Date   

Re: Berlin Marriage and Birth records? #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Michael Salzbank" <msalzbank@gmail.com> wrote
I thank all of you who have responded with leads to find death
certificates >from Berlin.

I would also like to know if there are marriage and birth records
available >from appx. 1885-1905 >from Berlin
I believe that you go to the relevant Standesamt (registration office) for
the area where the person lived and request the certificate.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK


Re: Ellis Island Manifest question #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Thu, 25 Aug 2005 01:16:39 UTC, highwind1@comcast.net (Howie
Axelrod) opined:

Can anyone tell me what the term "do" in the family name column of the EI
manifest means. It appears to indicate a reference to the name above it.
Pls. respond by e-mail to highwind1@comcast.net
Just my wild guess, of course, but I would suppose that "do", in the
context that you describe, means "ditto", as it does in similar lists,
even the most ungenealogical.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address
is not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the
URL above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Berlin Marriage and Birth records? #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Michael Salzbank" <msalzbank@gmail.com> wrote
I thank all of you who have responded with leads to find death
certificates >from Berlin.

I would also like to know if there are marriage and birth records
available >from appx. 1885-1905 >from Berlin
I believe that you go to the relevant Standesamt (registration office) for
the area where the person lived and request the certificate.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Ellis Island Manifest question #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Thu, 25 Aug 2005 01:16:39 UTC, highwind1@comcast.net (Howie
Axelrod) opined:

Can anyone tell me what the term "do" in the family name column of the EI
manifest means. It appears to indicate a reference to the name above it.
Pls. respond by e-mail to highwind1@comcast.net
Just my wild guess, of course, but I would suppose that "do", in the
context that you describe, means "ditto", as it does in similar lists,
even the most ungenealogical.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address
is not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the
URL above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


Re: Sephardic roots? #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Thu, 25 Aug 2005 02:20:26 UTC, armagnac@utep.edu (Armagnac, Ana M.)
opined:

Just very recently through a DNA test my brother had done on himself we
found out we have Jewish roots (Sephardim) >from Spain (or France?). My
mother's last name was SANDOVAL AGUILERA and my father's last name was
CHACON MENDEZ.

Are there any others with these last names?
The late premier of France, Pierre Mendez-France comes to mind
immediately.

Out of curiosity, I just googled the compound surname, and found a
fair number of others who bore it. It seems to me that I have read in
the past that the name Mendez has a Jewish background (which would be
low-tech confirmation of the DNA results).

I have also been told that, since the inquisition, the genes of those
Jews who submitted to the requirement to convert to Catholicism in
order to remain in Spain have been so widely distributed that most
Spaniards carry them. In other words, if this is true, if you have
Spanish ancestors, you are genetically Jewish to some degree.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Sephardic roots? #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Thu, 25 Aug 2005 02:20:26 UTC, armagnac@utep.edu (Armagnac, Ana M.)
opined:

Just very recently through a DNA test my brother had done on himself we
found out we have Jewish roots (Sephardim) >from Spain (or France?). My
mother's last name was SANDOVAL AGUILERA and my father's last name was
CHACON MENDEZ.

Are there any others with these last names?
The late premier of France, Pierre Mendez-France comes to mind
immediately.

Out of curiosity, I just googled the compound surname, and found a
fair number of others who bore it. It seems to me that I have read in
the past that the name Mendez has a Jewish background (which would be
low-tech confirmation of the DNA results).

I have also been told that, since the inquisition, the genes of those
Jews who submitted to the requirement to convert to Catholicism in
order to remain in Spain have been so widely distributed that most
Spaniards carry them. In other words, if this is true, if you have
Spanish ancestors, you are genetically Jewish to some degree.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


Re: Sephardic roots? #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Armagnac, Ana M." <armagnac@utep.edu> wrote
Just very recently through a DNA test my brother had done on himself we
found out we have Jewish roots (Sephardim) >from Spain (or France?). My
mother's last name was SANDOVAL AGUILERA and my father's last name was
CHACON MENDEZ.
I might be wrong but I would have thought that the test would have thrown up
this possibility without expressing a certainty.

See http://www.khazaria.com/genetics/abstracts-jews.html

--
Nick Landau
London, UK


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Sephardic roots? #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Armagnac, Ana M." <armagnac@utep.edu> wrote
Just very recently through a DNA test my brother had done on himself we
found out we have Jewish roots (Sephardim) >from Spain (or France?). My
mother's last name was SANDOVAL AGUILERA and my father's last name was
CHACON MENDEZ.
I might be wrong but I would have thought that the test would have thrown up
this possibility without expressing a certainty.

See http://www.khazaria.com/genetics/abstracts-jews.html

--
Nick Landau
London, UK


Re: 176 Clinton #general

Lisa Lepore <llepore@...>
 

The Montefiore Home was established in New York city,
in 1884 to provide care primarily for tuberculosis patients.

It still exists, but it is now called
Montefiore Medical Center, and is located in the Bronx.

It has a web site here-
http://www.montefiore.org/

If you search for "Montefiore Home for Chronic Invalids" in
any web search engine, you will find many other sites that
mention it.

I don't know about the records location, but at least this is
a place to start.

Lisa


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: 176 Clinton #general

Lisa Lepore <llepore@...>
 

The Montefiore Home was established in New York city,
in 1884 to provide care primarily for tuberculosis patients.

It still exists, but it is now called
Montefiore Medical Center, and is located in the Bronx.

It has a web site here-
http://www.montefiore.org/

If you search for "Montefiore Home for Chronic Invalids" in
any web search engine, you will find many other sites that
mention it.

I don't know about the records location, but at least this is
a place to start.

Lisa


Re: 176 Clinton #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Rabbi Ben-Zion Saydman" <ravbenzi@cox.net> wrote
Shalom Jewishgenvelt:

My latest mystery involves a NYC death certficate. Riva MELTSNER died
October 17, 1909 at the Montefiore Home for Chronic Invalids. Has anyone
ever heard of this institution?
See http://montekids.org/press/twins/mmchistory/

Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany) KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: 176 Clinton #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Rabbi Ben-Zion Saydman" <ravbenzi@cox.net> wrote
Shalom Jewishgenvelt:

My latest mystery involves a NYC death certficate. Riva MELTSNER died
October 17, 1909 at the Montefiore Home for Chronic Invalids. Has anyone
ever heard of this institution?
See http://montekids.org/press/twins/mmchistory/

Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany) KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)


cyrillic tranlsations #general

dprice dprice
 

Here is an amazing website to assist in reading cyrillic for birth, marriage
and death records:
"Take a look at the Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP shtetlinks site
(http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/kmain.html).
We have developed a
number of transliteration aides to help people who are trying to read
the microfilmed vital records for Russian /Ukrainian towns. Among the
items you'll find there are:

* Transliteration Guides for transliterating Russian to English and
Hebrew/Yiddish to English;
* Translations of the birth, marriage, and death column headings
from the Kremenets vital records;
* Russian & Hebrew images of Jewish Given Names >from vital records,
and their English transliteration ... one set for female names,
another for male names;
* Russian & Hebrew images of the "Causes of death" entries in the
vital records, and their English transliteration
* Russian & Hebrew images of keywords, occupations and social status
that appear in the vital records, and their English transliteration
* Russian & Hebrew Images of registration town names >from vital
records and their current names >from ShtetlSeeker.

You can find most of these by going to the Kremenets ShtetLinks page
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/kmain.html
After you enter the site, click on "Kremenets Records and Transcriptions",
then click on "Kremenets Records Translation Guides".

1. Cyrillic is mostly the Greek alphabet, therefore translating Russian to
English is like doing a cryptogram: (Russian-english) p=r, b=w, m bar
below=sz, m bar above=t, h=n, u=i, n=p, g=d, u=I, v upside down=l, y=u,
x=ch, c=s. Other letters: capital T=g, r backwards=ja, pie=p, io=ju,
lamed=b. Greek capital letters are used to make the English letters for
capital T, B, F, symbols for sounds such as zh, ts, szch are used as well.
The hebrew letter 'shin' is used for the sound 'sh'.
2. Have a Russian-English list of i) jewish surnames ii) given names.
3. Have a Russian-English list of professions for Jewish people.
4. Have a vocabulary list for birth, marriage and deaths.
5. Translation of a typical birth, marriage and death record.
6. Have a Russian-English list of cardinal numbers (1,2,3,..), ordinal
numbers (1st,2nd,3rd,..), 12 months of the year, familial relationships.

The references for the above resources are listed on jewishgen.

Then there is the problem of difficult handwriting. The trick I used is
to extrapolate the words >from the few letters you can read. Also the the
location of the word tells you if it is a name, age, profession, town or
other critical info. For example the baby's name always appears on the
second last line or so before the letters 'AKT' and the mother is always two
lines before this, however the father's name is always on the third line or
so, age and profession follows the name and then the town of origin.
Jonathan D. Shea's book 'Russian Language Documents >from Russian Poland: A
Translation Manual for Genealogists is an excellent reference for
translating Russian records into English.

David Price
researching: PRICE of Kielce, GORLICKI of Chmielnik, BADASH and KUSHNER of
Grodno


Re: Records in Cyrillic #general

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

Hello all;

I received numerous messages regarding this topic, which I posted. I would
like to thank everyone who responded. There was a lot of information in the
replies, as well as pointers toward helpful web sites and the like. Many of
the responses were quite detailed and I would like to thank those who put in
the effort to provide me with information and the benefit of your
experiences.

Best wishes,

Sam


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen cyrillic tranlsations #general

dprice dprice
 

Here is an amazing website to assist in reading cyrillic for birth, marriage
and death records:
"Take a look at the Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP shtetlinks site
(http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/kmain.html).
We have developed a
number of transliteration aides to help people who are trying to read
the microfilmed vital records for Russian /Ukrainian towns. Among the
items you'll find there are:

* Transliteration Guides for transliterating Russian to English and
Hebrew/Yiddish to English;
* Translations of the birth, marriage, and death column headings
from the Kremenets vital records;
* Russian & Hebrew images of Jewish Given Names >from vital records,
and their English transliteration ... one set for female names,
another for male names;
* Russian & Hebrew images of the "Causes of death" entries in the
vital records, and their English transliteration
* Russian & Hebrew images of keywords, occupations and social status
that appear in the vital records, and their English transliteration
* Russian & Hebrew Images of registration town names >from vital
records and their current names >from ShtetlSeeker.

You can find most of these by going to the Kremenets ShtetLinks page
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/kmain.html
After you enter the site, click on "Kremenets Records and Transcriptions",
then click on "Kremenets Records Translation Guides".

1. Cyrillic is mostly the Greek alphabet, therefore translating Russian to
English is like doing a cryptogram: (Russian-english) p=r, b=w, m bar
below=sz, m bar above=t, h=n, u=i, n=p, g=d, u=I, v upside down=l, y=u,
x=ch, c=s. Other letters: capital T=g, r backwards=ja, pie=p, io=ju,
lamed=b. Greek capital letters are used to make the English letters for
capital T, B, F, symbols for sounds such as zh, ts, szch are used as well.
The hebrew letter 'shin' is used for the sound 'sh'.
2. Have a Russian-English list of i) jewish surnames ii) given names.
3. Have a Russian-English list of professions for Jewish people.
4. Have a vocabulary list for birth, marriage and deaths.
5. Translation of a typical birth, marriage and death record.
6. Have a Russian-English list of cardinal numbers (1,2,3,..), ordinal
numbers (1st,2nd,3rd,..), 12 months of the year, familial relationships.

The references for the above resources are listed on jewishgen.

Then there is the problem of difficult handwriting. The trick I used is
to extrapolate the words >from the few letters you can read. Also the the
location of the word tells you if it is a name, age, profession, town or
other critical info. For example the baby's name always appears on the
second last line or so before the letters 'AKT' and the mother is always two
lines before this, however the father's name is always on the third line or
so, age and profession follows the name and then the town of origin.
Jonathan D. Shea's book 'Russian Language Documents >from Russian Poland: A
Translation Manual for Genealogists is an excellent reference for
translating Russian records into English.

David Price
researching: PRICE of Kielce, GORLICKI of Chmielnik, BADASH and KUSHNER of
Grodno


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Records in Cyrillic #general

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

Hello all;

I received numerous messages regarding this topic, which I posted. I would
like to thank everyone who responded. There was a lot of information in the
replies, as well as pointers toward helpful web sites and the like. Many of
the responses were quite detailed and I would like to thank those who put in
the effort to provide me with information and the benefit of your
experiences.

Best wishes,

Sam


Re: Records in Cyrillic #general

Kirsten Gradel <kmgradel@...>
 

To throw in my two bit of advice as far as indexing Cyrillic records for a
town.

It is a huge help to have indexed the Polish years in a town first. If you
know the names in a town you can make very qualified "guesses" - even with
the very smoothly flowing handwritings which I find the hardest to read. A
kalligrafic quality is often seen and is a pleasure to both see and read.

And yes, many of the Cyrillic resemble the Latin letters but for me that
was one of the main obstacles, it took ages to get used to.

Russians of today can often not read these old records. The first Cyrillic
record I ever saw was a copy of uncle Chaim's B record >from Plock. My son
had two Russian born collegues who offered to translate, the mother was a
former lecturer in Russian litterature in USSR. They had problems and
laughed because, as they said, there was no name for the boy.

Later, when I had taught myself enough to at least extract >from these
records, I checked above B record again - and his name Chaim was exactly
where it was supposed to be. Maybe their problem was not knowing Jewish
names but that many Russians of today cannot read these old, pre 1922
records is a story I heard often.

I have wondered whether the problem is the same as I meet with younger
both Danes and English people: They maintain not to be able to read a
sloping handwriting, even in their native Danish or English, ridiculous
but no way to convince them. Do younger Russians learn an "upright" (do
not know the English word) handwriting so they likewise simply block
mentally when they see the sloping hands in the old records?

Kirsten Gradel
Nyborg, Denmark
Zamosc Archives Project Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland

e-mail: kmgradel@dadlnet.dk


Re: teaching yourself Cyrillic #general

gasdoc <bernard.sivak@...>
 

Bert:
Are you distinguishing " script " >from " cursive " or are they the
same?

Bernard SIVAK

Ann Arbor MI


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Records in Cyrillic #general

Kirsten Gradel <kmgradel@...>
 

To throw in my two bit of advice as far as indexing Cyrillic records for a
town.

It is a huge help to have indexed the Polish years in a town first. If you
know the names in a town you can make very qualified "guesses" - even with
the very smoothly flowing handwritings which I find the hardest to read. A
kalligrafic quality is often seen and is a pleasure to both see and read.

And yes, many of the Cyrillic resemble the Latin letters but for me that
was one of the main obstacles, it took ages to get used to.

Russians of today can often not read these old records. The first Cyrillic
record I ever saw was a copy of uncle Chaim's B record >from Plock. My son
had two Russian born collegues who offered to translate, the mother was a
former lecturer in Russian litterature in USSR. They had problems and
laughed because, as they said, there was no name for the boy.

Later, when I had taught myself enough to at least extract >from these
records, I checked above B record again - and his name Chaim was exactly
where it was supposed to be. Maybe their problem was not knowing Jewish
names but that many Russians of today cannot read these old, pre 1922
records is a story I heard often.

I have wondered whether the problem is the same as I meet with younger
both Danes and English people: They maintain not to be able to read a
sloping handwriting, even in their native Danish or English, ridiculous
but no way to convince them. Do younger Russians learn an "upright" (do
not know the English word) handwriting so they likewise simply block
mentally when they see the sloping hands in the old records?

Kirsten Gradel
Nyborg, Denmark
Zamosc Archives Project Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland

e-mail: kmgradel@dadlnet.dk


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: teaching yourself Cyrillic #general

gasdoc <bernard.sivak@...>
 

Bert:
Are you distinguishing " script " >from " cursive " or are they the
same?

Bernard SIVAK

Ann Arbor MI