Date   

Re: Publishing genealogies #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

<yisraelasper@comcast.net> wrote

I have relatives who are by now very distant in relationship and don't
need a genealogist to tell them they are related. All they have to do
is look at a wedding invitation. They would be insulted to be kicked
out of a tree or a wedding invitation.
I have a family-tree going back to 1650 and I was shown the cemeteries in
Furth by Gisela Blume (for which much thanks).

I had not heard of her previously and she handed me family-trees which were
all connected to this family.

The name Rapaport appears in the family-tree and I have established quite a
few years ago a connection with a number of people who post on this
newsgroup.

The mathematics of this is not very difficult and either you are related to
yourself a number of times, or you must be related to half the Jews in New
York.

I have read that the number of Ashkenazi Jews at the time of Rashi was only
about 50,000.

We know that at succeeding generations with the family cycle of weddings
individuals form their own families and once fairly close relations become
more distant - their is only so many people you can invite to weddings and
there is the factor of geography.

In statistics I use degrees of connectedness and likewise we do so in our
family relations - third, fourth cousins etc.

We naturally recognise that someone who shares a greatgreatgreatfather is
not as closely related as a first cousin.

Having said that we probably know of families where they have regular
meetings of all descendants of such and such a family that came >from X. This
is more like the Scottish clan.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland)
ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)


List of jewish soldiers, Romanian army, dead in WWI #romania

Sorin Goldenberg <SorinG@...>
 

Hi,

Is anyone aware if there is a compiled list of jewish soldiers that have
fallen in the Romanian army during WWI ? If so, where could it be found
? Any historians that may be approached with this question?

Thanks,
Sorin Goldenberg,
MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign messages with your location.

*


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Publishing genealogies #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

<yisraelasper@comcast.net> wrote

I have relatives who are by now very distant in relationship and don't
need a genealogist to tell them they are related. All they have to do
is look at a wedding invitation. They would be insulted to be kicked
out of a tree or a wedding invitation.
I have a family-tree going back to 1650 and I was shown the cemeteries in
Furth by Gisela Blume (for which much thanks).

I had not heard of her previously and she handed me family-trees which were
all connected to this family.

The name Rapaport appears in the family-tree and I have established quite a
few years ago a connection with a number of people who post on this
newsgroup.

The mathematics of this is not very difficult and either you are related to
yourself a number of times, or you must be related to half the Jews in New
York.

I have read that the number of Ashkenazi Jews at the time of Rashi was only
about 50,000.

We know that at succeeding generations with the family cycle of weddings
individuals form their own families and once fairly close relations become
more distant - their is only so many people you can invite to weddings and
there is the factor of geography.

In statistics I use degrees of connectedness and likewise we do so in our
family relations - third, fourth cousins etc.

We naturally recognise that someone who shares a greatgreatgreatfather is
not as closely related as a first cousin.

Having said that we probably know of families where they have regular
meetings of all descendants of such and such a family that came >from X. This
is more like the Scottish clan.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland)
ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)


Romania SIG #Romania List of jewish soldiers, Romanian army, dead in WWI #romania

Sorin Goldenberg <SorinG@...>
 

Hi,

Is anyone aware if there is a compiled list of jewish soldiers that have
fallen in the Romanian army during WWI ? If so, where could it be found
? Any historians that may be approached with this question?

Thanks,
Sorin Goldenberg,
MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign messages with your location.

*


KUDISH family #belarus

tina gam <gam1227@...>
 

I am looking for information on Bella WEINBERG. I
have a very old address in Maryland. I understand her
maiden name is KUDISH.

Thank you,
Tina GAM/GAMM
reserching: GAMM/GAMM, KUDISH or CUDISH, KAPLAN,
KWATT all >from Russia/Poland.


Naming a Baby Girl #general

Stan <natsnehoc@...>
 

I would like to thank all the nice JGenners, who took the time to respond to
my message of August 17, 2005.
For information purposes, the following summarizes the information received.
***Name:
The most mentioned name closely related to "Chaim" was "Chaya". Other
suggestions were, Chaya, Chayoot, Chayootah.
It would appear that naming a child is merely a custom, (superstition and
tradition), and not a matter of Halacha (Law). Sephardim and Ashkenazim
follow different traditions, in that Sephardim will name after a living
parent or Gparent, while Ashkenazim will not.
The English name does'nt necessarily have to be equivalent in
Hebrew/Yiddish, as long as the family knows the connection of the name with
the relative.

***Unveiling vs Naming
Unveilings are purely an American invention and have no status in Jewish
Law, thus has no bearing on timing of naming. It is okay to have a Simcha
(naming) and a non Simcha (unveiling) on the same day--except Shabbat, of
course.

***Timing of Naming
There was no diffinitive answer, as to timing. I get the sense that it
depends on how religious one is. Many would name the child as soon a
possible after birth, on the first Monday, Thursday, or Saturday following,
when the Torah is read. Some said it is permissible to wait longer,
especially if it was to be done in coordination with family, who would be
coming >from far away to attend the ceremony. Timing does not 'adversly'
affect the name.

***Finally
Many qualified their responses with "talk to a Rabbi".
Well, we did and our little princess will be named in his Synagogue on a
Thursday morning, some 6 weeks after her birth to accomodate two important
events: An unveiling on the prior Sunday for the GGrandfather after whom
she will be named; and the arrival of the late GGrandfathers sister from
Israel to witness both events.

Thanks, again for your responses. To quote one nice person, who signed off
with "LeTorah, ULeChupah, ULeMaasim Tovim (to the Torah, to the Chuppah, and
on to Good Deeds"

Stan Cohen,
Toronto, Ontario
natnehoc@rogers.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus KUDISH family #belarus

tina gam <gam1227@...>
 

I am looking for information on Bella WEINBERG. I
have a very old address in Maryland. I understand her
maiden name is KUDISH.

Thank you,
Tina GAM/GAMM
reserching: GAMM/GAMM, KUDISH or CUDISH, KAPLAN,
KWATT all >from Russia/Poland.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Naming a Baby Girl #general

Stan <natsnehoc@...>
 

I would like to thank all the nice JGenners, who took the time to respond to
my message of August 17, 2005.
For information purposes, the following summarizes the information received.
***Name:
The most mentioned name closely related to "Chaim" was "Chaya". Other
suggestions were, Chaya, Chayoot, Chayootah.
It would appear that naming a child is merely a custom, (superstition and
tradition), and not a matter of Halacha (Law). Sephardim and Ashkenazim
follow different traditions, in that Sephardim will name after a living
parent or Gparent, while Ashkenazim will not.
The English name does'nt necessarily have to be equivalent in
Hebrew/Yiddish, as long as the family knows the connection of the name with
the relative.

***Unveiling vs Naming
Unveilings are purely an American invention and have no status in Jewish
Law, thus has no bearing on timing of naming. It is okay to have a Simcha
(naming) and a non Simcha (unveiling) on the same day--except Shabbat, of
course.

***Timing of Naming
There was no diffinitive answer, as to timing. I get the sense that it
depends on how religious one is. Many would name the child as soon a
possible after birth, on the first Monday, Thursday, or Saturday following,
when the Torah is read. Some said it is permissible to wait longer,
especially if it was to be done in coordination with family, who would be
coming >from far away to attend the ceremony. Timing does not 'adversly'
affect the name.

***Finally
Many qualified their responses with "talk to a Rabbi".
Well, we did and our little princess will be named in his Synagogue on a
Thursday morning, some 6 weeks after her birth to accomodate two important
events: An unveiling on the prior Sunday for the GGrandfather after whom
she will be named; and the arrival of the late GGrandfathers sister from
Israel to witness both events.

Thanks, again for your responses. To quote one nice person, who signed off
with "LeTorah, ULeChupah, ULeMaasim Tovim (to the Torah, to the Chuppah, and
on to Good Deeds"

Stan Cohen,
Toronto, Ontario
natnehoc@rogers.com


Re: Naming a Baby Girl #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Gary Holtzman" <garyholtzman@macnospam.com> wrote

It is traditional to call the father to the Torah following the
birth of a daughter, at which time a mishaberach is made using
the girl's name; this is what is usually meant by naming her in
the synagogue. In recent years many North
American congregations make this into a bigger "event" than was
traditionally the case. A positive development, IMHO.
In England in Orthodox congregations likewise. In very Orthodox
congregations, the close family won't tell anyone else the name until it has
been announced at the calling up and the following mishaberach in the
synagogue.

I am told that when my grandfather went to shul following the birth of my
mother (whose English name was Betty) when it came to the Mishaberach he
couldn't remember whether her Hebrew name was to be Bayla or Batya. In the
end, I understand that he got the name wrong.

It is this name that will appear on the Ketuba and then morbidly on the
tombstone (if the Hebrew name is given).

In the Jewish religion a boy is named at the Brit and the girl at this
ceremony.

Whereas the boy will use his Hebrew name >from before his Barmitzvah when he
is first called up (Aliyah) in shul, the only time a girl will be required
to use her name is on her ketuba if she gets married.

I exclude very Orthodox families where the custom these days is to use
Hebrew names and I assume that this is the same or similar to the religious
name.

In my own family when my aunt died a few years ago, my cousins didn't know
what her Hebrew name was and they couldn't find her Ketuba. They had to make
an intelligent guess based on her English name.

http://judaism.about.com/library/3_lifecycles/names/bl_names.htm is an
interesting site about customs regarding baby naming including some
questions that have been raised recently.
--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland)
ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany) KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naming a Baby Girl #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Gary Holtzman" <garyholtzman@macnospam.com> wrote

It is traditional to call the father to the Torah following the
birth of a daughter, at which time a mishaberach is made using
the girl's name; this is what is usually meant by naming her in
the synagogue. In recent years many North
American congregations make this into a bigger "event" than was
traditionally the case. A positive development, IMHO.
In England in Orthodox congregations likewise. In very Orthodox
congregations, the close family won't tell anyone else the name until it has
been announced at the calling up and the following mishaberach in the
synagogue.

I am told that when my grandfather went to shul following the birth of my
mother (whose English name was Betty) when it came to the Mishaberach he
couldn't remember whether her Hebrew name was to be Bayla or Batya. In the
end, I understand that he got the name wrong.

It is this name that will appear on the Ketuba and then morbidly on the
tombstone (if the Hebrew name is given).

In the Jewish religion a boy is named at the Brit and the girl at this
ceremony.

Whereas the boy will use his Hebrew name >from before his Barmitzvah when he
is first called up (Aliyah) in shul, the only time a girl will be required
to use her name is on her ketuba if she gets married.

I exclude very Orthodox families where the custom these days is to use
Hebrew names and I assume that this is the same or similar to the religious
name.

In my own family when my aunt died a few years ago, my cousins didn't know
what her Hebrew name was and they couldn't find her Ketuba. They had to make
an intelligent guess based on her English name.

http://judaism.about.com/library/3_lifecycles/names/bl_names.htm is an
interesting site about customs regarding baby naming including some
questions that have been raised recently.
--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland)
ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany) KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)


Re: "G I Photograph Museum of Honor" Posting #general

Dick Plotz
 

Further discussion about this site can be found at

http://www.armyairforces.com/scheme.html

I have no personal knowledge of either the "Museum of Honor" site or
the site containing the further discussion.

Dick Plotz
Providence RI USA

MODERATOR NOTE: This discussion has moved away >from genealogy.
Please continue privately or in a more appropriate forum.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: "G I Photograph Museum of Honor" Posting #general

Dick Plotz
 

Further discussion about this site can be found at

http://www.armyairforces.com/scheme.html

I have no personal knowledge of either the "Museum of Honor" site or
the site containing the further discussion.

Dick Plotz
Providence RI USA

MODERATOR NOTE: This discussion has moved away >from genealogy.
Please continue privately or in a more appropriate forum.


teaching yourself Cyrillic #general

Herbert Lazerow
 

<I am wondering if anyone has successfully attempted to teach themselves
enough Russian to be able to find vital records for their family on the
films >from the FHC?>
Yes, but the answer is much more complicated than that. I
taught myself enough Cyrillic to read Russian records, and I am helping
someone who is now at the point to start reading.
There is a difference between "enough Cyrillic to read" and
"enough Cyrillic to find" records. I do not believe that it is possible
to teach yourself enough Cyrillic to find records by yourself, nor
do I think it is necessary. LDS has microfilmed large numbers
of records of Jewish communities >from the Russian Empire just
waiting to be transliterated. You do not have to find them, as LDS
labels the records with reasonable accuracy, once you get to
know their system. But I do not think you can find records other-
wise without actually learning Russian.
As to reading records once you have found them, one must
distinguish between the records kept in Poland, which are in
paragraph form, and the records kept in Russia and Ukraine, which
are in columns. Getting to the point where you can read Poland-
style records takes more knowledge of Russian than columnar
records. With columnar records, you know which columns you
are interested in, and some of the columns use regular Arabic nu-
merals.
In my case, I learned Cyrillic to read printed materials
(the business directory Vsya Rossiya). Then I learned to read
script to read records. The process breaks down as follows:
1. Learn the printed letters and the sounds they make.
2. Learn the script version of those letters.
3. Try to recognize individual letters in script records you
know, like the Russian and Hebrew months.
4. Get someone to give you a list of words that commonly
appear in the records, like townsperson, son, wife, bachelor,
maiden, daughter, widow, divorcee, merchant.
5. Get someone to provide a list of common surnames
and given names used in the Jewish community in their Cyrillic
versions.
6. Find someone who is willing to check over your results
for the first group of records, and who is willing to help you through
steps 3-5.
As to time required, it is hard to generalize, but I think that
a person who is willing to devote half an hour a day to this can
be ready to read a columnar record in perhaps 2 months. The
most important quality is persistence. It is very discouraging to
look at a page that you know contains intelligible writing, and to
not be able to distinguish a single word. But if you can do one
letter the first day, two the second, and three the third, it will very
quickly become manageable-- as long as you don't expect to be
perfect at it.
<And if you've attempted to do this, would you recommend for or against
doing this to someone else?>
If your family comes >from Russia or Ukraine where there
are records, I would recommend it. All you need to be able to do
is transliterate. If we are talking about Poland-type records, you
need to be really dedicated, because the numerals are all written
out, and particular items are not necessarily in the same place,
so you need to know what a fair amount of Russian means.
With these records, you are both transliterating and translating.
Bert
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego CA
lazer@sandiego.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen teaching yourself Cyrillic #general

Herbert Lazerow
 

<I am wondering if anyone has successfully attempted to teach themselves
enough Russian to be able to find vital records for their family on the
films >from the FHC?>
Yes, but the answer is much more complicated than that. I
taught myself enough Cyrillic to read Russian records, and I am helping
someone who is now at the point to start reading.
There is a difference between "enough Cyrillic to read" and
"enough Cyrillic to find" records. I do not believe that it is possible
to teach yourself enough Cyrillic to find records by yourself, nor
do I think it is necessary. LDS has microfilmed large numbers
of records of Jewish communities >from the Russian Empire just
waiting to be transliterated. You do not have to find them, as LDS
labels the records with reasonable accuracy, once you get to
know their system. But I do not think you can find records other-
wise without actually learning Russian.
As to reading records once you have found them, one must
distinguish between the records kept in Poland, which are in
paragraph form, and the records kept in Russia and Ukraine, which
are in columns. Getting to the point where you can read Poland-
style records takes more knowledge of Russian than columnar
records. With columnar records, you know which columns you
are interested in, and some of the columns use regular Arabic nu-
merals.
In my case, I learned Cyrillic to read printed materials
(the business directory Vsya Rossiya). Then I learned to read
script to read records. The process breaks down as follows:
1. Learn the printed letters and the sounds they make.
2. Learn the script version of those letters.
3. Try to recognize individual letters in script records you
know, like the Russian and Hebrew months.
4. Get someone to give you a list of words that commonly
appear in the records, like townsperson, son, wife, bachelor,
maiden, daughter, widow, divorcee, merchant.
5. Get someone to provide a list of common surnames
and given names used in the Jewish community in their Cyrillic
versions.
6. Find someone who is willing to check over your results
for the first group of records, and who is willing to help you through
steps 3-5.
As to time required, it is hard to generalize, but I think that
a person who is willing to devote half an hour a day to this can
be ready to read a columnar record in perhaps 2 months. The
most important quality is persistence. It is very discouraging to
look at a page that you know contains intelligible writing, and to
not be able to distinguish a single word. But if you can do one
letter the first day, two the second, and three the third, it will very
quickly become manageable-- as long as you don't expect to be
perfect at it.
<And if you've attempted to do this, would you recommend for or against
doing this to someone else?>
If your family comes >from Russia or Ukraine where there
are records, I would recommend it. All you need to be able to do
is transliterate. If we are talking about Poland-type records, you
need to be really dedicated, because the numerals are all written
out, and particular items are not necessarily in the same place,
so you need to know what a fair amount of Russian means.
With these records, you are both transliterating and translating.
Bert
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego CA
lazer@sandiego.edu


Looking for GEORGE LURIE: Raseiniai, Lithuania -> Ambridge, PA #lithuania

Bruce Parr <bparr@...>
 

All,

I am looking for information on
GEORGE LOUIS LURIE
b. Raseiniai, Lithuania 1871
d. New Jersey approx 1940

Arrived in U.S. 1889 on U.S.S Alaska
Lived in:
Conneaut, PA or Conneaut OH
Ambridge, PA (owned working men's clothing store)
Pittsburgh, PA

Spouse: Sarah Rosenthal

Children:
Isabelle Yuckman - NJ
D'Vera Bendall - Pittsburgh, PA
Marion Lurie - Pittsburgh, PA
Hilary Smith - Pittsburgh, PA
Harry Lurie

Half-sisters:
Fannie
Sarah

He had cousins in Sharon, PA and I believe they were >from Sam Lurie's
family. Nephew Joe Lurie lived in Chicago and was married to Sadie. I also
believe there is a Yetta Lurie whose married name is Robinson.

from my grandmother's account, he was communicating with relatives in Israel
as late as the 1930's. We also have family in South Africa, and we are
looking for names.

Anyone with information that may be relevant, please email me!

Bruce Parr
bparr@jaxmeier.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Looking for GEORGE LURIE: Raseiniai, Lithuania -> Ambridge, PA #lithuania

Bruce Parr <bparr@...>
 

All,

I am looking for information on
GEORGE LOUIS LURIE
b. Raseiniai, Lithuania 1871
d. New Jersey approx 1940

Arrived in U.S. 1889 on U.S.S Alaska
Lived in:
Conneaut, PA or Conneaut OH
Ambridge, PA (owned working men's clothing store)
Pittsburgh, PA

Spouse: Sarah Rosenthal

Children:
Isabelle Yuckman - NJ
D'Vera Bendall - Pittsburgh, PA
Marion Lurie - Pittsburgh, PA
Hilary Smith - Pittsburgh, PA
Harry Lurie

Half-sisters:
Fannie
Sarah

He had cousins in Sharon, PA and I believe they were >from Sam Lurie's
family. Nephew Joe Lurie lived in Chicago and was married to Sadie. I also
believe there is a Yetta Lurie whose married name is Robinson.

from my grandmother's account, he was communicating with relatives in Israel
as late as the 1930's. We also have family in South Africa, and we are
looking for names.

Anyone with information that may be relevant, please email me!

Bruce Parr
bparr@jaxmeier.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Kolo city map from around 1900-1910? #poland

Kirsten Gradel <kmgradel@...>
 

Can someone tell me where it might be possible to find an download a City
map for Kolo, Poznan province, Poland >from around year 1900-10?

Thanks,

Kirsten Gradel
Nyborg, Denmark
Kolo CO-OP and Town leader
Zamosc Archives Project Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland

e-mail: kmgradel@dadlnet.dk


JRI Poland #Poland Kolo city map from around 1900-1910? #poland

Kirsten Gradel <kmgradel@...>
 

Can someone tell me where it might be possible to find an download a City
map for Kolo, Poznan province, Poland >from around year 1900-10?

Thanks,

Kirsten Gradel
Nyborg, Denmark
Kolo CO-OP and Town leader
Zamosc Archives Project Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland

e-mail: kmgradel@dadlnet.dk


Re: Research Experince at LBI #germany

Jane Vogel-Kohai & Ofer Kohai <vogelko@...>
 

MODERATOR NOTE: If other GerSIG members want to comment on research experiences
at the Leo Baeck Institute (LBI) in New York, please include information about
your ability to read printed and handwritten German. Messages which do not
include this information will not be accepted. MODERATOR=======>

Although I conducted my research at LBI before the conglomeration with
YIVO and the JHS, and at the previous premises, I had incredible
success. I must point out that I had a whole lot more luck than anything
else. My grandfather, who was interested in genealogy and had made
rather extensive notes, was involved with the LBI and at his death, his
papers were left to the LBI. I had the good fortune, while here in
Israel, to find that his papers were there, through one of Avotaynu's
reference books (can't recall the name now). A few months later, I was
in NY, showed up at LBI, and asked for the material. Staff (a woman by
the name of Leigh) was extremely helpful and friendly, and provided me
with a photocopy of all the material. Since it was a lot, and I was
about to return to Israel, they sent it to me. It was incredible seeing
my grandfather's handwritten notes! I also found his photograph hanging
on one of the walls, together with some of the other officers of LBI.
Last year, I was again there,** but then I was looking for material from
the Jewish Historical Society. Best regards -

Jane Vogel-Kohai Moshav Mesillat Zion, Israel

MODERATOR NOTE: The LBI is now located at the Center for Jewish History (CJH) in
New York. Other Jewish history organizations are also located in the CJH include:

YIVO, the (NY) Jewish Genealogical Society, the American Jewish Historical Society
and others. For more information about the CJH please visit their website. MOD1


German SIG #Germany RE: Research Experince at LBI #germany

Jane Vogel-Kohai & Ofer Kohai <vogelko@...>
 

MODERATOR NOTE: If other GerSIG members want to comment on research experiences
at the Leo Baeck Institute (LBI) in New York, please include information about
your ability to read printed and handwritten German. Messages which do not
include this information will not be accepted. MODERATOR=======>

Although I conducted my research at LBI before the conglomeration with
YIVO and the JHS, and at the previous premises, I had incredible
success. I must point out that I had a whole lot more luck than anything
else. My grandfather, who was interested in genealogy and had made
rather extensive notes, was involved with the LBI and at his death, his
papers were left to the LBI. I had the good fortune, while here in
Israel, to find that his papers were there, through one of Avotaynu's
reference books (can't recall the name now). A few months later, I was
in NY, showed up at LBI, and asked for the material. Staff (a woman by
the name of Leigh) was extremely helpful and friendly, and provided me
with a photocopy of all the material. Since it was a lot, and I was
about to return to Israel, they sent it to me. It was incredible seeing
my grandfather's handwritten notes! I also found his photograph hanging
on one of the walls, together with some of the other officers of LBI.
Last year, I was again there,** but then I was looking for material from
the Jewish Historical Society. Best regards -

Jane Vogel-Kohai Moshav Mesillat Zion, Israel

MODERATOR NOTE: The LBI is now located at the Center for Jewish History (CJH) in
New York. Other Jewish history organizations are also located in the CJH include:

YIVO, the (NY) Jewish Genealogical Society, the American Jewish Historical Society
and others. For more information about the CJH please visit their website. MOD1