Date   

Familianten, censuses and BMD records - differences #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I realise >from two postings in the last week [Jacob Michel & Jan Hellmann] that
there are some SIG members who are still confused re the various Jewish records
that are available in Bohemia and Moravia.

This is quite understandable, as we are all relative beginners in this area and
the more questions that are asked and answered, the better we shall all understand
the outstanding points. Language problems with our non-English speaking members
may also be a stumbling block and lead to confusion. I would like to continue
the debate as follows:

There are four main record types, namely:

- Familianten and "Mannschaftsbuecher"
- birth, marriage and death records [BMD]
- censuses
- tax and land registry

They are completely distinct and they should not be confused with each other.
They are all valuable in their own right and for a complete genealogical study
they should all, if possible, be cross-checked with each other.

1. Familianten: Jacob Michel [Israel] asked which is more accurate, BMD records
or Familianten?

The Familianten books can be thought of as "skeletal" family trees with almost
complete emphasis on the male line, especially the current Familiant and the
first-born son who inherits the Familianten licence. They are not detailed birth,
marriage or death records.

There are comments about the other sons, if relevant. Also, if the first-born son
dies or renounces his "Stelle" [Familianten position/rights] then the line
continues with the next son etc, etc.

In some cases, a number of sons have acquired "Stellen", through various clauses
and/or loopholes in the Familianten act - if so they will all be followed
through.

A normal family tree is drawn just like the traditional spreading Xmas tree -
with all the daughters included; but in the Familianten books, the tree goes
horizontally across a page, filling in various pre-headed columns - and then
onto another page, with the generations. Daughters are not listed.
You can see the headings on:

http://www.geocities.com/Tokyo/Palace/6691/loewy.html

2. Birth, marriage and death [BMD] records:

Birth records are completely different. They usually give full details of the
baby's name, sex, date of birth, mother, father, midwife, circumcision if a boy,
location and witnesses.

Marriage records are equally complex – and so are death records. They should
both have considerable detail on them [for example, on the marriage records:
names of bride and groom and their ages, parents’ full names and maiden names,
occupations, addresses etc].

These are documents which have a legal status and can be used as such. Thus, if
you look at BMD records, there are often hand-written dated annotations in the
margins, which may refer to requests for copies. They may have arisen when the
person is getting married or needs a certificate for some other purpose [i.e
Zustandigkeit/residency]. I have seen requests >from Vienna sent back to Kolin
or Grossbock, for example!
I very much doubt if you would be able to find such requests in a Familianten
record, which would probably be zealously guarded by Christian authorities.

The BMD records would have been under the safe-keeping of the local Jewish
community. You can see some of these detailed records on our own website:

http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/czechguide.html

3. Census records: with specific reference to the 1793 census of the 16 Kreis
of Bohemia and Prague [still to be transcribed]. There are also Moravian censuses;
one in particular has been used to great effect recently to establish LOEFF
family links in Holleschau for SIG member, Harold Chipman [Switzerland].

Censuses are based on households and family heads; the occupation of the
breadwinner is listed. All Jews in Bohemia in 1793 were enumerated and recorded
under their newly-acquired names.

The Klattauer Kreis census of 1793 gives ages as well, but this is the exception.
There are a very few ages scattered throughout the other 15 Kreis and a few more
than usual in the Budweiser Kreis, especially in Kalladey [luckily for SIG members
Ruth Coman, Randy Schoenberg and Jane Reber].

Census records do, however, list for every household:
wives, daughters, widows, much-maligned mothers-in-law, servants, as well as
tutors and teachers, many of whom came >from Moravia and some >from Poland – what
a brainy lot they were!

If the family was very poor, there is often an indication there [e.g. lives on
charity]. Widows, widowers and twins are singled out too. There are sometimes
comments on the whereabouts of a member of the family living outside the family
circle and even, in some cases, mention of ownership of property and future
inheritance.

So there is a vast amount of data here and if only we could compare it with the
1783 census, we could glean even more re name changes.

The censuses give us a glimpse into everyday life over 200 years ago. Paul King
[Israel] gave us an erudite analysis of census-taking in the 1700s and its
sophistication.

4: Tax and land registry records - they could be of great value in establishing
who was living where and at what period. They require a separate discussion.

Moravian records: I ended my first lengthy posting [8 April 2005] on the
Familianten books with the plea: "And finally, what about Moravia? We need a
complete listing of books available and where they are located. That is one of
the biggest problems for Moravian SIG members today."

Charlie Roberts [UK] repeated this, with a special request: “Regarding Moravia
and my interest in Boskovice, does anyone know if Familianten records exist?”
Jan Hellmann's enthusiastic reply: "they are there" [in Prague] in fact referred
to the censuses and Bohemian records and he has now sent us a correction.

The Moravian problem has not really been fully resolved, but Julius Mueller
[Prague] has pointed us the right way and so has Claire Bruell in her article
on her trip to Moravia in the current issue of Avotaynu. Moravia, unfortunately
remains our "problem child". I am not even sure how many Familianten books
[known as "Mannschaftsbuecher" in Moravia] we have to locate. Are these these
the books we are looking for?

see http://thorin.adnc.com/~lynnd/gfaqf.html

Auspitz, Boskowitz, Bruenn, Datschitz, Gaya, Goeding,
Gr.Meseritsc h, Hohenstadt, Holleschau, Iglau,
Kremsier, Kromau, Littau, Maehrisch-Truebau, Mistek,
Neustadtl, Neutitschein, Nikolsburg, Olmuetz, Prerau,
Prossnitz, Roemerstadt, Schoenberg, Sternberg,
Trebitsch, Ungarisch-Brod, Ungarisch-Hradisch,
Walachisch-Meseritsch, Weisskirchen, Wischa u,Znaim.

see also paragraph in German on Moravia {Mahren} which
also points to uncertainty:

http://www.genealogienetz.de/reg/SUD/sudet.html

Celia Male [UK]


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Familianten, censuses and BMD records - differences #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I realise >from two postings in the last week [Jacob Michel & Jan Hellmann] that
there are some SIG members who are still confused re the various Jewish records
that are available in Bohemia and Moravia.

This is quite understandable, as we are all relative beginners in this area and
the more questions that are asked and answered, the better we shall all understand
the outstanding points. Language problems with our non-English speaking members
may also be a stumbling block and lead to confusion. I would like to continue
the debate as follows:

There are four main record types, namely:

- Familianten and "Mannschaftsbuecher"
- birth, marriage and death records [BMD]
- censuses
- tax and land registry

They are completely distinct and they should not be confused with each other.
They are all valuable in their own right and for a complete genealogical study
they should all, if possible, be cross-checked with each other.

1. Familianten: Jacob Michel [Israel] asked which is more accurate, BMD records
or Familianten?

The Familianten books can be thought of as "skeletal" family trees with almost
complete emphasis on the male line, especially the current Familiant and the
first-born son who inherits the Familianten licence. They are not detailed birth,
marriage or death records.

There are comments about the other sons, if relevant. Also, if the first-born son
dies or renounces his "Stelle" [Familianten position/rights] then the line
continues with the next son etc, etc.

In some cases, a number of sons have acquired "Stellen", through various clauses
and/or loopholes in the Familianten act - if so they will all be followed
through.

A normal family tree is drawn just like the traditional spreading Xmas tree -
with all the daughters included; but in the Familianten books, the tree goes
horizontally across a page, filling in various pre-headed columns - and then
onto another page, with the generations. Daughters are not listed.
You can see the headings on:

http://www.geocities.com/Tokyo/Palace/6691/loewy.html

2. Birth, marriage and death [BMD] records:

Birth records are completely different. They usually give full details of the
baby's name, sex, date of birth, mother, father, midwife, circumcision if a boy,
location and witnesses.

Marriage records are equally complex – and so are death records. They should
both have considerable detail on them [for example, on the marriage records:
names of bride and groom and their ages, parents’ full names and maiden names,
occupations, addresses etc].

These are documents which have a legal status and can be used as such. Thus, if
you look at BMD records, there are often hand-written dated annotations in the
margins, which may refer to requests for copies. They may have arisen when the
person is getting married or needs a certificate for some other purpose [i.e
Zustandigkeit/residency]. I have seen requests >from Vienna sent back to Kolin
or Grossbock, for example!
I very much doubt if you would be able to find such requests in a Familianten
record, which would probably be zealously guarded by Christian authorities.

The BMD records would have been under the safe-keeping of the local Jewish
community. You can see some of these detailed records on our own website:

http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/czechguide.html

3. Census records: with specific reference to the 1793 census of the 16 Kreis
of Bohemia and Prague [still to be transcribed]. There are also Moravian censuses;
one in particular has been used to great effect recently to establish LOEFF
family links in Holleschau for SIG member, Harold Chipman [Switzerland].

Censuses are based on households and family heads; the occupation of the
breadwinner is listed. All Jews in Bohemia in 1793 were enumerated and recorded
under their newly-acquired names.

The Klattauer Kreis census of 1793 gives ages as well, but this is the exception.
There are a very few ages scattered throughout the other 15 Kreis and a few more
than usual in the Budweiser Kreis, especially in Kalladey [luckily for SIG members
Ruth Coman, Randy Schoenberg and Jane Reber].

Census records do, however, list for every household:
wives, daughters, widows, much-maligned mothers-in-law, servants, as well as
tutors and teachers, many of whom came >from Moravia and some >from Poland – what
a brainy lot they were!

If the family was very poor, there is often an indication there [e.g. lives on
charity]. Widows, widowers and twins are singled out too. There are sometimes
comments on the whereabouts of a member of the family living outside the family
circle and even, in some cases, mention of ownership of property and future
inheritance.

So there is a vast amount of data here and if only we could compare it with the
1783 census, we could glean even more re name changes.

The censuses give us a glimpse into everyday life over 200 years ago. Paul King
[Israel] gave us an erudite analysis of census-taking in the 1700s and its
sophistication.

4: Tax and land registry records - they could be of great value in establishing
who was living where and at what period. They require a separate discussion.

Moravian records: I ended my first lengthy posting [8 April 2005] on the
Familianten books with the plea: "And finally, what about Moravia? We need a
complete listing of books available and where they are located. That is one of
the biggest problems for Moravian SIG members today."

Charlie Roberts [UK] repeated this, with a special request: “Regarding Moravia
and my interest in Boskovice, does anyone know if Familianten records exist?”
Jan Hellmann's enthusiastic reply: "they are there" [in Prague] in fact referred
to the censuses and Bohemian records and he has now sent us a correction.

The Moravian problem has not really been fully resolved, but Julius Mueller
[Prague] has pointed us the right way and so has Claire Bruell in her article
on her trip to Moravia in the current issue of Avotaynu. Moravia, unfortunately
remains our "problem child". I am not even sure how many Familianten books
[known as "Mannschaftsbuecher" in Moravia] we have to locate. Are these these
the books we are looking for?

see http://thorin.adnc.com/~lynnd/gfaqf.html

Auspitz, Boskowitz, Bruenn, Datschitz, Gaya, Goeding,
Gr.Meseritsc h, Hohenstadt, Holleschau, Iglau,
Kremsier, Kromau, Littau, Maehrisch-Truebau, Mistek,
Neustadtl, Neutitschein, Nikolsburg, Olmuetz, Prerau,
Prossnitz, Roemerstadt, Schoenberg, Sternberg,
Trebitsch, Ungarisch-Brod, Ungarisch-Hradisch,
Walachisch-Meseritsch, Weisskirchen, Wischa u,Znaim.

see also paragraph in German on Moravia {Mahren} which
also points to uncertainty:

http://www.genealogienetz.de/reg/SUD/sudet.html

Celia Male [UK]


Help with Russian Translation of BMD documents #general

Karen Pratt <kvpratt@...>
 

Jewishgeners,
I need help with the translation of some documents that I have acquired via
the PSA ordering. I have uploaded three documents through Viewmate which
will be found at: http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

NITKA, Icek Death in 1897.jpg as file - VM5914
NITKA, Izrajel-GROS, Krasla Marr of 1871.jpg as file - VM5916
NITKA, Uszer Birth in 1875.jpg as file - VM5915

Uszer (Oscar) NITKA was my Grandpa.

Izrajel (Israel Laib) and Krasla (Kate) NITKA were Oscar's parents and thus
my great grandparents. These folk are all buried in Baron Hirsch Cem on
Staten Island, NYC.

Icek NITKA was the parent of Izrajel/Israel and thus my great great
grandfather.

I know that the town Burzenin is mentioned for Oscar and for Izrajel &
Krasla. And, the town of Lodz is for Icek NITKA.

Please respond privately: kvpratt@...

TIA for any help.
Karen Pratt-Miami, FL
Member of the PBCJGS

MODERATOR NOTE: The direct links to these images are:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5914
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5916
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5915


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help with Russian Translation of BMD documents #general

Karen Pratt <kvpratt@...>
 

Jewishgeners,
I need help with the translation of some documents that I have acquired via
the PSA ordering. I have uploaded three documents through Viewmate which
will be found at: http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

NITKA, Icek Death in 1897.jpg as file - VM5914
NITKA, Izrajel-GROS, Krasla Marr of 1871.jpg as file - VM5916
NITKA, Uszer Birth in 1875.jpg as file - VM5915

Uszer (Oscar) NITKA was my Grandpa.

Izrajel (Israel Laib) and Krasla (Kate) NITKA were Oscar's parents and thus
my great grandparents. These folk are all buried in Baron Hirsch Cem on
Staten Island, NYC.

Icek NITKA was the parent of Izrajel/Israel and thus my great great
grandfather.

I know that the town Burzenin is mentioned for Oscar and for Izrajel &
Krasla. And, the town of Lodz is for Icek NITKA.

Please respond privately: kvpratt@...

TIA for any help.
Karen Pratt-Miami, FL
Member of the PBCJGS

MODERATOR NOTE: The direct links to these images are:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5914
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5916
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5915


Who lived in the shetls? #general

John and Tereasa Lenius <jtlenius@...>
 

Perhaps this is a silly question, but, did only Jews live in the Shetls
found using the Shetl seeker? I know that my Great grandfather and all of
his brothers were born in a Nowa Wies (which one I don't know). I know
absolutely nothing about these villages. Also, I would like to thank all of
you who have answered my previous message. It is wonderful to know that
people are willing to help. Thank you again.
Tereasa Lenius
Tripoli, IA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Who lived in the shetls? #general

John and Tereasa Lenius <jtlenius@...>
 

Perhaps this is a silly question, but, did only Jews live in the Shetls
found using the Shetl seeker? I know that my Great grandfather and all of
his brothers were born in a Nowa Wies (which one I don't know). I know
absolutely nothing about these villages. Also, I would like to thank all of
you who have answered my previous message. It is wonderful to know that
people are willing to help. Thank you again.
Tereasa Lenius
Tripoli, IA


given name Shmerko #belarus

joyweave
 

Hi folks--

Can anyone tell me what the likely English-language version of the name
Shmerko (as found in Belarus) would be?

Thanks in advance.

Joy Weaver
Islip, NY USA

POLAND (Krasnik, Zaklikow, Lublin): Blumberg, Fogiel, Rosenel./
BELARUS (Wisoke-Litovsk, Brest, Grodno): Feinberg, Vilner, Greenberg, Petruskitz/ Petritzki?, Deibach.


Belarus SIG #Belarus given name Shmerko #belarus

joyweave
 

Hi folks--

Can anyone tell me what the likely English-language version of the name
Shmerko (as found in Belarus) would be?

Thanks in advance.

Joy Weaver
Islip, NY USA

POLAND (Krasnik, Zaklikow, Lublin): Blumberg, Fogiel, Rosenel./
BELARUS (Wisoke-Litovsk, Brest, Grodno): Feinberg, Vilner, Greenberg, Petruskitz/ Petritzki?, Deibach.


Re: Origins of people around the world #dna

ben.forman <ben.forman@...>
 

On 2005.04.14, Jeff Malka <malkajef@...> writes:

I heard on CNN about a project to determine the distant origins
of peoples around the world using DNA. Are you involved in this
world-wide project and would it provide useful additional data to
the genealogical DNA research you do?
Guys

Links for further info can be found here:

http://www5.nationalgeographic.com/genographic/atlas.html

http://www.waittfoundation.org/past/Genographic.html

Ben Forman


DNA Research #DNA Re: Origins of people around the world #dna

ben.forman <ben.forman@...>
 

On 2005.04.14, Jeff Malka <malkajef@...> writes:

I heard on CNN about a project to determine the distant origins
of peoples around the world using DNA. Are you involved in this
world-wide project and would it provide useful additional data to
the genealogical DNA research you do?
Guys

Links for further info can be found here:

http://www5.nationalgeographic.com/genographic/atlas.html

http://www.waittfoundation.org/past/Genographic.html

Ben Forman


Re: Origins of people around the world #dna

Matteson Richard <dickmatt@...>
 

On 2005.04.14, Jeff Malka <malkajef@...> writes:

I heard on CNN about a project to determine the distant origins
of peoples around the world using DNA. Are you involved in this
world-wide project and would it provide useful additional data to
the genealogical DNA research you do?
You bet!! Y-DNA and mtDNA analysis plus matching up persons of the
same or very similar genetic structure can nearly break open knotty
paper data "brick walls!"

I found an exact match person for my mother's mtDNA which I carry a
copy of along with my own Y--DNA. That lady and I have gone back
mother to mother to North Sweden where they apparently had lived in
about 1760- before my mother's branch came to the US in about 1770.
The daughter in that family was my great to the 3rd grandmother, the
matching lady's great grandmother came to the US about 1840. The
thing was, in the beginning we were so puzzled because our shared
mtDNA had been researched to having "beginning " in Central/North
**Finland**. The town in North Sweden was made up of many
**Finnish** families that had come to Sweden as iron and steel
workers in the early 1500s!! Almost an unreal association, for my
great to the 3rd grandmother was married in SC in 1808 and appeared
then to be an old SC family type.

I also discovered that my father - a first generation Swede in the
US - has been traced back to the water, in this case, the Bering
Sea, and there were two families, each headed by an Eric Ericson in
1690 in the very same town in North Sweden as above - Kopperburg!!
My Y-DNA said that I was of **Finnish** stock. I told my cousin in
Sweden, and he marvelled, that now we know that it was the Finnish
Eric Ericson that were should now follow!! Stunning help >from the
genes!

Also, I have found other near matches of my Y-DNA that show that my
gene array is also held by at least 60 percent of several isolated
Siberian tribes and one Jew of Polish ancestry. There are now hints
that my gene descent may well have come through the migration path
from the Eastern Mediterranean along the Altai mountains to the far
northeast of Siberia, went across the Bering Straits probably around
30,000 years ago and left genes there but returned to Siberia and
gradually went northwest through what is now Russia to central
Finland as the glaciers retreated in about 9,000 year ago.
Eventually the genes came to me >from there...

Much of this is conjecture, of course, but facts are there also! My
wife's mtDNA study was equally enlightening ... but I must defer to
the late hour....

Dick Matteson College Park, MD


Revue du Cercle de Genealogie Juive, # 81 #france

Ernest Kallmann
 

This is the summary of our Revue, issue 81, just off the press.

Families

AARON WORMS (1640 - 1722), Rabbi in Metz, is known through “Memoriaux
Alsaciens” by Moise Ginsburger and through entry # 839 in the Metz
Memorbuch. Pascal Faustini describes Aaron Worms’ family and origin in
Metz and Worms, based on unknown documents he has found in Metz Notary
deeds. He concentrates on his grandfather, ABRAHAM ABERLE LANDAU, Dayan
and parnass in Worms. Several namesakes had been mixed up, the confusion
being repeated without check-up by genealogists. Faustini applies the
same process to SARA BALLIN, Aaron’s wife, whose family tree he
publishes, based on 17th century sources.(p. 3)

The origin of a Parisian family: the Lehmann. (p. 10)

J.B. has recently unearthed documents about the couple SIMON LEHMANN -
MINETTE MEYER and now shows their ancestral line. They lived in
Sarreguemines at the end of the 18th century and begot a large family of
bankers and high government officers. Simon’s ancestors are traced back
to the village of Romanswiller around 1700 while Minette’s are Court
Jews to the Lords of Hessen-Darmstadt and the Palatinate.

The Jews in Einville during the 19th century.(p. 19)

Einville is a small town near Luneville in Lorraine which has suffered a
lot during the 18th century: plague, famine, arson (mainly by the
French). Einville really started to prosper only in the early 19th
century. Francoise Job scrutinizes the specificities and evolution of
its Jewish families and establishes their detailed genealogy.

Miscellaneous

Georges Graner, our webmaster, statistically analyzes the
Questions/Answers section of our website. (p. 28)

A family meeting in Jerusalem in December 2004 has been initiated by
Lyse Schwarzfuchs for the descendants of Rabbi LEOPOLD CAHN and his wife
LEONORE PERLE WEIL. Eliane Roos-Schuhl, with Jean-Francois Hurstel
assisting, reports about the work performed.(p. 30)

In November 2004 Pierre Katz has devoted a lecture at the Alsace local
group of our Cercle to a problem often encountered when practicing
Jewish genealogy: not to rely only on patronymics. A family belonging to
the Schwenheim community exemplifies the case. (p. 35).


Ernest Kallmann
Cercle de Genealogie Juive, Paris, France
e-mail : secretariat@...
website : www.genealoj.org (in French and English)


DNA Research #DNA Re: Origins of people around the world #dna

Matteson Richard <dickmatt@...>
 

On 2005.04.14, Jeff Malka <malkajef@...> writes:

I heard on CNN about a project to determine the distant origins
of peoples around the world using DNA. Are you involved in this
world-wide project and would it provide useful additional data to
the genealogical DNA research you do?
You bet!! Y-DNA and mtDNA analysis plus matching up persons of the
same or very similar genetic structure can nearly break open knotty
paper data "brick walls!"

I found an exact match person for my mother's mtDNA which I carry a
copy of along with my own Y--DNA. That lady and I have gone back
mother to mother to North Sweden where they apparently had lived in
about 1760- before my mother's branch came to the US in about 1770.
The daughter in that family was my great to the 3rd grandmother, the
matching lady's great grandmother came to the US about 1840. The
thing was, in the beginning we were so puzzled because our shared
mtDNA had been researched to having "beginning " in Central/North
**Finland**. The town in North Sweden was made up of many
**Finnish** families that had come to Sweden as iron and steel
workers in the early 1500s!! Almost an unreal association, for my
great to the 3rd grandmother was married in SC in 1808 and appeared
then to be an old SC family type.

I also discovered that my father - a first generation Swede in the
US - has been traced back to the water, in this case, the Bering
Sea, and there were two families, each headed by an Eric Ericson in
1690 in the very same town in North Sweden as above - Kopperburg!!
My Y-DNA said that I was of **Finnish** stock. I told my cousin in
Sweden, and he marvelled, that now we know that it was the Finnish
Eric Ericson that were should now follow!! Stunning help >from the
genes!

Also, I have found other near matches of my Y-DNA that show that my
gene array is also held by at least 60 percent of several isolated
Siberian tribes and one Jew of Polish ancestry. There are now hints
that my gene descent may well have come through the migration path
from the Eastern Mediterranean along the Altai mountains to the far
northeast of Siberia, went across the Bering Straits probably around
30,000 years ago and left genes there but returned to Siberia and
gradually went northwest through what is now Russia to central
Finland as the glaciers retreated in about 9,000 year ago.
Eventually the genes came to me >from there...

Much of this is conjecture, of course, but facts are there also! My
wife's mtDNA study was equally enlightening ... but I must defer to
the late hour....

Dick Matteson College Park, MD


French SIG #France Revue du Cercle de Genealogie Juive, # 81 #france

Ernest Kallmann
 

This is the summary of our Revue, issue 81, just off the press.

Families

AARON WORMS (1640 - 1722), Rabbi in Metz, is known through “Memoriaux
Alsaciens” by Moise Ginsburger and through entry # 839 in the Metz
Memorbuch. Pascal Faustini describes Aaron Worms’ family and origin in
Metz and Worms, based on unknown documents he has found in Metz Notary
deeds. He concentrates on his grandfather, ABRAHAM ABERLE LANDAU, Dayan
and parnass in Worms. Several namesakes had been mixed up, the confusion
being repeated without check-up by genealogists. Faustini applies the
same process to SARA BALLIN, Aaron’s wife, whose family tree he
publishes, based on 17th century sources.(p. 3)

The origin of a Parisian family: the Lehmann. (p. 10)

J.B. has recently unearthed documents about the couple SIMON LEHMANN -
MINETTE MEYER and now shows their ancestral line. They lived in
Sarreguemines at the end of the 18th century and begot a large family of
bankers and high government officers. Simon’s ancestors are traced back
to the village of Romanswiller around 1700 while Minette’s are Court
Jews to the Lords of Hessen-Darmstadt and the Palatinate.

The Jews in Einville during the 19th century.(p. 19)

Einville is a small town near Luneville in Lorraine which has suffered a
lot during the 18th century: plague, famine, arson (mainly by the
French). Einville really started to prosper only in the early 19th
century. Francoise Job scrutinizes the specificities and evolution of
its Jewish families and establishes their detailed genealogy.

Miscellaneous

Georges Graner, our webmaster, statistically analyzes the
Questions/Answers section of our website. (p. 28)

A family meeting in Jerusalem in December 2004 has been initiated by
Lyse Schwarzfuchs for the descendants of Rabbi LEOPOLD CAHN and his wife
LEONORE PERLE WEIL. Eliane Roos-Schuhl, with Jean-Francois Hurstel
assisting, reports about the work performed.(p. 30)

In November 2004 Pierre Katz has devoted a lecture at the Alsace local
group of our Cercle to a problem often encountered when practicing
Jewish genealogy: not to rely only on patronymics. A family belonging to
the Schwenheim community exemplifies the case. (p. 35).


Ernest Kallmann
Cercle de Genealogie Juive, Paris, France
e-mail : secretariat@...
website : www.genealoj.org (in French and English)


UK Times #unitedkingdom

Marcia Devries <marciadv@...>
 

Sylvia, I want to add my thanks to your instructions of how to get into the
UK Times archive.

I typed in my mother's maiden name (BRAUER), not expecting to find anything.
Imagine my surprise when one of the hits was an article listed under "The
Police Courts", in the Oct. 17, 1906 issue. It was an article entitled
"Illicit Still", and described how my grandfather (Israel BRAUER) and his
friend were charged and found guilty of manufacturing illicit spirits. They
were each fined £75 and £5 5s. costs, "or in default two months' hard
labour".

I know the family was very poor, living in the East End. £75 seems like a
very large sum of money for those days. What would be the equivalent today?
I wonder if they actually paid or did the "hard labour"?

My mother died many years ago (she would have been about 5 years old at that
time), but my children and I are enjoying reading about my wayward
grandfather.

Marcia Katzel DeVries
Concord, California (San Francisco area)
marciadv@...

Searching:
BRAUER, BOOKATZ, KATZEL all originally >from Russia/Lithuania


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom UK Times #unitedkingdom

Marcia Devries <marciadv@...>
 

Sylvia, I want to add my thanks to your instructions of how to get into the
UK Times archive.

I typed in my mother's maiden name (BRAUER), not expecting to find anything.
Imagine my surprise when one of the hits was an article listed under "The
Police Courts", in the Oct. 17, 1906 issue. It was an article entitled
"Illicit Still", and described how my grandfather (Israel BRAUER) and his
friend were charged and found guilty of manufacturing illicit spirits. They
were each fined £75 and £5 5s. costs, "or in default two months' hard
labour".

I know the family was very poor, living in the East End. £75 seems like a
very large sum of money for those days. What would be the equivalent today?
I wonder if they actually paid or did the "hard labour"?

My mother died many years ago (she would have been about 5 years old at that
time), but my children and I are enjoying reading about my wayward
grandfather.

Marcia Katzel DeVries
Concord, California (San Francisco area)
marciadv@...

Searching:
BRAUER, BOOKATZ, KATZEL all originally >from Russia/Lithuania


Re: Klein (and variants of this surname) #ciechanow #poland

Stish <mast@...>
 

There is a Klein family (His name was Harry) that were active for years in
the New York Chechanover (sic) society. His wife is buried in Old Montifiore
Cemetary in Queens NY in the Chechonover section. His family was fron
Ciechanow.

Stan Tishler

----- Original Message -----
From: <siroli@...>
To: "Ciechanow Research Group" <ciechanow@...>
Sent: Thursday, April 14, 2005 7:30 PM
Subject: Klein (and variants of this surname)


This list is supported by JewishGen. Please show
your appreciation and support by visiting
http://www.jewishgen.org/Jewishgen-erosity/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Hello fellow Ciechanow researchers

My Ciechanow ancestors arrived in London in the early 1890s and used the
surname
KLEIN. I'm almost 100% certain they were natives of Ciechanow as I have
many
records >from the UK and Australia in which they indicated that this was
their home
town. I've searched the JRI-Poland for Kleins in Ciechanow in the period
1860-1880
and nearby areas without any success, but I've noticed that the surname
KLEIN/KLEJN/KLAJN on its own does not appear very frequently in Ciechanow,
whereas names such as KLEJNIUD, KLEJNMAN, KLEINIEC, KLEJNOD,
KLAJNHAUS, etc are well represented.

I was wondering if anyone has examples of their Ciechanow ancestors
shortening their
longer Klein*** surnames to Klein?

Regards
Simon
Melbourne, Australia

---
To post to the Ciechanow Research discussion group, send your message to:
<ciechanow@...>

This research group (ciechanow@...) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org

You are currently subscribed to ciechanow as: [mast@...]
To change the format of our mailings, to stop/resume delivery (vacation),
or to unsubscribe, please go to http://www.jewishgen.org/listserv


#Ciechanow #Poland Re: Klein (and variants of this surname) #ciechanow #poland

Stish <mast@...>
 

There is a Klein family (His name was Harry) that were active for years in
the New York Chechanover (sic) society. His wife is buried in Old Montifiore
Cemetary in Queens NY in the Chechonover section. His family was fron
Ciechanow.

Stan Tishler

----- Original Message -----
From: <siroli@...>
To: "Ciechanow Research Group" <ciechanow@...>
Sent: Thursday, April 14, 2005 7:30 PM
Subject: Klein (and variants of this surname)


This list is supported by JewishGen. Please show
your appreciation and support by visiting
http://www.jewishgen.org/Jewishgen-erosity/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Hello fellow Ciechanow researchers

My Ciechanow ancestors arrived in London in the early 1890s and used the
surname
KLEIN. I'm almost 100% certain they were natives of Ciechanow as I have
many
records >from the UK and Australia in which they indicated that this was
their home
town. I've searched the JRI-Poland for Kleins in Ciechanow in the period
1860-1880
and nearby areas without any success, but I've noticed that the surname
KLEIN/KLEJN/KLAJN on its own does not appear very frequently in Ciechanow,
whereas names such as KLEJNIUD, KLEJNMAN, KLEINIEC, KLEJNOD,
KLAJNHAUS, etc are well represented.

I was wondering if anyone has examples of their Ciechanow ancestors
shortening their
longer Klein*** surnames to Klein?

Regards
Simon
Melbourne, Australia

---
To post to the Ciechanow Research discussion group, send your message to:
<ciechanow@...>

This research group (ciechanow@...) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org

You are currently subscribed to ciechanow as: [mast@...]
To change the format of our mailings, to stop/resume delivery (vacation),
or to unsubscribe, please go to http://www.jewishgen.org/listserv


"missing" Chicago Waldheim grave #general

Ruth Hyman <ruth.hyman@...>
 

Dear Genners:
I hope someone can help me. I believe I finally have the death
certificate for my great aunt, Sarah SAGER (spelled SEGER-thus my
difficulty finding the certificate). She died in 1896 and is buried in
"Waldheim". The death certificate is very primitive (no husban'ds or
parents' names), and I need her Hebrew name to make sure she is really
min., I have called Jewish Waldheim, Forest Home, and Silverman & Weiss
with no luck. Supposedly S & W and jewish Waldheim (gates 9 and 11)
have looked at paper records too. I hope someone can help me find my
mystery woman!
Thanks,
Ruth Hyman
Rockville Centre, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen "missing" Chicago Waldheim grave #general

Ruth Hyman <ruth.hyman@...>
 

Dear Genners:
I hope someone can help me. I believe I finally have the death
certificate for my great aunt, Sarah SAGER (spelled SEGER-thus my
difficulty finding the certificate). She died in 1896 and is buried in
"Waldheim". The death certificate is very primitive (no husban'ds or
parents' names), and I need her Hebrew name to make sure she is really
min., I have called Jewish Waldheim, Forest Home, and Silverman & Weiss
with no luck. Supposedly S & W and jewish Waldheim (gates 9 and 11)
have looked at paper records too. I hope someone can help me find my
mystery woman!
Thanks,
Ruth Hyman
Rockville Centre, NY