Date   

Garfinkel #general

NZF860@...
 

Does anyone have information on the Garfinkel (Halevi) family that came to
New York and London >from Poland (and Germany)?

Thanks,
Z Frankel
NZF860@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: To increase your chances of success, don't forget
to list your surnames of interest in the JewishGen Family Finder,
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Garfinkel #general

NZF860@...
 

Does anyone have information on the Garfinkel (Halevi) family that came to
New York and London >from Poland (and Germany)?

Thanks,
Z Frankel
NZF860@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: To increase your chances of success, don't forget
to list your surnames of interest in the JewishGen Family Finder,
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/


Re: Middle Names in Research #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

My father zal was Tsevi Moshe in shul, Hershmoyshe at home, and Moyshele to
his friends in America. His American name was Morris, so in general he was
known by his middle name. Three of his great-grandsons are Tsevi Moshe and
one is just Moshe.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

From: Pamela Weisberger [mailto:pweisberger@hotmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, October 05, 2004 8:09 PM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: Middle Names in Research

Israel and Fraida's comments about considering the usage of middle names in
research is an excellent reminder for all genealogists. I also have been
lead down the wrong (or confusing) research track by not investigating an
ancestor going by a middle name, instead of the given first name.

For example:

My great-grandfather's 1832 Polish birth certificate says he was: "Imie
Leysor" -- translated as "Named Leysor." (With the assumption that his
full name was Eliazer.)

He appears as Leysor or Lazar in his marriage and childrens' birth records
yet, on a Book of Residents >from Czestochowa, Poland, where his adult
childrens' names are listed, the father is written as: Icyk and other times
Eliazer, though with the same wife! Brothers marrying the same woman, I
thought? But no...that didn't match up with the childrens' birth documents.

Eventually, finding one of his son's gravestones in this country, the
father's name was written as: Icyk Eliezer so clearly that was his entire
Hebrew name, but for all intents and purposes he called himself Leysor.
(Except, when the census taker came around!)

One of his sons who emigrated to the United States was known as Leopold but
I could never find him in that Book of Residents. However, in that book,
there Was, another brother listed--never identified by me--named Napthali
Leyb. When I located That gravestone, I discovered that Leopold and
Napthali Leyb were one and the same. In this country, obvoiusly, Leopold
(>from the middle name Leyb) sounded more "American" than Napthali.

Luckily finding the gravestones helped me make these identifications, but
the lesson is that Yes, sometimes middle names were used, other times
discarded, but just because a given name doesn't match up with the person
your'e searching for, but everything else points to a connection, consider
this name-switching/modifying possibility.

snip <
Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Middle Names in Research #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

My father zal was Tsevi Moshe in shul, Hershmoyshe at home, and Moyshele to
his friends in America. His American name was Morris, so in general he was
known by his middle name. Three of his great-grandsons are Tsevi Moshe and
one is just Moshe.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

From: Pamela Weisberger [mailto:pweisberger@hotmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, October 05, 2004 8:09 PM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: Middle Names in Research

Israel and Fraida's comments about considering the usage of middle names in
research is an excellent reminder for all genealogists. I also have been
lead down the wrong (or confusing) research track by not investigating an
ancestor going by a middle name, instead of the given first name.

For example:

My great-grandfather's 1832 Polish birth certificate says he was: "Imie
Leysor" -- translated as "Named Leysor." (With the assumption that his
full name was Eliazer.)

He appears as Leysor or Lazar in his marriage and childrens' birth records
yet, on a Book of Residents >from Czestochowa, Poland, where his adult
childrens' names are listed, the father is written as: Icyk and other times
Eliazer, though with the same wife! Brothers marrying the same woman, I
thought? But no...that didn't match up with the childrens' birth documents.

Eventually, finding one of his son's gravestones in this country, the
father's name was written as: Icyk Eliezer so clearly that was his entire
Hebrew name, but for all intents and purposes he called himself Leysor.
(Except, when the census taker came around!)

One of his sons who emigrated to the United States was known as Leopold but
I could never find him in that Book of Residents. However, in that book,
there Was, another brother listed--never identified by me--named Napthali
Leyb. When I located That gravestone, I discovered that Leopold and
Napthali Leyb were one and the same. In this country, obvoiusly, Leopold
(>from the middle name Leyb) sounded more "American" than Napthali.

Luckily finding the gravestones helped me make these identifications, but
the lesson is that Yes, sometimes middle names were used, other times
discarded, but just because a given name doesn't match up with the person
your'e searching for, but everything else points to a connection, consider
this name-switching/modifying possibility.

snip <
Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Re: Galicia Jewish Museum #galicia

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
 

Joan,
Thank you for informing us of the opening of the Galicia Jewish Museum in
Krakow and their website.
The photographic tour was a moving and interesting vicarious visit.

I clicked on the English Language version and the link to "The Atrium, a
clearinghouse of information..which will keep you informed of the new
projects."
Clicking Search, I typed in Genealogy, but there isn't anything currently
available in that category.
One may subscribe to their Newsletter [which I have done] and watch for that
category to be available to us.

Sylvia
Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
President Emerita, JGSPBCI, FL
USA
Researching: ABELMAN, AWNER, DOROGOI, EHRENPREIS, FRIEDHOFFER, FRUCHT,
FURSHMAN, FURSTMAN, MELC, NUSINOV, LENT, SCHEINKEROVICH, WECHSLER.
Lithuania/Poland, Russia/Ukraine, Austria/Poland/Galicia, Israel, France,
England

----- Original Message -----
From: "Joan and Neiel Baronberg" <njbaron@frii.com>
To: "JewishGen Discussion Group" <jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Tuesday, October 05, 2004 9:58 AM
Subject: Galicia Jewish Museum

Some of you may already know about the newly opened "Galicia Jewish Museum"
in Krakov. (If not, see their home page and also their listing of events- at
http://www.galiciajewishmuseum.org/en/index.html)

I wrote to the Director and asked for their definition of Galicia. He
replied that all of Galicia is within their domain, although the current
photo exhibit covers only those parts of Galicia within current Polish
borders.

I am wondering if anyone has visited this museum and if so, what pertinent
genealogical information can be found there. I consider "pertinent" to
include lifestyles of our ancestors.

Thank you,
Joan Baronberg, Denver, CO


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Galicia Jewish Museum #general

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
 

Joan,
Thank you for informing us of the opening of the Galicia Jewish Museum in
Krakow and their website.
The photographic tour was a moving and interesting vicarious visit.

I clicked on the English Language version and the link to "The Atrium, a
clearinghouse of information..which will keep you informed of the new
projects."
Clicking Search, I typed in Genealogy, but there isn't anything currently
available in that category.
One may subscribe to their Newsletter [which I have done] and watch for that
category to be available to us.

Sylvia
Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
President Emerita, JGSPBCI, FL
USA
Researching: ABELMAN, AWNER, DOROGOI, EHRENPREIS, FRIEDHOFFER, FRUCHT,
FURSHMAN, FURSTMAN, MELC, NUSINOV, LENT, SCHEINKEROVICH, WECHSLER.
Lithuania/Poland, Russia/Ukraine, Austria/Poland/Galicia, Israel, France,
England

----- Original Message -----
From: "Joan and Neiel Baronberg" <njbaron@frii.com>
To: "JewishGen Discussion Group" <jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Tuesday, October 05, 2004 9:58 AM
Subject: Galicia Jewish Museum

Some of you may already know about the newly opened "Galicia Jewish Museum"
in Krakov. (If not, see their home page and also their listing of events- at
http://www.galiciajewishmuseum.org/en/index.html)

I wrote to the Director and asked for their definition of Galicia. He
replied that all of Galicia is within their domain, although the current
photo exhibit covers only those parts of Galicia within current Polish
borders.

I am wondering if anyone has visited this museum and if so, what pertinent
genealogical information can be found there. I consider "pertinent" to
include lifestyles of our ancestors.

Thank you,
Joan Baronberg, Denver, CO


Film of Rabbi's Funeral, NYC, 1917? #general

Sfingold
 

At a family reunion, I learned that the funeral
procession of my gggrandfather, Rabbi Abraham Eleazer
Alperstein, was filmed (funeral was in Manhattan and
the burial was at Mt Judah Cemetary in Brooklyn,
1917). Several different family members remember
their parents mentioning the filming.

Anyone know about the history of filming these types
of events in the early years of the 20th century?
Anyone know where I might look for the film just in
case it has survived? I'd love to track it down but
don't know where to start. Thanks for any help you
can provide!

Sharon Fingold
Researching: ALPERSTEIN, SCHNEIDER, SNYDER, EPSTEIN,
GURIN, GOLDEN, BENSUSSEN, CORDOVA, FINGOLD/FEINGOLD,
TARATOUT, FAIN/FINE


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Film of Rabbi's Funeral, NYC, 1917? #general

Sfingold
 

At a family reunion, I learned that the funeral
procession of my gggrandfather, Rabbi Abraham Eleazer
Alperstein, was filmed (funeral was in Manhattan and
the burial was at Mt Judah Cemetary in Brooklyn,
1917). Several different family members remember
their parents mentioning the filming.

Anyone know about the history of filming these types
of events in the early years of the 20th century?
Anyone know where I might look for the film just in
case it has survived? I'd love to track it down but
don't know where to start. Thanks for any help you
can provide!

Sharon Fingold
Researching: ALPERSTEIN, SCHNEIDER, SNYDER, EPSTEIN,
GURIN, GOLDEN, BENSUSSEN, CORDOVA, FINGOLD/FEINGOLD,
TARATOUT, FAIN/FINE


Bernsteins from Kremenchug #general

Brentsi
 

My paternal grandfather, Simon Bernstein(born 1870) emmigrated
from Kremenchug, Poltava, to Leeds UK becoming a British citizen
in 1913.
His parents were Israel and Cissie Bernstein. I would like to know
if these names "ring a bell" with others who are searching for Bernsteins.
Were there other relatives who emmigrated elsewhere..US, S.Africa, etc.
Simon Bernstein married Annie Lightman >from Vina: the youngest daughter
aged 89yrs is living in Leeds.
Brenda Habshush (Bernstein) Kibbutz Sde Boker, Israel.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Bernsteins from Kremenchug #general

Brentsi
 

My paternal grandfather, Simon Bernstein(born 1870) emmigrated
from Kremenchug, Poltava, to Leeds UK becoming a British citizen
in 1913.
His parents were Israel and Cissie Bernstein. I would like to know
if these names "ring a bell" with others who are searching for Bernsteins.
Were there other relatives who emmigrated elsewhere..US, S.Africa, etc.
Simon Bernstein married Annie Lightman >from Vina: the youngest daughter
aged 89yrs is living in Leeds.
Brenda Habshush (Bernstein) Kibbutz Sde Boker, Israel.


Re: Yiddish Obituaries #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Mara writes:

<<Everyone refers to NY Times Obits, but is that where they would have
appeared in the 1880's - 1930's for those ancestors who only spoke
Yiddish?>>

Often items listed under the category of "obituaries" in the ProQuest/NY
Times database, were, in fact, "death notices," and were not paid for by the
families. They were simply deaths reported to the New York City Department
of Health, with the same information found on the death records now held in
the New York City Municipal Archives or Dept. of Vital Records.

The Times column headline, for example, might read: "Deaths Reported on May
12th," but the index would clarify exactly what day in that month the
deceased had died. Because the exact age and home address was also
provided, this is useful genealogical resource, not just for adults who
died, but for infants and children as well.

<<What about the Yiddish newspapers like the Forward or others? Does anyone
know if obits appeared there?>>

Yes, obituaries and death notices were posted in the Jewish newspapers, but
finding these records is more difficult due to language and lack of
indexing. Some local Jewish newspapers (>from many cities in the United
States, not just New York) were written in English, and contain a wealth of
information, including unveiling and memorial service information.

Many public and university libraries have collections of these newspapers.
In Los Angeles, Hebrew Union College's Frances-Henry Library houses the
American Jewish Periodical Center where you will find many of these
newspapers on microfilm. Their website is:

http://www.huc.edu/libraries/losangeles/

Or you can search their combined New York City/Cincinnati and Los Angeles
online catalogue at:

http://www.huc.edu/libraries/libcats_v4.htm

Good luck!

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Yiddish Obituaries #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Mara writes:

<<Everyone refers to NY Times Obits, but is that where they would have
appeared in the 1880's - 1930's for those ancestors who only spoke
Yiddish?>>

Often items listed under the category of "obituaries" in the ProQuest/NY
Times database, were, in fact, "death notices," and were not paid for by the
families. They were simply deaths reported to the New York City Department
of Health, with the same information found on the death records now held in
the New York City Municipal Archives or Dept. of Vital Records.

The Times column headline, for example, might read: "Deaths Reported on May
12th," but the index would clarify exactly what day in that month the
deceased had died. Because the exact age and home address was also
provided, this is useful genealogical resource, not just for adults who
died, but for infants and children as well.

<<What about the Yiddish newspapers like the Forward or others? Does anyone
know if obits appeared there?>>

Yes, obituaries and death notices were posted in the Jewish newspapers, but
finding these records is more difficult due to language and lack of
indexing. Some local Jewish newspapers (>from many cities in the United
States, not just New York) were written in English, and contain a wealth of
information, including unveiling and memorial service information.

Many public and university libraries have collections of these newspapers.
In Los Angeles, Hebrew Union College's Frances-Henry Library houses the
American Jewish Periodical Center where you will find many of these
newspapers on microfilm. Their website is:

http://www.huc.edu/libraries/losangeles/

Or you can search their combined New York City/Cincinnati and Los Angeles
online catalogue at:

http://www.huc.edu/libraries/libcats_v4.htm

Good luck!

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


September 2004 update for Yizkor Book Project #latvia

Joyce Field
 

A Happy and Healthy New Year to all. It is always surprising that we
are able to add new material in a busy month with preparations for
Rosh HaShana and Yom Kippur and then Succot, but we seem always to do
it. In September we added four new entries and eight updates.

New entries:

-Pinkas HaKehillot Lita

-Baisogola, Lithuania
-Teverai, Lithuania
-Zemaiciu Kalvariaya, Lithuania

-Bukowina, Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina : "Jewish Sport in
Bukovina" >from volume 1, pages 167 to 172

Updates:

-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Derechin, Belarus
-Druzhkopol, Ukraine
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Marghita, Romania
-Radzyn, Poland
-Rejowiec, Poland
-Ropczyce, Poland

Thanks again to all our contributors, who took the time during a busy
month to submit translations and to our wonderful staff who worked on
these materials during the holiday month.

All our translations can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. The yizkor book
database, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html, has a
variety of information for researchers. When you search for a
particular book you will get a description of the yizkor books for
that location, a list of major libraries that have these books, and
links to translations on the yizkor book project website.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
jfield@jewishgen.org


September 2004 update for Yizkor Book Project #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

A Happy and Healthy New Year to all. It is always surprising that we
are able to add new material in a busy month with preparations for
Rosh HaShana and Yom Kippur and then Succot, but we seem always to do
it. In September we added four new entries and eight updates.

New entries:

-Pinkas HaKehillot Lita

-Baisogola, Lithuania
-Teverai, Lithuania
-Zemaiciu Kalvariaya, Lithuania

-Bukowina, Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina : "Jewish Sport in
Bukovina" >from volume 1, pages 167 to 172

Updates:

-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Derechin, Belarus
-Druzhkopol, Ukraine
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Marghita, Romania
-Radzyn, Poland
-Rejowiec, Poland
-Ropczyce, Poland

Thanks again to all our contributors, who took the time during a busy
month to submit translations and to our wonderful staff who worked on
these materials during the holiday month.

All our translations can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. The yizkor book
database, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html, has a
variety of information for researchers. When you search for a
particular book you will get a description of the yizkor books for
that location, a list of major libraries that have these books, and
links to translations on the yizkor book project website.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
jfield@jewishgen.org


Latvia SIG #Latvia September 2004 update for Yizkor Book Project #latvia

Joyce Field
 

A Happy and Healthy New Year to all. It is always surprising that we
are able to add new material in a busy month with preparations for
Rosh HaShana and Yom Kippur and then Succot, but we seem always to do
it. In September we added four new entries and eight updates.

New entries:

-Pinkas HaKehillot Lita

-Baisogola, Lithuania
-Teverai, Lithuania
-Zemaiciu Kalvariaya, Lithuania

-Bukowina, Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina : "Jewish Sport in
Bukovina" >from volume 1, pages 167 to 172

Updates:

-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Derechin, Belarus
-Druzhkopol, Ukraine
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Marghita, Romania
-Radzyn, Poland
-Rejowiec, Poland
-Ropczyce, Poland

Thanks again to all our contributors, who took the time during a busy
month to submit translations and to our wonderful staff who worked on
these materials during the holiday month.

All our translations can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. The yizkor book
database, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html, has a
variety of information for researchers. When you search for a
particular book you will get a description of the yizkor books for
that location, a list of major libraries that have these books, and
links to translations on the yizkor book project website.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
jfield@jewishgen.org


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia September 2004 update for Yizkor Book Project #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

A Happy and Healthy New Year to all. It is always surprising that we
are able to add new material in a busy month with preparations for
Rosh HaShana and Yom Kippur and then Succot, but we seem always to do
it. In September we added four new entries and eight updates.

New entries:

-Pinkas HaKehillot Lita

-Baisogola, Lithuania
-Teverai, Lithuania
-Zemaiciu Kalvariaya, Lithuania

-Bukowina, Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina : "Jewish Sport in
Bukovina" >from volume 1, pages 167 to 172

Updates:

-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Derechin, Belarus
-Druzhkopol, Ukraine
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Marghita, Romania
-Radzyn, Poland
-Rejowiec, Poland
-Ropczyce, Poland

Thanks again to all our contributors, who took the time during a busy
month to submit translations and to our wonderful staff who worked on
these materials during the holiday month.

All our translations can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. The yizkor book
database, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html, has a
variety of information for researchers. When you search for a
particular book you will get a description of the yizkor books for
that location, a list of major libraries that have these books, and
links to translations on the yizkor book project website.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
jfield@jewishgen.org


Chaskiel Orzech - b. 1930 Keilce, Thereseinstadt Survivor #poland

Ann Wine <annw@...>
 

Hi
I am looking for information on this person
Chaskiel Orzech - b. 1930 in Keilce, Poland
He was a survivor of Thereseinstadt.
I believe he moved to England after the war.
I have no further information.

Except in some way the name Rubin may be
associated. Does anyone have an ideas of how
I could find this person or people?


Thanks
Ann WINE
Sydney, Australia

Searching for:
WAJNBAUM, WEINBAUM , HERSZKOWICZ, STRAUSZ, BIDLOWSKI,
ZARKOVSKI/CHARKOVSKI, ORZECH, KALISTEN (Lodz, Stopnica, Nowy Korczyn)
ORZECH (USA)
SZTERN (Przysucha)
ZEIDNER (Kazimierz Dolny, Argentina)
GEFEN,WAJNBAUM,ORZECH (Israel)
WEINBAUM (Argentina)


JRI Poland #Poland Chaskiel Orzech - b. 1930 Keilce, Thereseinstadt Survivor #poland

Ann Wine <annw@...>
 

Hi
I am looking for information on this person
Chaskiel Orzech - b. 1930 in Keilce, Poland
He was a survivor of Thereseinstadt.
I believe he moved to England after the war.
I have no further information.

Except in some way the name Rubin may be
associated. Does anyone have an ideas of how
I could find this person or people?


Thanks
Ann WINE
Sydney, Australia

Searching for:
WAJNBAUM, WEINBAUM , HERSZKOWICZ, STRAUSZ, BIDLOWSKI,
ZARKOVSKI/CHARKOVSKI, ORZECH, KALISTEN (Lodz, Stopnica, Nowy Korczyn)
ORZECH (USA)
SZTERN (Przysucha)
ZEIDNER (Kazimierz Dolny, Argentina)
GEFEN,WAJNBAUM,ORZECH (Israel)
WEINBAUM (Argentina)


Town near Czestochowa -- in Cyrillic #poland

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

A town near Czestochowa has me stumped. Perhaps it is Kelci or something
close? Can someone help me with this town name? It is underlined in the
graphic below.

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/1005.KIFER-1890.jpg

The document is a death certificate, in Cyrillic, >from Czestochowa, 1890.
........................................................
Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Professor of Music / Wittenberg University / Springfield, Ohio USA
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/englander/

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


JRI Poland #Poland Town near Czestochowa -- in Cyrillic #poland

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

A town near Czestochowa has me stumped. Perhaps it is Kelci or something
close? Can someone help me with this town name? It is underlined in the
graphic below.

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/1005.KIFER-1890.jpg

The document is a death certificate, in Cyrillic, >from Czestochowa, 1890.
........................................................
Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Professor of Music / Wittenberg University / Springfield, Ohio USA
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/englander/

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.