Date   

reluctant relatives #general

Wendygriswold <wendygriswold@...>
 

Hi, cousins.
Please bear with me if this message is out of synch with anything that's
been going on recently. I have been out of the country and have about 6
weeks' worth of messages to catch up on.

But I wanted to share publicly a thought about this topic that I have
already shared privately with some members.

After years of searching I found the descendants of my grandfather's sister.
They told me nicely but firmly that they didn't want any contact. I figured
you catch more flies with honey, and told them I would "go away and leave
them alone." I also figured - and I turned out to be right - that eventually
one of the kids would have a school assignment involving family history or
would get curious about family history and start Googling the family name.
That's exactly what happened, and one of the younger generation responded to
my ancient posting at genealogy.com, which I had forgotten all about. So I
politely explained the situation. And I now have a bunch of "younger
generations" who will doubtless try to persuade the "older generations" to
drop their "non-intervention policy." Not that anyone remembers what the
80-year-old family rift was all about anyway.

And meanwhile they can read family history postings on my yahoo groups
listserv.

A little tricky? Well, they did contact me first.

Another few months, I would have put up a family website and they could have
just gone there and the surreptitious e-mails wouldn't have been necessary.

The point is: leave enough clues on the internet and someone >from the
extended family is liable to find you and start a dialogue.

Good luck,

Wendy Griswold
Arlington VA

Searching: Blitz, Pfeiffer/Fifer (Zurawno, near Lvov),
Einhorn, Wenzelberg (any spelling), Shifuldrem (Nowy Sacz area)
Sorokoff (Ukraine/Vitebsk)
Schauer (Austria>USA)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen reluctant relatives #general

Wendygriswold <wendygriswold@...>
 

Hi, cousins.
Please bear with me if this message is out of synch with anything that's
been going on recently. I have been out of the country and have about 6
weeks' worth of messages to catch up on.

But I wanted to share publicly a thought about this topic that I have
already shared privately with some members.

After years of searching I found the descendants of my grandfather's sister.
They told me nicely but firmly that they didn't want any contact. I figured
you catch more flies with honey, and told them I would "go away and leave
them alone." I also figured - and I turned out to be right - that eventually
one of the kids would have a school assignment involving family history or
would get curious about family history and start Googling the family name.
That's exactly what happened, and one of the younger generation responded to
my ancient posting at genealogy.com, which I had forgotten all about. So I
politely explained the situation. And I now have a bunch of "younger
generations" who will doubtless try to persuade the "older generations" to
drop their "non-intervention policy." Not that anyone remembers what the
80-year-old family rift was all about anyway.

And meanwhile they can read family history postings on my yahoo groups
listserv.

A little tricky? Well, they did contact me first.

Another few months, I would have put up a family website and they could have
just gone there and the surreptitious e-mails wouldn't have been necessary.

The point is: leave enough clues on the internet and someone >from the
extended family is liable to find you and start a dialogue.

Good luck,

Wendy Griswold
Arlington VA

Searching: Blitz, Pfeiffer/Fifer (Zurawno, near Lvov),
Einhorn, Wenzelberg (any spelling), Shifuldrem (Nowy Sacz area)
Sorokoff (Ukraine/Vitebsk)
Schauer (Austria>USA)


1896 Rabbi-New York City #general

mhlcswc2@...
 

I'm wondering if this is a gender error, female Rabbis in 1896, or did the
Rabbi marry Dave's aunt?

Marcia Hoffman
Baltimore, MD

Would like to know if there is a listing of the Rabbis and the names of
the congregrations served during 1896 in New York City. In particular I
am seaching for a Rabbi by the name of Rabbi R. LEIBOWITZ who married
an Uncle of mine in August of 1896. Many thanks, Dave Estes Winston at
E-Mail:dave279@charter.net
MODERATOR NOTE: Or is "married" meant to convey "performed the marriage
ceremony?" Dave is most welcome to post a clarification.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1896 Rabbi-New York City #general

mhlcswc2@...
 

I'm wondering if this is a gender error, female Rabbis in 1896, or did the
Rabbi marry Dave's aunt?

Marcia Hoffman
Baltimore, MD

Would like to know if there is a listing of the Rabbis and the names of
the congregrations served during 1896 in New York City. In particular I
am seaching for a Rabbi by the name of Rabbi R. LEIBOWITZ who married
an Uncle of mine in August of 1896. Many thanks, Dave Estes Winston at
E-Mail:dave279@charter.net
MODERATOR NOTE: Or is "married" meant to convey "performed the marriage
ceremony?" Dave is most welcome to post a clarification.


BENJAMIN Family Chumash #general

Stuart Raperport <sturappa@...>
 

I have a Chumash that belonged to the BENJAMIN family
and contains the original hand written record of names
and dates of death of kin >from 1777 until 1852
together with some ages. I would very much like to
pass this on in the UK, to a genuine member of this
family who can prove their connection and interest. As
a guide the last entry is, "Lucy died 29 Jan 1852
Aged 69 years".
Stuart Raperport
sturappa@yahoo.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen BENJAMIN Family Chumash #general

Stuart Raperport <sturappa@...>
 

I have a Chumash that belonged to the BENJAMIN family
and contains the original hand written record of names
and dates of death of kin >from 1777 until 1852
together with some ages. I would very much like to
pass this on in the UK, to a genuine member of this
family who can prove their connection and interest. As
a guide the last entry is, "Lucy died 29 Jan 1852
Aged 69 years".
Stuart Raperport
sturappa@yahoo.com


Re: Matronymics and the way Zayin is pronounced #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 3/6/2006 11:23:24 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
israel@math.ubc.ca writes, in response to my statement:

There is no sound in the German language that resembles the Z in "zero."
< I hesitate to question Michael's knowledge of German, but I was taught
< that a single s before a vowel (as in "sie" or "Hase") is pronounced as
< the English z in "zero". It certainly sounds that way to me when I
< hear German. I this a question of regional differences?

==Mea culpa! I was just half-way through the third grade when I left
Germany . . . It would have been more correct for me to say Hebrew, as
pronounced by Jews in Germany and Western Europe, pronounced the letter zayin
with an S sound, indistinguishable >from samekh or sin. And the letter Z in
German, was always pronounced "ts," whether at the beginning, the middle or
the end of a word.

==I thank Robert Israel for pointing out to me the fact that the
z-as-in-zero sound is actually heard in German. I wondered whether it was
regional (I was born and schooled in middle Franconia) and to test it, I
stuck the tip of my tongue between my teeth and quickly withdrew it as I
said "Sie" and "Sonne" and discovered that the z-as-in-zero sound did not
sound alien to me--but it worked neither for Samstag nor for Sontag. Did we
have that sound in our home and school, or had it become familiar to me from
hearing all those unFrankish people in the decades since?

==One plausible alternative: The z-as-in-zero sound did not obtain in
Judaeo-German, the prototypical Yiddish, and since it was a relatively lesser
occurrence in speech, it was not acquired by those whose environment (in the
synagogue or in the countryside) did not use it.

==Come to think of it, my mother could hold us in stitches when she told us
how, on her visit to her sister's in-laws in Hungary, she would be addressed
as "Du ~Z~ ue ~z~ e" [~z~ like z in zero]

==Which is really where I entered the argument, about the origin of the
names Sussman and Suskind which, I think, are never pronounced with an
initial ~z~

Michael Bernet, New York


Volyhna Russia/Ukraine #general

david wallace <dwphoto@...>
 

The Shtetl of Volyhma Russia/ Ukraine.

I have just received a copy of my great grandfathers British Naturalisation
certificate.
It says he was born in 1880 at a place called Volyhma or Volynma in Russia.
The Shtetl should be somewhere close to Kiev in Ukraine, but I can't find it
in Jewish Gen Shtetl Seeker or any where else on the Internet.
Can any help locate it.
Thankyou
David Wallace
Sydney
Australia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Matronymics and the way Zayin is pronounced #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 3/6/2006 11:23:24 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
israel@math.ubc.ca writes, in response to my statement:

There is no sound in the German language that resembles the Z in "zero."
< I hesitate to question Michael's knowledge of German, but I was taught
< that a single s before a vowel (as in "sie" or "Hase") is pronounced as
< the English z in "zero". It certainly sounds that way to me when I
< hear German. I this a question of regional differences?

==Mea culpa! I was just half-way through the third grade when I left
Germany . . . It would have been more correct for me to say Hebrew, as
pronounced by Jews in Germany and Western Europe, pronounced the letter zayin
with an S sound, indistinguishable >from samekh or sin. And the letter Z in
German, was always pronounced "ts," whether at the beginning, the middle or
the end of a word.

==I thank Robert Israel for pointing out to me the fact that the
z-as-in-zero sound is actually heard in German. I wondered whether it was
regional (I was born and schooled in middle Franconia) and to test it, I
stuck the tip of my tongue between my teeth and quickly withdrew it as I
said "Sie" and "Sonne" and discovered that the z-as-in-zero sound did not
sound alien to me--but it worked neither for Samstag nor for Sontag. Did we
have that sound in our home and school, or had it become familiar to me from
hearing all those unFrankish people in the decades since?

==One plausible alternative: The z-as-in-zero sound did not obtain in
Judaeo-German, the prototypical Yiddish, and since it was a relatively lesser
occurrence in speech, it was not acquired by those whose environment (in the
synagogue or in the countryside) did not use it.

==Come to think of it, my mother could hold us in stitches when she told us
how, on her visit to her sister's in-laws in Hungary, she would be addressed
as "Du ~Z~ ue ~z~ e" [~z~ like z in zero]

==Which is really where I entered the argument, about the origin of the
names Sussman and Suskind which, I think, are never pronounced with an
initial ~z~

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Volyhna Russia/Ukraine #general

david wallace <dwphoto@...>
 

The Shtetl of Volyhma Russia/ Ukraine.

I have just received a copy of my great grandfathers British Naturalisation
certificate.
It says he was born in 1880 at a place called Volyhma or Volynma in Russia.
The Shtetl should be somewhere close to Kiev in Ukraine, but I can't find it
in Jewish Gen Shtetl Seeker or any where else on the Internet.
Can any help locate it.
Thankyou
David Wallace
Sydney
Australia


Re: Willwacze/Willachia Romania #general

Sam Wolff <baalh@...>
 

I would suggest beginning in the Jewish cemetery of
Craiova, capital of the region. I have been there, and
the book of names of those buried there is accessible
and well organized (in alphabetical order according to
family name). No knowledge of Romanian is necessary to
read the names in the book.

Sam Wolff
Jerusalem

I am in a terrible dilemma. For almost 10 years I have
been doing genealogy basing my search on what I thought was the
village/town of my grandparents which I was led to believe was
called Willwacze or Willachia (pronounced Vilok) which is in
Romania. I have now been told that this is not a town but
an area. According to my both grandparents ships logs they both
as well as all their family put last place of residence as
Willwacze/ Willachia. Now how am I to find out which town or
village they really did come from.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Willwacze/Willachia Romania #general

Sam Wolff <baalh@...>
 

I would suggest beginning in the Jewish cemetery of
Craiova, capital of the region. I have been there, and
the book of names of those buried there is accessible
and well organized (in alphabetical order according to
family name). No knowledge of Romanian is necessary to
read the names in the book.

Sam Wolff
Jerusalem

I am in a terrible dilemma. For almost 10 years I have
been doing genealogy basing my search on what I thought was the
village/town of my grandparents which I was led to believe was
called Willwacze or Willachia (pronounced Vilok) which is in
Romania. I have now been told that this is not a town but
an area. According to my both grandparents ships logs they both
as well as all their family put last place of residence as
Willwacze/ Willachia. Now how am I to find out which town or
village they really did come from.


Re: Saving data #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Anita" <anitac47@optonline.net> wrote

I was reading this month's AARP bulletin (the American Assoc. of Retired
Persons) had a short blurb which stated that:
CD-R and CD-RW when recording music or videos have a life of 2-5 years.
The "burning" of them actually shortens the life. I would assume this
applies to data recordings as well (I'm sure some IT professionals out
there will correct this assumption if needed).
See this article "CD Life Span" in Computerworld
http://www.computerworld.com/hardwaretopics/storage/story/0,10801,107989,00.html

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Saving data #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Anita" <anitac47@optonline.net> wrote

I was reading this month's AARP bulletin (the American Assoc. of Retired
Persons) had a short blurb which stated that:
CD-R and CD-RW when recording music or videos have a life of 2-5 years.
The "burning" of them actually shortens the life. I would assume this
applies to data recordings as well (I'm sure some IT professionals out
there will correct this assumption if needed).
See this article "CD Life Span" in Computerworld
http://www.computerworld.com/hardwaretopics/storage/story/0,10801,107989,00.html

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


Re: Problems with Vad Yashem Database #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

During the weeks months which followed the opening of Yad Vashem
Database, in November 2004, there were many postings on the Jewishgen
about different problems and the way to solve it (see the archives).

As far as I'm concerned, I found very soon that, most of the time, it
depends on which computer you are working with : a PC or a MAC. It
seems that it's more difficult with a MAC. Secundly, it depends on
which navigator, and which version or i(, you are using. With my MAC
and Internet Explorer 5.1 it's very difficult to obtain some result :
the answer often says there is no results while with Netscape 7.0 I
have no problem.
--
Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Problems with Vad Yashem Database #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

During the weeks months which followed the opening of Yad Vashem
Database, in November 2004, there were many postings on the Jewishgen
about different problems and the way to solve it (see the archives).

As far as I'm concerned, I found very soon that, most of the time, it
depends on which computer you are working with : a PC or a MAC. It
seems that it's more difficult with a MAC. Secundly, it depends on
which navigator, and which version or i(, you are using. With my MAC
and Internet Explorer 5.1 it's very difficult to obtain some result :
the answer often says there is no results while with Netscape 7.0 I
have no problem.
--
Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


Re: British Jewish Newspaper Archive #general

Ian Singer <iansinger@...>
 

Fiona Carver wrote:
The Jewish Chronicle newspaper has just launched an Archive service,
which can be found on their website www.thejc.com . This archive gives
people free and paid for access to search through the original published
pages of The Jewish Chronicle >from 1841.
How do you get free? If I put anything in seach it gives me a
subscription page.

Ian Singer
--

See my homepage at http://www.iansinger.com
Join the iansinger_relatives@iansinger.com mailing list with msg to
Iansinger_relatives-request@iansinger.com & in body subscribe <password>
I am near Toronto Canada, can I tell where you are >from your reply?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: British Jewish Newspaper Archive #general

Ian Singer <iansinger@...>
 

Fiona Carver wrote:
The Jewish Chronicle newspaper has just launched an Archive service,
which can be found on their website www.thejc.com . This archive gives
people free and paid for access to search through the original published
pages of The Jewish Chronicle >from 1841.
How do you get free? If I put anything in seach it gives me a
subscription page.

Ian Singer
--

See my homepage at http://www.iansinger.com
Join the iansinger_relatives@iansinger.com mailing list with msg to
Iansinger_relatives-request@iansinger.com & in body subscribe <password>
I am near Toronto Canada, can I tell where you are >from your reply?


origins of Jewish doll? #general

mgordy <mgordy@...>
 

A little girl we know was recently given a limited edition porcelaine doll
by an old lady who says she bought it in Boston during the 1940s. We lifted
up the doll's (real) blonde hair and discovered the dollmaker had carved a
Mogen David into its skull as part of the design -- like a brand. We can't
think what this means or where the doll comes >from (lady, who is not Jewish,
said she bought it in a shop.)
The Jewish star appears on the lower back of the skull, flanked by the
letters K and R. The inscription "S & H" appears just below the star, and
beneath that, the marking "116-A."
I'd be grateful if someone could tell me of the doll's provenance, or
point me toward a source that may shed some light on its mysterious brand.'

Molly Gordy -- NYC
Searching for GORODETSKY of Malin, Zvhil, Berdichev and Korosten and
GLASSMAN of Chernigov.


Romanian translation #general

Jon Klein <kleins4@...>
 

from a listing of Moldovan business people in 1896 the entry reads:
B. Steinberg din Panciu datoreaza bani lui C. Unter

Could someone please translate this for me?
Jon Klein