Date   

Yonkers cemetery moved to Israel #general

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

A number of articles have appeared in recent weeks in New York and Jewish
newspapers about a former Jewish cemetery in Yonkers, N.Y. -- just west of
the New York State Thruway (Route 87) and about three miles north of the
Cross County Expressway. The half-acre cemetery of the now defunct
Congregation People of Righteousness has been the subject of a year-long
investigation by N.Y. State Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, begun after a
Lake Placid, N.Y., woman complained about the disappearance of the cemetery
where her grandparents were buried.

Investigators learned that the cemetery was moved 15 years ago to make way
for the parking garage for two new superstores. Under the terms of a
court-approved 1989 agreement, drawn up with the approval of rabbinical
authorities, all remains were to be relocated at the developer's expense, in
accordance with Orthodox Jewish law and under the supervision of a Jewish
funeral director - either to Eretz Hachaim Cemetery in Jerusalem or, at the
request of families, to cemeteries in the United States. Although an old map
of the cemetery shows at least 241 burials, Spitzer's office found evidence
that 77 graves (65 adults and 12 children) were moved to Jerusalem and that
no more than 20 were relocated within the U.S. Removal permits were obtained
for the 20 U.S. reburials but not for the graves moved to Israel. The
Attorney General's court brief raises questions in particular about the fate
of about 135 children's graves that cannot be accounted for and may never
have been moved. The brief calls for an appropriate memorial to those once
buried in the Yonkers cemetery and a contribution by the responsible parties
to rehabilitate and maintain other abandoned Jewish cemeteries in New York.

According to newspaper reports, People of Righteousness, an Orthodox
synagogue, was founded in 1898 and bought its cemetery grounds in 1899. The
synagogue, which was located adjacent to the cemetery, was demolished in
1969. By 1989, the cemetery, overseen by five surviving synagogue members,
was "in shameful condition" -- "thoroughly overgrown with vegetation" and
"in serious disrepair."

Renee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yonkers cemetery moved to Israel #general

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

A number of articles have appeared in recent weeks in New York and Jewish
newspapers about a former Jewish cemetery in Yonkers, N.Y. -- just west of
the New York State Thruway (Route 87) and about three miles north of the
Cross County Expressway. The half-acre cemetery of the now defunct
Congregation People of Righteousness has been the subject of a year-long
investigation by N.Y. State Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, begun after a
Lake Placid, N.Y., woman complained about the disappearance of the cemetery
where her grandparents were buried.

Investigators learned that the cemetery was moved 15 years ago to make way
for the parking garage for two new superstores. Under the terms of a
court-approved 1989 agreement, drawn up with the approval of rabbinical
authorities, all remains were to be relocated at the developer's expense, in
accordance with Orthodox Jewish law and under the supervision of a Jewish
funeral director - either to Eretz Hachaim Cemetery in Jerusalem or, at the
request of families, to cemeteries in the United States. Although an old map
of the cemetery shows at least 241 burials, Spitzer's office found evidence
that 77 graves (65 adults and 12 children) were moved to Jerusalem and that
no more than 20 were relocated within the U.S. Removal permits were obtained
for the 20 U.S. reburials but not for the graves moved to Israel. The
Attorney General's court brief raises questions in particular about the fate
of about 135 children's graves that cannot be accounted for and may never
have been moved. The brief calls for an appropriate memorial to those once
buried in the Yonkers cemetery and a contribution by the responsible parties
to rehabilitate and maintain other abandoned Jewish cemeteries in New York.

According to newspaper reports, People of Righteousness, an Orthodox
synagogue, was founded in 1898 and bought its cemetery grounds in 1899. The
synagogue, which was located adjacent to the cemetery, was demolished in
1969. By 1989, the cemetery, overseen by five surviving synagogue members,
was "in shameful condition" -- "thoroughly overgrown with vegetation" and
"in serious disrepair."

Renee


Re: ABARBANEL, Rabbinate at Lissa, Prussia #rabbinic

Simon Srebrny <srebrny@...>
 

On 2004.09.06, Jeff Miller <SingingTM@comcast.net> wrote:

Does anyone know anything about this rabbinate >from Lissa, Prussia?
I am also interested in learning more about the female line of the
ABARBANEL family, and about descendants >from this family.
Jeff Miller asked about ABARBANELs in Lissa. This might just be
his lucky day. I am in Lissa - now Leszno - for a few days, to do
genealogical research at the state archives. There were indeed
ABARBANELs here. I have started noting them down... No guarantees
or promises.

Regards,
Simon Srebrny


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: ABARBANEL, Rabbinate at Lissa, Prussia #rabbinic

Simon Srebrny <srebrny@...>
 

On 2004.09.06, Jeff Miller <SingingTM@comcast.net> wrote:

Does anyone know anything about this rabbinate >from Lissa, Prussia?
I am also interested in learning more about the female line of the
ABARBANEL family, and about descendants >from this family.
Jeff Miller asked about ABARBANELs in Lissa. This might just be
his lucky day. I am in Lissa - now Leszno - for a few days, to do
genealogical research at the state archives. There were indeed
ABARBANELs here. I have started noting them down... No guarantees
or promises.

Regards,
Simon Srebrny


When Can Immigrants Change Name? #general

Mara Fein <maraharv@...>
 

I have read many times that immigrants names were not changed at Ellis
Island. However, I would like to see more of a discussion about changing
names. I have a grandparent who, it is said changed his name after he left
Russia in 1901. But when could that have occurred?

As I understand it, you need to "register" to leave your town (and that
records exist documenting this), and I would assume to do that you had to
use your real name.

Once you got to the ship you were taking, did you have to show papers that
proved that the name you provided was your real name or could you give a
false name at this point?

Once you were in the country, could you just start using another name at the
turn of the 20th century?

Bottom line, for those of us who wish to find our ancestors in the Old
Country, how can we connect to the old name?

Mara Fein
Los Angeles
maraharv@msn.com

Researching surnames: GORDON (Kharkov), GOODER (Kharkov, Kiev), FRIEDMAN
(Lithuania), BRAUNHOLTZ (Lithuania), HECHT (Galicia), WEINSTEIN (Austria),
GOLDMAN (Russia), KNOBLER (Austria), GLASSBERG, KLUBKNICK


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen When Can Immigrants Change Name? #general

Mara Fein <maraharv@...>
 

I have read many times that immigrants names were not changed at Ellis
Island. However, I would like to see more of a discussion about changing
names. I have a grandparent who, it is said changed his name after he left
Russia in 1901. But when could that have occurred?

As I understand it, you need to "register" to leave your town (and that
records exist documenting this), and I would assume to do that you had to
use your real name.

Once you got to the ship you were taking, did you have to show papers that
proved that the name you provided was your real name or could you give a
false name at this point?

Once you were in the country, could you just start using another name at the
turn of the 20th century?

Bottom line, for those of us who wish to find our ancestors in the Old
Country, how can we connect to the old name?

Mara Fein
Los Angeles
maraharv@msn.com

Researching surnames: GORDON (Kharkov), GOODER (Kharkov, Kiev), FRIEDMAN
(Lithuania), BRAUNHOLTZ (Lithuania), HECHT (Galicia), WEINSTEIN (Austria),
GOLDMAN (Russia), KNOBLER (Austria), GLASSBERG, KLUBKNICK


Cemeteries #general

Ada Green
 

On Mon, 6 Sep 2004 13:20:22 -0700 (PDT) < msnodrog@yahoo.com > wrote:

What I need help with is the names of cemeteries in the Bronx/Brooklyn/Queens
area that would have a computerized database of people who are buried there.
Some of the largest Jewish cemeteries in the NY area are not computerized,
most notably Washington Cemetery in Brooklyn and Baron Hirsch Cemetery on
Staten Island. As has been written many times in this discussion group,
the only sure-fire way to find out where someone is buried is to order
their death certificate. Please read the JGSNY Cemetery FAQ's at
http://www.jgsny.org/cemfaqs.htm, especially FAQ #6.

There are no Jewish cemeteries in the Bronx. A list of Jewish Cemeteries
in the New York Metropolitan area can be found at
< http://www.jgsny.org/cemfaqs.htm >.

MODERATOR NOTE: A good place to look is the JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial
Registry. For NY they have documented 199 cemeteries most in NYC. Please go to:
http://www2.jewishgen.org/databases/cemetery/ >>
While I agree with the Moderator that checking the JewishGen Online
Worldwide Burial Registry (JOWBR) is a good first step, the burial
societies that are listed for NYC are not cemeteries, but rather are
landsmanshaftn and synagogue plots within a much larger cemetery. They are
part of a larger entity, but are not the whole entity in itself. Most of
the larger NYC Jewish cemeteries contain hundreds of thousands of burials
and thus it is not humanly possible for any single individual or group of
individuals to catalog an entire cemetery. It is more realistic to catalog
the burial societies for one's ancestral shtetl, family circle, or
synagogue. For instance, in the JOWBR listing under Queens, NY, there are
30 burial societies listed for Mt. Hebron Cemetery and 35 for Mt. Zion
Cemetery. In actuality, these are just a small portion of the total amount
of societies in these two cemeteries, which at last count are 846 and 764
societies, respectively. Thus the NYC burial societies listed in the JOWBR
are still just a minute drop in the bucket for any given cemetery and
cannot be construed to represent the entire cemetery. In all, there are
over 10,000 burial society plots in the New York Metropolitan area,
including Long Island and northern and central New Jersey. You can search
for them by town name and keyword at < http://www.jgsny.org/searchcity.htm >.

Waldheim Jewish Cemeteries in the Chicago suburb of Forest Park, Illinois
is a large Jewish cemetery that contains over 200,000 graves and where of
each of the separate landsmanshaftn and synagogue plots are referred to as
a "cemetery". The Piser Weinstein Menorah Chapels' cemetery map refers to
these societies collectively as the "Jewish Waldheim Cemeteries". In NYC
though that is not the case; a burial society is not a cemetery by any
stretch of the imagination. In fact, the majority of NYC burial societies
have plots in more than one cemetery. Thus the bottom line is that care
must be taken in what is referred to as a NYC cemetery.

Here's hoping that during the 2006 IAJGS Conference to be held in NYC, that
conference attendees will catalog at least one NYC burial society of their
ancestral shtetl, family circle, or synagogue so that the JOWBR can grow.

Ada Green
adagreen@att.net
New York, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Cemeteries #general

Ada Green
 

On Mon, 6 Sep 2004 13:20:22 -0700 (PDT) < msnodrog@yahoo.com > wrote:

What I need help with is the names of cemeteries in the Bronx/Brooklyn/Queens
area that would have a computerized database of people who are buried there.
Some of the largest Jewish cemeteries in the NY area are not computerized,
most notably Washington Cemetery in Brooklyn and Baron Hirsch Cemetery on
Staten Island. As has been written many times in this discussion group,
the only sure-fire way to find out where someone is buried is to order
their death certificate. Please read the JGSNY Cemetery FAQ's at
http://www.jgsny.org/cemfaqs.htm, especially FAQ #6.

There are no Jewish cemeteries in the Bronx. A list of Jewish Cemeteries
in the New York Metropolitan area can be found at
< http://www.jgsny.org/cemfaqs.htm >.

MODERATOR NOTE: A good place to look is the JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial
Registry. For NY they have documented 199 cemeteries most in NYC. Please go to:
http://www2.jewishgen.org/databases/cemetery/ >>
While I agree with the Moderator that checking the JewishGen Online
Worldwide Burial Registry (JOWBR) is a good first step, the burial
societies that are listed for NYC are not cemeteries, but rather are
landsmanshaftn and synagogue plots within a much larger cemetery. They are
part of a larger entity, but are not the whole entity in itself. Most of
the larger NYC Jewish cemeteries contain hundreds of thousands of burials
and thus it is not humanly possible for any single individual or group of
individuals to catalog an entire cemetery. It is more realistic to catalog
the burial societies for one's ancestral shtetl, family circle, or
synagogue. For instance, in the JOWBR listing under Queens, NY, there are
30 burial societies listed for Mt. Hebron Cemetery and 35 for Mt. Zion
Cemetery. In actuality, these are just a small portion of the total amount
of societies in these two cemeteries, which at last count are 846 and 764
societies, respectively. Thus the NYC burial societies listed in the JOWBR
are still just a minute drop in the bucket for any given cemetery and
cannot be construed to represent the entire cemetery. In all, there are
over 10,000 burial society plots in the New York Metropolitan area,
including Long Island and northern and central New Jersey. You can search
for them by town name and keyword at < http://www.jgsny.org/searchcity.htm >.

Waldheim Jewish Cemeteries in the Chicago suburb of Forest Park, Illinois
is a large Jewish cemetery that contains over 200,000 graves and where of
each of the separate landsmanshaftn and synagogue plots are referred to as
a "cemetery". The Piser Weinstein Menorah Chapels' cemetery map refers to
these societies collectively as the "Jewish Waldheim Cemeteries". In NYC
though that is not the case; a burial society is not a cemetery by any
stretch of the imagination. In fact, the majority of NYC burial societies
have plots in more than one cemetery. Thus the bottom line is that care
must be taken in what is referred to as a NYC cemetery.

Here's hoping that during the 2006 IAJGS Conference to be held in NYC, that
conference attendees will catalog at least one NYC burial society of their
ancestral shtetl, family circle, or synagogue so that the JOWBR can grow.

Ada Green
adagreen@att.net
New York, NY


Searching for descendants of Rubin and Minnie HONIG and WILKENFIELD #general

MSalzbank@...
 

Looking for descendants of the Honig Family >from or near Mielec Poland.

In particular looking for the following branch:

Rubin Honig b. 1865 was married to Minnie ?

They had Annie b. 1890 married to Sam WILKENFIELD
Sam and Annie had 3 children Leonard, Goldie and Morris

Rubin and Minnie Honig also had Pauline b. 1891, Lena b. 1893, Lily b. 1894 and
Hyman b. 1895...

Rubin was a sister to my gr. gr grandmother, Jennie Honig JORRISCH.

Michael SALZBANK
MSalzbank@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for descendants of Rubin and Minnie HONIG and WILKENFIELD #general

MSalzbank@...
 

Looking for descendants of the Honig Family >from or near Mielec Poland.

In particular looking for the following branch:

Rubin Honig b. 1865 was married to Minnie ?

They had Annie b. 1890 married to Sam WILKENFIELD
Sam and Annie had 3 children Leonard, Goldie and Morris

Rubin and Minnie Honig also had Pauline b. 1891, Lena b. 1893, Lily b. 1894 and
Hyman b. 1895...

Rubin was a sister to my gr. gr grandmother, Jennie Honig JORRISCH.

Michael SALZBANK
MSalzbank@aol.com


Re: ABARBANE; rabbinate from Prussia, female line, descendants #general

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Jeff:
There were six ABARBANEL (with spelling variants) households in the
Grand Duchy of Posen in 1834, according to Luft's transcription of the
citizenship list of that year. One was a rabbi in Lissa, named Hirsch
A. Very likely, all the rest were related one way or another.

The others lived in Fraustadt (Wschowa), Ostrowo, and Bojanowo. Lissa
and Bojanowo don't have much material available on LDS films, but
Fraustadt and Ostrowo do--not least some family registers. You might
start there.

Best,
Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ
researching Upper Silesia--and a few folks >from Lissa

Jeff Miller wrote:

According to "A History of the Jews," by Abram Leon Sachar, "With Samuel
ended the outstanding members of the ABARBANEL house. But the descendants
continued a tradition of scholarship and public service until the last of
the family in the male line, the head of the rabbinate at Lissa, Prussia,
passed away in 1863."

Does anyone know anything about this rabbinate >from Lissa, Prussia?
I am also interested in learning more about the female line of the ABARBANEL
family, and about descendants >from this family.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: ABARBANE; rabbinate from Prussia, female line, descendants #general

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Jeff:
There were six ABARBANEL (with spelling variants) households in the
Grand Duchy of Posen in 1834, according to Luft's transcription of the
citizenship list of that year. One was a rabbi in Lissa, named Hirsch
A. Very likely, all the rest were related one way or another.

The others lived in Fraustadt (Wschowa), Ostrowo, and Bojanowo. Lissa
and Bojanowo don't have much material available on LDS films, but
Fraustadt and Ostrowo do--not least some family registers. You might
start there.

Best,
Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ
researching Upper Silesia--and a few folks >from Lissa

Jeff Miller wrote:

According to "A History of the Jews," by Abram Leon Sachar, "With Samuel
ended the outstanding members of the ABARBANEL house. But the descendants
continued a tradition of scholarship and public service until the last of
the family in the male line, the head of the rabbinate at Lissa, Prussia,
passed away in 1863."

Does anyone know anything about this rabbinate >from Lissa, Prussia?
I am also interested in learning more about the female line of the ABARBANEL
family, and about descendants >from this family.


Book Reviews Needed #ukraine

Flo Elman
 

Some time ago, I put out a call to any of you who would be interested in
reviewing topical books for the Book Review Section of our Ukraine SIG
website. If you've read any informative books recently that describe the
Jewish experience anywhere in the Ukraine, your opinions would be of use to
our readers. More new publications come out daily. We'd like to add these to
our site at http://www2.jewishgen.org/ukraine/Book_Reviews/book_reviews.htm

Please consider becoming a contributor.

Thanks,
Florence Elman
Ukraine SIG Coordinator
haflo@shaw.ca


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Book Reviews Needed #ukraine

Flo Elman
 

Some time ago, I put out a call to any of you who would be interested in
reviewing topical books for the Book Review Section of our Ukraine SIG
website. If you've read any informative books recently that describe the
Jewish experience anywhere in the Ukraine, your opinions would be of use to
our readers. More new publications come out daily. We'd like to add these to
our site at http://www2.jewishgen.org/ukraine/Book_Reviews/book_reviews.htm

Please consider becoming a contributor.

Thanks,
Florence Elman
Ukraine SIG Coordinator
haflo@shaw.ca


Re: Given name of SCHEI #hungary

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Robert Hanscom posted as follows:

"Can anyone help me with context on the given name of "Schei"? I am
trying to determine if a resident of the city of Trencin in 1782 was
identical with one of my ancestors. Here is the entry >from the Jewish
census, taken on 16 January 1782:

Name: Schei Feitl, "ivcestor pauper"
Wife: Eszter
Daughter: Gidtll

I am trying to make the case that Schei Feitl was Simon KOHN-ZERKOWITZ, a
native of Weisskirchen, Moravia. Simon moved to Trencin sometime between
1772 and 1782, and was robbed and murdered -- prior to 1795 -- on a
journey to Leipzig. His father's name was Feitel KOHN-ZERKOWITZ
(1726-1809), so that part fits. What I'm trying to learn is whether
"Schei" might have been an equivalent to the given name of "Simon". Any
help with this would be appreciated."


Written in a more standard transliteration >from the original Yiddish name,
"Schei" would be the Hebrew nickname SHAY or SHAYE. This name was linked
to the Hebrew names Yehoshua and Yeshaya, but there were several variants
of the name SHAYE which were used, and these have been transliterated in
different ways: Shayo, Shie, Sia, Schay, etc., depending on the person who
did the transliterating.

The name Feitl derived >from the German secular name VEIT. This German name
was quite popular among Jews in a number of different European countries,
including Hungary, to the extent that the rabbis declared it to be a legal
secular kinui. Thus, in legal contracts (Get, etc.) a person with this
German secular name VEIT and the Hebrew name Yaakov (say) would have his
name called as Yaakov Fayt in an aliya in shul. A Yiddish nickname for the
Yiddish name FAYT would be Faytl and a German secular nickname would be
Feitl/Feitel in German script.

The name Simon was another German secular name which was recognized by the
rabbis as a legal secular kinui usable with virtually any Hebrew or Yiddish
name. Thus it would have been quite acceptable to see the secular name
SIMON used for someone who had the Hebrew name Yehoshua, or Yeshaya (or the
nickname Shaye which was used with them), or indeed nearly any other Hebrew
or Yiddish name. It was commonly used for children who were given the
Hebrew name Shim'on.

So, Robert can take the hypotheses that the the Simon that he found was
indeed his ancestor, but he should try to verify this >from other data.

Shavu'a tov

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel

--
Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel
jerry@vms.huji.ac.il


Kozma Cemetery #hungary

drgoldin90@...
 

Hi All

While I was in Budapest in July I located my great great grandparent's
gravesite at Kozma Cemetery. It was exciting and moving to have gone there, but it
was also somewhat distressing to see the neglect in the oldest sections of the
cemetery. Since returning I have been in contact with Toby Mendlowitz,
Assistant Director of the Heritage Foundation for the Preservation for Jewish
Cemeteries about this problem. Although Kozma falls somewhat outside the
jurisdiction of this new organization since it is a "working" cemetery with a part time
caretaker, she has contacted someone in Hungary to visit the areas I
described and report back on what would be involved in clearing weeds, re-setting
headstones, etc. If you are interested in participating in this project, please
contact me privately at the above address. Anyone uncertain if they have
family buried at Kozma can contact the Museum for Hungarian Speaking Jewry in
Israel (museum@hjm.olg.il) and they will do a search in exchange for a donation to
the museum.

Thanks!
Marge Goldin
Dix Hills, NY USA

Researching:
ELBERT (Budapest, Hungary); MEISELMAN (Korolovka, Ukraine); FISHER (Kutno,
Poland and London, England); LEVY (Kutno, Poland and London, England); BREGMAN
(Slutsk, Belarus); BREAKSTONE/PETZURAN (Minsk, Belarus); GOLDIN (Divin/Kobrin,
Belarus); PRESSNER (Zaleszciki)


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Given name of SCHEI #hungary

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Robert Hanscom posted as follows:

"Can anyone help me with context on the given name of "Schei"? I am
trying to determine if a resident of the city of Trencin in 1782 was
identical with one of my ancestors. Here is the entry >from the Jewish
census, taken on 16 January 1782:

Name: Schei Feitl, "ivcestor pauper"
Wife: Eszter
Daughter: Gidtll

I am trying to make the case that Schei Feitl was Simon KOHN-ZERKOWITZ, a
native of Weisskirchen, Moravia. Simon moved to Trencin sometime between
1772 and 1782, and was robbed and murdered -- prior to 1795 -- on a
journey to Leipzig. His father's name was Feitel KOHN-ZERKOWITZ
(1726-1809), so that part fits. What I'm trying to learn is whether
"Schei" might have been an equivalent to the given name of "Simon". Any
help with this would be appreciated."


Written in a more standard transliteration >from the original Yiddish name,
"Schei" would be the Hebrew nickname SHAY or SHAYE. This name was linked
to the Hebrew names Yehoshua and Yeshaya, but there were several variants
of the name SHAYE which were used, and these have been transliterated in
different ways: Shayo, Shie, Sia, Schay, etc., depending on the person who
did the transliterating.

The name Feitl derived >from the German secular name VEIT. This German name
was quite popular among Jews in a number of different European countries,
including Hungary, to the extent that the rabbis declared it to be a legal
secular kinui. Thus, in legal contracts (Get, etc.) a person with this
German secular name VEIT and the Hebrew name Yaakov (say) would have his
name called as Yaakov Fayt in an aliya in shul. A Yiddish nickname for the
Yiddish name FAYT would be Faytl and a German secular nickname would be
Feitl/Feitel in German script.

The name Simon was another German secular name which was recognized by the
rabbis as a legal secular kinui usable with virtually any Hebrew or Yiddish
name. Thus it would have been quite acceptable to see the secular name
SIMON used for someone who had the Hebrew name Yehoshua, or Yeshaya (or the
nickname Shaye which was used with them), or indeed nearly any other Hebrew
or Yiddish name. It was commonly used for children who were given the
Hebrew name Shim'on.

So, Robert can take the hypotheses that the the Simon that he found was
indeed his ancestor, but he should try to verify this >from other data.

Shavu'a tov

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel

--
Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel
jerry@vms.huji.ac.il


Hungary SIG #Hungary Kozma Cemetery #hungary

drgoldin90@...
 

Hi All

While I was in Budapest in July I located my great great grandparent's
gravesite at Kozma Cemetery. It was exciting and moving to have gone there, but it
was also somewhat distressing to see the neglect in the oldest sections of the
cemetery. Since returning I have been in contact with Toby Mendlowitz,
Assistant Director of the Heritage Foundation for the Preservation for Jewish
Cemeteries about this problem. Although Kozma falls somewhat outside the
jurisdiction of this new organization since it is a "working" cemetery with a part time
caretaker, she has contacted someone in Hungary to visit the areas I
described and report back on what would be involved in clearing weeds, re-setting
headstones, etc. If you are interested in participating in this project, please
contact me privately at the above address. Anyone uncertain if they have
family buried at Kozma can contact the Museum for Hungarian Speaking Jewry in
Israel (museum@hjm.olg.il) and they will do a search in exchange for a donation to
the museum.

Thanks!
Marge Goldin
Dix Hills, NY USA

Researching:
ELBERT (Budapest, Hungary); MEISELMAN (Korolovka, Ukraine); FISHER (Kutno,
Poland and London, England); LEVY (Kutno, Poland and London, England); BREGMAN
(Slutsk, Belarus); BREAKSTONE/PETZURAN (Minsk, Belarus); GOLDIN (Divin/Kobrin,
Belarus); PRESSNER (Zaleszciki)


Re: Given name of SCHEI #hungary

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

Schei or Shay would usually be a nickname for Yeshayahu. If Simon was the
civil name it is quite plausible.
Ida

Dr. Joseph M. Schwarcz
Dr. Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

Moderator: The subscribers street addresses have been suppressed. Please contact them by e-mail off-list if you need contact info.

-----Original Message-----
From: Robert Hanscom [mailto:rodihan@juno.com]
Sent: Friday, September 03, 2004 1:07 PM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] Given name of SCHEI


Can anyone help me with context on the given name of "Schei"? I am
trying to determine if a resident of the city of Trencin in 1782 was
identical with one of my ancestors. Here is the entry >from the Jewish
census, taken on 16 January 1782:

Name: Schei Feitl, "ivcestor pauper"
Wife: Eszter
Daughter: Gidtll

I am trying to make the case that Schei Feitl was Simon KOHN-ZERKOWITZ, a
native of Weisskirchen, Moravia. Simon moved to Trencin sometime between
1772 and 1782, and was robbed and murdered -- prior to 1795 -- on a
journey to Leipzig. His father's name was Feitel KOHN-ZERKOWITZ
(1726-1809), so that part fits. What I'm trying to learn is whether
"Schei" might have been an equivalent to the given name of "Simon". Any
help with this would be appreciated.

Robert Hanscom
Andover, Massachusetts

Researching (all in Trencin Co.): Tauber, Zerkowitz, Knopfelmacher,
Kohn, Frankl-Kohn, Teschner, Lazar, Wilhelm, Popper, Zwillinger


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: Given name of SCHEI #hungary

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

Schei or Shay would usually be a nickname for Yeshayahu. If Simon was the
civil name it is quite plausible.
Ida

Dr. Joseph M. Schwarcz
Dr. Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

Moderator: The subscribers street addresses have been suppressed. Please contact them by e-mail off-list if you need contact info.

-----Original Message-----
From: Robert Hanscom [mailto:rodihan@juno.com]
Sent: Friday, September 03, 2004 1:07 PM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] Given name of SCHEI


Can anyone help me with context on the given name of "Schei"? I am
trying to determine if a resident of the city of Trencin in 1782 was
identical with one of my ancestors. Here is the entry >from the Jewish
census, taken on 16 January 1782:

Name: Schei Feitl, "ivcestor pauper"
Wife: Eszter
Daughter: Gidtll

I am trying to make the case that Schei Feitl was Simon KOHN-ZERKOWITZ, a
native of Weisskirchen, Moravia. Simon moved to Trencin sometime between
1772 and 1782, and was robbed and murdered -- prior to 1795 -- on a
journey to Leipzig. His father's name was Feitel KOHN-ZERKOWITZ
(1726-1809), so that part fits. What I'm trying to learn is whether
"Schei" might have been an equivalent to the given name of "Simon". Any
help with this would be appreciated.

Robert Hanscom
Andover, Massachusetts

Researching (all in Trencin Co.): Tauber, Zerkowitz, Knopfelmacher,
Kohn, Frankl-Kohn, Teschner, Lazar, Wilhelm, Popper, Zwillinger