Date   

Review of Rules for Posting Messages #belarus

Paula Zieselman <pzieselman@...>
 

Something simple this time around: a few basics for posting to the Belarus
Discussion Group.

1. First item for today is the last in your post: Sign every post with
your full name. First name, last name, every time. Put in your
location, too, including state or country. Someone may know about a good
resource in your area. You may want to add the surnames you're searching
-- you may include up to six lines of surnames & towns after your
signature. Yes, six lines is a purely arbitrary limit. There had to be
a limit somewhere, otherwise everyone has to scroll and scroll. So it's
six lines. Rotate your list sometimes so that everything gets a viewing.

2. Make the most of your subject line to catch the most eyes... and
therefore get the most help. Use your subject line to cover the basics
of your message. Some examples:
Is there a synagogue in Sokolka, Poland?
RABINOWITZ, Grodno to Buenos Aires, 1910s
Sephardic naming traditions
Do *not* use subject lines like these:
Help please
Family question
They are sure-fire interest-killers, guaranteed to slip away into
oblivion, drawing the eyes of only the most dedicated message readers.
And the people with the information you need may not be as dedicated as
you like -- but you still need them.

3. Write your message clearly and include as much information as is
relevant, without rambling. You want to include whatever people need to
be able to help you, but you don't want your message to be too long, or
people may skip it or not read it deeply enough.

4. We want this list to be clear and easy to read, so as to encourage as
much reading (and therefore as many helpful responses) as possible. To
that end, please type surnames in all capitals -- PLOTZ, SKYDELL,
NIEDERHOFF. Type the rest of your message using proper capitalization --
that is, capitalize the beginning of each sentence and the beginning of
given names and place names. It just makes things easier on the eyes.

If you have a signature file, please take a moment to edit it.
Capitalize the surnames so they stand out. Make all other words "normal"
so that they don't interfere with the surnames -- this includes words
like "Researching" and all place names like Jerusalem, Ukraine, England.

More information on posting is available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/DiscussionGroup.htm . Take a few
minutes to read it; there are more good tips on getting the most out of
your post.

Thank you, and may the right eyes always fall on your message,

Belarus Coordinator and Moderators


Belarus SIG #Belarus Review of Rules for Posting Messages #belarus

Paula Zieselman <pzieselman@...>
 

Something simple this time around: a few basics for posting to the Belarus
Discussion Group.

1. First item for today is the last in your post: Sign every post with
your full name. First name, last name, every time. Put in your
location, too, including state or country. Someone may know about a good
resource in your area. You may want to add the surnames you're searching
-- you may include up to six lines of surnames & towns after your
signature. Yes, six lines is a purely arbitrary limit. There had to be
a limit somewhere, otherwise everyone has to scroll and scroll. So it's
six lines. Rotate your list sometimes so that everything gets a viewing.

2. Make the most of your subject line to catch the most eyes... and
therefore get the most help. Use your subject line to cover the basics
of your message. Some examples:
Is there a synagogue in Sokolka, Poland?
RABINOWITZ, Grodno to Buenos Aires, 1910s
Sephardic naming traditions
Do *not* use subject lines like these:
Help please
Family question
They are sure-fire interest-killers, guaranteed to slip away into
oblivion, drawing the eyes of only the most dedicated message readers.
And the people with the information you need may not be as dedicated as
you like -- but you still need them.

3. Write your message clearly and include as much information as is
relevant, without rambling. You want to include whatever people need to
be able to help you, but you don't want your message to be too long, or
people may skip it or not read it deeply enough.

4. We want this list to be clear and easy to read, so as to encourage as
much reading (and therefore as many helpful responses) as possible. To
that end, please type surnames in all capitals -- PLOTZ, SKYDELL,
NIEDERHOFF. Type the rest of your message using proper capitalization --
that is, capitalize the beginning of each sentence and the beginning of
given names and place names. It just makes things easier on the eyes.

If you have a signature file, please take a moment to edit it.
Capitalize the surnames so they stand out. Make all other words "normal"
so that they don't interfere with the surnames -- this includes words
like "Researching" and all place names like Jerusalem, Ukraine, England.

More information on posting is available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/DiscussionGroup.htm . Take a few
minutes to read it; there are more good tips on getting the most out of
your post.

Thank you, and may the right eyes always fall on your message,

Belarus Coordinator and Moderators


Does anyone know Specifics about Bogdanovka Concentration Camp? #general

Marilwebb@...
 

On my trip to Ukraine a few weeks ago I came across a concentration camp called
Bogdonifka, a town mear Pervomysk. Apparently they did medical experiments to
people there--people who came >from the whole southern area of Ukraine--and then
just shot them. There is a mass grave marker in a field in which it says 54,600
people were shot.

I'd appreciate any information on this camp. Also, in the Sthetl Seekers list, I
was searching for Zarivka and Bogdanivka came up as a parenthesis under the
spelling Chirowka. Does anyone know what this means? I could find no one in
Bogdanivka who knew the town as Chirowka, but Zarivka is what I was searching for
(and that town is exactly where I think my Zarivka should be). What does it mean
that Bogdanivka is in parentheses under the Zarivka listing?

Thanks,
Marilyn Webb
New York City

UKRIANE: SALZMAN, WISHNEPOLSKY, ZITOMERSKY, TIPLETSKY, KREMENETSKY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Does anyone know Specifics about Bogdanovka Concentration Camp? #general

Marilwebb@...
 

On my trip to Ukraine a few weeks ago I came across a concentration camp called
Bogdonifka, a town mear Pervomysk. Apparently they did medical experiments to
people there--people who came >from the whole southern area of Ukraine--and then
just shot them. There is a mass grave marker in a field in which it says 54,600
people were shot.

I'd appreciate any information on this camp. Also, in the Sthetl Seekers list, I
was searching for Zarivka and Bogdanivka came up as a parenthesis under the
spelling Chirowka. Does anyone know what this means? I could find no one in
Bogdanivka who knew the town as Chirowka, but Zarivka is what I was searching for
(and that town is exactly where I think my Zarivka should be). What does it mean
that Bogdanivka is in parentheses under the Zarivka listing?

Thanks,
Marilyn Webb
New York City

UKRIANE: SALZMAN, WISHNEPOLSKY, ZITOMERSKY, TIPLETSKY, KREMENETSKY


My Ukraine ShtetlSchleppers Trip report #general

Marilwebb@...
 

I recently returned >from a trip set up by ShtetlSchleppers' genius Joanna
Flectcher to Ukraine. It was absolutely fabulous! It turned out that I was the
only person wanting to go at that time so Joanna set me up with a terrific guide-
translator and driver, who took me to every possible shtetl my various ancestors
could have been from. We criss-crossed Ukraine, looking for various Zarivkas, we
traveled >from Kiev to Odessa and spots in between, and over to the west, and back.

Geyla, my guide, had already made contacts in the towns I was looking for before I
got there. And she was also able to just go into a town/village and find exactly
what we needed. I can't tell you all how wonderful this whole trip was.

I have taken photos of every last readable grave (and some not so readable, but
still standing) in the old Jewish cemeteries of Bogapoli, Savron (and some in the
newer section), the Nikolayev in Podillia, and many in Odessa. I have sent most
of these to various Genners for English translations.

As soon as I get the translations, I will share them. I'm also trying to figure
out how to get the photos onto viewmate so that anyone who wants to see them can
do so. I'm a little computer-slow so this might take time, but if anyone wants to
see them, let me know privately and I'll send what's relevant to them.

One thing I felt completely shocked at was how little I had known about the impact
of the Holocaust in Ukraine. Yes, maybe we've heard of Baba Yar, but mass murders
happened in villages everywhere I went. Huge huge numbers of Jews were just walked
to ravines and shot, then buried--whether they were dead or alive. In what I think
was my grandfather's village there was the one concentration camp I saw--
Bogdonifka-- where it was said the Germans performed some kind of medical
experiments (does anyone know more?. Then there is a gigantic field in which
54,600 people were shot. It's astounding. And there were very few Jews left
anywhere--except perhaps in Uman, where the community is rebuilding, in Odessa,
in Nikolayev, and in Medzibetch (my spelling isn't right here). I will send out a
separate message about Bogdonifka.

Anyway, I can't say enough good things about Joanna, Geyla, Oleg (my driver), or
this trip. All were just fantastic. Thanks to all of them, and a big
recommendation for the whole thing to anyone planning such a trip.
Best,
Marilyn Webb
New York City

UKRAINE: WISHNEPOLSKY, KREMENETSKY, ZITOMERSKY, TIPLETSKY, SALZMAN, WIS
***
MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen's ShtetlSchleppers service provides group tours to a
variety of destinations, as well as advice and assistance with independent travel
to ancestral towns. See http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/ for further
information.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen My Ukraine ShtetlSchleppers Trip report #general

Marilwebb@...
 

I recently returned >from a trip set up by ShtetlSchleppers' genius Joanna
Flectcher to Ukraine. It was absolutely fabulous! It turned out that I was the
only person wanting to go at that time so Joanna set me up with a terrific guide-
translator and driver, who took me to every possible shtetl my various ancestors
could have been from. We criss-crossed Ukraine, looking for various Zarivkas, we
traveled >from Kiev to Odessa and spots in between, and over to the west, and back.

Geyla, my guide, had already made contacts in the towns I was looking for before I
got there. And she was also able to just go into a town/village and find exactly
what we needed. I can't tell you all how wonderful this whole trip was.

I have taken photos of every last readable grave (and some not so readable, but
still standing) in the old Jewish cemeteries of Bogapoli, Savron (and some in the
newer section), the Nikolayev in Podillia, and many in Odessa. I have sent most
of these to various Genners for English translations.

As soon as I get the translations, I will share them. I'm also trying to figure
out how to get the photos onto viewmate so that anyone who wants to see them can
do so. I'm a little computer-slow so this might take time, but if anyone wants to
see them, let me know privately and I'll send what's relevant to them.

One thing I felt completely shocked at was how little I had known about the impact
of the Holocaust in Ukraine. Yes, maybe we've heard of Baba Yar, but mass murders
happened in villages everywhere I went. Huge huge numbers of Jews were just walked
to ravines and shot, then buried--whether they were dead or alive. In what I think
was my grandfather's village there was the one concentration camp I saw--
Bogdonifka-- where it was said the Germans performed some kind of medical
experiments (does anyone know more?. Then there is a gigantic field in which
54,600 people were shot. It's astounding. And there were very few Jews left
anywhere--except perhaps in Uman, where the community is rebuilding, in Odessa,
in Nikolayev, and in Medzibetch (my spelling isn't right here). I will send out a
separate message about Bogdonifka.

Anyway, I can't say enough good things about Joanna, Geyla, Oleg (my driver), or
this trip. All were just fantastic. Thanks to all of them, and a big
recommendation for the whole thing to anyone planning such a trip.
Best,
Marilyn Webb
New York City

UKRAINE: WISHNEPOLSKY, KREMENETSKY, ZITOMERSKY, TIPLETSKY, SALZMAN, WIS
***
MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen's ShtetlSchleppers service provides group tours to a
variety of destinations, as well as advice and assistance with independent travel
to ancestral towns. See http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/ for further
information.


Revue du Cercle de Genealogie Juive, Issue 78 #general

Ernest Kallmann <kallmann.ernest@...>
 

Just published, this issue is devoted to the implications of the anti-Semitic
persecutions of the Nazi era upon genealogy.

1. The death records of deportees who have not come back >from the camps are the
subject matter of French Law of 15th May 1985. This question, already touched in
our Revue, Issue 75, is of special interest for Jewish genealogists. The Law is
summarized, as well as the errors which have occurred in its implementation. What
is at stake is to obtain that the death records of these deportees be set up
correctly and comprehensively. Eve Line BLUM and Jean-Pierre NETTER illustrate
this case by their inquiries and by the answers given by the relevant section of
the Ministry of Defense.

2. In "Jewish patriotism and genealogy under the Vichy rule", Philippe E. LANDAU
examines how the French Jews have reacted to the anti-Semitic laws deriving >from
the Status of the Jews promulgated in 1940 and 1941 : they produced the proof of
their belonging to the French Nation along its history, in particular by
establishing their family trees. An inquiry made by the Consistoire Central
illustrates how they have participated in the French political and military life
during history. The author stresses that this has not impacted the Vichy policy.

3. Jacqueline BEHR and André CONVERS show documents established by their ancestors
to prove how early their ancestors had been French citizens and how integrated
they were in the society.

4. The racist obsession of the Nazis, which made genealogy a national and
institutional activity, involved over ten million Germans during the Third Reich.
This article, by Ernest KALLMANN, published simultaneously in English by
Stammbaum, The Journal of German-Jewish Genealogical Research, is comprised of
three parts.

Part One sketches the rise of racism in Germany >from the end of the 19th century,
showing its influence on genealogy, eugenic theories based on a biased use of
genetics, and Teutonic myths. Part Two describes how genealogy had become an
institutional tool of Nazi politics, spreading widely among the German population.

Part Three, to be published in a subsequent issue, shows the fallout of the Nazi
racist obsession on today’s German-Jewish genealogy research.


Ernest Kallmann
Cercle de Genealogie Juive, Paris, France


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Revue du Cercle de Genealogie Juive, Issue 78 #general

Ernest Kallmann <kallmann.ernest@...>
 

Just published, this issue is devoted to the implications of the anti-Semitic
persecutions of the Nazi era upon genealogy.

1. The death records of deportees who have not come back >from the camps are the
subject matter of French Law of 15th May 1985. This question, already touched in
our Revue, Issue 75, is of special interest for Jewish genealogists. The Law is
summarized, as well as the errors which have occurred in its implementation. What
is at stake is to obtain that the death records of these deportees be set up
correctly and comprehensively. Eve Line BLUM and Jean-Pierre NETTER illustrate
this case by their inquiries and by the answers given by the relevant section of
the Ministry of Defense.

2. In "Jewish patriotism and genealogy under the Vichy rule", Philippe E. LANDAU
examines how the French Jews have reacted to the anti-Semitic laws deriving >from
the Status of the Jews promulgated in 1940 and 1941 : they produced the proof of
their belonging to the French Nation along its history, in particular by
establishing their family trees. An inquiry made by the Consistoire Central
illustrates how they have participated in the French political and military life
during history. The author stresses that this has not impacted the Vichy policy.

3. Jacqueline BEHR and André CONVERS show documents established by their ancestors
to prove how early their ancestors had been French citizens and how integrated
they were in the society.

4. The racist obsession of the Nazis, which made genealogy a national and
institutional activity, involved over ten million Germans during the Third Reich.
This article, by Ernest KALLMANN, published simultaneously in English by
Stammbaum, The Journal of German-Jewish Genealogical Research, is comprised of
three parts.

Part One sketches the rise of racism in Germany >from the end of the 19th century,
showing its influence on genealogy, eugenic theories based on a biased use of
genetics, and Teutonic myths. Part Two describes how genealogy had become an
institutional tool of Nazi politics, spreading widely among the German population.

Part Three, to be published in a subsequent issue, shows the fallout of the Nazi
racist obsession on today’s German-Jewish genealogy research.


Ernest Kallmann
Cercle de Genealogie Juive, Paris, France


Re: No Death Certificate - Pennsylvania #general

Jay Cohen
 

The Pennsylvania Department of Health told me that there is no record of my
great-grandmother's death certificate (even though i know her date of death -
1-22-1913).

Any other suggestions?
One possibility (turned out to the case in my family) is that your
great-grandmother actually died in a different state. In my case, my
great-grandmother lived and was buried in Erie PA but actually died in a hospital
in Buffalo NY. When I tried to get her death record form the state of PA, I was
simply told that none existed. This confused me to no end until I heard the
family story of her death in Buffalo.

Hope that helps.

Jay Cohen <jlcohen@myadvocate.com>
(Washington DC Metro Area)
Searching: BRAUN, DOLOWICZ, FLATAU & KAC, (Grajewo, Lomza, Rajgrod, Suwalki),
KAGAN (Bialystok, Piaski, Volkovysk, Warsawa),
MANDELBAUM (Bialystok),
YERSZKI, YEZERSKY (Piaski, Volkovysk),
LOSHAK (Pogrebishche) and
KUSHNIRSKIY (Pliskov)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: No Death Certificate - Pennsylvania #general

Jay Cohen
 

The Pennsylvania Department of Health told me that there is no record of my
great-grandmother's death certificate (even though i know her date of death -
1-22-1913).

Any other suggestions?
One possibility (turned out to the case in my family) is that your
great-grandmother actually died in a different state. In my case, my
great-grandmother lived and was buried in Erie PA but actually died in a hospital
in Buffalo NY. When I tried to get her death record form the state of PA, I was
simply told that none existed. This confused me to no end until I heard the
family story of her death in Buffalo.

Hope that helps.

Jay Cohen <jlcohen@myadvocate.com>
(Washington DC Metro Area)
Searching: BRAUN, DOLOWICZ, FLATAU & KAC, (Grajewo, Lomza, Rajgrod, Suwalki),
KAGAN (Bialystok, Piaski, Volkovysk, Warsawa),
MANDELBAUM (Bialystok),
YERSZKI, YEZERSKY (Piaski, Volkovysk),
LOSHAK (Pogrebishche) and
KUSHNIRSKIY (Pliskov)


Kielce Town Indexing, JRI-Poland Kielce PSA project #general

dprice dprice
 

Subject: Kielce Town indexing in the JRI-Poland Kielce PSA project


Dear Fellow Researchers,
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland project is happy to announce that the indices
to all the Jewish vital records of Kielce Town - not filmed by the LDS (Mormons)-
have been indexed by the JRI-Poland team in Warsaw as part of the Kielce Polish
State Archives (PSA) Project.
Kielce is located 101 kilometers NNE of Krakow in the Kielce area.
Neighboring towns within 20 miles include Daleszyce, Checiny, Sobkow, Chmielnik,
Bodzentyn, Malogoszcz, Jedrzejow, Pinczow and Szydlow.
Summary of Kielce Records Being Indexed:
Births: 4530
Marriages: 721
Deaths: 1647
Surnames Found in the new indices:
These are the most common surnames found in the Kielce indices. (Number of entries
follows the name)
ZYLBERSZTAJN (149), MANEL (93), GARFINKEL (92), GOLDBERG (92), KUPERBERG (84),
MOSKOWICZ (70), GOLDFARB (60), KOCHEN (56), CUKER (53), RAJZMAN (49), GUTMAN (48),
ROZENBERG (48), TENENBAUM (48), URBAJTEL (48), MACHTYNGER (47), WAJNSZTOK (45),
GOTFRYD (44), BEKERMAN (43), JAKUBOWICZ (42), JOSKOWICZ (41), LEWKOWICZ (41),
EJZENBERG (40), FEDERMAN (40), PASTERNAK (35), WAJSBROT (35)
A list of all surnames appearing in the Kielce indices is now online at:
<http://www.jri-poland.org/psa/Kielce.htm>
If you would like to know the number of times any surname appears in the new
indices or more about the Kielce Town project, please contact me at:
dprice@sympatico.ca

Best wishes,
David Price, Toronto, Ont./Canada
Kielce Town Leader
Kielce PSA Project,
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
dprice@sympatico.ca


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kielce Town Indexing, JRI-Poland Kielce PSA project #general

dprice dprice
 

Subject: Kielce Town indexing in the JRI-Poland Kielce PSA project


Dear Fellow Researchers,
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland project is happy to announce that the indices
to all the Jewish vital records of Kielce Town - not filmed by the LDS (Mormons)-
have been indexed by the JRI-Poland team in Warsaw as part of the Kielce Polish
State Archives (PSA) Project.
Kielce is located 101 kilometers NNE of Krakow in the Kielce area.
Neighboring towns within 20 miles include Daleszyce, Checiny, Sobkow, Chmielnik,
Bodzentyn, Malogoszcz, Jedrzejow, Pinczow and Szydlow.
Summary of Kielce Records Being Indexed:
Births: 4530
Marriages: 721
Deaths: 1647
Surnames Found in the new indices:
These are the most common surnames found in the Kielce indices. (Number of entries
follows the name)
ZYLBERSZTAJN (149), MANEL (93), GARFINKEL (92), GOLDBERG (92), KUPERBERG (84),
MOSKOWICZ (70), GOLDFARB (60), KOCHEN (56), CUKER (53), RAJZMAN (49), GUTMAN (48),
ROZENBERG (48), TENENBAUM (48), URBAJTEL (48), MACHTYNGER (47), WAJNSZTOK (45),
GOTFRYD (44), BEKERMAN (43), JAKUBOWICZ (42), JOSKOWICZ (41), LEWKOWICZ (41),
EJZENBERG (40), FEDERMAN (40), PASTERNAK (35), WAJSBROT (35)
A list of all surnames appearing in the Kielce indices is now online at:
<http://www.jri-poland.org/psa/Kielce.htm>
If you would like to know the number of times any surname appears in the new
indices or more about the Kielce Town project, please contact me at:
dprice@sympatico.ca

Best wishes,
David Price, Toronto, Ont./Canada
Kielce Town Leader
Kielce PSA Project,
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
dprice@sympatico.ca


GOODOVITCH family #general

dmzohar@...
 

Does anyone know of the GOODOVITCH family >from Vitebsk-Belarus???

David Zohar
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen GOODOVITCH family #general

dmzohar@...
 

Does anyone know of the GOODOVITCH family >from Vitebsk-Belarus???

David Zohar
Jerusalem


Searching: KLEIN-ASCHER or ASZER in Stanislawow-Ukraine #general

Jacqueline Pollak <j.pollak@...>
 

It happened in Stanislawow (to day Ivano-Frankovsk) in Galizia-Ukraine.
My great grand father Osias Ascher (or Aszer) remarried ca 1880 with Dobritsch or
Deborah KLEIN. They had 4 children between 1884 and 1890 :
Sofie, Libe, Benjamin and Adolf.
Would anybody have some information about those 4 children or their descendants ?
I am searching for the families :
KLEIN, Stanislawow
ASCHER or ASZER, Stanislawow
POLLAK, Stanislawow
TREITLER, Stanislawow

Jacqueline POLLAK, Brussels
***
MODERATOR NOTE: One of JewishGen's most heavily visited sites is the
JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) and family connections are being made more and
more frequently. If you have not already done so, please log onto
www.jewishgen.org/jgff and using the ENTER/MODIFY procedure enter and register
all the surnames of interest to your family research. As you learn about more
names and places of origin, they can always be added, but only **you** can keep
your own listings up to date.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: KLEIN-ASCHER or ASZER in Stanislawow-Ukraine #general

Jacqueline Pollak <j.pollak@...>
 

It happened in Stanislawow (to day Ivano-Frankovsk) in Galizia-Ukraine.
My great grand father Osias Ascher (or Aszer) remarried ca 1880 with Dobritsch or
Deborah KLEIN. They had 4 children between 1884 and 1890 :
Sofie, Libe, Benjamin and Adolf.
Would anybody have some information about those 4 children or their descendants ?
I am searching for the families :
KLEIN, Stanislawow
ASCHER or ASZER, Stanislawow
POLLAK, Stanislawow
TREITLER, Stanislawow

Jacqueline POLLAK, Brussels
***
MODERATOR NOTE: One of JewishGen's most heavily visited sites is the
JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) and family connections are being made more and
more frequently. If you have not already done so, please log onto
www.jewishgen.org/jgff and using the ENTER/MODIFY procedure enter and register
all the surnames of interest to your family research. As you learn about more
names and places of origin, they can always be added, but only **you** can keep
your own listings up to date.


Searching: Obit Assistance on Ruth Sinai #general

Rsns93
 

I need help with a lookup on an obituary. Anyone who has access to the obituary
of Ruth E. Sinai who was born on June 14, 1914 and died on January 7, 2004 in
Healdsburg, Sonoma County, California, please give me the details or contact me
privately.

Thank you,

Richard Sinykin
rsns93@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: Obit Assistance on Ruth Sinai #general

Rsns93
 

I need help with a lookup on an obituary. Anyone who has access to the obituary
of Ruth E. Sinai who was born on June 14, 1914 and died on January 7, 2004 in
Healdsburg, Sonoma County, California, please give me the details or contact me
privately.

Thank you,

Richard Sinykin
rsns93@aol.com


What are "Fancy Goods" (1910 Occupation) #general

Bernard Kouchel <koosh@...>
 

NY 1910 occupation -- "Salesman fancy goods".
What are "fancy goods"???

I found this definition on the web, but it is not very specific--
fancy goods - goods that are chiefly ornamental


Thanks!
Bernard Kouchel
koosh@att.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen What are "Fancy Goods" (1910 Occupation) #general

Bernard Kouchel <koosh@...>
 

NY 1910 occupation -- "Salesman fancy goods".
What are "fancy goods"???

I found this definition on the web, but it is not very specific--
fancy goods - goods that are chiefly ornamental


Thanks!
Bernard Kouchel
koosh@att.net