beginning at 1:30 PM (30 minutes prior to the
program) the main program will be preceded by a question and answer
workshop.

This meeting is open to the public and there is no charge for attending this
meeting. For further information on the organization or for directions to
the meeting
call Mark Baron at 727-842-5789 or Sally Israel at 727-343-1652.

Mark Baron
President
JGSTampaBay@yahoo.com
(727) 842-5789
The Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay is a proud member of the
International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando - Meeting Monday, May 17, 2004 at 7:30 P.M. #general

Doris & Don Frank <dofrank@...>
 

Genealogists to Learn About Non-urban Jews

Much has been written about the Jews in the big cities in America, but what
about immigrants who chose other ways of life? Come to the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando's (JGSGO) meeting on May 17th and
learn about "Non-Urban Jewish immigrants: Farmers, Cowboys and Small Town
Jews," to be discussed by professional genealogist Gladys Friedman Paulin,
CGRS. *

from the 17th century to the present, some Jews in America have purchased
land, traded with Indians, homesteaded and even raised cattle. The talk
will provide some examples of each, including several Jewish farm colonies
in the west as well as in New Jersey!

You will also hear the story of Deadwood, South Dakota, a town with a very
Jewish history. The evening will include a discussion of resources to
discover if your ancestor obtained government land, as well as how to find
the records.

The speaker for the evening, Gladys Friedman Paulin, CGRS, is a favorite of
the genealogy group. She states that her interest in family history goes
back to her teens, and she has been actively pursuing her research since
1990. Paulin has been involved with genealogy on many levels. She is vice
president of the Genealogical Speakers Guild, past president of the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando, former director of the
International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies, and the Central
Florida Genealogical Society. She is active in the Association of
Professional Genealogists and is a director of the National Institute
Genealogical Research Alumni Association.

Gladys Friedman Paulin, CGRS, is a graduate of Cornell University and she
has attended the National Institute for Genealogical Research and the
Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research. She has spoken at many
state and national conferences. Gladys has contributed articles for
genealogical publications, and presently publishes a surname family
newsletter with a circulation of more than 650 households.

The monthly JGSGO meetings are now held at 7:30 p.m. at the Congregation of
Liberal Judaism, 928 Malone Dr., Orlando, just off Lee Road. Meetings are
open, and the community is invited to attend. For additional information,
please phone Doris at 407-323-9728. We look forward to welcoming you on May
17th.

* CGRS, Certified Genealogical Records Specialist, is a Service Mark of the
Board for Certification of Genealogists and used under license by
Board-certified persons who meet program standards and periodic rigorous
evaluations.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Drew Smith & George G. Morgan at JGS Tampa Bay meeting 5-16-04 #general

Mark
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay
Meeting, Sunday, May 16, 2004

Drew Smith To Speak on
"How To Do Genealogy Without Guilt"
Also: George G. Morgan will present "New Developments at the Tampa Library"

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay will meet on Sunday May 16 at
2:00 P.M. at Gulf Coast Jewish Family Services, 14041 Icot Blvd.,
Clearwater, Florida. Drew Smith is an instructor for the School of Library
and Information Science at USF in Tampa, where he teaches a graduate-level
course for library science students on genealogical librarian-ship. He
previously taught undergraduate-level courses in library/Internet research
and web page design. Mr. Smith will speak on "How To Do Genealogy Without
Guilt".

Drew Smith is a founding member of the group, "Librarians Serving
Genealogists", and he serves as its listowner and webmaster. He writes the
"Cybrarian" column for the quarterly Genealogical Computing, as well as
wrote the biweekly Digital Genealogy column for the Ancestry.com web site.
He has served as the leader of the Genealogy and Local History Interest
Group of the Florida Library Association. Mr. Smith has been working on his
personal genealogy since 1992.

The Tampa Library has made a commitment to upgrade their genealogy section
to make it the most extensive collection around. George G. Morgan is in
charge of collecting the data to see what people want in this collection.
He wants to make sure that the Jewish community and our genealogy needs are
well represented in this new collection. He will be asking our members what
we would like to see in the collection. This can include books, microfilm,
fiche, databases and more. He says ask and yea may receive. He explained
that this is not to be in competition with any other collection but to
enhance the quality of genealogy in our area. Mr. Morgan, an avid
genealogist and a published author in the field of genealogy, is president
of Aha! Seminars, Inc. and he served as a member of the senior staff of the
Genealogy Forum for America Online. Mr. Morgan has been an adjunct
instructor with the School of Library and Information Science at the
University of South Florida in Tampa, where he taught courses in
"Introduction to the Internet" and "Web Page Design and Management. He is
the editor of the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) monthly online
newsletter, the Delegate Digest. Mr. Morgan is the author of the book, The
Genealogy Forum on America Online: The Official User's Guide, published by
Ancestry.com. Mr. Morgan also has a new book released titled "How to do
Everything With Your Genealogy."

The Jewish Genealogical Society's library and research resources, including
both printed materials and computer access, along with guided assistance and
information exchange >from experienced researchers will be available to
participants at the meeting. Our library is growing and is quickly becoming
one of the most important reasons to come to the meetings. Many of the
items in the library are impossible to find in the local libraries, and if
they are reference only elsewhere, they can not be gotten through
inter-library loans.

*Back by popular demand*: Beginning at 1:30 PM (30 minutes prior to the
program) the main program will be preceded by a question and answer
workshop.

This meeting is open to the public and there is no charge for attending this
meeting. For further information on the organization or for directions to
the meeting
call Mark Baron at 727-842-5789 or Sally Israel at 727-343-1652.

Mark Baron
President
JGSTampaBay@yahoo.com
(727) 842-5789
The Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay is a proud member of the
International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies.


May Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia #general

JGLois@...
 

May Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia

Date: May 10, 2004
Time: 7:45 PM
Place: The Newman Building at Gratz College
Old York Road (Route 611) and Melrose Avenue
Melrose Park, PA

***
Speaker: Steven Morse

Topic: One-Step Webpages: A Potpourri of Genealogical
Search Tools

Stephen Morse is an amateur genealogist who has been researching
his Russian-Jewish origins for the past few years. His websites on
searching the Ellis Island database and the 1930 census have
attracted attention worldwide. In 2003, he was the recipient of the
IAJGS Outstanding Contribution award.

In his other life, Steve is a computer professional who has spent
his career alternately doing research, development, teaching,
consulting, and writing. He is best known as the designer of the
Intel 8086 microprocessor (grandfather of today's Pentium processor)
which sparked the PC revolution twenty years ago. He has a Ph.D.
in electrical engineering and still enjoys tinkering with electronics in
his spare time.

The One-Step website started out as an aid for finding passengers
in the Ellis Island database. Shortly afterwards it was expanded to
help with searching in the 1930 census. Over the years the One-Step
website has continued to evolve, and today includes nearly 40 web-based
tools divided into eight separate categories ranging >from genealogical
searches to astronomical calculations to Israeli phonebook lookups.
This presentation will describe the range of tools available and give
the highlights of each one.

****
For New Members
Come to the meeting 30 minutes early and hear more experienced
member of our group give advice and counsel on issues that
perplex you.

****

For all who are researching Philadelphia roots and need information
on local resources; cemeteries, funeral directors, repositories (and
much more) please visit the JGSGP website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp

***
Interested friends are always welcome!
Refreshments will be served following the meeting

***
Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
< JGLois@aol.com >


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen May Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia #general

JGLois@...
 

May Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia

Date: May 10, 2004
Time: 7:45 PM
Place: The Newman Building at Gratz College
Old York Road (Route 611) and Melrose Avenue
Melrose Park, PA

***
Speaker: Steven Morse

Topic: One-Step Webpages: A Potpourri of Genealogical
Search Tools

Stephen Morse is an amateur genealogist who has been researching
his Russian-Jewish origins for the past few years. His websites on
searching the Ellis Island database and the 1930 census have
attracted attention worldwide. In 2003, he was the recipient of the
IAJGS Outstanding Contribution award.

In his other life, Steve is a computer professional who has spent
his career alternately doing research, development, teaching,
consulting, and writing. He is best known as the designer of the
Intel 8086 microprocessor (grandfather of today's Pentium processor)
which sparked the PC revolution twenty years ago. He has a Ph.D.
in electrical engineering and still enjoys tinkering with electronics in
his spare time.

The One-Step website started out as an aid for finding passengers
in the Ellis Island database. Shortly afterwards it was expanded to
help with searching in the 1930 census. Over the years the One-Step
website has continued to evolve, and today includes nearly 40 web-based
tools divided into eight separate categories ranging >from genealogical
searches to astronomical calculations to Israeli phonebook lookups.
This presentation will describe the range of tools available and give
the highlights of each one.

****
For New Members
Come to the meeting 30 minutes early and hear more experienced
member of our group give advice and counsel on issues that
perplex you.

****

For all who are researching Philadelphia roots and need information
on local resources; cemeteries, funeral directors, repositories (and
much more) please visit the JGSGP website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp

***
Interested friends are always welcome!
Refreshments will be served following the meeting

***
Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
< JGLois@aol.com >


R' Isaac Elchanan Spektor #rabbinic

Menachem Butler <menachembutler@...>
 

On 2004.05.05, under the subject line "R' Y. E. SPEKTOR &
R' H. RABINOVICH of Kovno," Jeff Miller <SingingTM@aol.com> wrote:

I am interested in sources of information about the great Gaon and
teacher Rabbi Yitzhak Elchonan SPEKTOR of Kovno&#133;&#148; [...]
In 1959, Ephraim Shimoff completed his doctoral dissertation on
Rabbi Isaac Elchanan SPEKTOR and later published: "&#147;Rabbi Isaac
Elchanan Spektor; life and letters"&#148; (Yeshiva University).

More recently, RAMBI shows that Rabbi Aharon Rakeffet-Rothkoff wrote
an article about Rabbi Yitzhak Elchanan SPEKTOR in Tradition 29:3
(1995) pg. 5-20.

I hope that this helps,
Menachem Butler


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic R' Isaac Elchanan Spektor #rabbinic

Menachem Butler <menachembutler@...>
 

On 2004.05.05, under the subject line "R' Y. E. SPEKTOR &
R' H. RABINOVICH of Kovno," Jeff Miller <SingingTM@aol.com> wrote:

I am interested in sources of information about the great Gaon and
teacher Rabbi Yitzhak Elchonan SPEKTOR of Kovno&#133;&#148; [...]
In 1959, Ephraim Shimoff completed his doctoral dissertation on
Rabbi Isaac Elchanan SPEKTOR and later published: "&#147;Rabbi Isaac
Elchanan Spektor; life and letters"&#148; (Yeshiva University).

More recently, RAMBI shows that Rabbi Aharon Rakeffet-Rothkoff wrote
an article about Rabbi Yitzhak Elchanan SPEKTOR in Tradition 29:3
(1995) pg. 5-20.

I hope that this helps,
Menachem Butler


Szmuel of Kepno (Kempen) #rabbinic

Gilbert Hendlisz <gilbert.hendlisz@...>
 

Hello,

In the book, "Ir Lask V Rahakhma" by PZ Gliksman, I have found a
mention of a Rabbi Szmuel, who became Dayan and More Tzedek in Kepno
(probably around the middle of the 18th century). He is a mentioned
as one of the sons of Reb Meier HENDLES, a merchant in Lask, himself
the son-in-law of Rabbi Itzig GOLDAS of Lask.

Does anyone have any additional information about this R' Szmuel of
Kepno and his descendants?

Thanks for any clue.

Gilbert Hendlisz (Brussels)


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Szmuel of Kepno (Kempen) #rabbinic

Gilbert Hendlisz <gilbert.hendlisz@...>
 

Hello,

In the book, "Ir Lask V Rahakhma" by PZ Gliksman, I have found a
mention of a Rabbi Szmuel, who became Dayan and More Tzedek in Kepno
(probably around the middle of the 18th century). He is a mentioned
as one of the sons of Reb Meier HENDLES, a merchant in Lask, himself
the son-in-law of Rabbi Itzig GOLDAS of Lask.

Does anyone have any additional information about this R' Szmuel of
Kepno and his descendants?

Thanks for any clue.

Gilbert Hendlisz (Brussels)


Re: Grandfather's US citizenship #general

Lisa Lepore <llepore@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "john phillips" <garranuk@yahoo.co.uk>
Subject: Grandfather's US citizenship

Where do I contact to obtain this record.?
John Phillips
Bournemouth, Dorset, UK
John -

Where in the US did your grandfather live?

In 1900 a person could have gone to any court house
to apply to become a citizen. Sometimes they started
the process at one location, and finished somewhere else.

You can read all about the process, and where you might
find the records at this site
www.archives.gov/research_room/genealogy/research_topics/naturalization.html

If you post the name of the US location there may be other
local or on line resources we can tell you about.

Lisa


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Grandfather's US citizenship #general

Lisa Lepore <llepore@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "john phillips" <garranuk@yahoo.co.uk>
Subject: Grandfather's US citizenship

Where do I contact to obtain this record.?
John Phillips
Bournemouth, Dorset, UK
John -

Where in the US did your grandfather live?

In 1900 a person could have gone to any court house
to apply to become a citizen. Sometimes they started
the process at one location, and finished somewhere else.

You can read all about the process, and where you might
find the records at this site
www.archives.gov/research_room/genealogy/research_topics/naturalization.html

If you post the name of the US location there may be other
local or on line resources we can tell you about.

Lisa


Naturalization Certs #general

Charles F. Printz <cfphrai@...>
 

Ilona Lerman recently inquired -

I have recently come across my mother-in-law's
certificate of citizenship. On it is listed the number
of the Petition. I seem to remember hearing that there
is a lot of genealogical info on the petition papers,
but don't know how I can get a copy of these petition
papers. My mother-in-law received citizenship in
Boston in 1938.
Any help in this matter would be greatly appreciated.
Ilona Lerman
Beerot Yitzchak, Israel
phililona2001@yahoo.com

Dear Ilona and Colleagues -

At this late date, the petition for naturalization that Ilona speaks of
locating is found at the National Archives, likely still at or through the
NARA regional office having jurisdiction over her in-law's residence at the
time of filing (Massachusetts). A regional NARA office is located at the JFK
Library in Boston at http://www.jfklibrary.org/

The main NARA site: http://www.archives.gov/index.html,the genealogical section is
in the research room: http://www.archives.gov/research_room/genealogy/index.html

The petition today is called an N-400 Application for Naturalization and does
contain vital biographical information (maiden names, divorce info, birth/death
info on relatives, children, etc. Whether this was true for 1938 is unknown to me,
but I suspect it contained certain essentials, including date of last arrival in
the U.S. and the port of entry. The current N-400 application, for your guidance
purposes, can be located and downloaded at the BCIS (Bureau of Citizenship &
Immigration Services), formerly INS, website: http://uscis.gov/graphics/index.htm

Another section of the BCIS website gives information on the history of the INS
and genealogy research. It is worth examining, for it will provide guidance on
what one can reasonably be expected to find in immigration records and how that
information has expanded over time. The specific site within the larger main site
is: http://uscis.gov/graphics/aboutus/history/index.htm

This same type of information can also be found, perhaps with better guidance, by
searching the JewishGen Discussion Group Archives at
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~archpop This is obviously
a topic that has been discussed many times, as I am certain the Moderator will
also agree.

Best,

S/ Chuck Printz

Charles F. Printz
New York, NY - Elizabeth, NJ/USA
E-Mail: cprintz@teplenlaw.com - Office
E-Mail: cfphrai@bellatlantic.net - Home


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Naturalization Certs #general

Charles F. Printz <cfphrai@...>
 

Ilona Lerman recently inquired -

I have recently come across my mother-in-law's
certificate of citizenship. On it is listed the number
of the Petition. I seem to remember hearing that there
is a lot of genealogical info on the petition papers,
but don't know how I can get a copy of these petition
papers. My mother-in-law received citizenship in
Boston in 1938.
Any help in this matter would be greatly appreciated.
Ilona Lerman
Beerot Yitzchak, Israel
phililona2001@yahoo.com

Dear Ilona and Colleagues -

At this late date, the petition for naturalization that Ilona speaks of
locating is found at the National Archives, likely still at or through the
NARA regional office having jurisdiction over her in-law's residence at the
time of filing (Massachusetts). A regional NARA office is located at the JFK
Library in Boston at http://www.jfklibrary.org/

The main NARA site: http://www.archives.gov/index.html,the genealogical section is
in the research room: http://www.archives.gov/research_room/genealogy/index.html

The petition today is called an N-400 Application for Naturalization and does
contain vital biographical information (maiden names, divorce info, birth/death
info on relatives, children, etc. Whether this was true for 1938 is unknown to me,
but I suspect it contained certain essentials, including date of last arrival in
the U.S. and the port of entry. The current N-400 application, for your guidance
purposes, can be located and downloaded at the BCIS (Bureau of Citizenship &
Immigration Services), formerly INS, website: http://uscis.gov/graphics/index.htm

Another section of the BCIS website gives information on the history of the INS
and genealogy research. It is worth examining, for it will provide guidance on
what one can reasonably be expected to find in immigration records and how that
information has expanded over time. The specific site within the larger main site
is: http://uscis.gov/graphics/aboutus/history/index.htm

This same type of information can also be found, perhaps with better guidance, by
searching the JewishGen Discussion Group Archives at
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~archpop This is obviously
a topic that has been discussed many times, as I am certain the Moderator will
also agree.

Best,

S/ Chuck Printz

Charles F. Printz
New York, NY - Elizabeth, NJ/USA
E-Mail: cprintz@teplenlaw.com - Office
E-Mail: cfphrai@bellatlantic.net - Home


Jewish name for Isabelle? #general

Joy Weaver <joyweave@...>
 

While all these posts are flowing about Yiddish or Hebrew names, I
thought this might be a good time to ask about my middle name. I was
named Joyce Isabelle. The Joyce was for my mgm, Sheina/ Jean, and the
Isabelle for my pgf, Isadore/ Yitzak. I was never given a Jewish
equivalent for the middle name. A rabbi once told me I could use
Elisheva, but that doesn't seem to sit right. Any thoughts?

Joy Weaver
East Islip, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish name for Isabelle? #general

Joy Weaver <joyweave@...>
 

While all these posts are flowing about Yiddish or Hebrew names, I
thought this might be a good time to ask about my middle name. I was
named Joyce Isabelle. The Joyce was for my mgm, Sheina/ Jean, and the
Isabelle for my pgf, Isadore/ Yitzak. I was never given a Jewish
equivalent for the middle name. A rabbi once told me I could use
Elisheva, but that doesn't seem to sit right. Any thoughts?

Joy Weaver
East Islip, NY


Town Names (Toponyms) as Surnames #general

Dov & Varda <yknow@...>
 

Sally Bruckheimer wrote: >Usually someone took a town name as a surname when
they had moved >from that town to a nearby one.>

This is only one of many scenarios that could cause someone to take a town
name as a surname, thus I believe that, 'sometimes', is more apt than,
'usually'. Toponyms as surnames might be clues, but they also might not be
clues.

For example, many times names were given arbitrarily. My husband's family,
for instance, chose the name EPSTEIN, apropos of nothing at all. Another
example of arbitrary naming occurs in a cousin's line. His grandfather was a
Yeshiva student in Hebron, but apparently the Russians had a very long arm,
and all the students with Russian passports were required to take surnames.
The assignment of names was done through a process of lots. A big fur hat,
known as a streimel, was filled with pieces of folded paper, containing
surnames. My cousin's grandfather pulled the surname: KREISSBAUM. Thus, my
cousin felt it was no insult to his heritage to Hebraicize said surname to
KEHAT. Though KREISSBAUM is not a toponym, it was given to my cousin's
grandfather as arbitrarily as my husband's ancestor took the town name
EPSTEIN. A friend's great grandfather sent each of his many sons to
different cities, adjuring them to take different surnames so as to avoid
conscription. Thus my friend has no relatives with his surname: ABRAHAMS, is
not related to other ABRAHAMS, and he has no idea what surnames his cousins
chose or where they went to live. Only the legend remains.

There are other reasons for one to choose a toponym. When the authorities
compelled residents of a given area to take surnames, they often chose the
name of the shtetl in which they lived. They didn't have to move to choose
their town name as their surname. It is equally unlikely that someone was
moving at the time authorities caused this same person to adopt a surname.

For these reasons, the conclusion to Sally's hypothesis, >It is the same way
that someone in the US might say Sam >from Cleveland to differentiate among
the different Sam's working in a place.> does not necessarily follow.

There might be several citizens in a given shtetl who moved there >from the
same, neighboring shtetl. Giving them all the same toponym as surname
doesn't really help their neighbors to distinguish them >from each other, and
yet quite often, this is precisely what did happen: several people would
move >from the same given shtetl, to the same new shtetl. There would have to
be very few people using the same toponym, or only one person using it, to
make it a valid method of distinguishing one person >from another.

Sally wrote:> If Winowski is found in Poland, then it is not likely
shortened >from Klewinowski-if you have seen much Polish, shortening words
was not a high priority there. > It is true that to my American eyes, Polish
looks unwieldy, but unless Sally knows something that I do not, that is no
proof that they tended not to shorten names. I would be interested to hear
her source for this. I do know that I once explored the idea that the
comedian Jan MURRAY was related to me, based on the fact that his original
surname was JANOFSKY- my mpggm’s maiden surname. Though I knew that there
were over 50 towns in Eastern Europe with the name of Janow, I didn’t think
it would hurt to find out if I was related to Jan. I made contact with
MURRAY’s grandson, who found out >from Jan that the surname was JANKOWSKI
before it was JANOFSKY. Here is a case of a Polish sounding name that was
shortened, albeit once the family moved to the good ole USA.

As for Sally's assertion:>Like BRUCKHEIMER could be someone from
Bruckheim-but there is no Bruckheim.> BRUCKHEIMER is likely someone who
lived in a house located near a bridge and there is nothing about the name
that suggests it sounds like a town. However, if Sally knew what town her
family lived in and knew that at the time they lived in that town, there was
one bridge and a house right near it, she might have a house location. But,
heck (!), then again, maybe not.

Varda Epstein
Efrat
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Town Names (Toponyms) as Surnames #general

Dov & Varda <yknow@...>
 

Sally Bruckheimer wrote: >Usually someone took a town name as a surname when
they had moved >from that town to a nearby one.>

This is only one of many scenarios that could cause someone to take a town
name as a surname, thus I believe that, 'sometimes', is more apt than,
'usually'. Toponyms as surnames might be clues, but they also might not be
clues.

For example, many times names were given arbitrarily. My husband's family,
for instance, chose the name EPSTEIN, apropos of nothing at all. Another
example of arbitrary naming occurs in a cousin's line. His grandfather was a
Yeshiva student in Hebron, but apparently the Russians had a very long arm,
and all the students with Russian passports were required to take surnames.
The assignment of names was done through a process of lots. A big fur hat,
known as a streimel, was filled with pieces of folded paper, containing
surnames. My cousin's grandfather pulled the surname: KREISSBAUM. Thus, my
cousin felt it was no insult to his heritage to Hebraicize said surname to
KEHAT. Though KREISSBAUM is not a toponym, it was given to my cousin's
grandfather as arbitrarily as my husband's ancestor took the town name
EPSTEIN. A friend's great grandfather sent each of his many sons to
different cities, adjuring them to take different surnames so as to avoid
conscription. Thus my friend has no relatives with his surname: ABRAHAMS, is
not related to other ABRAHAMS, and he has no idea what surnames his cousins
chose or where they went to live. Only the legend remains.

There are other reasons for one to choose a toponym. When the authorities
compelled residents of a given area to take surnames, they often chose the
name of the shtetl in which they lived. They didn't have to move to choose
their town name as their surname. It is equally unlikely that someone was
moving at the time authorities caused this same person to adopt a surname.

For these reasons, the conclusion to Sally's hypothesis, >It is the same way
that someone in the US might say Sam >from Cleveland to differentiate among
the different Sam's working in a place.> does not necessarily follow.

There might be several citizens in a given shtetl who moved there >from the
same, neighboring shtetl. Giving them all the same toponym as surname
doesn't really help their neighbors to distinguish them >from each other, and
yet quite often, this is precisely what did happen: several people would
move >from the same given shtetl, to the same new shtetl. There would have to
be very few people using the same toponym, or only one person using it, to
make it a valid method of distinguishing one person >from another.

Sally wrote:> If Winowski is found in Poland, then it is not likely
shortened >from Klewinowski-if you have seen much Polish, shortening words
was not a high priority there. > It is true that to my American eyes, Polish
looks unwieldy, but unless Sally knows something that I do not, that is no
proof that they tended not to shorten names. I would be interested to hear
her source for this. I do know that I once explored the idea that the
comedian Jan MURRAY was related to me, based on the fact that his original
surname was JANOFSKY- my mpggm’s maiden surname. Though I knew that there
were over 50 towns in Eastern Europe with the name of Janow, I didn’t think
it would hurt to find out if I was related to Jan. I made contact with
MURRAY’s grandson, who found out >from Jan that the surname was JANKOWSKI
before it was JANOFSKY. Here is a case of a Polish sounding name that was
shortened, albeit once the family moved to the good ole USA.

As for Sally's assertion:>Like BRUCKHEIMER could be someone from
Bruckheim-but there is no Bruckheim.> BRUCKHEIMER is likely someone who
lived in a house located near a bridge and there is nothing about the name
that suggests it sounds like a town. However, if Sally knew what town her
family lived in and knew that at the time they lived in that town, there was
one bridge and a house right near it, she might have a house location. But,
heck (!), then again, maybe not.

Varda Epstein
Efrat
Israel