Date   

1000 years of Jewish presence in Poland events in IL #general

Romm Miriam
 

Association of Cracovians in Israel Israel-Polish Friendship
Association
are pleased to announce
an International Symposium
commemorating
the 700th anniversary of the establishment of the Jewish Community of Cracow
and 1000 years of Jewish presence in Poland

FESTIVE EVENING

Sunday, December 12th, 2004

Guests of Honor:
Wislawa Szymborska, Nobel Prize Laureate in Literature - 1996
M.P. Shimon Peres, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate - 1994
Auditorium Eretz-Israel Museum, Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv
At 6:30 p.m.

Program:
Reception
Exhibition of Photographs
Hanukah Candle lighting
M.P. Shimon Peres, Chairman of the Israel Labor Party
M.P. Michael Eitan
H.E. J.W. Piekarski, Ambassador of Poland in Israel
H.E. David Peleg, Ambassador of Israel in Poland
Prof. Schevach Weiss, former M.P.
Ms. Wislawa Szymborska will read >from her poems
Mr. Rafi Weichert will read the Hebrew translation

Entertainment:
Choir of the Telma Jelin School, Ishai Stekler, conductor
Maestro Leopold Kozlowski and Shmuel Atzmon

Master of Ceremonies: Shaul Meislish
Producer: Yossi Natkovitz
Tickets NIS 60. - available at Association of Crakovians in Israel
POB 17209 Tel Aviv, or by phone: 054-4436366, 054-4581223, 050-7737000

SYMPOSIUM
In cooperation with:
The Institute for Research on the History of Polish Jewry and Israel-Polish
Relations of Tel Aviv University
The Center for Research on the History and Culture of Polish Jewry of the
Hebrew University in Jerusalem

Tel-Aviv University, Gilman Hall, Jona Etinger Auditorium

10:00-12:30 a.m. “Between Two Worlds” The Influence of Polish
Literature on Hebrew Literature
Greetings: Prof. Itamar Rabinovitz, President of the
Tel-Aviv University

Guest of Honor: Wislawa Szymborska
Chair: Miriam Akavia, writer, president of the Israel-Polish Friendship
Association
Rafi Weichert - The Works of Wislawa Szymborska
Dr. David Weinfeld, Hebrew University - Stanislaw Wyspianski
Dr. Ruth Shenfeld - The Closed Wagon: >from Szymborska to Dan Pagis

2:00 - 4:00 p.m. “Prejudice and Stereotypes"
Session led by the joint chairmen of the Israel-Polish Society for Mental
Health:
Prof. Jacek Bomba, Jagiellonian University, Cracow
Dr. Henry Szor, Israel-Polish Association of Psychiatrists
Prof. Dov Aleksandrowicz - Myths and Stereoptyes, Necessary or Injurious?
Dr. Ilana Kremer - The Process of Forgiveness – Psychological and
Humanitarian Aspects
Dr. Haim Knobler - Cracow and Jerusalem – A Renewed Encounter

4:00 - 6:00 p.m. Cracow – A City and Its People in Israel
Chair: Prof. David Assaf, Institute of Diaspora Research, Tel-Aviv
University
Prof. Israel Bartal, Hebrew University - Between Cracow and Lwow
Prof. Chava Turnianski, Hebrew University – The Historical Poem in Yiddish
Between Ashkenaz and Poland
Prof. Elhanan Reiner, Tel Aviv
University -Has It Already Been 700 Years?
Rabbi Yaakov Sabra >from Cracow, Students of Rabbeinu Tam

Admission Free

Photo Exhibition

Tuseday, December 14th, 2004 at 5:30 p.m.

Chris Schwarz, Cracow – Exhibition >from the Galician Museum
Prof. Aleksander Skotnicki, Cracow – Photos >from a Private Collection(?)

Literary Evening

Tuseday, December 14th, 2004 at 6:30 p.m

Public High School "Hey”, 227 Ben -Yehuda Street, Tel Aviv

Admission Free

Miriam Romm

Israel

romiriam@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1000 years of Jewish presence in Poland events in IL #general

Romm Miriam
 

Association of Cracovians in Israel Israel-Polish Friendship
Association
are pleased to announce
an International Symposium
commemorating
the 700th anniversary of the establishment of the Jewish Community of Cracow
and 1000 years of Jewish presence in Poland

FESTIVE EVENING

Sunday, December 12th, 2004

Guests of Honor:
Wislawa Szymborska, Nobel Prize Laureate in Literature - 1996
M.P. Shimon Peres, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate - 1994
Auditorium Eretz-Israel Museum, Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv
At 6:30 p.m.

Program:
Reception
Exhibition of Photographs
Hanukah Candle lighting
M.P. Shimon Peres, Chairman of the Israel Labor Party
M.P. Michael Eitan
H.E. J.W. Piekarski, Ambassador of Poland in Israel
H.E. David Peleg, Ambassador of Israel in Poland
Prof. Schevach Weiss, former M.P.
Ms. Wislawa Szymborska will read >from her poems
Mr. Rafi Weichert will read the Hebrew translation

Entertainment:
Choir of the Telma Jelin School, Ishai Stekler, conductor
Maestro Leopold Kozlowski and Shmuel Atzmon

Master of Ceremonies: Shaul Meislish
Producer: Yossi Natkovitz
Tickets NIS 60. - available at Association of Crakovians in Israel
POB 17209 Tel Aviv, or by phone: 054-4436366, 054-4581223, 050-7737000

SYMPOSIUM
In cooperation with:
The Institute for Research on the History of Polish Jewry and Israel-Polish
Relations of Tel Aviv University
The Center for Research on the History and Culture of Polish Jewry of the
Hebrew University in Jerusalem

Tel-Aviv University, Gilman Hall, Jona Etinger Auditorium

10:00-12:30 a.m. “Between Two Worlds” The Influence of Polish
Literature on Hebrew Literature
Greetings: Prof. Itamar Rabinovitz, President of the
Tel-Aviv University

Guest of Honor: Wislawa Szymborska
Chair: Miriam Akavia, writer, president of the Israel-Polish Friendship
Association
Rafi Weichert - The Works of Wislawa Szymborska
Dr. David Weinfeld, Hebrew University - Stanislaw Wyspianski
Dr. Ruth Shenfeld - The Closed Wagon: >from Szymborska to Dan Pagis

2:00 - 4:00 p.m. “Prejudice and Stereotypes"
Session led by the joint chairmen of the Israel-Polish Society for Mental
Health:
Prof. Jacek Bomba, Jagiellonian University, Cracow
Dr. Henry Szor, Israel-Polish Association of Psychiatrists
Prof. Dov Aleksandrowicz - Myths and Stereoptyes, Necessary or Injurious?
Dr. Ilana Kremer - The Process of Forgiveness – Psychological and
Humanitarian Aspects
Dr. Haim Knobler - Cracow and Jerusalem – A Renewed Encounter

4:00 - 6:00 p.m. Cracow – A City and Its People in Israel
Chair: Prof. David Assaf, Institute of Diaspora Research, Tel-Aviv
University
Prof. Israel Bartal, Hebrew University - Between Cracow and Lwow
Prof. Chava Turnianski, Hebrew University – The Historical Poem in Yiddish
Between Ashkenaz and Poland
Prof. Elhanan Reiner, Tel Aviv
University -Has It Already Been 700 Years?
Rabbi Yaakov Sabra >from Cracow, Students of Rabbeinu Tam

Admission Free

Photo Exhibition

Tuseday, December 14th, 2004 at 5:30 p.m.

Chris Schwarz, Cracow – Exhibition >from the Galician Museum
Prof. Aleksander Skotnicki, Cracow – Photos >from a Private Collection(?)

Literary Evening

Tuseday, December 14th, 2004 at 6:30 p.m

Public High School "Hey”, 227 Ben -Yehuda Street, Tel Aviv

Admission Free

Miriam Romm

Israel

romiriam@...


Re: Brass mortar and pestle - "stacel" or "stasel" ? #general

Sally M. Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

A genner wrote:

'>from a health perspective, one of the ingredients in brass is lead. Lead
poisoning is very dangerous and I wonder if our ancestors suffered >from use
of the brass mortar and pestle for cooking and pharmaceutical purposes.'

Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc (according to Encarta Encyclopedia).
Pewter was often made with lead - but tableware, at least today, has tin
instead of lead.

It turns out that crystal is the worst common source of lead in food
products. If you keep wine in a lead crystal decanter, throw it out!

Copper is also poisonous. My family were coppersmiths, and I have a copper
tea set that my gr grandfather made. The teapot was lined with another
metal (tin as I remember, but I could be wrong-but a white metal). It is
not usable today unless I had it relined.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ

MODERATOR NOTE: Responses to this thread with clear genealogical
relevance will be considered for posting. Please continue with
non-genealogical responses privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Re: Brass mortar and pestle - "stacel" or "stasel" ? #general

Sally M. Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

A genner wrote:

'>from a health perspective, one of the ingredients in brass is lead. Lead
poisoning is very dangerous and I wonder if our ancestors suffered >from use
of the brass mortar and pestle for cooking and pharmaceutical purposes.'

Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc (according to Encarta Encyclopedia).
Pewter was often made with lead - but tableware, at least today, has tin
instead of lead.

It turns out that crystal is the worst common source of lead in food
products. If you keep wine in a lead crystal decanter, throw it out!

Copper is also poisonous. My family were coppersmiths, and I have a copper
tea set that my gr grandfather made. The teapot was lined with another
metal (tin as I remember, but I could be wrong-but a white metal). It is
not usable today unless I had it relined.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ

MODERATOR NOTE: Responses to this thread with clear genealogical
relevance will be considered for posting. Please continue with
non-genealogical responses privately.


Re: Brass mortar and pestle - "stacel" or "stasel" ? #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

Brass is essentially an alloy of copper and zinc. If it contains lead it is
in a very small amount and presents no danger.
Joseph

Dr. Joseph M. Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: Andrew Blumberg [mailto:ajb61@...]
Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2004 6:52 PM

We also have a brass mortar and pestle >from my great-grandmother. She was
from Lithuania and later lived in Beilsk, Poland, with my great-grandfather.
My father did not know what it is was used for.

from a health perspective, one of the ingredients in brass is lead. Lead
poisoning is very dangerous and I wonder if our ancestors suffered >from use
of the brass mortar and pestle for cooking and pharmaceutical purposes.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Brass mortar and pestle - "stacel" or "stasel" ? #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

Brass is essentially an alloy of copper and zinc. If it contains lead it is
in a very small amount and presents no danger.
Joseph

Dr. Joseph M. Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: Andrew Blumberg [mailto:ajb61@...]
Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2004 6:52 PM

We also have a brass mortar and pestle >from my great-grandmother. She was
from Lithuania and later lived in Beilsk, Poland, with my great-grandfather.
My father did not know what it is was used for.

from a health perspective, one of the ingredients in brass is lead. Lead
poisoning is very dangerous and I wonder if our ancestors suffered >from use
of the brass mortar and pestle for cooking and pharmaceutical purposes.


Feitje and Fietje #general

Ury Link
 

Dear genners,

I wanted to closed the discussion about the names Feitje and Fietje in
Holland and give a answer to Nick Landau about this names.

Feitje is derived >from the Yiddish-German name Fegele or Vogele. We don't
find this name in Dutch name books.

Fietje is a short form of the name Sofia (Sophia) .
Sofia - Sofietje - Fietje.

If you look in every Dutch name book you find this explanation about Sofia / Fietje.
I look into " Prisma Voor-namen" a dictionary of given names by J.van der
Schaar, Het Spectrum 1992 Utrecht, on page 329.

Best regards
Ury Link
Amsterdam
Holland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Feitje and Fietje #general

Ury Link
 

Dear genners,

I wanted to closed the discussion about the names Feitje and Fietje in
Holland and give a answer to Nick Landau about this names.

Feitje is derived >from the Yiddish-German name Fegele or Vogele. We don't
find this name in Dutch name books.

Fietje is a short form of the name Sofia (Sophia) .
Sofia - Sofietje - Fietje.

If you look in every Dutch name book you find this explanation about Sofia / Fietje.
I look into " Prisma Voor-namen" a dictionary of given names by J.van der
Schaar, Het Spectrum 1992 Utrecht, on page 329.

Best regards
Ury Link
Amsterdam
Holland


Re: Modlebojitcz *and* Bordelakes ?? #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Barbara Mannlein" wrote

A newly found relative raised in Uruguay and now living in Israel reported
that her grandmother was born in Bordelakes (Poland).

I have never heard of this, Google search comes up negative, Shtetl seeker
comes up with 4 towns which don't seem right.

And her grandfather was reported to have been born in Modlebojitcz
(Poland).

Again, I have never heard of this town, and both Google and the Shtetl
Seeker do not provide any leads.

Any ideas what these towns are?

Barbara S. Mannlein
Tucson, AZ
Barbara,

Internet's Google search engine and ShetelSeeker (US BGN database) have
their own limitations. In addition, search for the elusive shtetls once
located in Poland should be also conducted through the territories that are
now located in Lithuania, Belarus and Ukraine. For those reasons, Gary
Mokotoff's WOWW gazetteer should be consulted as the prime source.

Bordelakes "proper" Polish name used to be known before WWII as village
Bordulaki, district Brody in Tarnopol Province (Eastern Galicia). Currently
village is known as Bordulyaki, Ukraine at 5011 2457.
In Poland's 1929 Business Directory Bordulaki lists amongst village 1,087
(1921 census) residents one Jewish name: H. SAKS (tobacconeer).

I had a bit of a difficulties with the initial identification of gfather's
"Modlebojitcz" since I've assumed that this must be shtetl located in a
close proximity to gmother's Bordulyaki. It has only occurred to me later
that your relative's grandparents could have met and wed in Uruguay. In this
case, elusive "Modlebojitch" is identified as Modliborzyce (Yiddish:
Modlibozhits) district Janow (Lubelski) in Lublin's region. After all,
"Modlebojitcz" is the Spanish direct sounding variation of the Yiddish
"Modlibozhits".

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Modlebojitcz *and* Bordelakes ?? #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Barbara Mannlein" wrote

A newly found relative raised in Uruguay and now living in Israel reported
that her grandmother was born in Bordelakes (Poland).

I have never heard of this, Google search comes up negative, Shtetl seeker
comes up with 4 towns which don't seem right.

And her grandfather was reported to have been born in Modlebojitcz
(Poland).

Again, I have never heard of this town, and both Google and the Shtetl
Seeker do not provide any leads.

Any ideas what these towns are?

Barbara S. Mannlein
Tucson, AZ
Barbara,

Internet's Google search engine and ShetelSeeker (US BGN database) have
their own limitations. In addition, search for the elusive shtetls once
located in Poland should be also conducted through the territories that are
now located in Lithuania, Belarus and Ukraine. For those reasons, Gary
Mokotoff's WOWW gazetteer should be consulted as the prime source.

Bordelakes "proper" Polish name used to be known before WWII as village
Bordulaki, district Brody in Tarnopol Province (Eastern Galicia). Currently
village is known as Bordulyaki, Ukraine at 5011 2457.
In Poland's 1929 Business Directory Bordulaki lists amongst village 1,087
(1921 census) residents one Jewish name: H. SAKS (tobacconeer).

I had a bit of a difficulties with the initial identification of gfather's
"Modlebojitcz" since I've assumed that this must be shtetl located in a
close proximity to gmother's Bordulyaki. It has only occurred to me later
that your relative's grandparents could have met and wed in Uruguay. In this
case, elusive "Modlebojitch" is identified as Modliborzyce (Yiddish:
Modlibozhits) district Janow (Lubelski) in Lublin's region. After all,
"Modlebojitcz" is the Spanish direct sounding variation of the Yiddish
"Modlibozhits".

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta


Re: Modlebojitcz *and* Bordelakes ?? #general

Meyer Denn <meyersdenn@...>
 

Barbara,

The town you seek is Modliborzyce (in Yiddish pronounced Mozelboszhitz) and
is located in the Lublin region. I am not familiar with Bordelakes, but
perhaps it is in the vicinity of Modliborzyce.

Good luch,

Meyer Denn
meyersdenn@...
Los Angeles, CA

From: "Barbara Mannlein" <bsmannlein@...>
Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 22:04:05 -0700

A newly found relative raised in Uruguay and now living in Israel reported
that her grandmother was born in Bordelakes (Poland).

I have never heard of this, Google search comes up negative, Shtetl seeker
comes up with 4 towns which don't seem right.

And her grandfather was reported to have been born in Modlebojitcz
(Poland).

Again, I have never heard of this town, and both Google and the Shtetl
Seeker do not provide any leads.

Any ideas what these towns are?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Modlebojitcz *and* Bordelakes ?? #general

Meyer Denn <meyersdenn@...>
 

Barbara,

The town you seek is Modliborzyce (in Yiddish pronounced Mozelboszhitz) and
is located in the Lublin region. I am not familiar with Bordelakes, but
perhaps it is in the vicinity of Modliborzyce.

Good luch,

Meyer Denn
meyersdenn@...
Los Angeles, CA

From: "Barbara Mannlein" <bsmannlein@...>
Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 22:04:05 -0700

A newly found relative raised in Uruguay and now living in Israel reported
that her grandmother was born in Bordelakes (Poland).

I have never heard of this, Google search comes up negative, Shtetl seeker
comes up with 4 towns which don't seem right.

And her grandfather was reported to have been born in Modlebojitcz
(Poland).

Again, I have never heard of this town, and both Google and the Shtetl
Seeker do not provide any leads.

Any ideas what these towns are?


Re: Isidor - is this a Jewish name? #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

As it was mentioned, Isidor(e) is/was not a typically Jewish name. Some examples of
non-Jewish prominent people:

Ettore Isidoro Arco Bugatti
Italian car stylist, and manufacturer

Saint Isidore of Seville (Santo Isidoro)
Spanish ecclesiastic, and historian

Isidoro Macabich Llobet
Spanish historian, private prelate to pope John 23

Maximilien Francois Marie Isidore de Robespierre
French revolutionary leader

--
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@...>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Isidor - is this a Jewish name? #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

As it was mentioned, Isidor(e) is/was not a typically Jewish name. Some examples of
non-Jewish prominent people:

Ettore Isidoro Arco Bugatti
Italian car stylist, and manufacturer

Saint Isidore of Seville (Santo Isidoro)
Spanish ecclesiastic, and historian

Isidoro Macabich Llobet
Spanish historian, private prelate to pope John 23

Maximilien Francois Marie Isidore de Robespierre
French revolutionary leader

--
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@...>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


FW: Isidor - is this a Jewish name? #general

Nachum Tuchman <nachum@...>
 

I had a great uncle by marriage (who was a cousin prior to that) named
Asher, who took the name Isidore in the States. This stumped me for a
while, as Isidore is usually associated with Yitzchak, and as Judith
writes, with Yisrael.

Until I pronounced his name Asher as Litvaks pronounced in the old
country, Osser. >from Osser to Isidore seemed more plausible than >from
Asher.

Nachum Tuchman
Tekoa, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen FW: Isidor - is this a Jewish name? #general

Nachum Tuchman <nachum@...>
 

I had a great uncle by marriage (who was a cousin prior to that) named
Asher, who took the name Isidore in the States. This stumped me for a
while, as Isidore is usually associated with Yitzchak, and as Judith
writes, with Yisrael.

Until I pronounced his name Asher as Litvaks pronounced in the old
country, Osser. >from Osser to Isidore seemed more plausible than >from
Asher.

Nachum Tuchman
Tekoa, Israel


Re: Isidor - is this a Jewish name? #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Max & Bertha van Dam wrote on 17 nov 2004 in soc.genealogy.jewish:
I'm sorry to say but our impression in our own files that in the
Jewish families the name Isidor has been used as substitute for Izak
or Isaac. It is a form of assimilation. The name Isidor sounded less
Jewish. In many cases the grandfather had the name Izak.
Since they were simply called "Ies" in most cases,
wether their official name was Isidoor or Izaak,
this official name was often not known to their friends and neighbours,
and sometimes forgotten by their family.

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress,
but let us keep the discussions in the newsgroup)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Isidor - is this a Jewish name? #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Max & Bertha van Dam wrote on 17 nov 2004 in soc.genealogy.jewish:
I'm sorry to say but our impression in our own files that in the
Jewish families the name Isidor has been used as substitute for Izak
or Isaac. It is a form of assimilation. The name Isidor sounded less
Jewish. In many cases the grandfather had the name Izak.
Since they were simply called "Ies" in most cases,
wether their official name was Isidoor or Izaak,
this official name was often not known to their friends and neighbours,
and sometimes forgotten by their family.

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress,
but let us keep the discussions in the newsgroup)


Re: Isidor - is this a Jewish name? #general

CharlesPottins
 

Small point, but I thought the correct spelling was Isadore? Usually shortened
to Issy, as in my Uncle whose forenames were "Victor Isadore", and was known
Out West (Bristol way) as Victor, but my Dad referred to him as "Our Issy".
I've only ever met one non-Jewish "Issy", and she was an Isadora, from
Scotland. Incidentally, while we're on "Dores", anybody know the Jewish
derivation, if any, of Theodore?

Charles Pottins


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Isidor - is this a Jewish name? #general

CharlesPottins
 

Small point, but I thought the correct spelling was Isadore? Usually shortened
to Issy, as in my Uncle whose forenames were "Victor Isadore", and was known
Out West (Bristol way) as Victor, but my Dad referred to him as "Our Issy".
I've only ever met one non-Jewish "Issy", and she was an Isadora, from
Scotland. Incidentally, while we're on "Dores", anybody know the Jewish
derivation, if any, of Theodore?

Charles Pottins