Date   

Meaning of "Friede seiner Asche" #germany

Hans Martin Unger <hansmartin.unger@...>
 

I visited the Weissensee-cementary in Berlin and I have seen the following
engraving on a marble grave >from 1843 :

" Friede seiner Asche " - peace for the ashes

What does that mean ?

I also have learned that a greater place of this old cementary has gravestones
for Russian people. They know flowers on the graves and not stones.
Kind regards

Hansmartin Unger St Gallen Switzerland <hansmartin.unger@freesurf.ch>


German SIG #Germany Meaning of "Friede seiner Asche" #germany

Hans Martin Unger <hansmartin.unger@...>
 

I visited the Weissensee-cementary in Berlin and I have seen the following
engraving on a marble grave >from 1843 :

" Friede seiner Asche " - peace for the ashes

What does that mean ?

I also have learned that a greater place of this old cementary has gravestones
for Russian people. They know flowers on the graves and not stones.
Kind regards

Hansmartin Unger St Gallen Switzerland <hansmartin.unger@freesurf.ch>


JGS - Hamilton (Ontario, Canada) Feb. 7 "Jewish Genealogy in Bavarian Swabia" #germany

HJB <hjb@...>
 

Our next meeting will be held on Wednesday, February 7, 2007 at 7:30 pm
Temple Anshe Sholom 215 Cline Ave. N., Hamilton

We are pleased to welcome back Ralph Bloch. He will inform us about the
"Jewish Genealogy in Bavarian Swabia" Project.

Approximately 60 km west of Munich are some 23 little towns and villages
that had thriving Jewish communities in the 18th and 19th century. Rich
documentary material exists in several Bavarian archives relating to these
communities as a whole, as well as to individuals. Ralph Bloch will describe
an international collaboration of Jewish genealogists who are in the process
of making this material available on the internet.

We begin with our meet & greet at 7:30 followed by the presentation.
Admission is free for members. The fee for Non-members wishing to attend is
$5 which will be applied to the JGSH membership fee when joining in the same
membership year, and helps to defray our costs.

For all information on our upcoming meetings please check out our website at
http://www.jgsh.org/Events.php

Perhaps we'll see you on Wednesday!

Hazel Boon President JGS - Hamilton & Area president@jgsh.org
jgsh@cogeco.ca www.jgsh.org


German SIG #Germany JGS - Hamilton (Ontario, Canada) Feb. 7 "Jewish Genealogy in Bavarian Swabia" #germany

HJB <hjb@...>
 

Our next meeting will be held on Wednesday, February 7, 2007 at 7:30 pm
Temple Anshe Sholom 215 Cline Ave. N., Hamilton

We are pleased to welcome back Ralph Bloch. He will inform us about the
"Jewish Genealogy in Bavarian Swabia" Project.

Approximately 60 km west of Munich are some 23 little towns and villages
that had thriving Jewish communities in the 18th and 19th century. Rich
documentary material exists in several Bavarian archives relating to these
communities as a whole, as well as to individuals. Ralph Bloch will describe
an international collaboration of Jewish genealogists who are in the process
of making this material available on the internet.

We begin with our meet & greet at 7:30 followed by the presentation.
Admission is free for members. The fee for Non-members wishing to attend is
$5 which will be applied to the JGSH membership fee when joining in the same
membership year, and helps to defray our costs.

For all information on our upcoming meetings please check out our website at
http://www.jgsh.org/Events.php

Perhaps we'll see you on Wednesday!

Hazel Boon President JGS - Hamilton & Area president@jgsh.org
jgsh@cogeco.ca www.jgsh.org


San Francisco Bay Area JGS Meeting February 11 #general

Jerry acobson <drjjsf@...>
 

East Bay Meeting

Speaker: Ron Arons
Topic: Using The Internet For Jewish
Genealogy Beyond the Jewishgen and Steve Morse’s ”One Step” Websites.
Where: Berkeley Richmond JCC
1414 Walnut St.
North Berkeley, CA
When: Sunday, February 11, 2007
Time: Doors open: 12:30 PM
Program begins: 1:00 PM
Entry: Free
Info: http://www.jewishgen.org/sfbajgs

We all know there's much more to the Internet than two of our favorite sites, but
how often do we go beyond these familiar and seemingly all-encompassing sources?
SFBAJGS member Ron Arons will convince us to spend a little time elsewhere.

Jerry Jacobson Replies to drjjsf@aol.com please


Translation Help #general

M R
 

Hello,

Just recently found an immigration record for my relative Dora BEGUN >from
Turov, Belarus, and was hoping someone might be able to translate some of
the information contained therein.

Under the left behind section, it says:

Keine Nahste Verwauste ne der Heimatsstadb

I am guessing Keine Nahste in a name, but any ideas on what the rest of it
means.

Please respond privately. Much thanks...

Michael Rose
Long Island, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen San Francisco Bay Area JGS Meeting February 11 #general

Jerry acobson <drjjsf@...>
 

East Bay Meeting

Speaker: Ron Arons
Topic: Using The Internet For Jewish
Genealogy Beyond the Jewishgen and Steve Morse’s ”One Step” Websites.
Where: Berkeley Richmond JCC
1414 Walnut St.
North Berkeley, CA
When: Sunday, February 11, 2007
Time: Doors open: 12:30 PM
Program begins: 1:00 PM
Entry: Free
Info: http://www.jewishgen.org/sfbajgs

We all know there's much more to the Internet than two of our favorite sites, but
how often do we go beyond these familiar and seemingly all-encompassing sources?
SFBAJGS member Ron Arons will convince us to spend a little time elsewhere.

Jerry Jacobson Replies to drjjsf@aol.com please


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Translation Help #general

M R
 

Hello,

Just recently found an immigration record for my relative Dora BEGUN >from
Turov, Belarus, and was hoping someone might be able to translate some of
the information contained therein.

Under the left behind section, it says:

Keine Nahste Verwauste ne der Heimatsstadb

I am guessing Keine Nahste in a name, but any ideas on what the rest of it
means.

Please respond privately. Much thanks...

Michael Rose
Long Island, NY


Jean BENDA/ Itzig BENDIX - Berlin/Schwerin Warthe #germany

denise benda <denisebenda@...>
 

Hello,
I am looking for my ancestor Jean BENDA, who lived in Berlin in the 19th
century.

In Jacobson's Judenbuergerbuecher you can read:
"1818 Nr. 647
BENDA, Jean, Kaufmann (=merchant), Probstgasse 6,
born in Schwerin/ Warthe, 29 Years, (20.4.1791)
in Berlin since approx.1799
konditionierte seit 11 Jahren bei BESCHUETZ,
was called till 1812 Bendix Itzig (a.KM.152)
married 26.12.1819 Riecke LOEWENSTEIN, daughter of Levin Joseph LOEWENSTEIN
- originate >from Schwerin (29/18)
Father: Bendix Joseph, Handelsmann (merchant) in Schwerin"

Jean BENDA died in 1870
Do you know anything about him, about his ancestors or his family?

His children were:
Helene SIMON (1821-1893) marr. Isaac Isidor SIMON in 1843
Bertha (Bella) LIEBERMANN (1822-1901) marr. Joseph Joachim LIEBERMANN in 1840
Julius BENDA (1826-1882) marr. Therese COHN
Flore (?1831)
Clara FRAENKEL (1834-1903) marr. Joseph FRAENKEL in 1860
Zerline (?1838)
Benny BENDA (1840-1899) marr. Anna (Johanna) LESSER

Best Denise Benda, Vienna, Austria <denisebenda@hotmail.com>


German SIG #Germany Jean BENDA/ Itzig BENDIX - Berlin/Schwerin Warthe #germany

denise benda <denisebenda@...>
 

Hello,
I am looking for my ancestor Jean BENDA, who lived in Berlin in the 19th
century.

In Jacobson's Judenbuergerbuecher you can read:
"1818 Nr. 647
BENDA, Jean, Kaufmann (=merchant), Probstgasse 6,
born in Schwerin/ Warthe, 29 Years, (20.4.1791)
in Berlin since approx.1799
konditionierte seit 11 Jahren bei BESCHUETZ,
was called till 1812 Bendix Itzig (a.KM.152)
married 26.12.1819 Riecke LOEWENSTEIN, daughter of Levin Joseph LOEWENSTEIN
- originate >from Schwerin (29/18)
Father: Bendix Joseph, Handelsmann (merchant) in Schwerin"

Jean BENDA died in 1870
Do you know anything about him, about his ancestors or his family?

His children were:
Helene SIMON (1821-1893) marr. Isaac Isidor SIMON in 1843
Bertha (Bella) LIEBERMANN (1822-1901) marr. Joseph Joachim LIEBERMANN in 1840
Julius BENDA (1826-1882) marr. Therese COHN
Flore (?1831)
Clara FRAENKEL (1834-1903) marr. Joseph FRAENKEL in 1860
Zerline (?1838)
Benny BENDA (1840-1899) marr. Anna (Johanna) LESSER

Best Denise Benda, Vienna, Austria <denisebenda@hotmail.com>


Re: Can you help me identify Gershagui, West Falen #germany

Gregor Brand <Gregor.Brand@...>
 

"Gershagui" probably is the village of Giershagen in the Sauerland
region of Westphalia. The village (about 1500 inhabitants) is located
south of Paderborn, between Dortmund and Kassel.

You can find more information (in German) about Giershagen at:
www.giershagen.de

Hope this helps. Gregor Brand, Bargstedt, Germany


German SIG #Germany Re: Can you help me identify Gershagui, West Falen #germany

Gregor Brand <Gregor.Brand@...>
 

"Gershagui" probably is the village of Giershagen in the Sauerland
region of Westphalia. The village (about 1500 inhabitants) is located
south of Paderborn, between Dortmund and Kassel.

You can find more information (in German) about Giershagen at:
www.giershagen.de

Hope this helps. Gregor Brand, Bargstedt, Germany


Re: Can you help me identify Gershagui, West Falen #germany

Ralph Baer
 

Perhaps it is Geseke, Westfalen which is about 10 miles westsouthwest
of Paderborn.

Ralph N. Baer Washington, DC ursusminor@alum.rpi.edu

Ellen Barnett Cleary San Francisco, California <ellencleary@comcast.net> asked:
Someone shared some information with me about a person born in
1856 in Gershagui, West Falen. Can someone help me figure out where
this is and how to correctly spell it?


German SIG #Germany Re: Can you help me identify Gershagui, West Falen #germany

Ralph Baer
 

Perhaps it is Geseke, Westfalen which is about 10 miles westsouthwest
of Paderborn.

Ralph N. Baer Washington, DC ursusminor@alum.rpi.edu

Ellen Barnett Cleary San Francisco, California <ellencleary@comcast.net> asked:
Someone shared some information with me about a person born in
1856 in Gershagui, West Falen. Can someone help me figure out where
this is and how to correctly spell it?


Pronounciation in German dialects can cause spelling variations in old records #germany

buckidstein@...
 

When I speak of Burgsteinfurt, my home-town in North Germany, I pronounce
the g either like g as in English "get" or as a voiceless guttural ch.
The first version is High German, the second is dialect.

In the region around Frankfurt a.M., where I now live, there are two
more possibilities to pronounce a G: sch (German writing) or sh as
in English "ship" and j (German writing) or y as in yes.

Also, here in South Germany, "ch" is often pronounced as "sch".
Thus in this area "Kirche" (church) can sound exactly like "Kirsche"
(cherry). This may be confusing to a foreigner, yet a genealogist
is always confronted with the influence of regional dialects on the
spelling of names that appear in old vital records.

He or she should not be misled by the modern standardized pronunciation
of letters.

When one is aware of this and of the fact that there was no fixed spelling
of Jewish names in former centuries, one will, for example, see that
behind the names Mortje - Mortie - Mortche - Mordsche - Mordge
(t and d can always be exchanged) there is only one person whose full
name was Mordechai. The other versions are attempts to render one and
the same pronunciation of a familiar form of that name which we now
would write "Mordche".

G and ch are important letters, because they are used for the suffix of
the diminuitive form: -chen in modern writing, -gen in the 19th and
earlier centuries (together with -chen).

When this syllable was pronounced sh, (as in the English word shovel)
the -n at the end was dropped. Especially the women loved this ending.

More examples >from South Germany, where you should not think of
different pronunciations of the last syllable:
Bluemche = Bluemge = Bluemchen

Mannge = Mannchen = Mannsche = Mandje

And familiar forms of Elisabeth: Bettge = Bettchen = Beschen
(first syllable Bes).

Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Germany buckidstein@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Mr. Buck is the author of many books and articles based
on his research using German vital records and archival documents.
He will speak on these subjects at the SLC 2007 Conference.

His message is not intended as a lesson in spoken German. The point here
has been stated in many prior messages in this Forum:
In old German records the name of the same ancestor
can can be spelled in many different ways.
For example, I have a tape recording of my American grandmother speaking the
names of her German-born aunts: Binchen, Linchen, and Yetchen Straus.
Mr. Buck, who has spent decades searching vital records in South German
archives, knows >from experience that these familiar names could have been
spelled in several ways in old documents as per the examples in his
last paragraph, above.

(LDS films of their birth records >from Kaiserslautern, circa 1860 show that their
formal names, Philippina. Caroline and Henriette were recorded by the clerks but
that the given name of their father, Michael, was spelled in 2 or 3 different ways
in the 3 birth records as was the family name, STRAUS / STRAUSS / STRAUs (esszet))
MOD 1


German SIG #Germany Pronounciation in German dialects can cause spelling variations in old records #germany

buckidstein@...
 

When I speak of Burgsteinfurt, my home-town in North Germany, I pronounce
the g either like g as in English "get" or as a voiceless guttural ch.
The first version is High German, the second is dialect.

In the region around Frankfurt a.M., where I now live, there are two
more possibilities to pronounce a G: sch (German writing) or sh as
in English "ship" and j (German writing) or y as in yes.

Also, here in South Germany, "ch" is often pronounced as "sch".
Thus in this area "Kirche" (church) can sound exactly like "Kirsche"
(cherry). This may be confusing to a foreigner, yet a genealogist
is always confronted with the influence of regional dialects on the
spelling of names that appear in old vital records.

He or she should not be misled by the modern standardized pronunciation
of letters.

When one is aware of this and of the fact that there was no fixed spelling
of Jewish names in former centuries, one will, for example, see that
behind the names Mortje - Mortie - Mortche - Mordsche - Mordge
(t and d can always be exchanged) there is only one person whose full
name was Mordechai. The other versions are attempts to render one and
the same pronunciation of a familiar form of that name which we now
would write "Mordche".

G and ch are important letters, because they are used for the suffix of
the diminuitive form: -chen in modern writing, -gen in the 19th and
earlier centuries (together with -chen).

When this syllable was pronounced sh, (as in the English word shovel)
the -n at the end was dropped. Especially the women loved this ending.

More examples >from South Germany, where you should not think of
different pronunciations of the last syllable:
Bluemche = Bluemge = Bluemchen

Mannge = Mannchen = Mannsche = Mandje

And familiar forms of Elisabeth: Bettge = Bettchen = Beschen
(first syllable Bes).

Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Germany buckidstein@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Mr. Buck is the author of many books and articles based
on his research using German vital records and archival documents.
He will speak on these subjects at the SLC 2007 Conference.

His message is not intended as a lesson in spoken German. The point here
has been stated in many prior messages in this Forum:
In old German records the name of the same ancestor
can can be spelled in many different ways.
For example, I have a tape recording of my American grandmother speaking the
names of her German-born aunts: Binchen, Linchen, and Yetchen Straus.
Mr. Buck, who has spent decades searching vital records in South German
archives, knows >from experience that these familiar names could have been
spelled in several ways in old documents as per the examples in his
last paragraph, above.

(LDS films of their birth records >from Kaiserslautern, circa 1860 show that their
formal names, Philippina. Caroline and Henriette were recorded by the clerks but
that the given name of their father, Michael, was spelled in 2 or 3 different ways
in the 3 birth records as was the family name, STRAUS / STRAUSS / STRAUs (esszet))
MOD 1


Re: SEGAL Family in France #france

Sherry Landa <sherry@...>
 

Hi Lois,

I don't understand what you mean when you say you have no way to contact
these gentlemen.
If you go to http://www.pagesjaunes.fr/pb.cgi and put Segal in the first box
and 75 in the last you'll get the street address, the home phone and the
mobile for Claude plus the street address and home phone of Philippe. So,
between the two of them you have 5 ways to contact them.

Are you perhaps asking someone to telephone them or write to them on your
behalf? If so, then I suggest a letter. Cold calling is sometimes fantastic
but when people are not expecting it and may be vulnerable in some way they
can find it very intimidating. In addition, for someone to help you they
would need to know what you want to say to these gentlemen and how they can
contact you. You gave your email address but if neither have internet access
that is not going to be much use. Also you need to think of the logistics.
If someone contacts them and they phone you and they don't speak English and
you don't speak French it could be tricky ;-) Also there is something like 6
hours between Florida and Paris so if they were to call you mid-morning you
might get a nasty shock at 3 am!

If you want to email me back, privately, I am more than happy to write to
these gentlemen on your behalf. Post is taking 2 working days >from here to
France at the moment and I have French stamps to include a return envelope
which I find gets you further if included.

Hope this helps a bit and look forward to hearing >from you if I can be of
further assistance.
Best wishes,
Sherry Landa
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Once again I am searching for 'my' long lost SEGAL family. I now have
names and addresses so this might be helpful.


French SIG #France Re: SEGAL Family in France #france

Sherry Landa <sherry@...>
 

Hi Lois,

I don't understand what you mean when you say you have no way to contact
these gentlemen.
If you go to http://www.pagesjaunes.fr/pb.cgi and put Segal in the first box
and 75 in the last you'll get the street address, the home phone and the
mobile for Claude plus the street address and home phone of Philippe. So,
between the two of them you have 5 ways to contact them.

Are you perhaps asking someone to telephone them or write to them on your
behalf? If so, then I suggest a letter. Cold calling is sometimes fantastic
but when people are not expecting it and may be vulnerable in some way they
can find it very intimidating. In addition, for someone to help you they
would need to know what you want to say to these gentlemen and how they can
contact you. You gave your email address but if neither have internet access
that is not going to be much use. Also you need to think of the logistics.
If someone contacts them and they phone you and they don't speak English and
you don't speak French it could be tricky ;-) Also there is something like 6
hours between Florida and Paris so if they were to call you mid-morning you
might get a nasty shock at 3 am!

If you want to email me back, privately, I am more than happy to write to
these gentlemen on your behalf. Post is taking 2 working days >from here to
France at the moment and I have French stamps to include a return envelope
which I find gets you further if included.

Hope this helps a bit and look forward to hearing >from you if I can be of
further assistance.
Best wishes,
Sherry Landa
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Once again I am searching for 'my' long lost SEGAL family. I now have
names and addresses so this might be helpful.


Suggestion #ukraine

GeoestherL@...
 

There are frequent postings requesting names of researchers with private
responses. Is it possible to establish "boards" , such as on Yahoo groups and
Cruisecritic, where members can post their experiences in this area? We could
also establish "threads" of discussions, such as where various towns are,
family names, etc., so that members could log in and take advantage of this
knowledge at a later date; this might shortcut rehashing of the same issues.
George Liss

MOD NOTE: Ukraine SIG messages are archived at
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~sigspop
Members should always check here first for town names.
Town names are also listed in modern & current usage at Shtetlinks
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Ukraine.html You could find
a possible match on this site.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Suggestion #ukraine

GeoestherL@...
 

There are frequent postings requesting names of researchers with private
responses. Is it possible to establish "boards" , such as on Yahoo groups and
Cruisecritic, where members can post their experiences in this area? We could
also establish "threads" of discussions, such as where various towns are,
family names, etc., so that members could log in and take advantage of this
knowledge at a later date; this might shortcut rehashing of the same issues.
George Liss

MOD NOTE: Ukraine SIG messages are archived at
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~sigspop
Members should always check here first for town names.
Town names are also listed in modern & current usage at Shtetlinks
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Ukraine.html You could find
a possible match on this site.