Date   

ABELES/AREND #austria-czech

HOLIJOLI@...
 

In researching the family of David ABELES and Eva KUSSY of Bohemia
(Czechoslovakia) I have come across a number of Abeles family members
who changed their surname to AREND, probably shortly after WWII.
I understand that there are other (unrelated) Abeles families whose
members have made the same change. It was probably done to sound less Jewish.
Does anyone know why the name Arend was selected?

Susan Lubow


Re: What Price Familiant Numbers #austria-czech

Hans Peter Grab <hpgrab@...>
 

Dave Bernard wrote:
According to the Familianten act only the first-born
received the Familiant license and was permitted to
marry.

Does anyone know how one went about acquiring a
Familianten Number in the early 1800s -- other than
inheritance?

Local Notice Board? Family connections?
Itinerant pedlar? a matchmaker?
In the first half of the 19th century not only the
first-born sons were permitted to marry, but also
sons which have learned "ein nuetzliches Handwerk"
(an useful trade) - for example glazier. This individuals
have got a marriage license (special permit) without
a Familianten Number.

Hanus Grab


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech ABELES/AREND #austria-czech

HOLIJOLI@...
 

In researching the family of David ABELES and Eva KUSSY of Bohemia
(Czechoslovakia) I have come across a number of Abeles family members
who changed their surname to AREND, probably shortly after WWII.
I understand that there are other (unrelated) Abeles families whose
members have made the same change. It was probably done to sound less Jewish.
Does anyone know why the name Arend was selected?

Susan Lubow


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Re: What Price Familiant Numbers #austria-czech

Hans Peter Grab <hpgrab@...>
 

Dave Bernard wrote:
According to the Familianten act only the first-born
received the Familiant license and was permitted to
marry.

Does anyone know how one went about acquiring a
Familianten Number in the early 1800s -- other than
inheritance?

Local Notice Board? Family connections?
Itinerant pedlar? a matchmaker?
In the first half of the 19th century not only the
first-born sons were permitted to marry, but also
sons which have learned "ein nuetzliches Handwerk"
(an useful trade) - for example glazier. This individuals
have got a marriage license (special permit) without
a Familianten Number.

Hanus Grab


Re: Joyce and the Jews of Dublin Was: First Jews in England--and Ireland #general

Dan Goodman <dsgood@...>
 

Nick wrote:

I think that Mr Bernet might have noticed that I was responding to Mr
Kravitz's statement that:

"> I made no comment or suggestion about places of worship in
England/Britain pre-1702. In James Joyce's Ulysses he comments that there were
no Jews in Ireland but this was not true.
Does he? Or does one of the characters do so, rather than the author?

--
Dan Goodman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Joyce and the Jews of Dublin Was: First Jews in England--and Ireland #general

Dan Goodman <dsgood@...>
 

Nick wrote:

I think that Mr Bernet might have noticed that I was responding to Mr
Kravitz's statement that:

"> I made no comment or suggestion about places of worship in
England/Britain pre-1702. In James Joyce's Ulysses he comments that there were
no Jews in Ireland but this was not true.
Does he? Or does one of the characters do so, rather than the author?

--
Dan Goodman


Re: How to get a book? #hungary

KSL <resume@...>
 

Stan

Libraries *do* sell books. Culling is a common practice in almost every
library in the world.

A library is not a black-hole into which books get sucked never to emerge
again.

They are dynamic repositories, that buy sell and swop books on a regular
basis.

Of course, there are certain books and documents that a library will *never*
part with, but for a book of the type I understand Tom's uncle's book to be,
there is a good chance it will be culled some day.

Ken Lipworth
Sydney


"Stan Goodman" < SPAM_FOILER@hashkedim.com > wrote in message
news:uViCr8LlbtmJ-pn2-IrJuzNdsS9TH@poblano...


Libraries are full of old dusty tractates; that's what they do, and it's
one of the differences between libraries and bookstores. Libraries _acquire_
books, they don't sell them. It might be a better idea to ask her for the
addresses of dealers in old books. Or to buy a much more valuable book (that
they don't already have) and offer to swap.


Re: How to get a book? #hungary

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"KSL" < resume@lipworth.com.au > wrote:

"Nick" < tulse04-news@yahoo.co.uk > wrote
I think that it is more likely to work the other way round. After all the
original document is a historical artefact and libraries buy books as much
as for their historical significance in terms of what the actual copy says
about a book and the times in which the book was produced.
Unless it is a great illuminated text or something of similar nature, there
is probably close to nothing to be learnt about the times in which the book
was produced that can be learnt form seeing the original. Millions of books
were being mass produced at the time, and I doubt that the book in question
differs in any significant way >from all the other the mass produced books
produced in 1938.

For all we know, this particular book has been rebound, may be missing some
pages, etc.
Libraries exist for the benefit of everyone, which they can do through such
institutions as Inter-Library Loan.

A comparison is with great works of art which are purchased privately and
which are either displayed in someone's drawing room or even in storage.

There might be other relatives unknown to Tom who might wish to have access
to this book. Once Tom has the book in his private possession the only
people who would be able to see the book are those that Tom chooses to see
the book.

If this is really the only copy of the book, how much more important that
the original should be stored in a reputable library where we can all look
at it.

Books are stored in these great libraries not just for now, but for the
future. It would also seem that as far as Jews are concerned 1938 in
Slovakia was, unfortunately, the end of the era. We complain that the Jewish
presence has been obliterated in Central Europe. I think that we should be
celebrating in this case that there is enough interest to retain the book -
rather than saying what do they want the book for.

Otherwise we would not have Archives, but we would scan the books and throw
the originals away.

The most interesting thing about books besides their content, even with new
books is their look and feel. After all, that is why many of us love going
into bookshops - or libraries.

I might add that it is normally the other way round, that members of the
public donate old books or documents to libraries or museums because they
can look after it probably.

If I may say so, your comment about "some library in Slovakia" sees the
centre of world as Australia or the US - it would presumably be easier to
look at it there than in Tom's house.

I have lost my own copy of a book that I wrote. Not that many copies were
printed, but all British books are to be found in the British Library. I
wouldn't dream of asking the BL for the original copy (which is obviously
very important to me) and suggesting that they keep a photocopy.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany) KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: How to get a book? #general

KSL <resume@...>
 

Stan

Libraries *do* sell books. Culling is a common practice in almost every
library in the world.

A library is not a black-hole into which books get sucked never to emerge
again.

They are dynamic repositories, that buy sell and swop books on a regular
basis.

Of course, there are certain books and documents that a library will *never*
part with, but for a book of the type I understand Tom's uncle's book to be,
there is a good chance it will be culled some day.

Ken Lipworth
Sydney


"Stan Goodman" < SPAM_FOILER@hashkedim.com > wrote in message
news:uViCr8LlbtmJ-pn2-IrJuzNdsS9TH@poblano...


Libraries are full of old dusty tractates; that's what they do, and it's
one of the differences between libraries and bookstores. Libraries _acquire_
books, they don't sell them. It might be a better idea to ask her for the
addresses of dealers in old books. Or to buy a much more valuable book (that
they don't already have) and offer to swap.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: How to get a book? #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"KSL" < resume@lipworth.com.au > wrote:

"Nick" < tulse04-news@yahoo.co.uk > wrote
I think that it is more likely to work the other way round. After all the
original document is a historical artefact and libraries buy books as much
as for their historical significance in terms of what the actual copy says
about a book and the times in which the book was produced.
Unless it is a great illuminated text or something of similar nature, there
is probably close to nothing to be learnt about the times in which the book
was produced that can be learnt form seeing the original. Millions of books
were being mass produced at the time, and I doubt that the book in question
differs in any significant way >from all the other the mass produced books
produced in 1938.

For all we know, this particular book has been rebound, may be missing some
pages, etc.
Libraries exist for the benefit of everyone, which they can do through such
institutions as Inter-Library Loan.

A comparison is with great works of art which are purchased privately and
which are either displayed in someone's drawing room or even in storage.

There might be other relatives unknown to Tom who might wish to have access
to this book. Once Tom has the book in his private possession the only
people who would be able to see the book are those that Tom chooses to see
the book.

If this is really the only copy of the book, how much more important that
the original should be stored in a reputable library where we can all look
at it.

Books are stored in these great libraries not just for now, but for the
future. It would also seem that as far as Jews are concerned 1938 in
Slovakia was, unfortunately, the end of the era. We complain that the Jewish
presence has been obliterated in Central Europe. I think that we should be
celebrating in this case that there is enough interest to retain the book -
rather than saying what do they want the book for.

Otherwise we would not have Archives, but we would scan the books and throw
the originals away.

The most interesting thing about books besides their content, even with new
books is their look and feel. After all, that is why many of us love going
into bookshops - or libraries.

I might add that it is normally the other way round, that members of the
public donate old books or documents to libraries or museums because they
can look after it probably.

If I may say so, your comment about "some library in Slovakia" sees the
centre of world as Australia or the US - it would presumably be easier to
look at it there than in Tom's house.

I have lost my own copy of a book that I wrote. Not that many copies were
printed, but all British books are to be found in the British Library. I
wouldn't dream of asking the BL for the original copy (which is obviously
very important to me) and suggesting that they keep a photocopy.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany) KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)


Hawaii research- Thank you #general

Nachum Tuchman
 

Hi,

I received a number of replies to my original request for help,
regarding the RABINOWITZ family of Hawaii. I now have the address of
the Jewish Federation of Hawaii, as well as copies of the 1900 and
1910 census', which I will be sending to my friend.

I have thanked everyone personally.

Nachum Tuchman
Tekoa, Israel
--
Please note my new e-mail address

Searching:
TUCHMAN / KLARMAN / ASPIS - Busko-Zdroj Poland, Kielce Gubernia
LIEBERMAN / ZYSSMAN - Lowicz Poland
RAIDER / REJDER / GINSBERG - Soly/Smorgon Belarus
ROSINSKY / BAYLETT / PAILET / BERNSTEIN - London
KIWI - Samter, Posen/Berlin BUETOW - Zeitz/Berlin


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hawaii research- Thank you #general

Nachum Tuchman
 

Hi,

I received a number of replies to my original request for help,
regarding the RABINOWITZ family of Hawaii. I now have the address of
the Jewish Federation of Hawaii, as well as copies of the 1900 and
1910 census', which I will be sending to my friend.

I have thanked everyone personally.

Nachum Tuchman
Tekoa, Israel
--
Please note my new e-mail address

Searching:
TUCHMAN / KLARMAN / ASPIS - Busko-Zdroj Poland, Kielce Gubernia
LIEBERMAN / ZYSSMAN - Lowicz Poland
RAIDER / REJDER / GINSBERG - Soly/Smorgon Belarus
ROSINSKY / BAYLETT / PAILET / BERNSTEIN - London
KIWI - Samter, Posen/Berlin BUETOW - Zeitz/Berlin


Komarno #general

PKURTIS@...
 

Michael,

My father was born in Komarno in 1916, which was then part of
Austria-Hungary. In Hungarian it was known as Komarom. Today it is located in
Slovakia.

It is obviously a different town than the one that Mr. Sharon and Mr.
Halpern are referring to. It may be the one that you are looking for, however,
as the birth certificate that you have is Austrian.

Peter Kurtis


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Komarno #general

PKURTIS@...
 

Michael,

My father was born in Komarno in 1916, which was then part of
Austria-Hungary. In Hungarian it was known as Komarom. Today it is located in
Slovakia.

It is obviously a different town than the one that Mr. Sharon and Mr.
Halpern are referring to. It may be the one that you are looking for, however,
as the birth certificate that you have is Austrian.

Peter Kurtis


Saratov #ukraine

TE <tome1111@...>
 

Would anyone happen to be searching the town of Saratov?

Would anyone happen to know where it is in relation to Chernigov Gubernia?

Thank you,

Tom Erribe
CA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Saratov #ukraine

TE <tome1111@...>
 

Would anyone happen to be searching the town of Saratov?

Would anyone happen to know where it is in relation to Chernigov Gubernia?

Thank you,

Tom Erribe
CA


Re: First Jews in England #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Schelly Talalay Dardashti wrote on 19 jul 2005 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

"The Lost Jews of Cornwall" to his presentation
on the early Jews of England.
I only had time to take a cursory glance, but found it
fascinating. Sorry I cannot provide the author's name.
Edited by Godfrey Simmons, Keith Pearce and Helen Fry

see for the content:
< http://www.jewishgen.org/jcr-uk/community/exe/newsletter/jewscornwall.htm >

And 66 other links:
< http://www.google.com/search?q=The.Lost.Jews.of.Cornwall >


--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Replace all crosses with dots in my emailaddress)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: First Jews in England #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Schelly Talalay Dardashti wrote on 19 jul 2005 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

"The Lost Jews of Cornwall" to his presentation
on the early Jews of England.
I only had time to take a cursory glance, but found it
fascinating. Sorry I cannot provide the author's name.
Edited by Godfrey Simmons, Keith Pearce and Helen Fry

see for the content:
< http://www.jewishgen.org/jcr-uk/community/exe/newsletter/jewscornwall.htm >

And 66 other links:
< http://www.google.com/search?q=The.Lost.Jews.of.Cornwall >


--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Replace all crosses with dots in my emailaddress)


ZIMMERMAN - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania #general

Martha LEV-ZION <martha@...>
 

I am in possession of a letter that D. Louis ZIMMERMAN wrote to the
Department of State in Washington on 19 July 1919. In it, he requests
any information available about his uncle Lemme HIMMELHOCH, whose
last known address at that time was:
at the home of MELKOWSKAO on Trastonskaya street in the in the city
of Novozibkof in the gubernia of Chernigof, Russia.

D. Louis ZIMMERMAN owned Zimmerman & Company, "efficiency and
management engineers". His home address was 616 Bainbridge Street in
Philadelphia.

Does anyone have any knowledge of the Zimmerman or Melkowskao
families, or of Lemme Himmelhoch?

Thank you in advance for any help!

Martha Lev-Zion, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ZIMMERMAN - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania #general

Martha LEV-ZION <martha@...>
 

I am in possession of a letter that D. Louis ZIMMERMAN wrote to the
Department of State in Washington on 19 July 1919. In it, he requests
any information available about his uncle Lemme HIMMELHOCH, whose
last known address at that time was:
at the home of MELKOWSKAO on Trastonskaya street in the in the city
of Novozibkof in the gubernia of Chernigof, Russia.

D. Louis ZIMMERMAN owned Zimmerman & Company, "efficiency and
management engineers". His home address was 616 Bainbridge Street in
Philadelphia.

Does anyone have any knowledge of the Zimmerman or Melkowskao
families, or of Lemme Himmelhoch?

Thank you in advance for any help!

Martha Lev-Zion, Israel