Date   

records in Cyrillic #general

Irene K. <impromptus2002@...>
 

I'd like to add another couple words to the subject so
enthusiastically discussed. I express my respect to
Schelly who made impossible possible.
There are many types of records written in Russian.
Some are divided in columns relatively easy to read,
some are written as fairy-tales; the whole record is
one long sentence that sounds like that: "on the third
day of May 1834 came to me Itska B... who resides in
Slutsk, a son of Berka B... and Malka, daughter of
Moisha and late Tauba S..., in a company of his
schoolmates Simka R... and Ios'ka T..., who reside in
the very same town, and says, that his wife Doba gave
a birth to a son who was named ...... etc"
To read such records is a great pleasure, it is vivid
history. But it is much more difficult without knowing
grammar to understand "who is who". There are many
names and usually none of them either in *bold* or
*underlined*. Similar records were written as in Russian
as in Polish.
One of examples is on:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/belarus_documents.htm
(Slutsk, 1891, provided by Leonid Zeliger)

Good luck to all courages researchers!

Irene Kudish
Tel-Aviv
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/detailed_inv_13_rolls.htm


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen records in Cyrillic #general

Irene K. <impromptus2002@...>
 

I'd like to add another couple words to the subject so
enthusiastically discussed. I express my respect to
Schelly who made impossible possible.
There are many types of records written in Russian.
Some are divided in columns relatively easy to read,
some are written as fairy-tales; the whole record is
one long sentence that sounds like that: "on the third
day of May 1834 came to me Itska B... who resides in
Slutsk, a son of Berka B... and Malka, daughter of
Moisha and late Tauba S..., in a company of his
schoolmates Simka R... and Ios'ka T..., who reside in
the very same town, and says, that his wife Doba gave
a birth to a son who was named ...... etc"
To read such records is a great pleasure, it is vivid
history. But it is much more difficult without knowing
grammar to understand "who is who". There are many
names and usually none of them either in *bold* or
*underlined*. Similar records were written as in Russian
as in Polish.
One of examples is on:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/belarus_documents.htm
(Slutsk, 1891, provided by Leonid Zeliger)

Good luck to all courages researchers!

Irene Kudish
Tel-Aviv
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/detailed_inv_13_rolls.htm


Learning Russian #general

Avigdor&Laia <lbendov@...>
 

Sam Schleman suggests the option of learning Russian to deal with vital
records in that language, but reading old Russian script is far different
than just learning the language. I bought some self-instruction lessons in
Russian and had a private tutor, but just to get thru the phonetics of the
alphabet was several months in the doing (part time) and picking up the
vocabulary a matter of much practice. This depends of course on the learner,
but again, decifering script is not quite the same as "knowing" a language
and it is best, in my opinion, to have a native speaker who is familiar with
the shapes and configurations of penmanship. Being able to identify some
characters is a nice skill, but not very useful unless mastered. Learning a
new language is a challenge for most people and has its own value, but
unless you have lots of time to practice, I have concluded it is not
effective in dealing with older, hand written records.
Avigdor Ben-Dov
Director of Special Projects
Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute
Kedumim
RUDKEWICZ, ZUSMAN, SOLARZ, NURZEC


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Learning Russian #general

Avigdor&Laia <lbendov@...>
 

Sam Schleman suggests the option of learning Russian to deal with vital
records in that language, but reading old Russian script is far different
than just learning the language. I bought some self-instruction lessons in
Russian and had a private tutor, but just to get thru the phonetics of the
alphabet was several months in the doing (part time) and picking up the
vocabulary a matter of much practice. This depends of course on the learner,
but again, decifering script is not quite the same as "knowing" a language
and it is best, in my opinion, to have a native speaker who is familiar with
the shapes and configurations of penmanship. Being able to identify some
characters is a nice skill, but not very useful unless mastered. Learning a
new language is a challenge for most people and has its own value, but
unless you have lots of time to practice, I have concluded it is not
effective in dealing with older, hand written records.
Avigdor Ben-Dov
Director of Special Projects
Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute
Kedumim
RUDKEWICZ, ZUSMAN, SOLARZ, NURZEC


Re: Publishing genealogies #general

Yisrael Asper
 

I was referring to how many people in a family would be insulted at
not being invited to a wedding. With the PostHolocaust generation
Jewish families are getting bigger again. If your a member of "the
family" it doesn't matter how close or far you are physically to feel
a connectedness. If I would visit those relatives I talked of they
might as well be first cousins. For now I don't know all their names
or even all the people but it wouldn't matter a bit. This is really
how families were meant to be. 50,000 Ashkenazic Jews at the time of
Rashi? Was this before or after the Crusades that he lived to see?
Yisrael Asper
yisraelasper@comcast.net
Pittsburgh PA

I have a family-tree going back to 1650 and I was shown the cemeteries in
Furth by Gisela Blume (for which much thanks).

I had not heard of her previously and she handed me family-trees which were
all connected to this family.

The name Rapaport appears in the family-tree and I have established quite a
few years ago a connection with a number of people who post on this
newsgroup.

The mathematics of this is not very difficult and either you are related to
yourself a number of times, or you must be related to half the Jews in New
York.

I have read that the number of Ashkenazi Jews at the time of Rashi was only
about 50,000.

We know that at succeeding generations with the family cycle of weddings
individuals form their own families and once fairly close relations become
more distant - their is only so many people you can invite to weddings and
there is the factor of geography.

In statistics I use degrees of connectedness and likewise we do so in our
family relations - third, fourth cousins etc.

We naturally recognise that someone who shares a greatgreatgreatfather is
not as closely related as a first cousin.

Having said that we probably know of families where they have regular
meetings of all descendants of such and such a family that came >from X. This
is more like the Scottish clan.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK


Town of Kodell #general

Howie Axelrod <highwind1@...>
 

Is anyone familiar with a town called Kodell that would have been part of
Russia (or perhaps Poland) in 1913? This is on the text and scanned
manifest >from Ellis Is.

The rest of his family came >from an area known as Wladimar, Wolynsk, Poland
(about 1920). This town has many names, but is best know I believe as
Lublin, and in (I believe) present day Ukraine. I would assume that
Kodell, must be near here.

Pls.. respond by e-mail to highwind1@comcast.net

Thanks


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Publishing genealogies #general

Yisrael Asper
 

I was referring to how many people in a family would be insulted at
not being invited to a wedding. With the PostHolocaust generation
Jewish families are getting bigger again. If your a member of "the
family" it doesn't matter how close or far you are physically to feel
a connectedness. If I would visit those relatives I talked of they
might as well be first cousins. For now I don't know all their names
or even all the people but it wouldn't matter a bit. This is really
how families were meant to be. 50,000 Ashkenazic Jews at the time of
Rashi? Was this before or after the Crusades that he lived to see?
Yisrael Asper
yisraelasper@comcast.net
Pittsburgh PA

I have a family-tree going back to 1650 and I was shown the cemeteries in
Furth by Gisela Blume (for which much thanks).

I had not heard of her previously and she handed me family-trees which were
all connected to this family.

The name Rapaport appears in the family-tree and I have established quite a
few years ago a connection with a number of people who post on this
newsgroup.

The mathematics of this is not very difficult and either you are related to
yourself a number of times, or you must be related to half the Jews in New
York.

I have read that the number of Ashkenazi Jews at the time of Rashi was only
about 50,000.

We know that at succeeding generations with the family cycle of weddings
individuals form their own families and once fairly close relations become
more distant - their is only so many people you can invite to weddings and
there is the factor of geography.

In statistics I use degrees of connectedness and likewise we do so in our
family relations - third, fourth cousins etc.

We naturally recognise that someone who shares a greatgreatgreatfather is
not as closely related as a first cousin.

Having said that we probably know of families where they have regular
meetings of all descendants of such and such a family that came >from X. This
is more like the Scottish clan.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Town of Kodell #general

Howie Axelrod <highwind1@...>
 

Is anyone familiar with a town called Kodell that would have been part of
Russia (or perhaps Poland) in 1913? This is on the text and scanned
manifest >from Ellis Is.

The rest of his family came >from an area known as Wladimar, Wolynsk, Poland
(about 1920). This town has many names, but is best know I believe as
Lublin, and in (I believe) present day Ukraine. I would assume that
Kodell, must be near here.

Pls.. respond by e-mail to highwind1@comcast.net

Thanks


Seek MANTEI & Olga FALKENBERG who d. in Wurtzberg, Germany 1949 #germany

Marek Zacharski <prova@...>
 

I search information about family of my Father Jakob MANTEI, born in
Ukraine in village Sulshinowka (near Zytomir) in June 1916 year, and his
sister Olga FALKENBERG

My father after the war was changing the name end was living in Poland
(after change the secend name) like Wac³aw Zacharski, where hi die in 1976
(in town Gi¿ycko).

Jakob MANTEI was born in village Sulshinowka (Ukraine near Zytomir) in June
1916 year.

Known members of his family:

Sister: Olga FALKENBERG , born 1890, died in Wurzburg ( Germany) in 1949

She's children : Rudolf FALKENBERG born 1918, Alexander
FALKENBERG born 1922, Else FALKENBERG born 1928

I have some the notice about some members of his family, but I know only
names of uncles Reinhold and Adolfine MANTEI

Marek Zacharskiu ? Poland <prova@poczta.onet.pl>


German SIG #Germany Seek MANTEI & Olga FALKENBERG who d. in Wurtzberg, Germany 1949 #germany

Marek Zacharski <prova@...>
 

I search information about family of my Father Jakob MANTEI, born in
Ukraine in village Sulshinowka (near Zytomir) in June 1916 year, and his
sister Olga FALKENBERG

My father after the war was changing the name end was living in Poland
(after change the secend name) like Wac³aw Zacharski, where hi die in 1976
(in town Gi¿ycko).

Jakob MANTEI was born in village Sulshinowka (Ukraine near Zytomir) in June
1916 year.

Known members of his family:

Sister: Olga FALKENBERG , born 1890, died in Wurzburg ( Germany) in 1949

She's children : Rudolf FALKENBERG born 1918, Alexander
FALKENBERG born 1922, Else FALKENBERG born 1928

I have some the notice about some members of his family, but I know only
names of uncles Reinhold and Adolfine MANTEI

Marek Zacharskiu ? Poland <prova@poczta.onet.pl>


Re: SITE CITE - A helpful new resource for locating German towns - and more #germany

Nick Landau <N.Landau@...>
 

John Paul Lowens - Moderator 1 wrote:
Roger Lustig mentioned this resource:
http://www.literad.de/geschichte/ortsbuch39.html
It would be helpful to our members who don't know German if Mr. Lustig or
another GerSIG member could write a guide to this resource.
Volunteers please report to: gersig@aol.com
If you look up this website it provides you with an alphabetic index which
you click on to find the particular place that you are interested in.

The dissertation is actually a study of German history >from 1871-1945, and,
in particular the Nazi Party (NSDAP).

For 1933 it shows the breakdown of votes for each political party.

It gives the populations at different points in the period and sometimes a
breakdown by religion.

For each page he gives his sources.

It is a fascinating collection of information for the period.

I was told on a recent visit to Southern Germany that Gunzenhausen where I
have family connections was very anti-semitic early on.

I have looked at the electoral breakdown in March 1933 and I find that about
75% of the nearly 20,000 people who voted, voted for the Nazi party.

In 1933 there were 344 Jews out of a total population of about 32,000.

Nick Landau London, UK N.Landau@btinternet.com


German SIG #Germany Re: SITE CITE - A helpful new resource for locating German towns - and more #germany

Nick Landau <N.Landau@...>
 

John Paul Lowens - Moderator 1 wrote:
Roger Lustig mentioned this resource:
http://www.literad.de/geschichte/ortsbuch39.html
It would be helpful to our members who don't know German if Mr. Lustig or
another GerSIG member could write a guide to this resource.
Volunteers please report to: gersig@aol.com
If you look up this website it provides you with an alphabetic index which
you click on to find the particular place that you are interested in.

The dissertation is actually a study of German history >from 1871-1945, and,
in particular the Nazi Party (NSDAP).

For 1933 it shows the breakdown of votes for each political party.

It gives the populations at different points in the period and sometimes a
breakdown by religion.

For each page he gives his sources.

It is a fascinating collection of information for the period.

I was told on a recent visit to Southern Germany that Gunzenhausen where I
have family connections was very anti-semitic early on.

I have looked at the electoral breakdown in March 1933 and I find that about
75% of the nearly 20,000 people who voted, voted for the Nazi party.

In 1933 there were 344 Jews out of a total population of about 32,000.

Nick Landau London, UK N.Landau@btinternet.com


Need a volunteer to help maintain the Germany IAJGS cemetery project listings #germany

Kitty Munson Cooper
 

I will train any computer literate willing volunteer with word
processing skills, HTML knowledge a bonus but not required (I will
teach you what you need). German a plus.

Due to the unforeseen success of my business, I have fallen way behind
on this project and need some help. Please contact me privately

Kitty Cooper, Albuquerque, NM, USA <kittymcooper@gmail.com>
IAJGS cemetery volunteer webmaster


German SIG #Germany Need a volunteer to help maintain the Germany IAJGS cemetery project listings #germany

Kitty Munson Cooper
 

I will train any computer literate willing volunteer with word
processing skills, HTML knowledge a bonus but not required (I will
teach you what you need). German a plus.

Due to the unforeseen success of my business, I have fallen way behind
on this project and need some help. Please contact me privately

Kitty Cooper, Albuquerque, NM, USA <kittymcooper@gmail.com>
IAJGS cemetery volunteer webmaster


Kaunas District Wills Questions #lithuania

Connie Fisher Newhan
 

As a contributor to Litvak SI Kaunas uyezd (district) group I have been
sent several excel files. On one, I found a Court Inheritance File on an
index for Kaunas District Wills 1872-1883 for that lists Abram Itsik FELDMAN,
son of Movsha, as the executor of a will for Shlioma LEYKOVICH (LIKOVICH) d
1879, in the town of Seredzius, Kaunas Uyezd, Kaunas District. Also listed
as an executor is David Itsik EYLBERG, son of Meyer.

There are also the names of the person who drew the will and three witnesses,
each >from different nearby towns. I am not sure if Shlioma LEYKOVICH is male
or female. I looked on the GNDB and there are 35 entries, 12 are female names,
23 are male names.

My questions:

How likely is it that Abram Itsik FELDMAN and David Itsik EYLBERG as
executors of the will are related to the decedent Shlimona LEYKOVICH?

How likely is it that LEYKOVICH was a woman leaving a will? Did women have
wills or only men?

Is there any significance to the fact that the three witnesses were all
from different towns?
I believe Abram Itsik FELDMAN may be a brother of my ggm and wonder if
these other names may be related based on Feldman's being an executor to
the will.

I would appreciate any insight list members may have regarding my questions.

Best Regards,
Connie Fisher Newhan (#1272)
Corona, California
FISHER/FISCHER/FISZER, FISZEL (Warszawa& Bedzin, Poland),S(Z)PRINGER, ,
HERSZLIKOWICZ, HAMBURGER (Bedzin, Lagiza, Zarki, Poland), GERSTEN (Obertyn,
Galacia) BARSKA/BARSKY/BARSKIY(Odessa), GOLDBERG (Sokolka?), FELDMAN
(Veliuona,Kaunas), KAHN/KOHN/COHN/CAHN, FRIEDSAM (Bodendorf, Coln? Germany, Pittsburgh,
PA), NEWHAN/NEUHAN/NEUHAHN (Hesse Cassel, Meimbressen, Germany, Baltimore, MD),
BOHORODCZANER (Potok Zloty, Ukraine), LEVINE, BLUM, ROTH, ROCKOVITZ, ABRAMS,
RABINOWITZ


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Kaunas District Wills Questions #lithuania

Connie Fisher Newhan
 

As a contributor to Litvak SI Kaunas uyezd (district) group I have been
sent several excel files. On one, I found a Court Inheritance File on an
index for Kaunas District Wills 1872-1883 for that lists Abram Itsik FELDMAN,
son of Movsha, as the executor of a will for Shlioma LEYKOVICH (LIKOVICH) d
1879, in the town of Seredzius, Kaunas Uyezd, Kaunas District. Also listed
as an executor is David Itsik EYLBERG, son of Meyer.

There are also the names of the person who drew the will and three witnesses,
each >from different nearby towns. I am not sure if Shlioma LEYKOVICH is male
or female. I looked on the GNDB and there are 35 entries, 12 are female names,
23 are male names.

My questions:

How likely is it that Abram Itsik FELDMAN and David Itsik EYLBERG as
executors of the will are related to the decedent Shlimona LEYKOVICH?

How likely is it that LEYKOVICH was a woman leaving a will? Did women have
wills or only men?

Is there any significance to the fact that the three witnesses were all
from different towns?
I believe Abram Itsik FELDMAN may be a brother of my ggm and wonder if
these other names may be related based on Feldman's being an executor to
the will.

I would appreciate any insight list members may have regarding my questions.

Best Regards,
Connie Fisher Newhan (#1272)
Corona, California
FISHER/FISCHER/FISZER, FISZEL (Warszawa& Bedzin, Poland),S(Z)PRINGER, ,
HERSZLIKOWICZ, HAMBURGER (Bedzin, Lagiza, Zarki, Poland), GERSTEN (Obertyn,
Galacia) BARSKA/BARSKY/BARSKIY(Odessa), GOLDBERG (Sokolka?), FELDMAN
(Veliuona,Kaunas), KAHN/KOHN/COHN/CAHN, FRIEDSAM (Bodendorf, Coln? Germany, Pittsburgh,
PA), NEWHAN/NEUHAN/NEUHAHN (Hesse Cassel, Meimbressen, Germany, Baltimore, MD),
BOHORODCZANER (Potok Zloty, Ukraine), LEVINE, BLUM, ROTH, ROCKOVITZ, ABRAMS,
RABINOWITZ


Russian Translation Request #poland

Marc D. Machtinger <marc@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers:

I would be very grateful if someone would take a look at the following
1878 marriage record >from Jedrzejow, Poland. I believe it is in Russian.
The JRI-Poland index indicates this should be a marriage between Szandla
KAUFMAN and Nusyn Zorech NACHEMIA. There appears to be an unusual looking
entry written vertically on the left side of the record. I am interested
to know what it says. But most importantly, I would like to know the
details in the record. If I am correct, the parents of the bride should
be Symcha and Rivka KAUFMAN. Of primary interest would be the maiden name
of Rivka, but I would also like to obtain the other details in the record.
Any help is appreciated.

The ViewMate file is VM6738, found at the following URL:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6738

I can provide a higher resolution image if helpful. Kindly reply to me
directly at marc@patentstation.com . Thank you.

Very truly yours,

Marc D. Machtinger, Buffalo Grove, Illinois, U.S.A.
email: marc@patentstation.com


JRI Poland #Poland Russian Translation Request #poland

Marc D. Machtinger <marc@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers:

I would be very grateful if someone would take a look at the following
1878 marriage record >from Jedrzejow, Poland. I believe it is in Russian.
The JRI-Poland index indicates this should be a marriage between Szandla
KAUFMAN and Nusyn Zorech NACHEMIA. There appears to be an unusual looking
entry written vertically on the left side of the record. I am interested
to know what it says. But most importantly, I would like to know the
details in the record. If I am correct, the parents of the bride should
be Symcha and Rivka KAUFMAN. Of primary interest would be the maiden name
of Rivka, but I would also like to obtain the other details in the record.
Any help is appreciated.

The ViewMate file is VM6738, found at the following URL:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6738

I can provide a higher resolution image if helpful. Kindly reply to me
directly at marc@patentstation.com . Thank you.

Very truly yours,

Marc D. Machtinger, Buffalo Grove, Illinois, U.S.A.
email: marc@patentstation.com


SITE CITE: Breslau/Wroclaw digital library #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

There is a nascent digital library at the Politechnika Wroclawska
(http://dlib.bg.pwr.wroc.pl/dlibra). It is organized similarly to the
Digital Library of Wielkopolska, which has digitized and posted online many
useful Polish business directories (see earlier posts). Unfortunately, it
seems that this library has not digitized any items of genealogical
interest, yet, but it might be worth monitoring for those with an interest
in the area. Perhaps, it might also be useful to contact the digital
library and request that certain types of books be digitized (such as
directories, histories of the area, Jewish-interest items, etc.).

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


JRI Poland #Poland SITE CITE: Breslau/Wroclaw digital library #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

There is a nascent digital library at the Politechnika Wroclawska
(http://dlib.bg.pwr.wroc.pl/dlibra). It is organized similarly to the
Digital Library of Wielkopolska, which has digitized and posted online many
useful Polish business directories (see earlier posts). Unfortunately, it
seems that this library has not digitized any items of genealogical
interest, yet, but it might be worth monitoring for those with an interest
in the area. Perhaps, it might also be useful to contact the digital
library and request that certain types of books be digitized (such as
directories, histories of the area, Jewish-interest items, etc.).

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.