Date   

Re: Ujazd Galicia STEINMETZ #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Howard Steinmetz asks about the STEINMETZ family
{their name may originally have been TOBIAS} from
Galicia:
The Hapsburg emperor's directive was that Jews in
Galicia were required to have recorded a
non-patronymic name by January 1789. What ever became
of all the Hapsburg Galician documentation of the
newly registered names? Were the Jews issued some
sort of identification documentation confirming their
newly acquired Surname?

My knowledge in this subject is mainly derived from
experience in Bohemia. Here one can sometimes find
original names in Familianten books or the census of
1793. If there are existing censuses of this area of
Galicia pre- and post- the name change date [1789] -
you might be able to identify the original name,
assuming the family lived at the same address. I have
never heard of an official document confirming the new
name.

The Special Interest Group {SIG} for Galicia and
jri-Pl first come to mind for this research, but do
not forget the archives in Vienna which may also
reveal some useful data.

The Austria-Czech SIG, as the name implies, covers the
current geographic areas of Austrian and the Czech
Republic, however the cemeteries and holocaust
databases >from this area often contain Galician data.

Galicia was a Hapsburg province and Vienna, the
capital of this mighty Empire, was a magnet for
immigrants >from all around. You can find STEINMETZ
holocaust victims >from Vienna - >from their names, two
are probably of Galician origin: Chaim Steinmetz
[born 19.3.1882 in Kielnarow] and Chaja Steinmetz from
? [see also Yad vashem]

One Steinmetz wife is >from Bohemia and we have as yet
little data on the last victim.

There are also ten STEINMETZ buried in the huge Jewish
Zentralfriedhof, Vienna and all these can be checked
out, in case they are relatives.

There are also 17 TOBIAS burials in Vienna. One Yad
vashem testimonial suggests a Galician origin to a
Viennese victim.

I have included data on Austrian STEINMETZ in the
footnote. The moral of this posting is - if you have
Galician roots do not forget to check out Vienna data
and our website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/

Celia Male {UK}

Footnote:

Tragically, four Austrian STEINMETZ holocaust victims:

A couple: Chaim and Eugenie
Chaim - dob 19.03.1882 in Kielnarow
Eugenie - dob 13.12.1894 in Goltsch-Jenikau [Bohemia]


Ella - dob 21.07.1881 in ?
Chaja Steinmetz dob ? in ?

STEINMETZ burials in Vienna 1923-1983 - all at Gate IV

Name - age - date of death [ddmmyyyy]
Steinmetz Nute 86 11.01.1923
Steinmetz David 40 28.01.1929
Steinmetz Scheindl 74 11.11.1940
Steinmetz Leopold 76 27.09.1943
Steinmetz Bernhard 69 02.10.1959
Steinmetz Aurelia 60 03.07.1969

In the same grave:
Steinmetz Leni 53 - 09.08.1933
Steinmetz Selma, Dr. 71 - 18.06.1979

In the same grave:
Steinmetz Leo, Dr. 62 - 11.06.1956
Steinmetz Hertha 84 - 13.03.1983


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: Ujazd Galicia STEINMETZ #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Howard Steinmetz asks about the STEINMETZ family
{their name may originally have been TOBIAS} from
Galicia:
The Hapsburg emperor's directive was that Jews in
Galicia were required to have recorded a
non-patronymic name by January 1789. What ever became
of all the Hapsburg Galician documentation of the
newly registered names? Were the Jews issued some
sort of identification documentation confirming their
newly acquired Surname?

My knowledge in this subject is mainly derived from
experience in Bohemia. Here one can sometimes find
original names in Familianten books or the census of
1793. If there are existing censuses of this area of
Galicia pre- and post- the name change date [1789] -
you might be able to identify the original name,
assuming the family lived at the same address. I have
never heard of an official document confirming the new
name.

The Special Interest Group {SIG} for Galicia and
jri-Pl first come to mind for this research, but do
not forget the archives in Vienna which may also
reveal some useful data.

The Austria-Czech SIG, as the name implies, covers the
current geographic areas of Austrian and the Czech
Republic, however the cemeteries and holocaust
databases >from this area often contain Galician data.

Galicia was a Hapsburg province and Vienna, the
capital of this mighty Empire, was a magnet for
immigrants >from all around. You can find STEINMETZ
holocaust victims >from Vienna - >from their names, two
are probably of Galician origin: Chaim Steinmetz
[born 19.3.1882 in Kielnarow] and Chaja Steinmetz from
? [see also Yad vashem]

One Steinmetz wife is >from Bohemia and we have as yet
little data on the last victim.

There are also ten STEINMETZ buried in the huge Jewish
Zentralfriedhof, Vienna and all these can be checked
out, in case they are relatives.

There are also 17 TOBIAS burials in Vienna. One Yad
vashem testimonial suggests a Galician origin to a
Viennese victim.

I have included data on Austrian STEINMETZ in the
footnote. The moral of this posting is - if you have
Galician roots do not forget to check out Vienna data
and our website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/

Celia Male {UK}

Footnote:

Tragically, four Austrian STEINMETZ holocaust victims:

A couple: Chaim and Eugenie
Chaim - dob 19.03.1882 in Kielnarow
Eugenie - dob 13.12.1894 in Goltsch-Jenikau [Bohemia]


Ella - dob 21.07.1881 in ?
Chaja Steinmetz dob ? in ?

STEINMETZ burials in Vienna 1923-1983 - all at Gate IV

Name - age - date of death [ddmmyyyy]
Steinmetz Nute 86 11.01.1923
Steinmetz David 40 28.01.1929
Steinmetz Scheindl 74 11.11.1940
Steinmetz Leopold 76 27.09.1943
Steinmetz Bernhard 69 02.10.1959
Steinmetz Aurelia 60 03.07.1969

In the same grave:
Steinmetz Leni 53 - 09.08.1933
Steinmetz Selma, Dr. 71 - 18.06.1979

In the same grave:
Steinmetz Leo, Dr. 62 - 11.06.1956
Steinmetz Hertha 84 - 13.03.1983


Searching SKIBA, LEWTON or LEWITON, Ostroleka #general

Skiba <skiba@...>
 

Genners, trying to trace SKIBA, LEWTON / LEWITON / LEWINTON
from Ostroleka. Some of them emigrated to Argentina around 1920-1930.
Any of these names in your families?

Dov Skiba
skiba@netvision.net.il
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching SKIBA, LEWTON or LEWITON, Ostroleka #general

Skiba <skiba@...>
 

Genners, trying to trace SKIBA, LEWTON / LEWITON / LEWINTON
from Ostroleka. Some of them emigrated to Argentina around 1920-1930.
Any of these names in your families?

Dov Skiba
skiba@netvision.net.il
Israel


Shoah- new Dutch website #general

Irene <mimosa@...>
 

Hello Genners

I have been going through the new dutch website

http://www.joodsmonument.nl/article.php?thg_id=1005.72&lang=nl

A very good site, I have a lot of family to look up there. However,
I also have lots of family and friends in Belgium.
Does anyone know, if there is something similar for Belgium?
If there is something similar, would like to have that
information where I can obtain it.
Thank you

Irene Levita
Norhtern California


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Shoah- new Dutch website #general

Irene <mimosa@...>
 

Hello Genners

I have been going through the new dutch website

http://www.joodsmonument.nl/article.php?thg_id=1005.72&lang=nl

A very good site, I have a lot of family to look up there. However,
I also have lots of family and friends in Belgium.
Does anyone know, if there is something similar for Belgium?
If there is something similar, would like to have that
information where I can obtain it.
Thank you

Irene Levita
Norhtern California


ROSEN from Lithuania? #general

empr3ss@...
 

Hi,

My great-grandfather, Joseph ROSEN, came >from Vilnius, Lithuania in the
late 1800's to New York City.

Was Rosen really his name when he came to Ellis Island or did most
Lithuanian jews change their names when coming through?

I will be going to Vilnius this summer and would like to know
cemetaries, etc. that I can look for, and that I'm looking for the
correct name.

Thanks,
Gail Rosen


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ROSEN from Lithuania? #general

empr3ss@...
 

Hi,

My great-grandfather, Joseph ROSEN, came >from Vilnius, Lithuania in the
late 1800's to New York City.

Was Rosen really his name when he came to Ellis Island or did most
Lithuanian jews change their names when coming through?

I will be going to Vilnius this summer and would like to know
cemetaries, etc. that I can look for, and that I'm looking for the
correct name.

Thanks,
Gail Rosen


re Freda BLANKENSTEIN Willowdale Ontario Canada #general

Alice Josephs
 

Thank you to everyone who has contacted regarded my effort to trace Yad
Vashem page of testimony submitter Freda BLANKENSTEIN. Someone in
Canada generously put in a few phone calls and I have now spoken to
Freda who is interested in trying to find out whether we are related.

Thank you once again!

Alice Josephs UK
JABLUSZKO ROZENBERG Ciechanow DON GOLDMACHER GURMAN Pultusk, Poland.
STERN (STARR) Heppenheim HERZ Kochendorf MARKUS Otterstadt, Hainchen,
Roedelheim GRUEN GRUENEWALD Roedelheim HOCHSCHILD Gross Rohrheim
MAYERFELD Biebesheim, Germany
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~genealice/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re Freda BLANKENSTEIN Willowdale Ontario Canada #general

Alice Josephs
 

Thank you to everyone who has contacted regarded my effort to trace Yad
Vashem page of testimony submitter Freda BLANKENSTEIN. Someone in
Canada generously put in a few phone calls and I have now spoken to
Freda who is interested in trying to find out whether we are related.

Thank you once again!

Alice Josephs UK
JABLUSZKO ROZENBERG Ciechanow DON GOLDMACHER GURMAN Pultusk, Poland.
STERN (STARR) Heppenheim HERZ Kochendorf MARKUS Otterstadt, Hainchen,
Roedelheim GRUEN GRUENEWALD Roedelheim HOCHSCHILD Gross Rohrheim
MAYERFELD Biebesheim, Germany
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~genealice/


Harry Israel Bernstein #general

Brentsi
 

Harry Israel Bernstein who arrived >from Leeds UK aged 21yrs in 1915 may
have settled in Leydon,Chicago.In 1944 his brother Myer >from Leeds
changed the name Bernstein to Burns and adopted the name Harry.
This probably meant that Harry died near to that year. Harry's exact
birthdate was 25/12/1894.
His father,Simon Bernstein was born 1870 in Kremenchug,Ukraine;
grandparents;Israel and Cissie Bernstein.

Any imformation or ideas as to continuing search welcome.

Brenda Habshush (Bernstein) Kibbutz Sde Boker,Israel.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Harry Israel Bernstein #general

Brentsi
 

Harry Israel Bernstein who arrived >from Leeds UK aged 21yrs in 1915 may
have settled in Leydon,Chicago.In 1944 his brother Myer >from Leeds
changed the name Bernstein to Burns and adopted the name Harry.
This probably meant that Harry died near to that year. Harry's exact
birthdate was 25/12/1894.
His father,Simon Bernstein was born 1870 in Kremenchug,Ukraine;
grandparents;Israel and Cissie Bernstein.

Any imformation or ideas as to continuing search welcome.

Brenda Habshush (Bernstein) Kibbutz Sde Boker,Israel.


ABERBACH or AUERBACH????? #general

NJ55TURTLE@...
 

I've struck out in finding this ABERBACH family. Here is what I know.

The family consisting of Aron (father) age 35, Gittel (mother) age 29,
children -- Salomon age 8, Anna age 5, and Rachel age 6 months arrived
in NYC on May 9, 1890. They came on the SS Russia, for which I have
the ship's manifest, out of Hamburg, Germany. Also on this ship were
the following families in adjoining rooms::
BERNSTEIN-- (Blume, Hersch and David);
BUCHHOLTZ-- (Berisch, Sara, Olga, Anna, and Fanny) This family's correct
name is
PICKHOLTZ;
KACZER-- (Rachmiel, Rifke, Gotzel, Gabriel, Anna and Kalman) This
family is now known as KATCHER.
These families are mentioned because they all came >from the same town of
"Skalat," as did the ABERBACH family. It should also be noted that
these three families are related, so I am thinking ABERBACH is too.

Having not found this ABERBACH family using the spelling >from the ship's
manifest, could it have been misspelled and the correct spelling
is AUERBACH or one of its variants?

If you have this ABERBACH/AUERBACH family in your tree, or even
the other three families, would you contact me privately.

Thanks,
Stephen Pickholtz
Tabernacle, NJ
E-mail nj55turtle@aol.com
Searching -- PICKHOLTZ (all spellings), WINITSKY (all spellings)
and KLEIN/KLINE (of the Phila. JCC family)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ABERBACH or AUERBACH????? #general

NJ55TURTLE@...
 

I've struck out in finding this ABERBACH family. Here is what I know.

The family consisting of Aron (father) age 35, Gittel (mother) age 29,
children -- Salomon age 8, Anna age 5, and Rachel age 6 months arrived
in NYC on May 9, 1890. They came on the SS Russia, for which I have
the ship's manifest, out of Hamburg, Germany. Also on this ship were
the following families in adjoining rooms::
BERNSTEIN-- (Blume, Hersch and David);
BUCHHOLTZ-- (Berisch, Sara, Olga, Anna, and Fanny) This family's correct
name is
PICKHOLTZ;
KACZER-- (Rachmiel, Rifke, Gotzel, Gabriel, Anna and Kalman) This
family is now known as KATCHER.
These families are mentioned because they all came >from the same town of
"Skalat," as did the ABERBACH family. It should also be noted that
these three families are related, so I am thinking ABERBACH is too.

Having not found this ABERBACH family using the spelling >from the ship's
manifest, could it have been misspelled and the correct spelling
is AUERBACH or one of its variants?

If you have this ABERBACH/AUERBACH family in your tree, or even
the other three families, would you contact me privately.

Thanks,
Stephen Pickholtz
Tabernacle, NJ
E-mail nj55turtle@aol.com
Searching -- PICKHOLTZ (all spellings), WINITSKY (all spellings)
and KLEIN/KLINE (of the Phila. JCC family)


6 Photos Taken in Wyszkow during the 1920s and 1930s #general

Howard Orenstein
 

The website, "Explore Your Jewish Heritage in Wyszkow, Poland"
has been updated.

http://wwwfac.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/JHWyszkow3.html

Scroll down the page. Click on the link: "Photos taken in 1920s and
1930s in Wyszkow," and you will see 6 thumbnail photos. After each
thumbnail there is a link to a larger version of and bibliographic
notes about the photo.

Howard Orenstein
Westminster, MD
horenstein@mcdaniel.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 6 Photos Taken in Wyszkow during the 1920s and 1930s #general

Howard Orenstein
 

The website, "Explore Your Jewish Heritage in Wyszkow, Poland"
has been updated.

http://wwwfac.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/JHWyszkow3.html

Scroll down the page. Click on the link: "Photos taken in 1920s and
1930s in Wyszkow," and you will see 6 thumbnail photos. After each
thumbnail there is a link to a larger version of and bibliographic
notes about the photo.

Howard Orenstein
Westminster, MD
horenstein@mcdaniel.edu


Re: Naming a son after a brother? #general

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

Perhaps the son was NOT named after the mother's living brother. The son
may have been named after a deceased relative of the husband. I understand
that many Ashkenazi families followed a pattern of naming the first son
after the husband's deceased father or grandfather.

The custom of not naming a child after a living relative did not mean the
child could not be given a name used by any other relative. If that were
the case, there would have to have been a great many more Jewish personal
names available.

My grandmother named her first daughter Esther, after _her_ deceased mother.
Each of my grandmother' siblings also named a child Esther. So there were
several first cousins all named Esther. That is not much different >from the
situation Leslie describes.

--
Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

"Leslie Weinberg" <artsoul@optonline.net> wrote in message
news:2_Yce.22553$RP1.2162@fe10.lga...

X-No-archive: yes
Thanks once again to the tireless efforts of JRI-Poland, I have the name
of my grandfather's nephew, but there is something very strange here.
The son, born four months after the civil marriage (I guess I have to
assume there was a religious marriage earlier?) has the name Mozes,
which also happens to be the name of her own brother. My grandfather
had two siblings by my great-grandfather's second marriage, Hene and
Mozes. I know Mozes lived through the War (he was in a camp in Italy, I
was told, and came to the U.S. after the War on the ship which docked in
upstate NY). and I remember meeting him as a child. Why would a Jew
from Galicia name a son after a brother?


Re: Naming a son after a brother? #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sun, 1 May 2005 08:47:11 UTC, artsoul@optonline.net (Leslie Weinberg)
opined:

Thanks once again to the tireless efforts of JRI-Poland, I have the name
of my grandfather's nephew, but there is something very strange here.
The son, born four months after the civil marriage (I guess I have to
assume there was a religious marriage earlier?) has the name Mozes,
which also happens to be the name of her own brother. My grandfather
had two siblings by my great-grandfather's second marriage, Hene and
Mozes. I know Mozes lived through the War (he was in a camp in Italy, I
was told, and came to the U.S. after the War on the ship which docked in
upstate NY). and I remember meeting him as a child. Why would a Jew
from Galicia name a son after a brother?
from as much as I have been able to understand in your description, I don't
know that you can say that he was named abter the brother. Brother Moses was
almost certainly named for a forebear; if not, then for some prestigious
personage or someone else. The son that occupies your thoughts may have been
named for that same forebear, or for another, on either side of the family.

You don't mention whether Brother Moses was alive or dead when the son was
born (or possibly that has gone over my head). If he was dead, expecially if
he had died without issue, there would be nothing surprising about wishing
to carry his name forward as a memorial. If he was alive, that would seem to
confirm the possibilities I have tried to describe in the paragraph above.
If two people have the same forename, they are not necessarily named for
each other, even in Galicia.

As a relevant anecdote, I can tell you that my pmggm bore two sons of the
same forename. The first had died in infancy, and she "recycled" the name,
which was that of her grandfather, for the second. Things in the real world
are not programmed as neatly as one might imagine.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naming a son after a brother? #general

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

Perhaps the son was NOT named after the mother's living brother. The son
may have been named after a deceased relative of the husband. I understand
that many Ashkenazi families followed a pattern of naming the first son
after the husband's deceased father or grandfather.

The custom of not naming a child after a living relative did not mean the
child could not be given a name used by any other relative. If that were
the case, there would have to have been a great many more Jewish personal
names available.

My grandmother named her first daughter Esther, after _her_ deceased mother.
Each of my grandmother' siblings also named a child Esther. So there were
several first cousins all named Esther. That is not much different >from the
situation Leslie describes.

--
Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

"Leslie Weinberg" <artsoul@optonline.net> wrote in message
news:2_Yce.22553$RP1.2162@fe10.lga...

X-No-archive: yes
Thanks once again to the tireless efforts of JRI-Poland, I have the name
of my grandfather's nephew, but there is something very strange here.
The son, born four months after the civil marriage (I guess I have to
assume there was a religious marriage earlier?) has the name Mozes,
which also happens to be the name of her own brother. My grandfather
had two siblings by my great-grandfather's second marriage, Hene and
Mozes. I know Mozes lived through the War (he was in a camp in Italy, I
was told, and came to the U.S. after the War on the ship which docked in
upstate NY). and I remember meeting him as a child. Why would a Jew
from Galicia name a son after a brother?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naming a son after a brother? #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sun, 1 May 2005 08:47:11 UTC, artsoul@optonline.net (Leslie Weinberg)
opined:

Thanks once again to the tireless efforts of JRI-Poland, I have the name
of my grandfather's nephew, but there is something very strange here.
The son, born four months after the civil marriage (I guess I have to
assume there was a religious marriage earlier?) has the name Mozes,
which also happens to be the name of her own brother. My grandfather
had two siblings by my great-grandfather's second marriage, Hene and
Mozes. I know Mozes lived through the War (he was in a camp in Italy, I
was told, and came to the U.S. after the War on the ship which docked in
upstate NY). and I remember meeting him as a child. Why would a Jew
from Galicia name a son after a brother?
from as much as I have been able to understand in your description, I don't
know that you can say that he was named abter the brother. Brother Moses was
almost certainly named for a forebear; if not, then for some prestigious
personage or someone else. The son that occupies your thoughts may have been
named for that same forebear, or for another, on either side of the family.

You don't mention whether Brother Moses was alive or dead when the son was
born (or possibly that has gone over my head). If he was dead, expecially if
he had died without issue, there would be nothing surprising about wishing
to carry his name forward as a memorial. If he was alive, that would seem to
confirm the possibilities I have tried to describe in the paragraph above.
If two people have the same forename, they are not necessarily named for
each other, even in Galicia.

As a relevant anecdote, I can tell you that my pmggm bore two sons of the
same forename. The first had died in infancy, and she "recycled" the name,
which was that of her grandfather, for the second. Things in the real world
are not programmed as neatly as one might imagine.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.