Date   

Border Crossing, Terespol, Poland to Brest, Belarus #general

Jim Brook <jim_brook1935@...>
 

Border Crossing – Terespol, Poland to Brest, Belarus

Looking for any current information about how much time it might take to cross the
border between Terespol, Poland to Brest, Belarus for citizens of either the
United States, Argentina or Israel.

Everyone will have a valid current Belarus Visa.

A small group is planning a trip for September 2005 and has the option to travel
by either tour bus or passenger train >from Warsaw, Poland.

We are attempting to make a decision on which mode of travel will be the least
troublesome.

Jim Brook
New York, NY
jim_brook1935@yahoo.com
***
MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen's ShtetlSchleppers service provides group tours to a
variety of destinations, as well as advice and assistance with independent travel
to ancestral towns. See http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/ for
further information.


Brest-Litovsk, Russia Fires of 1802 to 1836 #general

Jim Brook <jim_brook1935@...>
 

Brest-Litovsk, Russia now Brest, Belarus – Fires of 1802 - 1836

During the period of about thirty-four years (1802-1836) the city of Brest –
Litvosk, Russia now Brest, Belarus suffered >from four (4) disastrous fires. The
government forbids the restoration of the burnt buildings. Though the evidences
are not available some historians state that the city was put on fire deliberately
to make its inhabitants move to new places outside Brest, so that the Brest
Fortress could be built on the site of the original city.

Can anyone give me additional information about the many fires that occurred
between the years of 1802 – 1836?

Jim Brook
New York, NY
jim_brook1935@yahoo.com


Who was Madame Pristorova? #general

Steinsteve@...
 

On two Belarus Yizkor book translations currently posted at Shtetlinks, as well as
book I am currently working on >from Nesvizh, there are references to a "Madame
Pristorova," apparently involved with the Polish government's banning kosher
slaughter in the 1930's in Poland. Does anyone have more information about this
person? You can Google "Madame Pristorova" for more specific references. Thanks.

Steve Stein
Highland Park, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Border Crossing, Terespol, Poland to Brest, Belarus #general

Jim Brook <jim_brook1935@...>
 

Border Crossing – Terespol, Poland to Brest, Belarus

Looking for any current information about how much time it might take to cross the
border between Terespol, Poland to Brest, Belarus for citizens of either the
United States, Argentina or Israel.

Everyone will have a valid current Belarus Visa.

A small group is planning a trip for September 2005 and has the option to travel
by either tour bus or passenger train >from Warsaw, Poland.

We are attempting to make a decision on which mode of travel will be the least
troublesome.

Jim Brook
New York, NY
jim_brook1935@yahoo.com
***
MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen's ShtetlSchleppers service provides group tours to a
variety of destinations, as well as advice and assistance with independent travel
to ancestral towns. See http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/ for
further information.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Brest-Litovsk, Russia Fires of 1802 to 1836 #general

Jim Brook <jim_brook1935@...>
 

Brest-Litovsk, Russia now Brest, Belarus – Fires of 1802 - 1836

During the period of about thirty-four years (1802-1836) the city of Brest –
Litvosk, Russia now Brest, Belarus suffered >from four (4) disastrous fires. The
government forbids the restoration of the burnt buildings. Though the evidences
are not available some historians state that the city was put on fire deliberately
to make its inhabitants move to new places outside Brest, so that the Brest
Fortress could be built on the site of the original city.

Can anyone give me additional information about the many fires that occurred
between the years of 1802 – 1836?

Jim Brook
New York, NY
jim_brook1935@yahoo.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Who was Madame Pristorova? #general

Steinsteve@...
 

On two Belarus Yizkor book translations currently posted at Shtetlinks, as well as
book I am currently working on >from Nesvizh, there are references to a "Madame
Pristorova," apparently involved with the Polish government's banning kosher
slaughter in the 1930's in Poland. Does anyone have more information about this
person? You can Google "Madame Pristorova" for more specific references. Thanks.

Steve Stein
Highland Park, NJ


Re: St. Louis, MO. Question #general

Warren Rabinowitz <mrfbstl@...>
 

There are 2 Chesed Shel Emeth Cemeteries but only 1 is in University City,
Missouri which is the original location opened around the turn of the century. The
2nd location is in Chesterfield, Missouri off White Road which is about 15 miles
west of the of University City, Missouri which opened around 1980.

Warren Rabinowitz

How do you distinquish between the 2 Chesed Shel Emet cemeteries in
University City?

Thank you.
Trudy Barch


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: St. Louis, MO. Question #general

Warren Rabinowitz <mrfbstl@...>
 

There are 2 Chesed Shel Emeth Cemeteries but only 1 is in University City,
Missouri which is the original location opened around the turn of the century. The
2nd location is in Chesterfield, Missouri off White Road which is about 15 miles
west of the of University City, Missouri which opened around 1980.

Warren Rabinowitz

How do you distinquish between the 2 Chesed Shel Emet cemeteries in
University City?

Thank you.
Trudy Barch


Re: Old Brooklyn Street Name #general

Dan Goodman <dsgood@...>
 

On 19 Oct 2004 21:28:17 -0700, Bubylu@aol.com wrote:

I am trying to locate "Old Fulton St" in Brooklyn. Was this street name
replaced by another street name or has this street been done away with
altogether?
Old Fulton Street exists under that name at present. If you send him mail at that
address, it should reach him.

My guess is that (as with Old Broadway in Manhattan), the street was rerouted but
at least a bit of the old street remained.

Dan Goodman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Old Brooklyn Street Name #general

Dan Goodman <dsgood@...>
 

On 19 Oct 2004 21:28:17 -0700, Bubylu@aol.com wrote:

I am trying to locate "Old Fulton St" in Brooklyn. Was this street name
replaced by another street name or has this street been done away with
altogether?
Old Fulton Street exists under that name at present. If you send him mail at that
address, it should reach him.

My guess is that (as with Old Broadway in Manhattan), the street was rerouted but
at least a bit of the old street remained.

Dan Goodman


Re: Old Brooklyn Street Name #general

Don Solomon
 

Here's my guess -- as an expatriate. Fulton Street has always run >from the East
River all the way to the Queens border. When downtown Brooklyn underwent some
redevelopment in the 1950s, part of Fulton Street was closed off, so the street is
now discontinuous. The Brooklyn Heights portion (11201) runs next to the Brooklyn
Bridge down to old warehouses and the ferry terminal that was there before the
bridge was built. When that area experienced a resurgence of popularity in recent
years, probably the name "Old" was appended (officially or not) to indicate that
portion.

I am trying to locate "Old Fulton St" in Brooklyn. Was this street name replaced
by another street name or has this street been done away with altogether?
Lois Friedman
Don Solomon <dsolomon@post.harvard.edu>
Boston, MA USA
Searching: NIMOY, DRUTIN, KATZ (Izyaslav, Volhynia Gub., Ukr.)
SOLOMON, JOSEPH, CAHANE, SEGAL (Iasi, Rom.)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Old Brooklyn Street Name #general

Don Solomon
 

Here's my guess -- as an expatriate. Fulton Street has always run >from the East
River all the way to the Queens border. When downtown Brooklyn underwent some
redevelopment in the 1950s, part of Fulton Street was closed off, so the street is
now discontinuous. The Brooklyn Heights portion (11201) runs next to the Brooklyn
Bridge down to old warehouses and the ferry terminal that was there before the
bridge was built. When that area experienced a resurgence of popularity in recent
years, probably the name "Old" was appended (officially or not) to indicate that
portion.

I am trying to locate "Old Fulton St" in Brooklyn. Was this street name replaced
by another street name or has this street been done away with altogether?
Lois Friedman
Don Solomon <dsolomon@post.harvard.edu>
Boston, MA USA
Searching: NIMOY, DRUTIN, KATZ (Izyaslav, Volhynia Gub., Ukr.)
SOLOMON, JOSEPH, CAHANE, SEGAL (Iasi, Rom.)


Re: Brest-Litovsk, Russia Fires of 1802 to 1836 #belarus

Jenni Buch
 

I am in the middle of translating the Brisk D'lita Yizkor book >from Yiddish
to English - it is a 710
page collection of historical, anecdotal and personal memoirs - divided into
sections- such as the Old town of Brest, Personalities, Holocaust etc.
There are numerous mentions of fires, but none of fires being deliberately
lit in order to move the city to it's new position west... these are the
references to this period and moving the city westwards >from the Yizchor
book.....

THE DESTROYED CITY. BY A.L. FEINSTEIN

The year Tav Kuf Zadik Alef (1830) (fear and panic in the city),saw great
changes in the situation of our city, Brest. This was due to a great tragedy
which was unleashed in the country of Poland – war and insurrection broke
out. The Poles rebelled against the Russian Tsar, who increasingly spread
his domination over them since the partition of Poland decided at the
Congress of Vienna in 1815. The city of Brest, located at the gates of
Poland, was besieged and the inhabitants began building fortresses and
barracks which were surrounded by high earthworks with deep canals so that
they could defend themselves against the Poles who had mobilised their last
forces to try and take the town.
A year later, when the fighting had subsided, an edict was issued by Tsar
Nicholai ordering that the town, which sat between wide rivers and lakes, be
rebuilt and strengthened. A large fortress was built with large buildings
housing munition stores and factories, and barracks for housing the
garrisons. In order to make space for this fortress an order was issued to
demolish and raze the houses that had stood there previously, so that in
their place, a high wall with a gate in the middle of the town stood there,
and high earthworks were built up around the town. When the builders began
their work a proportion of the inhabitants left their houses
and moved to the new houses which were being built inside the city. These
places were called suburbs which the government had bought in order to
resettle the population. One of these areas was a large suburb to the west,
which was called Kobryner Forshtadt or the New City, and to the south a
smaller area which was called, Volyner Forshtadt. The whole town was called
Brest D’Lita or Brest – Litevski.
The year 1835, was the year of the great fire, in which God’s wrath was
poured over the old town, which was consumed by fire, on the holy Sabbath,
the fire became a blaze which consumed several streets in the centre of the
city. About 500 houses were destroyed and the frightened residents rushed to
find shelter and build new houses in the grounds of the new city. In order
to provide shelter and protection, they rushed the building works with all
their strengths, and within two years, in 1837, it was completed. The new
town stood in all its’ beauty, and tens of thousands of people filled it’s
streets – large good quality stops were created, and the commerce and trade
returned to normal and Brest once again became a joyous city. In the old
town were the ruins of the burnt houses, which were demolished one by one,
no memory of them was left. At the same time as the new buildings were
growing in the new town, the town’s rates and taxes increased five-fold.
Also at this same time the government built storehouses for military
equipment and uniforms. They also built barracks and residences for their
employees. They built a beautiful and magnificent railway station. The
houses that were built for the town’s inhabitants were built on town land,
so that the town spread to a village called Trishin, creating a new suburb
called Horodek (small town in Russian).
As was the fate of all the residents houses, so followed the fate of the
synagogues, which had been partially burnt down, partially vandalised, and
then destroyed. These were rebuilt in the new city, and given the same names
as the old ones, according to the size of their congregations, which
multiplied and grew in the new city. This large city attracted masses who
streamed to it >from all the corners of the land to settle there.....


THE BREST JEWS IN THE !9th CENTURY. M. KAPLAN

The Great Synagogue.

In the year of 1793, after the partition of Poland, Brest fell into the
hands of the Russians.
Then Brest- Litovsk came into a new and difficult period. The ruling powers
decided to build a fortress in the city.
The orders to build this fortress and to move the town to a new suburb,
Korbyner Forshtadt,
were decreed in 1837. Under these edicts, the government were to pay the
full value of the property assets that were in private ownership, so an
assessors’ office was established.
The order of moving the houses in order to build the fortress, was
established according to the street plan. It was also forbidden to bury the
dead in the old town’s cemetery.
The committee set aside an area for burials in the new town, which later
became Spitalna street, the intention being that the new town would be
established away >from this area..
After the plans for the new town were finished by a competent authority, it
became obvious that the area allocated for the new cemetery (people were
already buried there) had become developed with small factories, so they
were forced to move the cemetery to another area.
The Jewish community received a certain sum as compensation for the old
synagogue and decided to build a new synagogue. The plans were presented to
the military authorities at the fortress and >from there it was sent to the
‘Supreme Power’. After personally inspecting the plans and not liking them,
the Tsar wrote the following remarks with a pencil, saying: ‘not beautiful,
the synagogue should be built according to the Viennese design’.
The Tsar’s wishes were presented to the head of the kahal, and the Jewish
community sent a man to Vienna to design a synagogue based on the Great
Synagogue of Vienna. The Viennese architect prepared plans which were
adorned with artistic drawings of men and women in the grounds of the
synagogue. The men wore shtreimls (fur hats) and the women wore wigs in the
style of the orthodox Viennese Jews. The plans were delivered to the office
at the fortress and endorsed as being in accordance with the wishes of the
Tsar. This is the story of the Brest –Litovsk synagogue being built in the
“style of the Great Synagogue of Vienna”.
The historic synagogue in the old city was built in the time of Saul Wahl,
in its’ lobby on the wall was a white marble plaque about one metre in
length, which read : ” to the memory of the Gaon (genius) Saul Wahl, under
whose patronage and generosity this synagogue was built in the year ….
During the transfer of the holy vessels >from the old synagogue to the new
one, they tore this plaque off the wall and rebuilt it in the lobby of the
new synagogue, also in the rebuilding of the plaques, words such as the year
were missing, so they just inserted dots ….
Opposite the white marble plaque there was a black marble tablet with the
inscription:
This Synagogue was built according to the plans and under the supervision of
Tsar Nicholai 1st. The building of the synagogue in the new Brest lasted
several years before it blossomed into a large building in an open space in
the centre of the town. Especially beautiful and precious were the synagogue
ornaments `, which were crafted in 1882 when Arye Lieb Feinstein, author of
the book ‘Ir Tefilla’ (City of Prayer) was the Gabbeh.
The terrible fire, which broke out in the town on the 4th May 1895,
destroyed half the city – 45 souls perished by fire or suffocation. But the
fire did not spare the beautiful Great Synagogue of which only four walls
remained; also the historic plaque of Saul Wahl was destroyed. The synagogue
was rebuilt in 1896, but it was not as beautiful as before. During the
German occupation of 1915-1918, the synagogue was also badly damaged, thanks
to the dedication of the Gabbehs, the synagogue was restored and surpassed
the earlier building....

These are the only references to this period but there is not mention of
burning the town so that the townsfolk would shift -they had no choice.

The Tzar took a personal interest in the design of the new synagogue
(destroyed by fire in 1895)
The townsfolk were given new plots of land to match what they owned... it is
mentioned that women would measure their plot size with their head scarfs !!
The townsfolk were also compensated for the relocation and rebuilding...
This caused alot of argument and dissention -the Russian officials were also
open to corruption as to who got what and where...
.
THe one article that I have translated about fires in Brest was written in
1901 by Nachum Sokolov (the famous Zionist) and deals with the 2 Great Fires
of 1895 and 1901 - the first destroyed half the city, the second (6 years
later to the day!! ) destroyed the other half.... the committee set up
investigate the fire of 1901 recommended that all buildings be built of
brick/stone, this happened with public buildings, but not private homes...
Brest houses were mainly built of timber, and people burnt wood and kerosene
for heating - thus the numerous fires...
Jenni Buch,
Melbourne Australia
Coordinator Brest and district research group.



Belarus SIG #Belarus RE: Brest-Litovsk, Russia Fires of 1802 to 1836 #belarus

Jenni Buch
 

I am in the middle of translating the Brisk D'lita Yizkor book >from Yiddish
to English - it is a 710
page collection of historical, anecdotal and personal memoirs - divided into
sections- such as the Old town of Brest, Personalities, Holocaust etc.
There are numerous mentions of fires, but none of fires being deliberately
lit in order to move the city to it's new position west... these are the
references to this period and moving the city westwards >from the Yizchor
book.....

THE DESTROYED CITY. BY A.L. FEINSTEIN

The year Tav Kuf Zadik Alef (1830) (fear and panic in the city),saw great
changes in the situation of our city, Brest. This was due to a great tragedy
which was unleashed in the country of Poland – war and insurrection broke
out. The Poles rebelled against the Russian Tsar, who increasingly spread
his domination over them since the partition of Poland decided at the
Congress of Vienna in 1815. The city of Brest, located at the gates of
Poland, was besieged and the inhabitants began building fortresses and
barracks which were surrounded by high earthworks with deep canals so that
they could defend themselves against the Poles who had mobilised their last
forces to try and take the town.
A year later, when the fighting had subsided, an edict was issued by Tsar
Nicholai ordering that the town, which sat between wide rivers and lakes, be
rebuilt and strengthened. A large fortress was built with large buildings
housing munition stores and factories, and barracks for housing the
garrisons. In order to make space for this fortress an order was issued to
demolish and raze the houses that had stood there previously, so that in
their place, a high wall with a gate in the middle of the town stood there,
and high earthworks were built up around the town. When the builders began
their work a proportion of the inhabitants left their houses
and moved to the new houses which were being built inside the city. These
places were called suburbs which the government had bought in order to
resettle the population. One of these areas was a large suburb to the west,
which was called Kobryner Forshtadt or the New City, and to the south a
smaller area which was called, Volyner Forshtadt. The whole town was called
Brest D’Lita or Brest – Litevski.
The year 1835, was the year of the great fire, in which God’s wrath was
poured over the old town, which was consumed by fire, on the holy Sabbath,
the fire became a blaze which consumed several streets in the centre of the
city. About 500 houses were destroyed and the frightened residents rushed to
find shelter and build new houses in the grounds of the new city. In order
to provide shelter and protection, they rushed the building works with all
their strengths, and within two years, in 1837, it was completed. The new
town stood in all its’ beauty, and tens of thousands of people filled it’s
streets – large good quality stops were created, and the commerce and trade
returned to normal and Brest once again became a joyous city. In the old
town were the ruins of the burnt houses, which were demolished one by one,
no memory of them was left. At the same time as the new buildings were
growing in the new town, the town’s rates and taxes increased five-fold.
Also at this same time the government built storehouses for military
equipment and uniforms. They also built barracks and residences for their
employees. They built a beautiful and magnificent railway station. The
houses that were built for the town’s inhabitants were built on town land,
so that the town spread to a village called Trishin, creating a new suburb
called Horodek (small town in Russian).
As was the fate of all the residents houses, so followed the fate of the
synagogues, which had been partially burnt down, partially vandalised, and
then destroyed. These were rebuilt in the new city, and given the same names
as the old ones, according to the size of their congregations, which
multiplied and grew in the new city. This large city attracted masses who
streamed to it >from all the corners of the land to settle there.....


THE BREST JEWS IN THE !9th CENTURY. M. KAPLAN

The Great Synagogue.

In the year of 1793, after the partition of Poland, Brest fell into the
hands of the Russians.
Then Brest- Litovsk came into a new and difficult period. The ruling powers
decided to build a fortress in the city.
The orders to build this fortress and to move the town to a new suburb,
Korbyner Forshtadt,
were decreed in 1837. Under these edicts, the government were to pay the
full value of the property assets that were in private ownership, so an
assessors’ office was established.
The order of moving the houses in order to build the fortress, was
established according to the street plan. It was also forbidden to bury the
dead in the old town’s cemetery.
The committee set aside an area for burials in the new town, which later
became Spitalna street, the intention being that the new town would be
established away >from this area..
After the plans for the new town were finished by a competent authority, it
became obvious that the area allocated for the new cemetery (people were
already buried there) had become developed with small factories, so they
were forced to move the cemetery to another area.
The Jewish community received a certain sum as compensation for the old
synagogue and decided to build a new synagogue. The plans were presented to
the military authorities at the fortress and >from there it was sent to the
‘Supreme Power’. After personally inspecting the plans and not liking them,
the Tsar wrote the following remarks with a pencil, saying: ‘not beautiful,
the synagogue should be built according to the Viennese design’.
The Tsar’s wishes were presented to the head of the kahal, and the Jewish
community sent a man to Vienna to design a synagogue based on the Great
Synagogue of Vienna. The Viennese architect prepared plans which were
adorned with artistic drawings of men and women in the grounds of the
synagogue. The men wore shtreimls (fur hats) and the women wore wigs in the
style of the orthodox Viennese Jews. The plans were delivered to the office
at the fortress and endorsed as being in accordance with the wishes of the
Tsar. This is the story of the Brest –Litovsk synagogue being built in the
“style of the Great Synagogue of Vienna”.
The historic synagogue in the old city was built in the time of Saul Wahl,
in its’ lobby on the wall was a white marble plaque about one metre in
length, which read : ” to the memory of the Gaon (genius) Saul Wahl, under
whose patronage and generosity this synagogue was built in the year ….
During the transfer of the holy vessels >from the old synagogue to the new
one, they tore this plaque off the wall and rebuilt it in the lobby of the
new synagogue, also in the rebuilding of the plaques, words such as the year
were missing, so they just inserted dots ….
Opposite the white marble plaque there was a black marble tablet with the
inscription:
This Synagogue was built according to the plans and under the supervision of
Tsar Nicholai 1st. The building of the synagogue in the new Brest lasted
several years before it blossomed into a large building in an open space in
the centre of the town. Especially beautiful and precious were the synagogue
ornaments `, which were crafted in 1882 when Arye Lieb Feinstein, author of
the book ‘Ir Tefilla’ (City of Prayer) was the Gabbeh.
The terrible fire, which broke out in the town on the 4th May 1895,
destroyed half the city – 45 souls perished by fire or suffocation. But the
fire did not spare the beautiful Great Synagogue of which only four walls
remained; also the historic plaque of Saul Wahl was destroyed. The synagogue
was rebuilt in 1896, but it was not as beautiful as before. During the
German occupation of 1915-1918, the synagogue was also badly damaged, thanks
to the dedication of the Gabbehs, the synagogue was restored and surpassed
the earlier building....

These are the only references to this period but there is not mention of
burning the town so that the townsfolk would shift -they had no choice.

The Tzar took a personal interest in the design of the new synagogue
(destroyed by fire in 1895)
The townsfolk were given new plots of land to match what they owned... it is
mentioned that women would measure their plot size with their head scarfs !!
The townsfolk were also compensated for the relocation and rebuilding...
This caused alot of argument and dissention -the Russian officials were also
open to corruption as to who got what and where...
.
THe one article that I have translated about fires in Brest was written in
1901 by Nachum Sokolov (the famous Zionist) and deals with the 2 Great Fires
of 1895 and 1901 - the first destroyed half the city, the second (6 years
later to the day!! ) destroyed the other half.... the committee set up
investigate the fire of 1901 recommended that all buildings be built of
brick/stone, this happened with public buildings, but not private homes...
Brest houses were mainly built of timber, and people burnt wood and kerosene
for heating - thus the numerous fires...
Jenni Buch,
Melbourne Australia
Coordinator Brest and district research group.



Re: "Pogroms in Russia in 1881" #belarus

Dinberg Donna <donna.dinberg@...>
 

Thank you, Naomi Fatouros, for your informative post listing sources of
information on the early pogroms in Belarus and environs.

I have long meant ... but have not had time ... to research this myself so
as to better understand the possible reasons much of my ancestral family
picked up and immigrated in 1886 >from eastern Latvia to the U.S. Many
others here probably have both similar desires and time constraints. Having
your list at hand means I shall probably now begin that put-off research!

Donna Dinberg
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
donna.dinberg@lac-bac.gc.ca

[Opinions above are all mine, of course. Usual disclaimers apply.]


town called Gomery #belarus

Eileen Price <eileen.price@...>
 

Dear SIG members,

I just started checking all documents before writing a small family history.
I thought everyone came >from Brest Litovsk, or so they told me.

On the passenger list for my grandmother, she said that her home town name
was Gomery.

I am not sure where she was born, but my father and all his siblings were
born in Brest Litovsk.

Could this be a very small stetl nearby?
When I first received the passaenger list, I overlooked this small item.

I did some checking and was told the town could be Gomel.

Your help would be appreciated.

Eileen Price
Denver, CO
eileen.price@worldnet.att.net


Belarus SIG #Belarus RE: "Pogroms in Russia in 1881" #belarus

Dinberg Donna <donna.dinberg@...>
 

Thank you, Naomi Fatouros, for your informative post listing sources of
information on the early pogroms in Belarus and environs.

I have long meant ... but have not had time ... to research this myself so
as to better understand the possible reasons much of my ancestral family
picked up and immigrated in 1886 >from eastern Latvia to the U.S. Many
others here probably have both similar desires and time constraints. Having
your list at hand means I shall probably now begin that put-off research!

Donna Dinberg
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
donna.dinberg@lac-bac.gc.ca

[Opinions above are all mine, of course. Usual disclaimers apply.]


Belarus SIG #Belarus town called Gomery #belarus

Eileen Price <eileen.price@...>
 

Dear SIG members,

I just started checking all documents before writing a small family history.
I thought everyone came >from Brest Litovsk, or so they told me.

On the passenger list for my grandmother, she said that her home town name
was Gomery.

I am not sure where she was born, but my father and all his siblings were
born in Brest Litovsk.

Could this be a very small stetl nearby?
When I first received the passaenger list, I overlooked this small item.

I did some checking and was told the town could be Gomel.

Your help would be appreciated.

Eileen Price
Denver, CO
eileen.price@worldnet.att.net


JRI-Pl update for LASZCZOW, LU province #poland

Kirsten Gradel <kmgradel@...>
 

Dear friends

LASZCZOW is located in the province of Lublin at Latitude/Longitude
50 32/ 23 43

Already last autumn the indexes for the years not filmed by the Mormons
were indexed by the JRI-Poland team in Warsaw and awaited publication as
part of JRI-Polands database. The database had 1106 entries and covered

the years 1871-75 and 1891-01.

This year another 120 indexes have been added for 1902, but
unfortunately I have not succeeded in collecting the funding needed before
JRI-Poland can publish the database.

And we still need someone to step in as CO-OP for indexing the filmed
years.

Can we help each other? Although I have no personal family interest in
Laszczow I am, as Zamosc Archives Coordinator, very interested in seeing
the indexes for all "my" towns published in JRI-Poland's database.

SO HERE IS MY OFFER: The moment JRI-Poland has collected minimum $230
for Laszczow I will sign-up as CO-OP for Laszczow, order the 6 films
(Polish 4158, Russian 697 entries, covering 1826-69, 1876-77, 1879-82,
1884-89)and index them.

Any funds over the target will give us the opportunity to have funds on
hand to acquire future years as they become available (when the registers
are transferred >from Laszczow's Civil Records Office to the Zamosc
Archives) after they are more than 100 years old.

The pre-WWII records that will eventually become available are 1903-10,
1922-37.

I hope enough researchers will consider this an good offer and help
JRI-Poland to get Laszczow documented and published. If you have contact
with other researchers or family with an interest in Laszczow, please
ask them to help. If we are fast we could have Laszczow all indexed by
April 2005!

A researcher is eligible to obtain - for his personal research - the
full Laszczow PSA database and those we receive in future years if he/she
donates minimum the qualifying amount of $50 and sign a Database Sharing
Agreement.

If you are interested in knowing the number of occurrences of your
surname, please contact me.

Kirsten Gradel
Nyborg, Denmark
Zamosc Archives Project Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
e-mail: kmgradel@dadlnet.dk

Here is how to donate:

Contributions to "Jewish Records Indexing - Poland" may be
made by check, bank draft, money order, or Visa or MasterCard.
The web site for the credit card contribution form is:
www.jri-poland.org/visa.htm

Please note the donation is for LASZCZOW, Zamosc PSA project.

Send your contributions to:
Jewish Records Indexing-Poland, Inc.
c/o Sheila Salo, Treasurer
5607 Greenleaf Road
Cheverly, MD 20785 USA

Tel: 1-301-341-1261
Fax: 1-810-592-1768 (24 hours)
E-Mail: ssalo@capaccess.org

Credit card contributions may also be telephoned to Sheila Salo.
(Only between the hours of 8:00 am to 8:00 pm EDT/EST, please).

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, Inc. is an independent
non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Contributions to JRI-Poland
are tax-deductible in the U.S. to the extent permitted by law.


JRI Poland #Poland JRI-Pl update for LASZCZOW, LU province #poland

Kirsten Gradel <kmgradel@...>
 

Dear friends

LASZCZOW is located in the province of Lublin at Latitude/Longitude
50 32/ 23 43

Already last autumn the indexes for the years not filmed by the Mormons
were indexed by the JRI-Poland team in Warsaw and awaited publication as
part of JRI-Polands database. The database had 1106 entries and covered

the years 1871-75 and 1891-01.

This year another 120 indexes have been added for 1902, but
unfortunately I have not succeeded in collecting the funding needed before
JRI-Poland can publish the database.

And we still need someone to step in as CO-OP for indexing the filmed
years.

Can we help each other? Although I have no personal family interest in
Laszczow I am, as Zamosc Archives Coordinator, very interested in seeing
the indexes for all "my" towns published in JRI-Poland's database.

SO HERE IS MY OFFER: The moment JRI-Poland has collected minimum $230
for Laszczow I will sign-up as CO-OP for Laszczow, order the 6 films
(Polish 4158, Russian 697 entries, covering 1826-69, 1876-77, 1879-82,
1884-89)and index them.

Any funds over the target will give us the opportunity to have funds on
hand to acquire future years as they become available (when the registers
are transferred >from Laszczow's Civil Records Office to the Zamosc
Archives) after they are more than 100 years old.

The pre-WWII records that will eventually become available are 1903-10,
1922-37.

I hope enough researchers will consider this an good offer and help
JRI-Poland to get Laszczow documented and published. If you have contact
with other researchers or family with an interest in Laszczow, please
ask them to help. If we are fast we could have Laszczow all indexed by
April 2005!

A researcher is eligible to obtain - for his personal research - the
full Laszczow PSA database and those we receive in future years if he/she
donates minimum the qualifying amount of $50 and sign a Database Sharing
Agreement.

If you are interested in knowing the number of occurrences of your
surname, please contact me.

Kirsten Gradel
Nyborg, Denmark
Zamosc Archives Project Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
e-mail: kmgradel@dadlnet.dk

Here is how to donate:

Contributions to "Jewish Records Indexing - Poland" may be
made by check, bank draft, money order, or Visa or MasterCard.
The web site for the credit card contribution form is:
www.jri-poland.org/visa.htm

Please note the donation is for LASZCZOW, Zamosc PSA project.

Send your contributions to:
Jewish Records Indexing-Poland, Inc.
c/o Sheila Salo, Treasurer
5607 Greenleaf Road
Cheverly, MD 20785 USA

Tel: 1-301-341-1261
Fax: 1-810-592-1768 (24 hours)
E-Mail: ssalo@capaccess.org

Credit card contributions may also be telephoned to Sheila Salo.
(Only between the hours of 8:00 am to 8:00 pm EDT/EST, please).

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, Inc. is an independent
non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Contributions to JRI-Poland
are tax-deductible in the U.S. to the extent permitted by law.