Date   

Re: What does town name Mazowiecki mean? #poland

garymaher@...
 

Mazowsze (Masovia in English) is a historical region of Poland, so Makow
Mazowiecki is Masovian Makow, as distinguished >from Masurian Makow (if
there is one) or some other Makow.

More here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masovia

Gary Maher
NJ / USA

Several Polish towns have double names like Makow Mazowiecki. What
does the second part of their name -Mazowiecki - mean?


What does town name Mazowiecki mean? #poland

Fay Bussgang <fbussgang@...>
 

"Mazowiecki" is an adjective that tells that the town is in the
region of Masovia (Masowsza in Polish). There are many towns in
Poland with the same name, so it helps to distinguish them by adding
on what region they are in. Alexandrow Lodzki is near Lodz, but
Alexandrow Kujawski is in the Kujawski region.

Fay Bussgang


JRI Poland #Poland Re: What does town name Mazowiecki mean? #poland

garymaher@...
 

Mazowsze (Masovia in English) is a historical region of Poland, so Makow
Mazowiecki is Masovian Makow, as distinguished >from Masurian Makow (if
there is one) or some other Makow.

More here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masovia

Gary Maher
NJ / USA

Several Polish towns have double names like Makow Mazowiecki. What
does the second part of their name -Mazowiecki - mean?


JRI Poland #Poland What does town name Mazowiecki mean? #poland

Fay Bussgang <fbussgang@...>
 

"Mazowiecki" is an adjective that tells that the town is in the
region of Masovia (Masowsza in Polish). There are many towns in
Poland with the same name, so it helps to distinguish them by adding
on what region they are in. Alexandrow Lodzki is near Lodz, but
Alexandrow Kujawski is in the Kujawski region.

Fay Bussgang


Re: Mlawa yizkor books #poland

garymaher@...
 

Pinkas Hakehillot is an encyclopedia with entries on the various Jewish
communities. It is not specific to Mlawa, but apparently has a Mlawa
entry. So you are back down to three books.

The 1950 book is available here:

http://yizkor.nypl.org/index.php?id=2467

I don't know what T327 would be.

Gary Maher
NJ / USA



On Fri, 04 Nov 2005 00:00:18 -0500 "JRI-Poland digest"
Paul Concus writes:

Does anyone know the answer to this?

In the JewishGen.org Yizkor book listing for Mlawa there are the
entries:

(i) "Jewish Mlawa; its history, development, destruction", D.
Shtokfish, ed. (two volumes), Tel Aviv, 1984

(ii) "Pinkas Mlave", New York, 1950

(iii) "Pinkas hakehillot: encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Poland

vol. 4: Warsaw and its region", Jerusalem, 1989.

In the Yad Vashem Library collection (as listed on JewishGen.org),
there are listed three titles for Mlawa:
T763, which corresponds to listing (i) above
T72, which corresponds to listing (ii) above.
However, the Yad Vashem third listing T327 (Yediom, Assoc.,
1966-1972) looks as if it is a different book than (iii) above.

Is it the case that there are four Mlawa books, two of which are in

both listings, the other two being in only one of the listings?


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Mlawa yizkor books #poland

garymaher@...
 

Pinkas Hakehillot is an encyclopedia with entries on the various Jewish
communities. It is not specific to Mlawa, but apparently has a Mlawa
entry. So you are back down to three books.

The 1950 book is available here:

http://yizkor.nypl.org/index.php?id=2467

I don't know what T327 would be.

Gary Maher
NJ / USA



On Fri, 04 Nov 2005 00:00:18 -0500 "JRI-Poland digest"
Paul Concus writes:

Does anyone know the answer to this?

In the JewishGen.org Yizkor book listing for Mlawa there are the
entries:

(i) "Jewish Mlawa; its history, development, destruction", D.
Shtokfish, ed. (two volumes), Tel Aviv, 1984

(ii) "Pinkas Mlave", New York, 1950

(iii) "Pinkas hakehillot: encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Poland

vol. 4: Warsaw and its region", Jerusalem, 1989.

In the Yad Vashem Library collection (as listed on JewishGen.org),
there are listed three titles for Mlawa:
T763, which corresponds to listing (i) above
T72, which corresponds to listing (ii) above.
However, the Yad Vashem third listing T327 (Yediom, Assoc.,
1966-1972) looks as if it is a different book than (iii) above.

Is it the case that there are four Mlawa books, two of which are in

both listings, the other two being in only one of the listings?


Need help- Przemysl #general

arie meir
 

Hi to all of you

looking for Jewish survivors >from the town of Przemysl in Poland who might
have known my grandfather Chaim GLASER (who was a shoemaker),his wife
Rachela (former name STOLZBERG ) and their daughter Dvora Jenty who was born
in 1927.

The last time my family heard >from them was in 1939

Arieh Mayer
Haifa Israel

meir1935@netvision.net.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need help- Przemysl #general

arie meir
 

Hi to all of you

looking for Jewish survivors >from the town of Przemysl in Poland who might
have known my grandfather Chaim GLASER (who was a shoemaker),his wife
Rachela (former name STOLZBERG ) and their daughter Dvora Jenty who was born
in 1927.

The last time my family heard >from them was in 1939

Arieh Mayer
Haifa Israel

meir1935@netvision.net.il


Yiddish translation #general

Dr. Trevor Waner
 

I would appreciate help in translating some text on the back of a picture of
a gentleman >from Johannesburg, South Afrcia.
The text can be viewed at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7050

Or the text can be viewd at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate in the To View section - as file - VM7050

Thank you in anticipation

Trevor Waner
Rehovot, Israel
(formally Springs, South Africa)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yiddish translation #general

Dr. Trevor Waner
 

I would appreciate help in translating some text on the back of a picture of
a gentleman >from Johannesburg, South Afrcia.
The text can be viewed at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7050

Or the text can be viewd at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate in the To View section - as file - VM7050

Thank you in anticipation

Trevor Waner
Rehovot, Israel
(formally Springs, South Africa)


Lodz 1903-1904 indices complete #poland

Roni S. Liebowitz
 

We are very pleased to announce that the 1903 and 1904 indices for almost
14,000 birth, marriage and death records for the city of Lodz have now been
completed.

We now have available a list of 25 of the most common surnames found in this
batch of Lodz indices, 1903-1904. The surnames are followed by the frequency
with which they appear:

GOLDBERG 138
JAKUBOWICZ 124
KON 101
ROZENBERG 90
LEWKOWICZ 86
FRENKEL 68
LEWIN 61
FRYDMAN 60
ROZENBLUM 55
GRYNBAUM 54
ZILBERBERG 54
LIPSZYC 50
FUKS 48
ROZENCWAJG 48
GOLDMAN 47
MOSZKOWICZ 45
ROZEN 45
GROSMAN 44
GLIKSMAN 43
SZWARC 43
MARKOWICZ 42
WAJNBERG 41
BORNSZTEJN 39
KAC 39
ROZENBLAT 38

A list of all surnames found in the new data (1903-1904) is now online at:
http://www.jri-poland.org/psa/lodz_surn2.htm There are an impressive 4760
unique surnames in this list. Not surprising since Lodz contained the second
largest Jewish community in Poland, if not all of Europe. If you want to
know how many times your family's surname exits, please contact us.

We owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to all those who have been so
supportive of this project. We would also like to particularly thank
JRI-Poland's Sheila Salo, Michael Tobias, and Stanley Diamond for their
invaluable assistance and guidance.

The Lodz PSA Project consists of two phases. Phase 1 is for the years 1878
to 1898 with over 50,000 records. All of this data is now live on the
JRI-Poland database. Phase 2, also known as the "Seven-Year Initiative,"
was created to index the records for the years 1899 through 1905. With
today's addition, the total records indexed for the Seven-Year Initiative is
now 37,536 which covers the years 1899 through 1904.

However, for Phase 2, only 1899 through 1901 is currently live on the
database. We are not able to make the 1902 to 1904 indices live due to lack
of funds. As we approach the final year of the Initiative, we need help to
bring us closer to our goal of putting this data online. As in the past, all
individuals who are able to contribute US$100 or more to this effort will
become eligible to receive the complete database as an Excel file for
personal research. You need only contribute this amount *once* to receive
the databases for 1899-1905 (as each year's data becomes available and
indexing is completed).

A contribution of a minimum US$100 will ensure that you receive the data as
soon as it has been indexed, and likely in advance of its general
availability in the JRI-Poland Searchable Database. Those who are Qualified
Contributors will be able to order copies of the records through the
JRI-Poland PSA Ordering Process prior to the data going online.

If you contribue $200, you will be sent copies of the files for both Phases
1 and 2. This will also enable you to study all the 88,000 Lodz indices at
once, and perhaps find a family name whose connection you had forgotten, or
to work with the data (for example, sorting by first name) to search for a
grandmother's or great-grandmother's elusive maiden name.

Contributions towards the Lodz PSA Project, phase 2, are cumulative. Any
amounts you contributed during this period and now will be combined and you
will qualify to receive all Excel files once you reach the $100 threshold.
Think of it as an investment in your family research and in the future of
all Lodz researchers to come!

Please visit http://www.jri-poland.org/visa.htm for more information on how
to make tax-deductible donations, or send your check, money order or credit
card information to:

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, Inc.
c/o Sheila Salo, Treasurer
5607 Greenleaf Road
Cheverly, MD 20785 USA

Telephone: (301) 341-1261 (8:00 AM to 8:00 PM Eastern time only, please.)
Fax: 1-810-592-1768 (24 hours)
E-Mail: ssalo@capaccess.org

Visa or Master Card contributions may be phoned to Sheila or print out the
form at http://www.jri-poland.org/visa.htm by clicking on the VISA Card and
fax or mail it to Sheila. Please specify if you are donating to Phase 2
"LODZ 7-YEAR INITIATIVE" or for both Phases 1 and 2.

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, Inc. is a non-profit 501(c)(3)
organization. Contributions to Jewish Records Indexing - Poland are
tax-deductible in the U.S. and Canada to the extent permitted by law. The
JRI-Poland web site, mailing list, and database are hosted by JewishGen.

If we can be of any further help, please contact us. With one more year
left to index in the "Seven Year Initiative", let's pull together to raise
the funds needed to get all these indices on-line!


Sincerely,

Roni Seibel Liebowitz,
Lodz PSA/JRI-Poland Archive Coordinator
Scarsdale, New York
and
Joe Ross,
Lodz Town Leader, JRI-Poland
Bala Cynwyd, PA


JRI Poland #Poland Lodz 1903-1904 indices complete #poland

Roni S. Liebowitz
 

We are very pleased to announce that the 1903 and 1904 indices for almost
14,000 birth, marriage and death records for the city of Lodz have now been
completed.

We now have available a list of 25 of the most common surnames found in this
batch of Lodz indices, 1903-1904. The surnames are followed by the frequency
with which they appear:

GOLDBERG 138
JAKUBOWICZ 124
KON 101
ROZENBERG 90
LEWKOWICZ 86
FRENKEL 68
LEWIN 61
FRYDMAN 60
ROZENBLUM 55
GRYNBAUM 54
ZILBERBERG 54
LIPSZYC 50
FUKS 48
ROZENCWAJG 48
GOLDMAN 47
MOSZKOWICZ 45
ROZEN 45
GROSMAN 44
GLIKSMAN 43
SZWARC 43
MARKOWICZ 42
WAJNBERG 41
BORNSZTEJN 39
KAC 39
ROZENBLAT 38

A list of all surnames found in the new data (1903-1904) is now online at:
http://www.jri-poland.org/psa/lodz_surn2.htm There are an impressive 4760
unique surnames in this list. Not surprising since Lodz contained the second
largest Jewish community in Poland, if not all of Europe. If you want to
know how many times your family's surname exits, please contact us.

We owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to all those who have been so
supportive of this project. We would also like to particularly thank
JRI-Poland's Sheila Salo, Michael Tobias, and Stanley Diamond for their
invaluable assistance and guidance.

The Lodz PSA Project consists of two phases. Phase 1 is for the years 1878
to 1898 with over 50,000 records. All of this data is now live on the
JRI-Poland database. Phase 2, also known as the "Seven-Year Initiative,"
was created to index the records for the years 1899 through 1905. With
today's addition, the total records indexed for the Seven-Year Initiative is
now 37,536 which covers the years 1899 through 1904.

However, for Phase 2, only 1899 through 1901 is currently live on the
database. We are not able to make the 1902 to 1904 indices live due to lack
of funds. As we approach the final year of the Initiative, we need help to
bring us closer to our goal of putting this data online. As in the past, all
individuals who are able to contribute US$100 or more to this effort will
become eligible to receive the complete database as an Excel file for
personal research. You need only contribute this amount *once* to receive
the databases for 1899-1905 (as each year's data becomes available and
indexing is completed).

A contribution of a minimum US$100 will ensure that you receive the data as
soon as it has been indexed, and likely in advance of its general
availability in the JRI-Poland Searchable Database. Those who are Qualified
Contributors will be able to order copies of the records through the
JRI-Poland PSA Ordering Process prior to the data going online.

If you contribue $200, you will be sent copies of the files for both Phases
1 and 2. This will also enable you to study all the 88,000 Lodz indices at
once, and perhaps find a family name whose connection you had forgotten, or
to work with the data (for example, sorting by first name) to search for a
grandmother's or great-grandmother's elusive maiden name.

Contributions towards the Lodz PSA Project, phase 2, are cumulative. Any
amounts you contributed during this period and now will be combined and you
will qualify to receive all Excel files once you reach the $100 threshold.
Think of it as an investment in your family research and in the future of
all Lodz researchers to come!

Please visit http://www.jri-poland.org/visa.htm for more information on how
to make tax-deductible donations, or send your check, money order or credit
card information to:

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, Inc.
c/o Sheila Salo, Treasurer
5607 Greenleaf Road
Cheverly, MD 20785 USA

Telephone: (301) 341-1261 (8:00 AM to 8:00 PM Eastern time only, please.)
Fax: 1-810-592-1768 (24 hours)
E-Mail: ssalo@capaccess.org

Visa or Master Card contributions may be phoned to Sheila or print out the
form at http://www.jri-poland.org/visa.htm by clicking on the VISA Card and
fax or mail it to Sheila. Please specify if you are donating to Phase 2
"LODZ 7-YEAR INITIATIVE" or for both Phases 1 and 2.

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, Inc. is a non-profit 501(c)(3)
organization. Contributions to Jewish Records Indexing - Poland are
tax-deductible in the U.S. and Canada to the extent permitted by law. The
JRI-Poland web site, mailing list, and database are hosted by JewishGen.

If we can be of any further help, please contact us. With one more year
left to index in the "Seven Year Initiative", let's pull together to raise
the funds needed to get all these indices on-line!


Sincerely,

Roni Seibel Liebowitz,
Lodz PSA/JRI-Poland Archive Coordinator
Scarsdale, New York
and
Joe Ross,
Lodz Town Leader, JRI-Poland
Bala Cynwyd, PA


Re: Nyirmada Cemetery #hungary

Katz, Itzik <Itzik.Katz@...>
 

Dear Tom,

Thank you for your input.

Unfortunately, since I live in Israel, I have no access to FHL films.
Another thing is that I'm looking for the death record/tombstone of
people born ca. 1813-1816. I am not sure if they lived to be 70 years
old to be included in the film you mentioned.
Thank you,

Isaac Katz
Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Venetianer [mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br]=20
Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2005 1:56 PM
To: Hungarian-SIG
Cc: Katz, Itzik
Subject: *RE: Nyirmada Cemetery

You will find death records for Mada at FHL, film number 642914. Periods
covered are 1880 through 1895.
Tom

At 00:00 -0500 03.11.2005, Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com wrote:
Subject: RE: Nyirmada Cemetery
From: "Katz, Itzik" <Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Oct 2005 09:00:48 +0200
X-Message-Number: 4

I am looking for lists, photos or any other information concerning the
people buried in Nyirmada (aka Kismada or Nagymada or Mada) in Szabolcs
County.
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: Nyirmada Cemetery #hungary

Katz, Itzik <Itzik.Katz@...>
 

Dear Tom,

Thank you for your input.

Unfortunately, since I live in Israel, I have no access to FHL films.
Another thing is that I'm looking for the death record/tombstone of
people born ca. 1813-1816. I am not sure if they lived to be 70 years
old to be included in the film you mentioned.
Thank you,

Isaac Katz
Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Venetianer [mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br]=20
Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2005 1:56 PM
To: Hungarian-SIG
Cc: Katz, Itzik
Subject: *RE: Nyirmada Cemetery

You will find death records for Mada at FHL, film number 642914. Periods
covered are 1880 through 1895.
Tom

At 00:00 -0500 03.11.2005, Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com wrote:
Subject: RE: Nyirmada Cemetery
From: "Katz, Itzik" <Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Oct 2005 09:00:48 +0200
X-Message-Number: 4

I am looking for lists, photos or any other information concerning the
people buried in Nyirmada (aka Kismada or Nagymada or Mada) in Szabolcs
County.
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Re: Some Basic Questions #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Pat,

There are records in the Hungarian state archives, the archives in
Nyireghaza, and in many other locations that have not been filmed by
the FHL. When JewishGen volunteers and staff come across such records
they attempt to acquire such records and obtain permission for
JewishGen to transcribe them. If you are unable to find the records
you want in the FHL catalog, you need to contact other sources,
including the closest regional and national archives to find out if
such records exist. It's always a good idea to first post your inquiry
to the Hungarian SIG website because many researchers have obtained
records that have not been filmed by the FHL. The next step is to
contact various sources directly to find out if the records you seek
exist. H-SIG members may also be able to direct you to the places that
are most likely to have the records you seek.

The FHL donated a catalog of its Jewish records to JewishGen several
years ago. That database, which you can find on the JewishGen website,
does not include Jewish records that have been filmed during the time
when this catalog was created. You need to go to the FHL website or
your local FHL branch for more current information.

I hope that this answers your question.

Vivian Kahn

Subject: re:Some Basic Questions
From: Patricia J Weisshaus <patjw28@earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2005 12:16:32 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Dear Vivian,

You mention more records >from Nireghaza. You also say that the FHL
list is
dated. Do you know of these other records >from Nireghaza are being/have
been filed and just not included in the list online, or are the the
numbers
available a the FHC?

Pat

12:58 AM On 10/28/2005, vkahn@kmort.com wrote:
Dear Peter,

You've asked some questions for which others who have recently begun
researching Hungarian Jewish roots may also need answers.

Hungary began civil registration in October 1895. Before then, vital
records were maintained by the Jewish community and turned over to the
authorities. One copy of these records was kept in the place where
the
records were generated and the other was usually sent to the county
(megye). As a result, even though some of the local records were
destroyed during WWII, others that were kept in county, regional, or
national archives may have been preserved. The Mormon Family History
Library (FHL) has filmed many records >from pre-World War I Hungary,
which
included areas that are in present-day Hungary as well as places that
are
now in Slovakia, Romania, Ukraine, Yugoslavia, and other modern
nations
surrounding Hungary. The first step in researching your roots is to
find
out in which current nation your ancestors lived.

Check the FHL on-line catalogue to see if they have filmed Jewish
records
from the places where your relatives lived. You can search a somewhat
dated version of the FHL collection of Jewish records at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/FHLC/
You should also search the surnames and places that you are
researching in
the JewishGen Hungary Database (JHD)
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary >.

If you have family >from areas that are in present-day Hungary or
Slovakia,
you may be able to obtain records by writing to the Hungarian or
Slovak
National Archives. Check the Hungarian SIG message archives and
website
for current addresses. Your research will be more difficult if your
family came >from parts of pre-Trianon Hungary that are now in Romania
or
the Ukraine. The FHL has microfilmed most of the 1848 Jewish Census
records that are held by the Hungarian National
Archives, but we continue to find records in regional archives
(Nyireghaza and Satorjaujhely, for example) and archives in Romania.
We know that there are other census and Jewish vital records in
Romanian
and Ukrainian archives. JewishGen is continuing to try and obtain
these
records and get permission to create indices that we can publish
on-line.

In addition to searching the JewishGen Hungary Database (JHD), you
should
send messages to the Hungarian SIG mailing list to find out if anyone
is
researching your names and/or places or can suggest other resources.
We
have more than 800 members in more than a dozen countries and many of
them
are fluent in Hungarian. Make sure to use a meaningful subject line
(e.g.
Searching KAHAN/Sziget) and include your place of residence with your
full
name. This will help folks to identify resources
that are available close to where you live. Also, make sure to
turn off SPAM blockers to allow H-SIG members to reach you.

Please feel free to contact me off-line or, if your questions might
be of
general interest, through the Hungarian SIG discussion group.

Happy hunting!

Vivian Kahn, Hungarian SIG Coordinator


*RE: Nyirmada Cemetery #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

You will find death records for Mada at FHL, film number 642914. Periods covered are 1880 through 1895.
Tom

At 00:00 -0500 03.11.2005, Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com wrote:
Subject: RE: Nyirmada Cemetery
From: "Katz, Itzik" <Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Oct 2005 09:00:48 +0200
X-Message-Number: 4

I am looking for lists, photos or any other information concerning the
people buried in Nyirmada (aka Kismada or Nagymada or Mada) in Szabolcs
County.
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Some Basic Questions #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Pat,

There are records in the Hungarian state archives, the archives in
Nyireghaza, and in many other locations that have not been filmed by
the FHL. When JewishGen volunteers and staff come across such records
they attempt to acquire such records and obtain permission for
JewishGen to transcribe them. If you are unable to find the records
you want in the FHL catalog, you need to contact other sources,
including the closest regional and national archives to find out if
such records exist. It's always a good idea to first post your inquiry
to the Hungarian SIG website because many researchers have obtained
records that have not been filmed by the FHL. The next step is to
contact various sources directly to find out if the records you seek
exist. H-SIG members may also be able to direct you to the places that
are most likely to have the records you seek.

The FHL donated a catalog of its Jewish records to JewishGen several
years ago. That database, which you can find on the JewishGen website,
does not include Jewish records that have been filmed during the time
when this catalog was created. You need to go to the FHL website or
your local FHL branch for more current information.

I hope that this answers your question.

Vivian Kahn

Subject: re:Some Basic Questions
From: Patricia J Weisshaus <patjw28@earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2005 12:16:32 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Dear Vivian,

You mention more records >from Nireghaza. You also say that the FHL
list is
dated. Do you know of these other records >from Nireghaza are being/have
been filed and just not included in the list online, or are the the
numbers
available a the FHC?

Pat

12:58 AM On 10/28/2005, vkahn@kmort.com wrote:
Dear Peter,

You've asked some questions for which others who have recently begun
researching Hungarian Jewish roots may also need answers.

Hungary began civil registration in October 1895. Before then, vital
records were maintained by the Jewish community and turned over to the
authorities. One copy of these records was kept in the place where
the
records were generated and the other was usually sent to the county
(megye). As a result, even though some of the local records were
destroyed during WWII, others that were kept in county, regional, or
national archives may have been preserved. The Mormon Family History
Library (FHL) has filmed many records >from pre-World War I Hungary,
which
included areas that are in present-day Hungary as well as places that
are
now in Slovakia, Romania, Ukraine, Yugoslavia, and other modern
nations
surrounding Hungary. The first step in researching your roots is to
find
out in which current nation your ancestors lived.

Check the FHL on-line catalogue to see if they have filmed Jewish
records
from the places where your relatives lived. You can search a somewhat
dated version of the FHL collection of Jewish records at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/FHLC/
You should also search the surnames and places that you are
researching in
the JewishGen Hungary Database (JHD)
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary >.

If you have family >from areas that are in present-day Hungary or
Slovakia,
you may be able to obtain records by writing to the Hungarian or
Slovak
National Archives. Check the Hungarian SIG message archives and
website
for current addresses. Your research will be more difficult if your
family came >from parts of pre-Trianon Hungary that are now in Romania
or
the Ukraine. The FHL has microfilmed most of the 1848 Jewish Census
records that are held by the Hungarian National
Archives, but we continue to find records in regional archives
(Nyireghaza and Satorjaujhely, for example) and archives in Romania.
We know that there are other census and Jewish vital records in
Romanian
and Ukrainian archives. JewishGen is continuing to try and obtain
these
records and get permission to create indices that we can publish
on-line.

In addition to searching the JewishGen Hungary Database (JHD), you
should
send messages to the Hungarian SIG mailing list to find out if anyone
is
researching your names and/or places or can suggest other resources.
We
have more than 800 members in more than a dozen countries and many of
them
are fluent in Hungarian. Make sure to use a meaningful subject line
(e.g.
Searching KAHAN/Sziget) and include your place of residence with your
full
name. This will help folks to identify resources
that are available close to where you live. Also, make sure to
turn off SPAM blockers to allow H-SIG members to reach you.

Please feel free to contact me off-line or, if your questions might
be of
general interest, through the Hungarian SIG discussion group.

Happy hunting!

Vivian Kahn, Hungarian SIG Coordinator


Hungary SIG #Hungary *RE: Nyirmada Cemetery #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

You will find death records for Mada at FHL, film number 642914. Periods covered are 1880 through 1895.
Tom

At 00:00 -0500 03.11.2005, Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com wrote:
Subject: RE: Nyirmada Cemetery
From: "Katz, Itzik" <Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Oct 2005 09:00:48 +0200
X-Message-Number: 4

I am looking for lists, photos or any other information concerning the
people buried in Nyirmada (aka Kismada or Nagymada or Mada) in Szabolcs
County.
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Re: The Origins of Katz Surname #hungary

Robert Neu
 

Hi.
Meaning of Katz straight >from Ancestry.com
Jewish (Ashkenazic): acronym >from the Hebrew phrase
kohen tsedek ‘priest of righteousness’ (see Cohen).

Robert Neu

--- "Katz, Itzik" <Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com> wrote:

Dear Siggers,

My cousin had taken the FTDNA Y37 test and the
results that came back
matched several people, one of which is an exact
match with us. The DNA
matching indicate that we are all relatives and that
our common ancestor
(depending on the level of DNA matchin) lived
between 200 to 600 years
ago.
The ancestors of these people are known to have come
from Ukraine and
Poland. My family is the only one >from Hungary.

All the people we match with (exact or partial
match) are known to be
Kohanim as the Katz surname would suggest. However,
only one of them
carry
the surname Katz. All the others have different
surnames like Kahan,
Bloom,
Kaplansky, Feinberg, etc. Most of these people have
indications that
thier
surname was changed >from Kahan or Kohen but not from
Katz.

I always believed that Katz was one of those ancient
surnames since it
has a
meaning in Hebrew and that it was carried over the
generations.

Is it possible that Katz is a germanized name to
comply with the 1786
Empiral naming Order?

I have seen in other places that Katz was also used
as a title and not
as a
surname. For examply, Rabby Shimshon Eliezer Katz
Gottdiener who was a
"Av-Beit Din (head of Jewish court)" in Tiszalok (in
the book "Shem
Ha'Gdolim" by Pinhas Zelig Schwartz) who is known to
have been a Kohen.
Gottdiener is a greminazed name of the Hebrew
surnmae Ovadia (server of
God).

Thank you,
Itzik Katz
Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE:The Origins of Katz Surname #hungary

Robert Neu
 

Hi.
Meaning of Katz straight >from Ancestry.com
Jewish (Ashkenazic): acronym >from the Hebrew phrase
kohen tsedek ‘priest of righteousness’ (see Cohen).

Robert Neu

--- "Katz, Itzik" <Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com> wrote:

Dear Siggers,

My cousin had taken the FTDNA Y37 test and the
results that came back
matched several people, one of which is an exact
match with us. The DNA
matching indicate that we are all relatives and that
our common ancestor
(depending on the level of DNA matchin) lived
between 200 to 600 years
ago.
The ancestors of these people are known to have come
from Ukraine and
Poland. My family is the only one >from Hungary.

All the people we match with (exact or partial
match) are known to be
Kohanim as the Katz surname would suggest. However,
only one of them
carry
the surname Katz. All the others have different
surnames like Kahan,
Bloom,
Kaplansky, Feinberg, etc. Most of these people have
indications that
thier
surname was changed >from Kahan or Kohen but not from
Katz.

I always believed that Katz was one of those ancient
surnames since it
has a
meaning in Hebrew and that it was carried over the
generations.

Is it possible that Katz is a germanized name to
comply with the 1786
Empiral naming Order?

I have seen in other places that Katz was also used
as a title and not
as a
surname. For examply, Rabby Shimshon Eliezer Katz
Gottdiener who was a
"Av-Beit Din (head of Jewish court)" in Tiszalok (in
the book "Shem
Ha'Gdolim" by Pinhas Zelig Schwartz) who is known to
have been a Kohen.
Gottdiener is a greminazed name of the Hebrew
surnmae Ovadia (server of
God).

Thank you,
Itzik Katz
Israel