Date   

LICHTERMAN and LICHMAN - Leviim? #belarus

Israel P
 

Does anyone have evidence or tradition one way or the other that LICHTERMANs
or LICHMANs >from the Borisov area were (or were not) Leviim?

Israel Pickholtz


LICHTERMAN / LICHMAN - ROSENBLOOM #belarus

Israel P
 

Does anyone have any overlap between LICHTERMAN or LICHMAN and ROSENBLOOM,
from the Borisov area?
Israel Pickholtz


Belarus SIG #Belarus LICHTERMAN and LICHMAN - Leviim? #belarus

Israel P
 

Does anyone have evidence or tradition one way or the other that LICHTERMANs
or LICHMANs >from the Borisov area were (or were not) Leviim?

Israel Pickholtz


Belarus SIG #Belarus LICHTERMAN / LICHMAN - ROSENBLOOM #belarus

Israel P
 

Does anyone have any overlap between LICHTERMAN or LICHMAN and ROSENBLOOM,
from the Borisov area?
Israel Pickholtz


WILNER from Warsaw, Poland #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

I am posting this for a friend who is looking for the siblings of Alexander
WILNER who was born in Warsaw in 1918 and came to the U.S. after WWII. He
had two brothers who lived in New York and whose first names are not known.

Please contact me privately if you have any information regarding this
specific family.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen WILNER from Warsaw, Poland #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

I am posting this for a friend who is looking for the siblings of Alexander
WILNER who was born in Warsaw in 1918 and came to the U.S. after WWII. He
had two brothers who lived in New York and whose first names are not known.

Please contact me privately if you have any information regarding this
specific family.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


Re: 1811 date and writing permitted on shabbat? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 6/5/2005 8:00:49 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, I wrote:

==This was about the time that most European nations adjusted the Julian
calendar and adopted the Gregorian calendar, which also required adjusting
dates by about 11 days. In France an entirely new calendar was created.
Either of these could explain the why of the date of the week.

I left out a few words about the creation of the new French calendar. It
was designed by the post-Bastille revolutionaries. The days and the months were
given new names (and, I believe, new durations). The change didn't go down t
oo well, and after a few years--certainly before 1811, they went back to the
gregorian calendar

Michael Bernet, New York

MODERATOR NOTE: Please keep the discussion grounded in genealogy.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: 1811 date and writing permitted on shabbat? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 6/5/2005 8:00:49 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, I wrote:

==This was about the time that most European nations adjusted the Julian
calendar and adopted the Gregorian calendar, which also required adjusting
dates by about 11 days. In France an entirely new calendar was created.
Either of these could explain the why of the date of the week.

I left out a few words about the creation of the new French calendar. It
was designed by the post-Bastille revolutionaries. The days and the months were
given new names (and, I believe, new durations). The change didn't go down t
oo well, and after a few years--certainly before 1811, they went back to the
gregorian calendar

Michael Bernet, New York

MODERATOR NOTE: Please keep the discussion grounded in genealogy.


What's Nu with the -National Genealogical Society Convention? #general

jewishgen@juno.com <jewishgen@...>
 

By chance I learned early last week that the National Genealogical Society's
annual convention was being held at the Nashville Convention Center later in
the week.

I didn't know how much if any Jewish Genealogy involvement, if any, there
would be, so I did not register. But, since the exhibit area was open to
non-registrants, I was able to spend a hour or so there Saturday (yesterday)
afternoon.

It was worth more than the price of my (free) admission but "our" presence
still seemed to be missing (Would love to know if any of you were registered
and to how helpful the lectures, etc. were helpful to you) until someone told
me that Avotaynu had a booth there.)

Unfortunately, I learned this only as the exhibits were closing down and
apparently after the Avotaynu booth had been shuttered.

Did I miss winning a lifetime subscription?<G>

Stacy Harris
Nashville, TN


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen What's Nu with the -National Genealogical Society Convention? #general

jewishgen@juno.com <jewishgen@...>
 

By chance I learned early last week that the National Genealogical Society's
annual convention was being held at the Nashville Convention Center later in
the week.

I didn't know how much if any Jewish Genealogy involvement, if any, there
would be, so I did not register. But, since the exhibit area was open to
non-registrants, I was able to spend a hour or so there Saturday (yesterday)
afternoon.

It was worth more than the price of my (free) admission but "our" presence
still seemed to be missing (Would love to know if any of you were registered
and to how helpful the lectures, etc. were helpful to you) until someone told
me that Avotaynu had a booth there.)

Unfortunately, I learned this only as the exhibits were closing down and
apparently after the Avotaynu booth had been shuttered.

Did I miss winning a lifetime subscription?<G>

Stacy Harris
Nashville, TN


Jewish genealogy #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Dear JGenners:

Yesterday in shul it crossed my mind that the idea of recording one's
genealogy for posterity goes back further than we may suppose.
For most of us, "doing our genealogy" is a pastime that began about
15-20 years ago. But yesterday's Torah portion, in which the Book of
Numbers opens with an account of Moses taking a census of the
Israelites "In the Wilderness" (that's the book's Hebrew name:
B'midbar), I noted the interesting Hebrew verb that means "giving
one's data to the census-taker."

Numbers 1:18 says (in the new JPS translation): "and on the first day
of he second month they convoked the whole community, who were
registered by the clans of their ancestral houses." The verb
translated: "they were registered" is va-yit-yal'du. And the NRSV --
a modern Christian translation -- actually follows the grammar even
more precisely: "they registered themselves."

But for JGenners the old-fashioned Hertz translation, which follows
the traditional King James Version, will have far greater appeal
because it comes closer to the true meaning: "they declared their
pedigrees." Depending on the conjugation, the root y-l-d can mean
"to give birth", "to beget", "to be born" , or, as in yesterday's
reading: "to declare one's pedigree."

So now we have an answer for those who tease us about wasting so much
time on this activity; we can quote a a good biblical precedent for
pursuing our "yihus." We can tell them that our ancestors had
already "been there, done that" before they ever got to the Promised
Land!

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish genealogy #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Dear JGenners:

Yesterday in shul it crossed my mind that the idea of recording one's
genealogy for posterity goes back further than we may suppose.
For most of us, "doing our genealogy" is a pastime that began about
15-20 years ago. But yesterday's Torah portion, in which the Book of
Numbers opens with an account of Moses taking a census of the
Israelites "In the Wilderness" (that's the book's Hebrew name:
B'midbar), I noted the interesting Hebrew verb that means "giving
one's data to the census-taker."

Numbers 1:18 says (in the new JPS translation): "and on the first day
of he second month they convoked the whole community, who were
registered by the clans of their ancestral houses." The verb
translated: "they were registered" is va-yit-yal'du. And the NRSV --
a modern Christian translation -- actually follows the grammar even
more precisely: "they registered themselves."

But for JGenners the old-fashioned Hertz translation, which follows
the traditional King James Version, will have far greater appeal
because it comes closer to the true meaning: "they declared their
pedigrees." Depending on the conjugation, the root y-l-d can mean
"to give birth", "to beget", "to be born" , or, as in yesterday's
reading: "to declare one's pedigree."

So now we have an answer for those who tease us about wasting so much
time on this activity; we can quote a a good biblical precedent for
pursuing our "yihus." We can tell them that our ancestors had
already "been there, done that" before they ever got to the Promised
Land!

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


STROMWASSEROWNA #general

Robert Strumwasser <RobertStrumwasser@...>
 

Hi
I'm engaged in one-surname-research on the surname STROMWASSER (sometimes
SZTROMWASSER). I recently came across a woman whose name is given as Eliza
STROMWASSEROWNA. She was >from Zbarazh in eastern Galicia and was studying
in Krakow.

I have never come across this particular variant before, and Google does not
provide any instances of this name anywhere on the web. However, my
knowledge of Russian suffixes is not good. I had thought that the "owna" or
"ovna" suffix was typically applied to a woman's middle name and was the
form of patronymic used by women (as opposed to "ovitz" or "ovitch" which
was used by men). However, if this is correct, such suffixes in my
experience are only applied to the person's father's given name, not their
surname.

Does anyone know how I should interpret a surname of STROMWASSEROWNA?

Thanks for any and all help!

Robert Strumwasser
Sharon, MA, USA
RobertStrumwasser@comcast.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen STROMWASSEROWNA #general

Robert Strumwasser <RobertStrumwasser@...>
 

Hi
I'm engaged in one-surname-research on the surname STROMWASSER (sometimes
SZTROMWASSER). I recently came across a woman whose name is given as Eliza
STROMWASSEROWNA. She was >from Zbarazh in eastern Galicia and was studying
in Krakow.

I have never come across this particular variant before, and Google does not
provide any instances of this name anywhere on the web. However, my
knowledge of Russian suffixes is not good. I had thought that the "owna" or
"ovna" suffix was typically applied to a woman's middle name and was the
form of patronymic used by women (as opposed to "ovitz" or "ovitch" which
was used by men). However, if this is correct, such suffixes in my
experience are only applied to the person's father's given name, not their
surname.

Does anyone know how I should interpret a surname of STROMWASSEROWNA?

Thanks for any and all help!

Robert Strumwasser
Sharon, MA, USA
RobertStrumwasser@comcast.net


Salvador de Bahia, Brazil #general

Mathilde Tagger <tagger@...>
 

Hello,

Can someone living in Brazil look for an address in Salvador de Bahia?

Please answer in private.
Thank you very much!

Shalom,
Mathilde Tagger
Israel Genealogical Society
Visit:: www.isragen.org.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Salvador de Bahia, Brazil #general

Mathilde Tagger <tagger@...>
 

Hello,

Can someone living in Brazil look for an address in Salvador de Bahia?

Please answer in private.
Thank you very much!

Shalom,
Mathilde Tagger
Israel Genealogical Society
Visit:: www.isragen.org.il


Re: I'm stumped! (need records with parents' names) #general

Diane Jacobs <kingart@...>
 

Also, remember that on a marriage certificate the names of
The witnesses are listed. This can be very helpful in breaking
Down brick walls. In my own family, on the MC of my grandmother
Ida Begun Singman, there is listed a J. Begun. According to
Family history, there were no relatives other than her and her
Sister who came to NYC in the early 1900s. Tracking down this
J. Begun, has stumped me searching for census records and vital
Records in NYC, but at least it is a significant lead.

Diane Glazer Jacobs
Somerset, NJ

On 6/3/2005 Marilyn Feingold asked:

<< Are there other forms or records
where she might have been asked to provide her parents names? I know she
also lived in Brooklyn in 1906. Would her maiden name be on birth records
for her children? Would synagogues she attended have this information? I'm
really stumped! Thanks for any creative ideas.>>

Yes, the mother's maiden name *usually* appers on the the child's birth
certificate.

Also, if she was maried in the USA the names of the bride's and groom's
parents would appear on the marriage license application.

Adelle Weintraub Gloger
Shaker Hts., Ohio (Cleveland)
agloger@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: I'm stumped! (need records with parents' names) #general

Diane Jacobs <kingart@...>
 

Also, remember that on a marriage certificate the names of
The witnesses are listed. This can be very helpful in breaking
Down brick walls. In my own family, on the MC of my grandmother
Ida Begun Singman, there is listed a J. Begun. According to
Family history, there were no relatives other than her and her
Sister who came to NYC in the early 1900s. Tracking down this
J. Begun, has stumped me searching for census records and vital
Records in NYC, but at least it is a significant lead.

Diane Glazer Jacobs
Somerset, NJ

On 6/3/2005 Marilyn Feingold asked:

<< Are there other forms or records
where she might have been asked to provide her parents names? I know she
also lived in Brooklyn in 1906. Would her maiden name be on birth records
for her children? Would synagogues she attended have this information? I'm
really stumped! Thanks for any creative ideas.>>

Yes, the mother's maiden name *usually* appers on the the child's birth
certificate.

Also, if she was maried in the USA the names of the bride's and groom's
parents would appear on the marriage license application.

Adelle Weintraub Gloger
Shaker Hts., Ohio (Cleveland)
agloger@aol.com


Seeking Harry London (re Sheinfeld) #general

A S Goldberg
 

I am trying to trace a Harry London who posted to this Discussion Group late
in 1993. His email address at the time was [ * ] f1000.n261.z1.cgsg.com

I would appreciate hearing >from anyone who can put me in contact with him
(if he is still alive) or his family. Please respond to me directly on
alancomm@netmedia.net.il

Many thanks

Abraham Goldberg
Jerusalem

MODERATOR NOTE: Probably the e-mail address is invalid by now,
but to adhere to Discussion Group guidelines, we will not post it.
The domain name has been left in.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking Harry London (re Sheinfeld) #general

A S Goldberg
 

I am trying to trace a Harry London who posted to this Discussion Group late
in 1993. His email address at the time was [ * ] f1000.n261.z1.cgsg.com

I would appreciate hearing >from anyone who can put me in contact with him
(if he is still alive) or his family. Please respond to me directly on
alancomm@netmedia.net.il

Many thanks

Abraham Goldberg
Jerusalem

MODERATOR NOTE: Probably the e-mail address is invalid by now,
but to adhere to Discussion Group guidelines, we will not post it.
The domain name has been left in.