Date   

Uploaded Names to FTJP #ukraine

Linda Shefler <linsilv@...>
 

I am very excited to announce that last Friday I uploaded 2800 names to the
Family Tree of the Jewish People. The names are now online and viewable. I
hope that people will check and see if there are any names there that might
work with their family trees.
The following are just a SMALL sample of some of the more frequently found
names:
SILVERMAN;SNOPARSKY;GORDON;HOROWITZ;KOREIN;KURZBERG;SCHEFLER/SEFLER;MARX;
FERTEL/VIERTEL;ROSENBLATT/ROZENBLAT;NULMAN;FLEISIG;CHARNOW;COPPIT;FISCHEL/
FISZEL;REICHER;TORGAN;TROOB;GOLDFARB;SALGANEK;SCHNEIDER;SOFORENKO;KOHN;
KAUSHANSKY;MENDEL;OFFMAN.
I look forward to hearing >from anyone who finds some matches/connections.

Chanukah Sameach to all!

Linda Silverman Shefler
Cary, NC
linsilv@nc.rr.com


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Uploaded Names to FTJP #ukraine

Linda Shefler <linsilv@...>
 

I am very excited to announce that last Friday I uploaded 2800 names to the
Family Tree of the Jewish People. The names are now online and viewable. I
hope that people will check and see if there are any names there that might
work with their family trees.
The following are just a SMALL sample of some of the more frequently found
names:
SILVERMAN;SNOPARSKY;GORDON;HOROWITZ;KOREIN;KURZBERG;SCHEFLER/SEFLER;MARX;
FERTEL/VIERTEL;ROSENBLATT/ROZENBLAT;NULMAN;FLEISIG;CHARNOW;COPPIT;FISCHEL/
FISZEL;REICHER;TORGAN;TROOB;GOLDFARB;SALGANEK;SCHNEIDER;SOFORENKO;KOHN;
KAUSHANSKY;MENDEL;OFFMAN.
I look forward to hearing >from anyone who finds some matches/connections.

Chanukah Sameach to all!

Linda Silverman Shefler
Cary, NC
linsilv@nc.rr.com


Re: GROSSFELD #courland #latvia

Dinberg Donna <donna.dinberg@...>
 

Hello Nicolas,

You have enough information to direct your query to the Latvian
State Historical Archives. They have information on residents
of Dunaberg (now Daugavpils) during the years you mention and
will most likely be able to provide details on your family >from
their collections. A number of us on this list have received
what could be termed "goldmines" >from the LSHA in response to
simple queries about our families.

Details on contacting the Historical Archives is available here:
http://www.jewishgen.org/latvia/Contacting_Latvian_StateHA.html

(Note that it is the _Historical_ Archives you want, not one of the other
Latvian offices holding various records.)

Good luck with your research.

Donna Dinberg
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
donna.dinberg@lac-bac.gc.ca

-----Original Message-----
From: Nicolas Grossfeld [mailto:ngrossfeld@bluewin.ch]

I am searching for all possible information about Lausik GROSSFELD
born on November, 18th 1862 in Dunabourg(Dvinsk).
<snip>


Latvia SIG #Latvia RE: GROSSFELD #latvia

Dinberg Donna <donna.dinberg@...>
 

Hello Nicolas,

You have enough information to direct your query to the Latvian
State Historical Archives. They have information on residents
of Dunaberg (now Daugavpils) during the years you mention and
will most likely be able to provide details on your family >from
their collections. A number of us on this list have received
what could be termed "goldmines" >from the LSHA in response to
simple queries about our families.

Details on contacting the Historical Archives is available here:
http://www.jewishgen.org/latvia/Contacting_Latvian_StateHA.html

(Note that it is the _Historical_ Archives you want, not one of the other
Latvian offices holding various records.)

Good luck with your research.

Donna Dinberg
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
donna.dinberg@lac-bac.gc.ca

-----Original Message-----
From: Nicolas Grossfeld [mailto:ngrossfeld@bluewin.ch]

I am searching for all possible information about Lausik GROSSFELD
born on November, 18th 1862 in Dunabourg(Dvinsk).
<snip>


AGAD Record Orders Using JRI-Poland Order Processing System #galicia

Mark Halpern
 

If you have ordered records in recent months >from the AGAD Archives using the
JRI-Poland Order Processing System or intend to order records, this message is for
you.

To preserve the original record registers, the AGAD Archives makes copies of records
only >from microfilms of these books. AGAD only has one set of equipment for making
copies >from microfilm. Recently, AGAD notified JRI-Poland that they have had
technical problems with their printer. Repair of the printer cannot be accomplished
until an important part is acquired >from outside of Poland. They advise that the
delay may be four weeks or more.

We do not expect that processing of orders will begin again until early 2005. If you
have ordered records >from the AGAD Archives, please be patient. It will probably take
90-120 days to receive your order.

Mark Halpern
JRI-Poland Order Processing Center


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia AGAD Record Orders Using JRI-Poland Order Processing System #galicia

Mark Halpern
 

If you have ordered records in recent months >from the AGAD Archives using the
JRI-Poland Order Processing System or intend to order records, this message is for
you.

To preserve the original record registers, the AGAD Archives makes copies of records
only >from microfilms of these books. AGAD only has one set of equipment for making
copies >from microfilm. Recently, AGAD notified JRI-Poland that they have had
technical problems with their printer. Repair of the printer cannot be accomplished
until an important part is acquired >from outside of Poland. They advise that the
delay may be four weeks or more.

We do not expect that processing of orders will begin again until early 2005. If you
have ordered records >from the AGAD Archives, please be patient. It will probably take
90-120 days to receive your order.

Mark Halpern
JRI-Poland Order Processing Center


New and Updated JewishGen Databases #general

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

Some gifts for Hannukah...

Over the past several weeks, JewishGen has released several
new databases and features, including:

- The "All Scandinavia Database"
- Updates to the "All Romania Database"
- Enhancements to the "All Belarus Database"
- Updates to JOWBR Data

Each is described in detail below.


1) The "All Scandinavia Database":

This new database incorporates all of JewishGen's data for
Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Finland -- over 12,000 entries.

This includes datasets such as:
- Danish Census and Tax records, spanning 1711 to 1906;
- Jews mentioned in Swedish-Jewish historical literature;
- Holocaust transport data for Denmark, Norway and Sweden.

Thanks to Elsebeth Paiken of JewishGen's Scandinavia SIG
for transcribing and coordinating this new database.

The JewishGen "All Scandinavia Database" can be searched at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Scandinavia >.


2) Updates to the "All Romania Database":

Two datasets in the JewishGen "All Romania Database" have
been updated.

- The Bessarabia Duma Voter List, 1906-1907, has added
25,000 additional records, primarily for the Akkerman,
Beltsi, Kishinev and Soroki districts. This includes the
towns of Beltsy (Balti), Ganchesty (Hincesti), Soroki
(Soroca), as well as many smaller towns.

The Bessarabia Duma Voter List database now contains
over 72,000 entries... but there over 50,000 records
still to be transcribed. To volunteer, or for more
information about the Bessarabia Duma Voter Lists, see
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/BessarabiaDuma.htm >.

- Census of Jewish Males, 1942. This database has been
updated with 10,000 additional records. Previously our
database contained only those men over 50 years old.
The new data contains all men aged 15 and over.
For more information about the "Tabele Barbatilor" census, see
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/TabeleBarbatilor.htm >.

- We've also updated our InfoFile containing translations
of occupational terms >from Romanian to English:
< http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/RomanianOccs.htm >.

All of these records are accessible amongst the more than
170,000 records in the JewishGen "All Romania Database" at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania >.


3) Enhancements to the "All Belarus Database":

We've also made two enhancements to the JewishGen
"All Belarus Database": the inclusion of some data
from the Vilnius Archives, and the ability to filter
searches by gubernia.

Data >from the LitvakSIG's Revision Lists dataset which
pertains to modern Belarus is now included in the
JewishGen "All Belarus Database". This is data for the
four southern uyezds of Vilna gubernia: Lida, Oshmiany,
Vilieka, and Disna districts -- areas which are now in
Belarus.

These 24,000 records are now included in both the
LitvakSIG "All Lithuania Database" and the JewishGen
"All Belarus Database".

In addition, we've also categorized all data in the
JewishGen "All Belarus Database" according to gubernia,
and thus users can now filter database searches by gubernia,
for more refined searches. A new optional pulldown in the
redesigned interface to the JewishGen "All Belarus Database"
allows users to specify which pre-WWI gubernia to search:
Grodno, Minsk, Mogilev, Vilna or Vitebsk; or all gubernias.

With the addition of the Revision List data >from southern
Vilna gubernia, there are now more than 300,000 records
accessible in the JewishGen "All Belarus Database", at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Belarus >.


4) Updates to JOWBR Data:

We've added over 40,000 new records to the JewishGen
Online Worldwide Burial Registry (JOWBR), >from 130
different cemeteries.

This includes data for 35 landsmanshaft societies in
Toronto, Canada; and 60 landsmanshaft societies in
Newark, New Jersey cemeteries. Other American localities
represented include Tucson, AZ, and Boston, MA.

This update also includes data >from Jewish cemeteries in
Belize (Central America); Dunaszerdahely and Nagykanizsa,
Hungary; Tel Aviv; Sokolow Malopolski and Warta, Poland;
Harlau, Romania; Kurima, Slovakia; and Lviv, Ukraine.

The JOWBR database contains data for nearly half a million
burials in 930 cemeteries. The database can be searched at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery >.


We also have a comprehensive new set of InfoFiles on
Jewish genealogical research in the Chicago area:
"Guide to Jewish Genealogy in Chicagoland", by Mike Karsen.
< http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Chicago >.


Thanks to all of the volunteers who made these happen.

All of JewishGen's databases can be found at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases >.


Warren

Warren Blatt
JewishGen Editor-in-Chief
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New and Updated JewishGen Databases #general

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

Some gifts for Hannukah...

Over the past several weeks, JewishGen has released several
new databases and features, including:

- The "All Scandinavia Database"
- Updates to the "All Romania Database"
- Enhancements to the "All Belarus Database"
- Updates to JOWBR Data

Each is described in detail below.


1) The "All Scandinavia Database":

This new database incorporates all of JewishGen's data for
Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Finland -- over 12,000 entries.

This includes datasets such as:
- Danish Census and Tax records, spanning 1711 to 1906;
- Jews mentioned in Swedish-Jewish historical literature;
- Holocaust transport data for Denmark, Norway and Sweden.

Thanks to Elsebeth Paiken of JewishGen's Scandinavia SIG
for transcribing and coordinating this new database.

The JewishGen "All Scandinavia Database" can be searched at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Scandinavia >.


2) Updates to the "All Romania Database":

Two datasets in the JewishGen "All Romania Database" have
been updated.

- The Bessarabia Duma Voter List, 1906-1907, has added
25,000 additional records, primarily for the Akkerman,
Beltsi, Kishinev and Soroki districts. This includes the
towns of Beltsy (Balti), Ganchesty (Hincesti), Soroki
(Soroca), as well as many smaller towns.

The Bessarabia Duma Voter List database now contains
over 72,000 entries... but there over 50,000 records
still to be transcribed. To volunteer, or for more
information about the Bessarabia Duma Voter Lists, see
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/BessarabiaDuma.htm >.

- Census of Jewish Males, 1942. This database has been
updated with 10,000 additional records. Previously our
database contained only those men over 50 years old.
The new data contains all men aged 15 and over.
For more information about the "Tabele Barbatilor" census, see
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/TabeleBarbatilor.htm >.

- We've also updated our InfoFile containing translations
of occupational terms >from Romanian to English:
< http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/RomanianOccs.htm >.

All of these records are accessible amongst the more than
170,000 records in the JewishGen "All Romania Database" at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania >.


3) Enhancements to the "All Belarus Database":

We've also made two enhancements to the JewishGen
"All Belarus Database": the inclusion of some data
from the Vilnius Archives, and the ability to filter
searches by gubernia.

Data >from the LitvakSIG's Revision Lists dataset which
pertains to modern Belarus is now included in the
JewishGen "All Belarus Database". This is data for the
four southern uyezds of Vilna gubernia: Lida, Oshmiany,
Vilieka, and Disna districts -- areas which are now in
Belarus.

These 24,000 records are now included in both the
LitvakSIG "All Lithuania Database" and the JewishGen
"All Belarus Database".

In addition, we've also categorized all data in the
JewishGen "All Belarus Database" according to gubernia,
and thus users can now filter database searches by gubernia,
for more refined searches. A new optional pulldown in the
redesigned interface to the JewishGen "All Belarus Database"
allows users to specify which pre-WWI gubernia to search:
Grodno, Minsk, Mogilev, Vilna or Vitebsk; or all gubernias.

With the addition of the Revision List data >from southern
Vilna gubernia, there are now more than 300,000 records
accessible in the JewishGen "All Belarus Database", at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Belarus >.


4) Updates to JOWBR Data:

We've added over 40,000 new records to the JewishGen
Online Worldwide Burial Registry (JOWBR), >from 130
different cemeteries.

This includes data for 35 landsmanshaft societies in
Toronto, Canada; and 60 landsmanshaft societies in
Newark, New Jersey cemeteries. Other American localities
represented include Tucson, AZ, and Boston, MA.

This update also includes data >from Jewish cemeteries in
Belize (Central America); Dunaszerdahely and Nagykanizsa,
Hungary; Tel Aviv; Sokolow Malopolski and Warta, Poland;
Harlau, Romania; Kurima, Slovakia; and Lviv, Ukraine.

The JOWBR database contains data for nearly half a million
burials in 930 cemeteries. The database can be searched at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery >.


We also have a comprehensive new set of InfoFiles on
Jewish genealogical research in the Chicago area:
"Guide to Jewish Genealogy in Chicagoland", by Mike Karsen.
< http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Chicago >.


Thanks to all of the volunteers who made these happen.

All of JewishGen's databases can be found at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases >.


Warren

Warren Blatt
JewishGen Editor-in-Chief
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


Fw: Searching for Yad Vashem PoT submitter: Toby Rabinowitz #general

Melinda Korbman
 

Hello Jewishgenners,


I am trying to find a Yad Vahsem PoT submitter by the name of Toby
Rabinowitz. She submitted info on a Ryvka Lederman nee Green from
Niedrzwice, Poland in 1992. Ryvka was my Ggrandfather's sister. All the
other surnames she listed are either Zysberg or Lederman.

Toby listed her address being New City , NY. I am unable to locate that
listing so I am guessing she no longer resides there. Any help in locating
Toby Rabinowitz would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!

Melinda Korbman
Mkorbman@optonline.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Fw: Searching for Yad Vashem PoT submitter: Toby Rabinowitz #general

Melinda Korbman
 

Hello Jewishgenners,


I am trying to find a Yad Vahsem PoT submitter by the name of Toby
Rabinowitz. She submitted info on a Ryvka Lederman nee Green from
Niedrzwice, Poland in 1992. Ryvka was my Ggrandfather's sister. All the
other surnames she listed are either Zysberg or Lederman.

Toby listed her address being New City , NY. I am unable to locate that
listing so I am guessing she no longer resides there. Any help in locating
Toby Rabinowitz would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!

Melinda Korbman
Mkorbman@optonline.net


Re: Mother's surname #general

Carlos Glikson
 

I've noticed that in many old vital records and specifically in the
JRI-Poland database, many children's birth - and even death - records are
listed as the child having the mother's surname rather than the father's
as is customary today.
There could be so many reasons for usage of the mother's last name that I am
including a message I posted in JewishGen years ago. At the time I
summarized possible motives for different areas, dates, and situations,
after receiving many mails in response to a similar question about use of
the mother's name....Sorry for the late reply, I am catching up after an
absence.

"Thank you to all who helped me gain insight on the many reasons behind
surname changes in immigrants and use of maternal name. I wish to thank all
who took their time to answer. It was my first posting in JewishGen and I
felt the added strength of individual and collective knowledge and
experiences.

Here is a summary of many varied facts and theories mentioned by Genners for
different dates, areas, and circumstances - different >from the unfairly
blamed clerk in Ellis Island!

They could help to look into other cases and pinpoint the reason for the
change in names:

+Different policies in terms of recording Jewish marriages and legislating
use of surnames among Jews.

+Jewish marriages not being recognized, and children being given documents
with their mothers maiden name

+Religious Marriage considered sufficient. Never bothering to register a
civil marriage with the authorities, with the option for children of taking
either surname

+Having religious marriages, in general not registering until after the
first child was born, and scoffing at the notations of illegitimacy in the
eyes of the Polish government as of no consequence at all.

+Not being able to afford the fee for a civil marriage - children born of
the religious marriage had to take the surname of the mother

+Only one marriage permit issued per Jew family descendance under
Austro-Hungarian law, and only if a significant fee was paid. So marriage of
more than one children would not be recorded by the civil authorities and
children of such couples would be listed in the Austro-Hungarian metrical
records as illegitimate.

+Times when governments in Poland and in Hungary did not allow Jews to marry
more than once (even if his spouse was deceased). In that case, they were
married only by Jewish ceremony and the children of this second (etc.)
marriage bore the family name of the mother.

+Civil marriages being conducted in front of a cross. Jews who refused to
marry in front of a cross were technically illegitimate

+Marriages performed elsewhere and not formally registered in cities where
children were born

+Many people in the United States, Irish in particular, had a particular
dislike for Russians, or what they perceived as Russian sounding names...
Consequently, many Russian or East-European Jews Germanized their names.

+Thinking that having a close maternal relative with the same surname in the
States would make it easier to be admitted if using the maternal surname

+Desire to avoid the authorities for some reason, probably connected with
military service - either to avoid conscription or to evade punishment after
deserting

+In Russia outside the Kingdom of Poland, Jewish men except the first born
were draftable and sometimes not permitted to marry - so baby boys were
never registered or sometimes registered as the child of another couple with
no boys.

+Inherited surnames were still relatively new and not especially desired by
Jews since they were forced on them by the government in an effort to keep
track of who was who (and draftable, etc.)

+A Jew emmigrating to the US may give no second thought to getting rid of a
name forced on him by the Czar.

+Inconsistent use amongst European Jews of what we consider to be "surnames"
(family names uniformly reflecting the paternal line) until the 19th century
as the earliest.

+Marriages governed by religious law until fairly recently (typically the
19th century) with individual names recorded in official documents being a
totally different question.

+In 20th century not recognition of the state or synagogue as a power proper
for marriage authorization, not for reasons related to religion, but for
political ones

+Need to be sponsored by a family member in order to be accepted as an
immigrant, and pretending to be related to the sponsor using papers in the
new name.

+Jews who needed a surname often used the wife's name if they were (as often
occured) living with the wife's family.

+Men marrying into a well known Rabbinical family taking the father-in-law's
family name

+Men going into their father-in-law's profession, and the family's name
changing according to that profession

+Anglicization, easier spelling or pronounciation, and even choosing a name
more in their liking, and ease in the States to "call yourself anything you
wanted"

+Travelling under the mother's maiden name and resuming the father's name on
arrival

+Travels under the mother's maiden name being thus noted by the authorities
on their certificate of arrival or naturalization papers.

Thank you very much for all these comments - hope they help and did not skip
any!

Carlos Glikson
Buenos Aires, Argentina


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Mother's surname #general

Carlos Glikson
 

I've noticed that in many old vital records and specifically in the
JRI-Poland database, many children's birth - and even death - records are
listed as the child having the mother's surname rather than the father's
as is customary today.
There could be so many reasons for usage of the mother's last name that I am
including a message I posted in JewishGen years ago. At the time I
summarized possible motives for different areas, dates, and situations,
after receiving many mails in response to a similar question about use of
the mother's name....Sorry for the late reply, I am catching up after an
absence.

"Thank you to all who helped me gain insight on the many reasons behind
surname changes in immigrants and use of maternal name. I wish to thank all
who took their time to answer. It was my first posting in JewishGen and I
felt the added strength of individual and collective knowledge and
experiences.

Here is a summary of many varied facts and theories mentioned by Genners for
different dates, areas, and circumstances - different >from the unfairly
blamed clerk in Ellis Island!

They could help to look into other cases and pinpoint the reason for the
change in names:

+Different policies in terms of recording Jewish marriages and legislating
use of surnames among Jews.

+Jewish marriages not being recognized, and children being given documents
with their mothers maiden name

+Religious Marriage considered sufficient. Never bothering to register a
civil marriage with the authorities, with the option for children of taking
either surname

+Having religious marriages, in general not registering until after the
first child was born, and scoffing at the notations of illegitimacy in the
eyes of the Polish government as of no consequence at all.

+Not being able to afford the fee for a civil marriage - children born of
the religious marriage had to take the surname of the mother

+Only one marriage permit issued per Jew family descendance under
Austro-Hungarian law, and only if a significant fee was paid. So marriage of
more than one children would not be recorded by the civil authorities and
children of such couples would be listed in the Austro-Hungarian metrical
records as illegitimate.

+Times when governments in Poland and in Hungary did not allow Jews to marry
more than once (even if his spouse was deceased). In that case, they were
married only by Jewish ceremony and the children of this second (etc.)
marriage bore the family name of the mother.

+Civil marriages being conducted in front of a cross. Jews who refused to
marry in front of a cross were technically illegitimate

+Marriages performed elsewhere and not formally registered in cities where
children were born

+Many people in the United States, Irish in particular, had a particular
dislike for Russians, or what they perceived as Russian sounding names...
Consequently, many Russian or East-European Jews Germanized their names.

+Thinking that having a close maternal relative with the same surname in the
States would make it easier to be admitted if using the maternal surname

+Desire to avoid the authorities for some reason, probably connected with
military service - either to avoid conscription or to evade punishment after
deserting

+In Russia outside the Kingdom of Poland, Jewish men except the first born
were draftable and sometimes not permitted to marry - so baby boys were
never registered or sometimes registered as the child of another couple with
no boys.

+Inherited surnames were still relatively new and not especially desired by
Jews since they were forced on them by the government in an effort to keep
track of who was who (and draftable, etc.)

+A Jew emmigrating to the US may give no second thought to getting rid of a
name forced on him by the Czar.

+Inconsistent use amongst European Jews of what we consider to be "surnames"
(family names uniformly reflecting the paternal line) until the 19th century
as the earliest.

+Marriages governed by religious law until fairly recently (typically the
19th century) with individual names recorded in official documents being a
totally different question.

+In 20th century not recognition of the state or synagogue as a power proper
for marriage authorization, not for reasons related to religion, but for
political ones

+Need to be sponsored by a family member in order to be accepted as an
immigrant, and pretending to be related to the sponsor using papers in the
new name.

+Jews who needed a surname often used the wife's name if they were (as often
occured) living with the wife's family.

+Men marrying into a well known Rabbinical family taking the father-in-law's
family name

+Men going into their father-in-law's profession, and the family's name
changing according to that profession

+Anglicization, easier spelling or pronounciation, and even choosing a name
more in their liking, and ease in the States to "call yourself anything you
wanted"

+Travelling under the mother's maiden name and resuming the father's name on
arrival

+Travels under the mother's maiden name being thus noted by the authorities
on their certificate of arrival or naturalization papers.

Thank you very much for all these comments - hope they help and did not skip
any!

Carlos Glikson
Buenos Aires, Argentina


Help with phoning Latvian relative in Riga #general

lailandre <lailandre@...>
 

Hi Genners

Is there a Latvian Genner who would be kind enough to get in touch with a
probable Latvian relative for me and give them my name and address or obtain
theirs for me so that I may contact them by snail mail or Email. I have
been searching for the family SOLOVJEVS and now have a really good lead. If
anyone out there can help me please contact me directly on my Email:
lailandre@bigpond.com.

Many thanks and best wishes for Channuka

Laila Andre


PoT Submitter - Chana Pressman #general

Shlomo Katz <SKATZ@...>
 

I am seeking contact information for a PoT submitter named Chana Pressman of
Kiryat Chaim, Israel (or her descendants). She appears to have been a cousin
of my wife's grandfather.
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring MD


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help with phoning Latvian relative in Riga #general

lailandre <lailandre@...>
 

Hi Genners

Is there a Latvian Genner who would be kind enough to get in touch with a
probable Latvian relative for me and give them my name and address or obtain
theirs for me so that I may contact them by snail mail or Email. I have
been searching for the family SOLOVJEVS and now have a really good lead. If
anyone out there can help me please contact me directly on my Email:
lailandre@bigpond.com.

Many thanks and best wishes for Channuka

Laila Andre


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen PoT Submitter - Chana Pressman #general

Shlomo Katz <SKATZ@...>
 

I am seeking contact information for a PoT submitter named Chana Pressman of
Kiryat Chaim, Israel (or her descendants). She appears to have been a cousin
of my wife's grandfather.
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring MD


Zegivke society #ukraine

mister snappy <mistersnappy@...>
 

Has anyone ever heard of the 'Zegivke Society' in Brooklyn NY. I believe is
was a group of people >from Zegivke/Dzygovka in the Ukraine who had settled
in NY in the early 1900s. It seems a great great aunt was a member of this
group but I can't find any reference to it anywhere.

Simon Kisner
London


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Zegivke society #ukraine

mister snappy <mistersnappy@...>
 

Has anyone ever heard of the 'Zegivke Society' in Brooklyn NY. I believe is
was a group of people >from Zegivke/Dzygovka in the Ukraine who had settled
in NY in the early 1900s. It seems a great great aunt was a member of this
group but I can't find any reference to it anywhere.

Simon Kisner
London


Seeking descendants of BLACKMAN family shown in ViewMate photos #usa

Martin Fischer
 

MOD NOTE: A recent Internet exploration took me to Mr. Fischer's website
referenced below. I would suggest other members take a look. It's well
constructed and it includes a very thoughtful set of instructions on how
to build a personal / family website of your own. MODERATOR

I am seeking to contact descendants of the BLACKMAN family shown in VM5150
and VM5151 ViewMate photos at:

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/index.asp

One photo shows young mother and father and three young sons photographed in
1917 in Chicago. The other, showing the three brothers in June, 1919,
identifies them as Marcus, age 9; Philip, age 7; Harold, age 5. Their mother
may be named Tillie Blackman, possibly a daughter of Gershon HARRIS, but we
lack documentation and have been unable to find their descendants.

Please respond directly to martinfischer@hotmail.com

Thanks. Martin Fischer Oak Park, Illinois, USA

The Fischer and Levin family history Web site is at:
http://mefischer1.home.comcast.net/


Early American SIG #USA Seeking descendants of BLACKMAN family shown in ViewMate photos #usa

Martin Fischer
 

MOD NOTE: A recent Internet exploration took me to Mr. Fischer's website
referenced below. I would suggest other members take a look. It's well
constructed and it includes a very thoughtful set of instructions on how
to build a personal / family website of your own. MODERATOR

I am seeking to contact descendants of the BLACKMAN family shown in VM5150
and VM5151 ViewMate photos at:

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/index.asp

One photo shows young mother and father and three young sons photographed in
1917 in Chicago. The other, showing the three brothers in June, 1919,
identifies them as Marcus, age 9; Philip, age 7; Harold, age 5. Their mother
may be named Tillie Blackman, possibly a daughter of Gershon HARRIS, but we
lack documentation and have been unable to find their descendants.

Please respond directly to martinfischer@hotmail.com

Thanks. Martin Fischer Oak Park, Illinois, USA

The Fischer and Levin family history Web site is at:
http://mefischer1.home.comcast.net/