Date   

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The name "Bunem"and its origins #general

Simon Barak
 

If I recall correctly, several years ago a similar thread occupied both
Michael and myself on the names Bunim and Simcha.
The juxtaposition of Bunim/Bonim with Simcha is rather constant, and
although Simcha appears sometimes as a solitary name, the name of Bunim
alone is uncommon and I know only of a 19th century commentator of the
Torah and a theatre director in Israel (that Bunim is his family name).
On the other hand the "double name" Simche Bunim has deep rabbinical
roots: Reb Simcha Bunim of Pshischa, the ADMO"R >from Goor Rabbi Simche
Bunim Alter, Rabbi Simcha Bunim Cohen, Rabbi Simcha Bunim of Prashschka,
the author of Kol Simcha, Rabbi Simcha Bunim Schreiber, grandson
of the Chatam Sofer, and many more.
My great-uncle used to explain that this double name comes >from the
biblical quote "Em habanim smecha" (The mother of sons is happy) and
ment to be given originally to a male born after several female siblings

Dr Shimon Barak - Tel Aviv, Israel.
Researching the following surnames:
BARG, BARK, BARCK, BERG (Anywhere but especially Ukraine & Argentina;
please visit our Homepage at www.geocities.com/bargfamily/)
MAURER, NEUMANN (Drohobycz, Boryslaw and Lwow)
TACHMAN, TAJMAN, TAKHMAN (Chisinau, Argentina)
HOLZMANN (Przasnysz, Poland and Israel)
SILBERSTEIN (Warsaw and Tel Aviv)

MBernet@... wrote:
In a message dated 8/3/2005 1:29:40 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
tulse04-news@... writes:

< I found >from Rabbi Bernard Susser's website about Devon and
Cornwall that Bunem is >from Medieval (or some such) French "bonhomme".>

==It is now generally agreed, on the recent accumulation of evidence, that
the name is derived >from French (Bon nom) or Spanish translations of the
common Hebrew name ShemTov (good name or good reputation). Beider agrees with
this view.

==There is no common Hebrew equivalent of bonhomme/Good Man. There are two
more "youthful" forms, BenTov (good boy/son) and ElemTov (good youth) [or
TovElem] in Hebrew, Belinfante in Spanish, Bonfils in French.

==Because of the auditory similarity, the names Bunem and Binyamin are often
intertwined among Ashkenazi males. There is no other connection between
these two.


Re: The name "Bunem"and its origins #general

Simon Barak
 

If I recall correctly, several years ago a similar thread occupied both
Michael and myself on the names Bunim and Simcha.
The juxtaposition of Bunim/Bonim with Simcha is rather constant, and
although Simcha appears sometimes as a solitary name, the name of Bunim
alone is uncommon and I know only of a 19th century commentator of the
Torah and a theatre director in Israel (that Bunim is his family name).
On the other hand the "double name" Simche Bunim has deep rabbinical
roots: Reb Simcha Bunim of Pshischa, the ADMO"R >from Goor Rabbi Simche
Bunim Alter, Rabbi Simcha Bunim Cohen, Rabbi Simcha Bunim of Prashschka,
the author of Kol Simcha, Rabbi Simcha Bunim Schreiber, grandson
of the Chatam Sofer, and many more.
My great-uncle used to explain that this double name comes >from the
biblical quote "Em habanim smecha" (The mother of sons is happy) and
ment to be given originally to a male born after several female siblings

Dr Shimon Barak - Tel Aviv, Israel.
Researching the following surnames:
BARG, BARK, BARCK, BERG (Anywhere but especially Ukraine & Argentina;
please visit our Homepage at www.geocities.com/bargfamily/)
MAURER, NEUMANN (Drohobycz, Boryslaw and Lwow)
TACHMAN, TAJMAN, TAKHMAN (Chisinau, Argentina)
HOLZMANN (Przasnysz, Poland and Israel)
SILBERSTEIN (Warsaw and Tel Aviv)

MBernet@... wrote:
In a message dated 8/3/2005 1:29:40 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
tulse04-news@... writes:

< I found >from Rabbi Bernard Susser's website about Devon and
Cornwall that Bunem is >from Medieval (or some such) French "bonhomme".>

==It is now generally agreed, on the recent accumulation of evidence, that
the name is derived >from French (Bon nom) or Spanish translations of the
common Hebrew name ShemTov (good name or good reputation). Beider agrees with
this view.

==There is no common Hebrew equivalent of bonhomme/Good Man. There are two
more "youthful" forms, BenTov (good boy/son) and ElemTov (good youth) [or
TovElem] in Hebrew, Belinfante in Spanish, Bonfils in French.

==Because of the auditory similarity, the names Bunem and Binyamin are often
intertwined among Ashkenazi males. There is no other connection between
these two.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Need Some Help Deciphering (Cyrillic) Family Name (BLUM? BULION?) #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

Dear Friends,
I have two requests that are somewhat related.

(1) Please look at the following name that is highlighted in light aqua and
tell me what you think the person's family name is. The section was taken
from a wedding bann >from Wyszkow,Poland in 1880 written in Cyrillic.The name of
the parent is Zysman B?????
Could it be BLUM? Could it be BULION? BOLION?

http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/ZysmanB.jpg
The man who appeared at eleven o'clock in the morning is "the Jew
Zysman Blyum".

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address
is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


Re: Need Some Help Deciphering (Cyrillic) Family Name (BLUM? BULION?) #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

Dear Friends,
I have two requests that are somewhat related.

(1) Please look at the following name that is highlighted in light aqua and
tell me what you think the person's family name is. The section was taken
from a wedding bann >from Wyszkow,Poland in 1880 written in Cyrillic.The name of
the parent is Zysman B?????
Could it be BLUM? Could it be BULION? BOLION?

http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/ZysmanB.jpg
The man who appeared at eleven o'clock in the morning is "the Jew
Zysman Blyum".

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address
is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pleasanton, CA and SF Bay Area Wedding Announcement Resources #general

Matt Friedman
 

Pleasanton, CA is a city in the San Francisco Bay
Area. The Jewish newspaper for the area is called
"J." Its website is : www.jewishsf.com J used to be
known as The Northern California Jewish Bulletin and
before that The San Francisco Jewish Bulletin. There
is a life cycle events section that includes
engagements, weddings, births, B'nai Mitzvah, and
deaths. The site also features a search feature. The
on line archive goes back to mid 1995.
There are numerous secular newspapers in the area.
The major regional papers are the San Francisco
Chronicle, Oakland Tribune and the San Jose Mercury
News. There are many local papers.... Good luck.

Matt Friedman


Pleasanton, CA and SF Bay Area Wedding Announcement Resources #general

Matt Friedman
 

Pleasanton, CA is a city in the San Francisco Bay
Area. The Jewish newspaper for the area is called
"J." Its website is : www.jewishsf.com J used to be
known as The Northern California Jewish Bulletin and
before that The San Francisco Jewish Bulletin. There
is a life cycle events section that includes
engagements, weddings, births, B'nai Mitzvah, and
deaths. The site also features a search feature. The
on line archive goes back to mid 1995.
There are numerous secular newspapers in the area.
The major regional papers are the San Francisco
Chronicle, Oakland Tribune and the San Jose Mercury
News. There are many local papers.... Good luck.

Matt Friedman


Pinkas Hakehillot for Tunisia #general

Eva Floersheim
 

A friend here in Israel tried to buy the Pinkas Hakehillot for Tunisia
from Yad Vashem, but they told him they were sold out.
He is interested in either buying it, or if that is impossible, borrow
it for a few months >from somebody living in Israel.
Can you help him?

Eva Floersheim
Shadmot Dvorah
Israel

evaflor@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pinkas Hakehillot for Tunisia #general

Eva Floersheim
 

A friend here in Israel tried to buy the Pinkas Hakehillot for Tunisia
from Yad Vashem, but they told him they were sold out.
He is interested in either buying it, or if that is impossible, borrow
it for a few months >from somebody living in Israel.
Can you help him?

Eva Floersheim
Shadmot Dvorah
Israel

evaflor@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Re: Bonvalet Des Salon in Paris... more #france

Bernard Kouchel <koosh@...>
 

It is not just names and dates, but stories that make genealogy come alive.
Here is interesting new information regarding Bonvalet, where my uncle was
married in 1920.
--
Bernard Kouchel
koosh@...

BONVALET
ENTRÉE DES SALONS

If you walk in Paris today, you'll find this kind of sign next to the
doors of some of the famous Cafes.

The known French chef Auguste Escoffier wrote his Culinary Guide (1929)
with his friend Gilbert Phileas who was, for many years, the Chef of the
Bonvalet Restaurant in Paris.

Bonvalet was mentioned in some stories and was a place for the "Nouveaux
riches" and the "Celebrities" at that time (19th- 20th).

For example, Gustave Flaubert described in a letter to his niece Caroline,
what he could see >from his window, which overlooked the Salons Bonvalet
(Weddings, Restaurant, and Dancing).

from different sources, it looks like it was at or next to 42, Rue du
Temple. Paris 75003 , where Flaubert lived 1855-1869. There, he wrote the
second part and finished his "Madame Bovary". This address is in the heart
of the Jewish Quarter in Paris and I think that now there is a modern
building there.
[Bonvalet research by Bila Kogan].


French SIG #France Re: Bonvalet Des Salon in Paris... more #france

Bernard Kouchel <koosh@...>
 

It is not just names and dates, but stories that make genealogy come alive.
Here is interesting new information regarding Bonvalet, where my uncle was
married in 1920.
--
Bernard Kouchel
koosh@...

BONVALET
ENTRÉE DES SALONS

If you walk in Paris today, you'll find this kind of sign next to the
doors of some of the famous Cafes.

The known French chef Auguste Escoffier wrote his Culinary Guide (1929)
with his friend Gilbert Phileas who was, for many years, the Chef of the
Bonvalet Restaurant in Paris.

Bonvalet was mentioned in some stories and was a place for the "Nouveaux
riches" and the "Celebrities" at that time (19th- 20th).

For example, Gustave Flaubert described in a letter to his niece Caroline,
what he could see >from his window, which overlooked the Salons Bonvalet
(Weddings, Restaurant, and Dancing).

from different sources, it looks like it was at or next to 42, Rue du
Temple. Paris 75003 , where Flaubert lived 1855-1869. There, he wrote the
second part and finished his "Madame Bovary". This address is in the heart
of the Jewish Quarter in Paris and I think that now there is a modern
building there.
[Bonvalet research by Bila Kogan].


Longitude error in Aust-Hung Map 1910 of Central Europe #general

abe simon
 

On 3 Aug 2005, as part of a question "what is nee in Polish" Steven Tesser
wrote

A second question: the 3rd Military Mapping Survey of Austria-Hungary, at
http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/digkonyv/topo/3felmeres.htm
the (East-West) longitudes seem to be off by about 17 degrees, 45
minutes. That is, the longitudes shown at the top of the map are
consistently 17 degrees, 45 minutes too high.
That would make sense if they started with the zero longitude running
(North-South) through the western end of cornwall, or something. Has
anyone noticed theis problem with the map?
Yes I noticed this on the map and in checking it out with a world map the
longitude numbers are off as he says but the zero North-South line for 17
degrees difference >from Greenwich would go through Iceland and the West
Canary Islands, not Cornwall. I also noticed a small note at the bottom of
the map and just above the long Remarks chart which says "Longitude is
counted >from Ferro".
I have no idea where "Ferro" is. Although this could possibly mean Magnetic
North as in Ferrous for iron. This would be that far West >from Central
Europe.

Abe Simon
Las Vegas NV
email abe_simon@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Longitude error in Aust-Hung Map 1910 of Central Europe #general

abe simon
 

On 3 Aug 2005, as part of a question "what is nee in Polish" Steven Tesser
wrote

A second question: the 3rd Military Mapping Survey of Austria-Hungary, at
http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/digkonyv/topo/3felmeres.htm
the (East-West) longitudes seem to be off by about 17 degrees, 45
minutes. That is, the longitudes shown at the top of the map are
consistently 17 degrees, 45 minutes too high.
That would make sense if they started with the zero longitude running
(North-South) through the western end of cornwall, or something. Has
anyone noticed theis problem with the map?
Yes I noticed this on the map and in checking it out with a world map the
longitude numbers are off as he says but the zero North-South line for 17
degrees difference >from Greenwich would go through Iceland and the West
Canary Islands, not Cornwall. I also noticed a small note at the bottom of
the map and just above the long Remarks chart which says "Longitude is
counted >from Ferro".
I have no idea where "Ferro" is. Although this could possibly mean Magnetic
North as in Ferrous for iron. This would be that far West >from Central
Europe.

Abe Simon
Las Vegas NV
email abe_simon@...


Berman's in 1930 USA Census #general

Shirley Collier <shirley.collier@...>
 

I have finally found three members of my Berman family - in the 1930
American Census:
mother Sarah age 45, daughter Marion (formerly Miriam) age 24, and son Henry, age
22. Still missing are another son, Barney, and another daughter, Cissie.
They emigrated >from the UK around 1914 after the death of Sarah's husband.

Do these names mean anything to anyone, please? And is there any way of
tracking what happened to them later?

The address is 618 West 142nd Street, Manhattan, and under the column
"Citizenship" arethe letters "Pa" which I believe mean that papers have been
applied for.

Shirley Collier
London UK

Researching:
BERMAN/BEARMAN - Piesk,Lublin/Warsaw/London/Manhattan
HARRIS - Sieradz/Hull/London
ROZAINSKY/WAPNASH - Rozan/Czestochowa/New York/London
TILLES/TRINKENREICH - Tarnow/Krakow/Newcastle/London


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Berman's in 1930 USA Census #general

Shirley Collier <shirley.collier@...>
 

I have finally found three members of my Berman family - in the 1930
American Census:
mother Sarah age 45, daughter Marion (formerly Miriam) age 24, and son Henry, age
22. Still missing are another son, Barney, and another daughter, Cissie.
They emigrated >from the UK around 1914 after the death of Sarah's husband.

Do these names mean anything to anyone, please? And is there any way of
tracking what happened to them later?

The address is 618 West 142nd Street, Manhattan, and under the column
"Citizenship" arethe letters "Pa" which I believe mean that papers have been
applied for.

Shirley Collier
London UK

Researching:
BERMAN/BEARMAN - Piesk,Lublin/Warsaw/London/Manhattan
HARRIS - Sieradz/Hull/London
ROZAINSKY/WAPNASH - Rozan/Czestochowa/New York/London
TILLES/TRINKENREICH - Tarnow/Krakow/Newcastle/London


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Naturalisation information for New York resident #general

Merv & Naomi Barnett
 

On the census in 1910, 1920 and 1930 I have found someone who could be a
family member. It states they were naturalised in 1897 and I would like
to know what steps I need to take to obtain the papers for this person.
He resided in New York throughout this period and I have no reason to
believe ever lived in another state.

Any advice greatly appreciated.

Many thanks.

Naomi Barnett
Melbourne, Australia


Naturalisation information for New York resident #general

Merv & Naomi Barnett
 

On the census in 1910, 1920 and 1930 I have found someone who could be a
family member. It states they were naturalised in 1897 and I would like
to know what steps I need to take to obtain the papers for this person.
He resided in New York throughout this period and I have no reason to
believe ever lived in another state.

Any advice greatly appreciated.

Many thanks.

Naomi Barnett
Melbourne, Australia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Census Puzzle #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 3 Aug 2005 17:43:26 UTC, llepore@... (Lisa Lepore)
opined:

This website has the instructions for US census enumerators
for the various census years.

http://www.ipums.umn.edu/usa/voliii/tEnumInstr.html

There is no mention that this abbreviation - PRWR -
should be used - in fact the instructions are very specific
for instance; they were not supposed to use the designation
Austria-Hungary, but were supposed to write either Austria or
Hungary. Of course the enumerators did not always follow
these instructions, but at least there is a guide here.

I wonder if this PRWR was only used in certain areas of the
country? By a certain enumerator? If it was used in different
areas of the country, then it would seem to me that it would
reflect the common understanding of the name of a certain
area that the people were from. I think one would have to
read some newspapers of the day to see if this term was regularly
used to describe the area "Prussian Westphalia Rhineland",
or used by the immigrants themselves to describe where they
were from.

Lisa
Once more: It does not matter how "the immigrants themselves
[described] where they were from. Just as it was not up to the
immigrants to give themselves unsupported names, or even for
immigration officials to invent them, the place of birth on an
enumeration page indicates the sovereign political division in which
the person was born. This is as true for an immigrant as it is for a
native US citizen born abroad. There are rules, you see. These data
are collected for purposes of statisical analysis, and it simply would
not do for a birthplace to be noted as "Prussian Westphalia
Rhineland", or "Lomza Gobernia", or "Kamchatka".

If tis four-letter rubric was used, it indicates that it was to be
understood by those who would later be reviewing the enumeration
pages. Very clearly, it was not the invention of an especially
imaginative enumerator, because he was not the one for whom he was
preparing the pages. So it was an institutional device of some sort.
And if that is so, than the logical place to inquire about its meaning
is the Bureau of the Census. I don't understand why this is hard to
grasp.

Someone has suggested that it was part of a device for "machine
sorting". It seems very likely that it had something to do with
sorting, but nothing whatever to do with machines. Sorting for the
1910 Census was done manually with "Hollerith Cards", which were
large, square, pasteboard cards with a single row of holes around the
four edges. Each hole might, or might not, be cut out to the edge. To
sort, steel rods were inserted through specific combinations of holes
in a stack of cards, and then the stack picked up and shaken to see
which ones fell out (if that brief description is clear). The
Hollerith Company later devised machines to do this with cards of
different and more familiar size and shape, and became the
International Business Machines Company. But in 1910 there were no
machines.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return addressis
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


Re: Census Puzzle #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 3 Aug 2005 17:43:26 UTC, llepore@... (Lisa Lepore)
opined:

This website has the instructions for US census enumerators
for the various census years.

http://www.ipums.umn.edu/usa/voliii/tEnumInstr.html

There is no mention that this abbreviation - PRWR -
should be used - in fact the instructions are very specific
for instance; they were not supposed to use the designation
Austria-Hungary, but were supposed to write either Austria or
Hungary. Of course the enumerators did not always follow
these instructions, but at least there is a guide here.

I wonder if this PRWR was only used in certain areas of the
country? By a certain enumerator? If it was used in different
areas of the country, then it would seem to me that it would
reflect the common understanding of the name of a certain
area that the people were from. I think one would have to
read some newspapers of the day to see if this term was regularly
used to describe the area "Prussian Westphalia Rhineland",
or used by the immigrants themselves to describe where they
were from.

Lisa
Once more: It does not matter how "the immigrants themselves
[described] where they were from. Just as it was not up to the
immigrants to give themselves unsupported names, or even for
immigration officials to invent them, the place of birth on an
enumeration page indicates the sovereign political division in which
the person was born. This is as true for an immigrant as it is for a
native US citizen born abroad. There are rules, you see. These data
are collected for purposes of statisical analysis, and it simply would
not do for a birthplace to be noted as "Prussian Westphalia
Rhineland", or "Lomza Gobernia", or "Kamchatka".

If tis four-letter rubric was used, it indicates that it was to be
understood by those who would later be reviewing the enumeration
pages. Very clearly, it was not the invention of an especially
imaginative enumerator, because he was not the one for whom he was
preparing the pages. So it was an institutional device of some sort.
And if that is so, than the logical place to inquire about its meaning
is the Bureau of the Census. I don't understand why this is hard to
grasp.

Someone has suggested that it was part of a device for "machine
sorting". It seems very likely that it had something to do with
sorting, but nothing whatever to do with machines. Sorting for the
1910 Census was done manually with "Hollerith Cards", which were
large, square, pasteboard cards with a single row of holes around the
four edges. Each hole might, or might not, be cut out to the edge. To
sort, steel rods were inserted through specific combinations of holes
in a stack of cards, and then the stack picked up and shaken to see
which ones fell out (if that brief description is clear). The
Hollerith Company later devised machines to do this with cards of
different and more familiar size and shape, and became the
International Business Machines Company. But in 1910 there were no
machines.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return addressis
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Steven Morse speaking at JHSUM meeting #general

Carol Gurstelle
 

I've been asked to post an announcement that Dr. Steven Morse will be
the keynote speaker at the annual meeting of the Jewish Historical
Society of the Upper Midwest, September 18, >from 2:00-4:00 p.m. The
meeting will be held at the Sabes Jewish Community Center, 4330 S. Cedar
Lake Road, Minneapolis, MN 55416. Phone number is 952/381-3360. More
information can be found on the JHSUM's website: www.jhsum.org


Carol Gurstelle
Roseville, MN

RITZ/RITS,RICH; Lithuania
RUDER; Romania
HOLLANDER; Romania
NICKELSBERG/NICKELSBURG; Lithuania


Steven Morse speaking at JHSUM meeting #general

Carol Gurstelle
 

I've been asked to post an announcement that Dr. Steven Morse will be
the keynote speaker at the annual meeting of the Jewish Historical
Society of the Upper Midwest, September 18, >from 2:00-4:00 p.m. The
meeting will be held at the Sabes Jewish Community Center, 4330 S. Cedar
Lake Road, Minneapolis, MN 55416. Phone number is 952/381-3360. More
information can be found on the JHSUM's website: www.jhsum.org


Carol Gurstelle
Roseville, MN

RITZ/RITS,RICH; Lithuania
RUDER; Romania
HOLLANDER; Romania
NICKELSBERG/NICKELSBURG; Lithuania