Date   
New Director of Ukraine Research #Romania

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

I am pleased to announce that long-time JewishGen volunteer, Phyllis Gold Berenson, has assumed the position of Director of Ukraine Research. Phyllis has extensive experience researching Jewish family history in Ukraine, mentoring others, and has successfully acquired records from a variety of archives, overseen data transcription and translation projects, and coordinated the photography, transcription and translation of tombstones in the Mogilev-Podolsky Cemetery.

In addition to her focus on Ukraine research, she has taken an active role within the Senior Leadership Team, participating in strategic planning, and drafting legal documents.

Beyond her work for JewishGen.org, she has contributed greatly to the broader Jewish genealogical community by starting a Facebook group for those researching the town of Mogilev-Podolsky and co-managing a regional group on Family Tree DNA.

A lawyer by profession, Phyllis resides in San Francisco and Sonoma, California. She can be reached at pberenson@....

I thank Phyllis for all her devotion and dedication to JewishGen over the years, her vision for increasing the quantity and quality of Ukraine records on JewishGen, and for her role in helping JewishGen modernize and improve our systems.

Mazal Tov and Congratulations, Phyllis!

Wishing everyone success with their research

Avraham Groll

Executive Director

JewishGen.org

German SIG #Germany Seek information from Gruenstadt near Worms. #Germany

Dean Rosenthal <deanrosenthal@...>
 

Hello Gersig,

I am Dean Rosenthal, researching family history >from the United
States. A GGGG grandfather of mine was David Loewi,(o umlaut) born in
Gruenstadt (u umlaut) just outside the storied community of Worms in 1777,
according to the census in the Mecklenburg region, where he settled
around 1800.

My question is: how can I find out more about birth certificates or
census records in Gruenstadt at that time, 1770s. Clearly the reason
is to find out who his parents were and any other relevant family
information. I have searched through Jewish Gen databases and a few
other archives. I'm not starting >from scratch, but I wonder if
experts on this forum could suggest particular places to look. For
example, I have not been able to find any census records or birth or
death certificates >from this town of Grunstadt. Thank you!

Dean Rosenthal deanrosenthal@... www.deanrosenthal.org

Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia ViewMate Translation Request - Polish Birth Record with German Heading #Galicia

Yaron Wolfsthal
 

Dear Group,

I've posted a vital record >from Galicia (column heading in German) for
which I would appreciate a translation. It is on ViewMate at the
following address:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM75243

This is the birth record of Mojzesz Wolfsthal (1866), son of Schloma
and Chane Ruchel (nee Schwarz).

I am asking for help in extracting any information about the father
Schloma (is there an occupation here?) as well as the persons listed
on the right column, as their names may be of value in continuing my
search. Thank you

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.

Yaron Wolfsthal

German SIG #Germany Re: Symbol on Letter #Germany

Ralph Baer
 

Thanks to everyone who responded to my Viewmate submission
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=75219.

I am, of course, interested in any additional interpretations.
The consensus of the responses, both on the website and by private
e-mail, is that the symbol is my great-great-grandmother
Babette BAER nee KLEIN's monogram, although there
was not agreement as to whether it was in German or Hebrew.

Babette was born either on 23 October 1805 (data received >from the
Joehlingen Jewish community by my granduncle Max BAER in the 1930s) or
24 October 1806 (the recently published Joehlingen Ortsfamilienbuch). In
any case, she was in her mid-teens in 1821 when the letter was supposedly
written. As one of the responders stated, the handwriting does not
appear to be by someone that young. I had earlier come to the same
conclusion.

Two possibilities crossed my mind. For one, perhaps someone had written
it for her. More likely, the 1821 date is incorrect, and it was later.
As I wrote, the letter is undated, and the year 1821 is >from the
translation or transcription into German script by my great-grandfather
Nathan Carl BAER.
He wrote the 1821 in two parts. 18 was written at the same time as the
transcription and 21 later. I suspect that he did not know and asked a
sibling, most likely his oldest sibling who survived childhood
Therese FRANK nee BAER. Both lived in Frankfurt, and she was about
ten years older than he.

One more thing which I regard as funny. Babette BAER nee KLEIN was
known as Buhle when young. She had two sisters, Breinle and Berle (Bina).
All three used the German name Babette.

Ralph Baer Washington, DC RalphNBaer@...

JRI Poland #Poland New useful resource for finding graves in Israel #Poland

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay
 

I haven't seen any mention of this previously, so thought people might
be interested ...

The Israeli Chevra Kadisha forum has just launched a website and app
called Gravez which enables people to search for graves, see photos
and info about them online, and (using the app, which works like Waze)
navigate to visit them physically. At the moment they cover around 25
cemeteries in Israel with thousands of burials.

This seems to be a very useful resource in addition to the
long-running and even bigger BillionGraves website, which covers a
large number of cemeteries in Israel. (Of course, another major
grave-finding website is Find A Grave, but this has very few records
from Israel.)
There seems to be some overlap between Gravez and BillionGraves in the
cemeteries they cover, but each also has cemeteries the other doesn't
have, so it's worth searching both sites! I personally have been able
to find the graves of many people in one or the other or both.

Please note that in the case of Gravez, their platform works in
English (and looks very nice!) but you have to search for names in
Hebrew. In BillionGraves, you can search for names in English but the
only results you'll get will be >from other countries, so you'll need
to search in Hebrew for people buried in Israel.

I have no affiliation with or special knowledge about any of the
organizations mentioned above and am just posting to let people know
about these useful resources!

Gravez:
https://gravez.me/en/

BillionGraves:
https://billiongraves.com

Shana Tova Umetuka and Gmar Hatima Tova to all,
Yours Sincerely,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.

Yehuda Klausner z"l

Rose Feldman
 

Yehuda Klausner was a Civil Engineer with a doctorate from Princeton University. He was an erudite, modest and friendly man who studied rabbinical lineages with the same scientific approach, rigour and passion which characterized his academic career. We will miss his warm voice and accent, which had an indefinite touch of Eastern Europe.


Yehuda willingly responded to queries of people seeking answers to their genealogical questions.


Yehuda and his wife Yocheved were true partners in life and in genealogy. Together they volunteered for many JewishGen projects, where they especially contributed to RAV-SIG.


Yocheved, our thoughts are with you in these moments of sorrow.
May his memory be for a blessing.
Baruch dayan haemet


Your friends at the Israel Genealogy Research Association



Rose Feldman
Israel Genealogy Research Association
Winner of 2017 IAJGS Award for Volunteer of the Year  
http://genealogy.org.il
http:/facebook.com/israelgenealogy

Help us index more records at http://igra.csindexing.com

Keep up to date on archives, databases and genealogy in general and Jewish and Israeli roots in particular with http://twitter.com/JewDataGenGirl


--
Rose Feldman
Israel Genealogy Research Association
Winner of 2017 IAJGS Award for Volunteer of the Year  
http://genealogy.org.il
http:/facebook.com/israelgenealogy

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Wilesden cemetery London-photo request for Rabbi Isaac Simcha Meisels #jewishgen

Benjamin First
 

Hello

If anyone is going to Willesden cemetery in London would they be able
to take a photo of the grave of Rabbi Isaac Simcha Meisels (son of
Samuel Lemmel Meisels) (1844-1923/1924). According to the United
synagogue website the grave location is section MX Row 5 Plot 80. I
am currently researching a few of the earliest families to come from
Krakow to Manchester.

Many Thanks and Shana Tovah to all

Ben First

Manchester
UK

MODERATOR NOTE: Please contact Ben First first before heading to the cemetery.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate Translation Request - Russian (Polish) KOPLOWITZ, Szczekociny #jewishgen

Michael McTeer
 

Seeking translation >from a page of Szczekociny Book of Residents, "Doma
87", page (317) 2145. Hopefully this is the family of Szymon
KOPLOWICZ/KOPLEWICZ and Brucha (LENCZNER). Primarly I am interested in
birth and parental information of the parents. >from other records,
Szymon was a permanent resident of Ropocice. There are two more related
pages with some confusing info regarding mother of children. Will
appreciate whatever information.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM75299

Please respond privately or per ViewMate

Thanks, Michael McTeer, mcteer@... Crowley, TX USA

Romania SIG #Romania Tree Branch in Romania - Family WOLFTHAL #Romania

Yaron Wolfsthal
 

Dear Group,
I am new to this group and new to Romanian genealogy.
In researching my family roots >from Galicia, I have identified a
branch of family that lived in Romania before moving to Argentina.
I am investigating the roots of this Romanian branch, aiming & hoping
to connect it to the broader family tree.

Specifically, I've found there was a Herman Wolfthal
loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=gdc3&fileName=scd0001_20078205001abpage
.db&recNum=429 in 1937

[Tiny URL] https://tinyurl.com/yyxngfnn

He was also in the directory one year later, 1938.

I know Herman's children moved to Argentina. That part is understood.
The challenge, however, is in tracking Herman's ancestry.
I am seeking help/advice...

More specifically How can I find who were Herman's parents? and where
was he born? etc

And more generally, Is there a Romanian National Archive I should look
at, in order to find this missing information?

Any additional information about the WOLFTHAL (or interchangeably
WOLFSTHAL) would be welcome.

Thankfully, Prof. Yaron Wolfsthal, Israel (yaron.wolfsthal@...)
--

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request- Russian #jewishgen

Amoz Chernoff
 

I've posted a vital record in Russian for which I need a translation. It is on
ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM75293

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you very much.

Amoz Chernoff
Bethesda, MD

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need help establishing family ties - FROST and COHEN #jewishgen

Andrea Dechter
 

I've just found a new cousin through Ancestry. Her mother Clara Frost was born
and placed for adoption at the charity hospital on Blackwell's Island in NYC
in 1907. Per Clara's birth certificate, her parents were Fannie Frost and
Samuel. Clara was adopted and raised in Minnesota.

My grandmother's maiden name was Pauline Frost and she did have an older sister
Fannie (about 10 years age difference). This Fannie married Samuel Cohen and
they had a son Leon who was my dad's 1st cousin. I haven't been able to find
this Cohen family in any NYC census although I've been told that they lived in
the lower east side. The Frost family immigrated >from Kolomea. Fannie was in NY
by 1907. Pauline arrived circa 1911 along with her mother Pearl. They first
lived in San Francisco (where Pauline married my GF, Sigmund Fireman) and then
moved to NYC by 1913.

I am looking for any information about Pauline and/or Fannie i.e. immigration,
info that will link them as sisters, and anything that may shed more light on
Clara's adoption/confirmation of parentage.

Thank you very much in advance.

Andrea Dechter
Coral Springs, FL
Researching: FIREMAN, FEUERMAN, FROST, SANDLER, KAMINSKY
ar3j@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Gesher Galicia at Gratz College (Philadelphia metropolitan area) #jewishgen

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Join us for the event hosted by Gratz College, the oldest independent
and pluralistic college for Jewish studies in North America. The
program will feature the talk by Andrew Zalewski, Gesher Galicia board
member.

Title: "Jewish Galicia: Living Together and Apart"
Thursday, October 3, 2019
Gratz College, 7605 Old York Road, Melrose Park, PA 19027
12:15 p.m. to 1:45 p.m.

To register, please follow the link:
https://www.gratz.edu/event/lunch-learn-jewish-galicia

**Synopsis**
Join us as we "enter" 19th century homes to meet the Jewish
inhabitants of Galicia (home to the largest Jewish community in the
Austro-Hungarian Empire). Gesher Galicia's extensive archival
collections, Austrian censuses, postcards and maps, together with
newspaper clippings and pamphlets, bring to life Jewish presence in
cities, such as Lwow and Krakow, and other, smaller towns. Market
squares, streets, and schools - situated close to synagogues and
churches - provided shared spaces for Jews, Poles, and Ukrainians.
Reconstruct life of shared spaces and the richness of the cultural
heritage of the former Galicia.

**Speaker**
Andrew Zalewski is vice president of Gesher Galicia and author of two
books on Austrian Galicia. Andrew is a frequent speaker at Jewish
genealogical societies and cultural and academic institutions in the
US and abroad. His talks focus on Galicia, with unique records
providing a background for his description of a large Jewish community
that once lived there.

Dr. Steven Turner
President, Gesher Galicia

**Please do not reply to this email address**
Send all inquiries to info@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kiev marriage record #jewishgen

Roberta Berman
 

My gr-grandparents, Yitchak Oppenheim and Rifka Weisberg, were in married in
Kiev sometime in the 1860s. Do marriage records exist for that time period
and place? If so, how can I access them?

I searched the JewishGen Ukraine database and FamilySearch and did not find them.

All the best,
Roberta Berman
California

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Oppenheim surname #jewishgen

Roberta Berman
 

I traced my Oppenheim line back to my gr-grandfather Yitchak Oppenheim, born in
Brest-Litovsk in the early 1800s. YDNA testing on that line closely matches
others >from Majorca. FTDNA Family Finder has a 3-5 cousin match with my
immediate family and me with someone who knows that his family is >from Majorca.

My origin map on FTDNA shows roots in Spain, the Mediterranean, Turkey and
Eastern Europe.

So it seems there is the possibility that the Oppenheim line goes back to
Majorca. Oppenheim is not a Sephardic name, so at some point this unknown
ancestral family's surname would have been changed. So my question is, what
are the possibilities of where the name change to Oppenheim might have
occurred?

All the best,
Roberta Berman
California

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New useful resource for finding graves in Israel #jewishgen

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay
 

I haven't seen any mention of this previously, so thought people might
be interested ...

The Israeli Chevra Kadisha forum has just launched a website and app
called Gravez which enables people to search for graves, see photos
and info about them online, and (using the app, which works like Waze)
navigate to visit them physically. At the moment they cover around 25
cemeteries in Israel with thousands of burials.

This seems to be a very useful resource in addition to the
long-running and even bigger BillionGraves website, which covers a
large number of cemeteries in Israel. (Of course, another major
grave-finding website is Find A Grave, but this has very few records
from Israel.)
There seems to be some overlap between Gravez and BillionGraves in the
cemeteries they cover, but each also has cemeteries the other doesn't
have, so it's worth searching both sites! I personally have been able
to find the graves of many people in one or the other or both.

Please note that in the case of Gravez, their platform works in
English (and looks very nice!) but you have to search for names in
Hebrew. In BillionGraves, you can search for names in English but the
only results you'll get will be >from other countries, so you'll need
to search in Hebrew for people buried in Israel.

I have no affiliation with or special knowledge about any of the
organizations mentioned above and am just posting to let people know
about these useful resources!

Gravez:
https://gravez.me/en/

BillionGraves:
https://billiongraves.com

Shana Tova Umetuka and Gmar Hatima Tova to all,

Yours Sincerely,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen LAZAROFF children-list #jewishgen

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

Someone recently sent mea list of the children of an Isaac LAZAROFF ,
New Haven, Ct. turn of the 19-20 cent. I seem to have lost the list.
Can the kind person please resend it to me and I apologize for the
inconvenience.

Shana Tova to all

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Symbol on Letter #jewishgen

Ralph Baer
 

Thanks to everyone who responded to my Viewmate submission
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=75219 . I am, of
course, interested in any additional interpretations. The consensus of the
responses, both on the website and by private e-mail, is that the symbol is
my great-great-grandmother Babette BAER nee KLEIN's monogram, although there
was not agreement as to whether it was in German or Hebrew.

Babette was born either on 23 October 1805 (data received >from the
Joehlingen Jewish community by my granduncle Max BAER in the 1930s) or 24
October 1806 (the recently published Joehlingen Ortsfamilienbuch). In any
case, she was in her mid-teens in 1821 when the letter was supposedly
written. As one of the responders stated, the handwriting does not appear to
be by someone that young. I had earlier come to the same conclusion.

Two possibilities crossed my mind. For one, perhaps someone had written it
for her. More likely, the 1821 date is incorrect, and it was later. As I
wrote, the letter is undated, and the year 1821 is >from the translation or
transcription into German script by my great-grandfather Nathan Carl BAER.
He wrote the 1821 in two parts. 18 was written at the same time as the
transcription and 21 later. I suspect that he did not know and asked a
sibling, most likely his oldest sibling who survived childhood Therese FRANK
nee BAER. Both lived in Frankfurt, and she was about ten years older than
he.

One more thing which I regard as funny. Babette BAER nee KLEIN was known as
Buhle when young. She had two sisters, Breinle and Berle (Bina). All three
used the German name Babette.

Ralph Baer Washington, DC RalphNBaer@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Gittle (Abramowitz) -Russia-New Haven, Ct. 19th cent. #jewishgen

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

Further to my posting regarding my great great grandmother residence
in New Haven: My assumption is that she lived for a few years in N.H.
during the last decade(s) of the 19th cent.

Supposedly she returned >from the states (>from N.H. ?) as a widow and
married a British widower Isaac LAZAROV (possibly ELIAZAROV) who died
in Jerusalem about 1910. She passed away in Jerusalem during W W !.

Again, thanks to all who replied.

Shana Tova to one and all.

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Marriages and Family Origins in Russia #jewishgen

David Goldman
 

Hi everyone. >from my own genealogical research I have begun to get the
impression that ancestors who I know had origins in one reason but lived
elsewhere married their spouses who very likely also came >from the same
region. Here are three examples:

1) One great-great-grandfather originated in Zhitomir. We have found records
on him but not on his wife who he married in Odessa. I suspect I have to try
finding records on her >from Zhitomir since I know that her brother came from
Lutsk/Kolki which is not far >from Zhitomir.
2) Another great-great-grandfather who came to Odessa >from Dabrowa
Byalistocka married his wife (Livshitz) who was born near Odessa. Since
there are many Livshitzes >from White Russia, I suspect that her family
originated there as well.
3) A third great-great-grandfather named Shneur Zalman born in 1813 lived in
Nova Ushitza in Ukraine. Now since Shneur Zalman is a Lubavitch name, I
suspect his family migrated >from the north. His son, my great-grandfather,
married my great-grandmother of the FUKS family, a last name that was common
in Minsk and White Russia too.

It would be interesting to read what other Jewishgenners have discovered in
this regard. It is possible that this kind of investigation could lead to
finding ancestral records in the northern region. Of course this can still
be difficult if it goes back to the early 19th century or before. It also
suggests the possibility that migrants would prefer marrying those whose
families originated >from the same region. I am not sure why this would be
such a big deal, but in those days maybe it was.

David Goldman
NYC

Belarus SIG #Belarus Regarding Family Search 1920's-1930s #Belarus

Anna Doggart
 

Regarding Jenny Rapaport's search in 1920s and 1930s for family records
in Belarus, we have had amazing results >from the Belarus state archives
in Minsk. We found FRIEDLAND family going back to 1814 census and HEIFETZ
family going back to 1869 marriage. Before that we didn't even know
where our grandfather Victor FRIEDLAND came from, although we knew he
had a wallpaper factory in MINSK >from around 1910 to 1918.
Write to them by email to say what names you are looking for. Each name will
count as a separate search. They will let you know how much they want for
the search. You then pay in advance. We thought their charges were reasonable.
We found a Russian lady who sent all communications in Russian for us.

Our searches took nearly 8 months to come through and we then paid a further
sum before they sent us the results. They included information >from census
birth, death and marriage registries, business and addresses.
Once you have the records( if they find any) you can, if you are interested,
ask for copies of actual documents. (Further cost of course for this work.
They had initially found the record of my great grandparents marriage in 1869.
Normally this would have included the names of the parents of both bride and
groom and occupations of father, so a good one to look at. Unfortunately for us
the record came >from a book with a list of marriages and all the others include
names of parents but in our case not. So it isn't always successful.
t always successful.
Anna
anna.doggart@...
Researching FRIEDLAND HEIFETZ LEVIN BLUMIN SCHWARZKOPF in ORSHA MINSK WARS=
AW MOSCOW HARBIN BIALYSTOK=20
By the way I only have email for Belarus archive in Cyrillic script so please
look for it yourself on line or if stuck contact me and I'll try and cut and
paste it.



Subject: Looking for Family Records >from 1920s-1930s From: Jenny Rappaport <jennyrappaport@...>
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 2019 21:49:13 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1
I'm interested in finding records for my family in Belarus >from the
early 1900s through the beginning of World War II. I'm most interested
in the period of the 1920s and 1930s.