Date   

Re: Post WWI Austrian citizenship #galicia

Mike Joseph
 

Lancy Spalter raises some very interesting questions. But I am not sure
I am convinced by Suzan & Ron Wynne's comment:
There were massive problems in Poland as well, of course. I don't mean
to minimize them. But, it makes sense that people would have been
seeking safety, a way to make a decent living, and comfort. It just
doesn't seem that Vienna would have offered any of those features.
I doubt that the decision to retain Polish nationality can be read as a
positive vote for the safety and comfort of life in Poland. Other
factors were are work. For many young Jewish Galicians, neither Poland
nor Austria seemed to offer much post-First World War. Germany was a
different matter.

My grandfather was decorated for war service in the Austro-Hungarian
Army, despite which he too maintained Polish nationality. However that
was purely by default. By 1918 he had already emigrated to Germany,
where he raised a family, ran a business, and tried without success to
obtain German nationality - refused in 1924 and impossible by 1933.

Three years after Hitler came to power, and still holding a Polish
passport, he wrote "To be out of Poland’s hell. I don’t want to be there
again at any price’.

Despite this, my mother surmised that her father was not completely
dismayed to be stuck with a Polish passport in Germany. He was still
supporting his parents, siblings and cousins in Galicia. And ‘he didn’t
want to find himself fighting in the German Army against his own family
in another war’.

As a Polish national, he was deported with his wife and children to
Poland in 1938.

Mike Joseph


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Post WWI Austrian citizenship #galicia

Mike Joseph
 

Lancy Spalter raises some very interesting questions. But I am not sure
I am convinced by Suzan & Ron Wynne's comment:
There were massive problems in Poland as well, of course. I don't mean
to minimize them. But, it makes sense that people would have been
seeking safety, a way to make a decent living, and comfort. It just
doesn't seem that Vienna would have offered any of those features.
I doubt that the decision to retain Polish nationality can be read as a
positive vote for the safety and comfort of life in Poland. Other
factors were are work. For many young Jewish Galicians, neither Poland
nor Austria seemed to offer much post-First World War. Germany was a
different matter.

My grandfather was decorated for war service in the Austro-Hungarian
Army, despite which he too maintained Polish nationality. However that
was purely by default. By 1918 he had already emigrated to Germany,
where he raised a family, ran a business, and tried without success to
obtain German nationality - refused in 1924 and impossible by 1933.

Three years after Hitler came to power, and still holding a Polish
passport, he wrote "To be out of Poland’s hell. I don’t want to be there
again at any price’.

Despite this, my mother surmised that her father was not completely
dismayed to be stuck with a Polish passport in Germany. He was still
supporting his parents, siblings and cousins in Galicia. And ‘he didn’t
want to find himself fighting in the German Army against his own family
in another war’.

As a Polish national, he was deported with his wife and children to
Poland in 1938.

Mike Joseph


Re: galicia digest: June 10, 2006 #galicia

Edward Goldstein <editor.TheGalitzianer@...>
 

In addition to the several reasons that have been advanced, Polish
patriotism may have played a role in the choice many Galician Jews --
especially young adults -- made in their choice of citizenship.

My father, who had served in the Polish army, often mentioned to us
children that he returned to Galicia full of hope for a new Poland in
which Jews would be treated with full civil rights. Of course, it did
not take him long to be disappointed. Galicia had been the poorest of
the areas >from which modern Poland was assembled. In addition, it had
suffered terribly in the War. Jobs were hard to find. And then,
before long, Polish anti-Semitism -- both popular and government
sponsored -- was added to this mix.

Edward Goldstein


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: galicia digest: June 10, 2006 #galicia

Edward Goldstein <editor.TheGalitzianer@...>
 

In addition to the several reasons that have been advanced, Polish
patriotism may have played a role in the choice many Galician Jews --
especially young adults -- made in their choice of citizenship.

My father, who had served in the Polish army, often mentioned to us
children that he returned to Galicia full of hope for a new Poland in
which Jews would be treated with full civil rights. Of course, it did
not take him long to be disappointed. Galicia had been the poorest of
the areas >from which modern Poland was assembled. In addition, it had
suffered terribly in the War. Jobs were hard to find. And then,
before long, Polish anti-Semitism -- both popular and government
sponsored -- was added to this mix.

Edward Goldstein


Post WWI Austrian citizenship #galicia

Johannes Heidecker <Johannes@...>
 

One reason for opting for a citizenship was to keep their possessions
(specifically real estate) and the right to stay. I do not know for
Poland, but for SHS (later Jugoslavia) or Italy. Many Austrian officers
opted for Italian citizenship to keep their villas and right to stay on
the coast, even so in the country of the former enemy. One Habsburg
princess opted for SHS (later Jugoslav) citizenship to keep her castle
in that area.

Johannes Heidecker

Belgrad (Serbien)
www.Heidecker-Post.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Post WWI Austrian citizenship #galicia

Johannes Heidecker <Johannes@...>
 

One reason for opting for a citizenship was to keep their possessions
(specifically real estate) and the right to stay. I do not know for
Poland, but for SHS (later Jugoslavia) or Italy. Many Austrian officers
opted for Italian citizenship to keep their villas and right to stay on
the coast, even so in the country of the former enemy. One Habsburg
princess opted for SHS (later Jugoslav) citizenship to keep her castle
in that area.

Johannes Heidecker

Belgrad (Serbien)
www.Heidecker-Post.com


Re: Citizenship after WWI #galicia

Alan Weiser <alanboy@...>
 

Well several people have added some insight to the question, Why did
Galitzianers retain Polish citizenship rather that opt for Austrian
after a year's wait? Here's my two-cents worth based on my father's
history. For whatever reason my father left his home in Kolomyja at
age 15 in 1918. He went first to Vienna for 2 years, then to
Bratislava for 2 years then to America in 1922. His passport and
related good citizenship papers were all in Polish. I suspect that in
order to move around when he did, he needed to have a citizenship.
Delaying his departure just to obtain Austrian citizenship evidently
was not what he wanted to do. Thus, it could be said that Galitzianers
that wanted to leave the old Galicia area, and possibly escape Polish
rule, decided that the best course of action was to retain Polish
citizenship. Following W.W.I, I suspect being German or speaking
German was not a social or economic advantage.
Alan Weiser
alanboy@...
Silver Spring, MD

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bev Beiman" <bbevy@...>
To: "Gesher Galicia SIG" <galicia@...>
Sent: Friday, June 09, 2006 5:49 AM
Subject: Re:[galicia] Citizenship after WWI


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~
Support the work of this group with a contribution to the JewishGen
General
Fund http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~

Come to the 26th Annual IAJGS International Summer Conference on
Jewish Genealogy
New York City August 13-18, 2006
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~
Fellow researcher M. Goldberger drew my attention to the relevant
clauses of
the Treaty of Peace between the Allied and Associate Powers and
Austria. The
answer is that Galitzianers were automatically granted Polish
citizenship
BUT they had a 12-month period to opt for Austrian citizenship.
Very few of them > did.

My new question is: WHY?
The truth is, I don't know the answer why, but I can add something
to
the mystery.

My Galician family spent WWone in Vienna. After the war they spent
their time waiting for one of my uncles to return >from a Russian POW
camp and tending various members of the family back in Bucaczowce
who
were caught up (and died) in the Spanish Flu epidemic.

The family moved to The Netherlands in 1920.

At the archives in The Hague I found passport applications, before
they became citizens of Holland, for my grandfather and several of
my
older uncles dated in the 20s. They were not granted passports but
rather Laissez Passers as "stateless persons", noting that the
country
they came from, namely the Austrian Empire, no longer existed and
they
therefore had no citizenship at all.

I don't have the documents at hand for the exact wording, but that
is
the gist of it.

Beverly Shulster
Yehud, Israel

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~
The Gesher Galicia Discussion Group (galicia@...) is
hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~
Join Gesher Galicia! Visit our home page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/galicia
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sign up for the JGFFAlert!
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html#q3.7

Help JewishGen Help You!
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
You are currently subscribed to galicia as: [alanboy@...]
To change the format of our mailings, to stop/resume delivery
(vacation),
or to unsubscribe, please go to http://www.jewishgen.org/listserv


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Re:Citizenship after WWI #galicia

Alan Weiser <alanboy@...>
 

Well several people have added some insight to the question, Why did
Galitzianers retain Polish citizenship rather that opt for Austrian
after a year's wait? Here's my two-cents worth based on my father's
history. For whatever reason my father left his home in Kolomyja at
age 15 in 1918. He went first to Vienna for 2 years, then to
Bratislava for 2 years then to America in 1922. His passport and
related good citizenship papers were all in Polish. I suspect that in
order to move around when he did, he needed to have a citizenship.
Delaying his departure just to obtain Austrian citizenship evidently
was not what he wanted to do. Thus, it could be said that Galitzianers
that wanted to leave the old Galicia area, and possibly escape Polish
rule, decided that the best course of action was to retain Polish
citizenship. Following W.W.I, I suspect being German or speaking
German was not a social or economic advantage.
Alan Weiser
alanboy@...
Silver Spring, MD

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bev Beiman" <bbevy@...>
To: "Gesher Galicia SIG" <galicia@...>
Sent: Friday, June 09, 2006 5:49 AM
Subject: Re:[galicia] Citizenship after WWI


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~
Support the work of this group with a contribution to the JewishGen
General
Fund http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~

Come to the 26th Annual IAJGS International Summer Conference on
Jewish Genealogy
New York City August 13-18, 2006
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~
Fellow researcher M. Goldberger drew my attention to the relevant
clauses of
the Treaty of Peace between the Allied and Associate Powers and
Austria. The
answer is that Galitzianers were automatically granted Polish
citizenship
BUT they had a 12-month period to opt for Austrian citizenship.
Very few of them > did.

My new question is: WHY?
The truth is, I don't know the answer why, but I can add something
to
the mystery.

My Galician family spent WWone in Vienna. After the war they spent
their time waiting for one of my uncles to return >from a Russian POW
camp and tending various members of the family back in Bucaczowce
who
were caught up (and died) in the Spanish Flu epidemic.

The family moved to The Netherlands in 1920.

At the archives in The Hague I found passport applications, before
they became citizens of Holland, for my grandfather and several of
my
older uncles dated in the 20s. They were not granted passports but
rather Laissez Passers as "stateless persons", noting that the
country
they came from, namely the Austrian Empire, no longer existed and
they
therefore had no citizenship at all.

I don't have the documents at hand for the exact wording, but that
is
the gist of it.

Beverly Shulster
Yehud, Israel

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~
The Gesher Galicia Discussion Group (galicia@...) is
hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~
Join Gesher Galicia! Visit our home page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/galicia
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sign up for the JGFFAlert!
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html#q3.7

Help JewishGen Help You!
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
You are currently subscribed to galicia as: [alanboy@...]
To change the format of our mailings, to stop/resume delivery
(vacation),
or to unsubscribe, please go to http://www.jewishgen.org/listserv


Post WWI citizenship of Galician Jews #galicia

Judy Keiner <J.C.Keiner@...>
 

My mother's family made choices of citizenship after WWI which ultimately
determined whether they lived or died in the Nazi era.

My grandparents emigrated to Berlin in the first decade of the twentieth
century. My grandfather and oldest uncle served in the Austro-Hungarian army
during WWI.

After WWI, my oldest uncle chose German nationality-he had by then gained
his PhD in Berlin and was a fervently would-be Jecke. In later years, he
denied that he had ever spoken Yiddish; he referred to his experience of
coming to Germany as a five year old as involving having to learn to "speak
German properly", even though his parents continued to speak Yiddish at
home.

My next oldest uncle chose Austrian nationality. I don't really know why he
did this, but he was certainly assimilationist, and an admirer of the
modernism that he associated with both Germany and post war Austria. He was
much more into style than his oldest brother. It's possible he regarded
Austria as a more stylish and elegant country than Germany.

My youngest uncle and my mother were still under age at the time, so my
grandfather chose Polish nationality for them and himself and his wife. He
does not seem to have been an admirer of Polish nationalism, but he was a
wholesale egg importer, who brought trainloads of eggs >from Poland and
Hungary for sale in the Berlin metropolis. So I think the choice of Polish
nationality was probably for business reasons. It's possible that there were
also taxation advantages.

When the Nazi era came, it was much easier for my two oldest uncles to get
onto the US emigration visa quotas, which were much larger for German and
Austrian citizens than Poles, reflecting the particular racisms of then US
immigration policies, which regarded Poles as beings of "poorer stock". Once
they were on the quota waiting lists, they were able to get transit visas
into England, where they remained.

So my grandparents, my mother and her youngest brother had great difficulty
in getting their visas. And they were still in Berlin at the time of the
great round-up and expulsion of Polish Jews of October 1938, which the Nazis
did in order to forestall the anti-semitic action of the then Polish
government which was due to strip long-term expatriate Polish citizens like
them of their nationality. My grandfather and youngest uncle were rounded up
and dumped at the no-man's land between the two countries, >from where they
were rescued and taken in by cousins in Krakow.

The family was able to get my grandfather out to join his sons and daughter
in London just a couple of months before the war started, but sadly and
ironically, he was killed in a bombing raid the day after Yom Kippur 1940.

My youngest uncle was unable to get out of Poland because the Polish
authorities, who months earlier had been proposing to strip him of his
nationality, now refused to grant exit visas to men of military age as the
threat of a German invasion grew higher. He was rounded up for "forced
labour" some time in 1940 with other young Jewish men in Krakow; they were
made to dig a collective grave before being shot into it.

Judy Keiner

Researching: FROMMER, METH, KEINER, FUHRER, TELLER, BIRNBAUM,SPITZER,
GUTTMAN, RAAB, EISNER, ZELLERKRAUT in Kanczuga, Blazowa, Rzeszow, Przemysl,
Rcziepenick, Tarnow, Gorlice, Sadowa-Wisznyia.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Post WWI citizenship of Galician Jews #galicia

Judy Keiner <J.C.Keiner@...>
 

My mother's family made choices of citizenship after WWI which ultimately
determined whether they lived or died in the Nazi era.

My grandparents emigrated to Berlin in the first decade of the twentieth
century. My grandfather and oldest uncle served in the Austro-Hungarian army
during WWI.

After WWI, my oldest uncle chose German nationality-he had by then gained
his PhD in Berlin and was a fervently would-be Jecke. In later years, he
denied that he had ever spoken Yiddish; he referred to his experience of
coming to Germany as a five year old as involving having to learn to "speak
German properly", even though his parents continued to speak Yiddish at
home.

My next oldest uncle chose Austrian nationality. I don't really know why he
did this, but he was certainly assimilationist, and an admirer of the
modernism that he associated with both Germany and post war Austria. He was
much more into style than his oldest brother. It's possible he regarded
Austria as a more stylish and elegant country than Germany.

My youngest uncle and my mother were still under age at the time, so my
grandfather chose Polish nationality for them and himself and his wife. He
does not seem to have been an admirer of Polish nationalism, but he was a
wholesale egg importer, who brought trainloads of eggs >from Poland and
Hungary for sale in the Berlin metropolis. So I think the choice of Polish
nationality was probably for business reasons. It's possible that there were
also taxation advantages.

When the Nazi era came, it was much easier for my two oldest uncles to get
onto the US emigration visa quotas, which were much larger for German and
Austrian citizens than Poles, reflecting the particular racisms of then US
immigration policies, which regarded Poles as beings of "poorer stock". Once
they were on the quota waiting lists, they were able to get transit visas
into England, where they remained.

So my grandparents, my mother and her youngest brother had great difficulty
in getting their visas. And they were still in Berlin at the time of the
great round-up and expulsion of Polish Jews of October 1938, which the Nazis
did in order to forestall the anti-semitic action of the then Polish
government which was due to strip long-term expatriate Polish citizens like
them of their nationality. My grandfather and youngest uncle were rounded up
and dumped at the no-man's land between the two countries, >from where they
were rescued and taken in by cousins in Krakow.

The family was able to get my grandfather out to join his sons and daughter
in London just a couple of months before the war started, but sadly and
ironically, he was killed in a bombing raid the day after Yom Kippur 1940.

My youngest uncle was unable to get out of Poland because the Polish
authorities, who months earlier had been proposing to strip him of his
nationality, now refused to grant exit visas to men of military age as the
threat of a German invasion grew higher. He was rounded up for "forced
labour" some time in 1940 with other young Jewish men in Krakow; they were
made to dig a collective grave before being shot into it.

Judy Keiner

Researching: FROMMER, METH, KEINER, FUHRER, TELLER, BIRNBAUM,SPITZER,
GUTTMAN, RAAB, EISNER, ZELLERKRAUT in Kanczuga, Blazowa, Rzeszow, Przemysl,
Rcziepenick, Tarnow, Gorlice, Sadowa-Wisznyia.


The family Langrot, originally from Bobrka near Lvov #galicia

פנינה מיזליש <pniname@...>
 

Dear friends,
If any of you knows something about the family Langrot, originally from
Lvov, please let me know.
Lots of thanks
Dr. Pnina Meislish, Jerusalem


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia The family Langrot, originally from Bobrka near Lvov #galicia

פנינה מיזליש <pniname@...>
 

Dear friends,
If any of you knows something about the family Langrot, originally from
Lvov, please let me know.
Lots of thanks
Dr. Pnina Meislish, Jerusalem


YELIN #belarus

Carol Graham <stukawife@...>
 

The conversation about YELIN sparked my interest. The
furthest back I can go with my YELLIN family is to
Lomza, Poland. In this country my Yellins are mostly
ALLEN now (my maiden name). Jacob Yellin and his wife
Eva DONN came to the USA Poland via England after 1898
(they we married 12/25/1898 in London) and settled in
NYC. Jacob was born 12 Apr 1872 in Lomza.

But in another branch we have a family member whose
name is Jacob Kopyl FRANK. I have only just recently
learned that there is a town named Kopyl. He was born
June 1861, in Bobryisk (spelling is bad here), but no
other information is to be had for us. He was married
to Fanny Judith CARMEL.

Carol Graham
Augusta ME (via NY)



_


Belarus SIG #Belarus YELIN #belarus

Carol Graham <stukawife@...>
 

The conversation about YELIN sparked my interest. The
furthest back I can go with my YELLIN family is to
Lomza, Poland. In this country my Yellins are mostly
ALLEN now (my maiden name). Jacob Yellin and his wife
Eva DONN came to the USA Poland via England after 1898
(they we married 12/25/1898 in London) and settled in
NYC. Jacob was born 12 Apr 1872 in Lomza.

But in another branch we have a family member whose
name is Jacob Kopyl FRANK. I have only just recently
learned that there is a town named Kopyl. He was born
June 1861, in Bobryisk (spelling is bad here), but no
other information is to be had for us. He was married
to Fanny Judith CARMEL.

Carol Graham
Augusta ME (via NY)



_


Levy Myer GOLDSTON #general

Derek & Rosemary Wenzerul <dandr@...>
 

I am trying to find details of my great uncle, Levy Myer GOLDSTON. He was
born on 13 January 1861, St. Julian Street, Norwich, Norfolk, England.

On the 1881 census he was shown (aged 20/Jeweller) as living with his
parents (Rev. Abraham and Amelia Goldston) at 1 Sandys Row, Spitalfields,
London.E.

There are no details of his death in the free b,m,d, indexes of the GRO. I
have a feeling that he probably died between the census date of 1881 when he
is shown as aged 20 and either his father's obituary date of January 1906 as
he wasn't mentioned. Or he might have died before May 1903 as Joseph
Goldston (his brother) had named a son born in May 1903 as Levi Goldston.
Failing this, he may have gone overseas, in which case, it is unlikely that
I will find anything about him.

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Rosemary Wenzerul
dandr@...
Researching: Barnett, Benjamin, deFries, Goldston, Molen/Vandermolen, Myers,
Nunes-Martines/Martin and Wenzerul


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Levy Myer GOLDSTON #general

Derek & Rosemary Wenzerul <dandr@...>
 

I am trying to find details of my great uncle, Levy Myer GOLDSTON. He was
born on 13 January 1861, St. Julian Street, Norwich, Norfolk, England.

On the 1881 census he was shown (aged 20/Jeweller) as living with his
parents (Rev. Abraham and Amelia Goldston) at 1 Sandys Row, Spitalfields,
London.E.

There are no details of his death in the free b,m,d, indexes of the GRO. I
have a feeling that he probably died between the census date of 1881 when he
is shown as aged 20 and either his father's obituary date of January 1906 as
he wasn't mentioned. Or he might have died before May 1903 as Joseph
Goldston (his brother) had named a son born in May 1903 as Levi Goldston.
Failing this, he may have gone overseas, in which case, it is unlikely that
I will find anything about him.

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Rosemary Wenzerul
dandr@...
Researching: Barnett, Benjamin, deFries, Goldston, Molen/Vandermolen, Myers,
Nunes-Martines/Martin and Wenzerul


Toleranz Patent on view in Vienna #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Anyone visiting Vienna between now and 17th September 2006 has a chance
to see a copy of the Toleranz Patent of Josef II - a key piece of
legislation which changed the life of Jews in the Habsburg Empire.

The Patent is displayed as part of fascinating exhibition celebrating
the life of Lorenzo da Ponte, ne 1749 as Emanuele Conegliano in Caneda
the ghetto nr Venice. He was probably Mozart's most important librettist
and the exhibition at the Jewish Museum, Vienna is well-worth a visit.
Emanuele's father, Geremia, was a leather merchant and his mother was
Rachel PINCHERLE: see http://www.jmw.at

This Toleranz Patent comes >from the Niederoesterreichisches Landesarchiv
in St Polten: http://tinyurl.com/nrkg8

The Patent is accompanied in a display case with an enthusiastic pamphlet
from the 17-year old Benedict David ARNSTEIN. David was the grandson of
the Viennese banker Adam Isaac von ARNSTEIN and the nephew of the famous
Nathan ARNSTEIN; David was born in Vienna on Oct. 15 1765 -
http://tinyurl.com/hdnct

The poem is lengthily entitled in "Einige judische Familienszenen bey
Erblickung des Patents uber die Freyheit, welche die Juden in den
kaiserlichen Staaten erhalten haben, von einem judischen Jungling Arenhof."

The teenager describes, in rhyme, the scenes of rejoicing in the households
of the ARNSTEIN and ESKELES families of Vienna - the Jews will now be free,
liberated and equal. However, in later years, he was to be disappointed.
Nothing much had changed in everyday life - except of course all the Jews
in the Habsburg Empire now had family names and in legislation they had
more rights and admittedly, an excellent education system.

This is the grave of the David Benedict in Wahring - a wonderful link to
Vienna in the the time of Mozart, da Ponte and the excitement surrounding
the enactment of the Toleranz Patent:

ARNSTEIN Benedict David, Benedict 83 yrs 06.01.1841
Wahringer Friedhof 4 707

I have no idea whether many more copies of the Toleranz Patent exist and,
if so, where they are located. I am pleased, at long last, to have seen
a copy of the famous document.

Celia Male [U.K.]


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Toleranz Patent on view in Vienna #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Anyone visiting Vienna between now and 17th September 2006 has a chance
to see a copy of the Toleranz Patent of Josef II - a key piece of
legislation which changed the life of Jews in the Habsburg Empire.

The Patent is displayed as part of fascinating exhibition celebrating
the life of Lorenzo da Ponte, ne 1749 as Emanuele Conegliano in Caneda
the ghetto nr Venice. He was probably Mozart's most important librettist
and the exhibition at the Jewish Museum, Vienna is well-worth a visit.
Emanuele's father, Geremia, was a leather merchant and his mother was
Rachel PINCHERLE: see http://www.jmw.at

This Toleranz Patent comes >from the Niederoesterreichisches Landesarchiv
in St Polten: http://tinyurl.com/nrkg8

The Patent is accompanied in a display case with an enthusiastic pamphlet
from the 17-year old Benedict David ARNSTEIN. David was the grandson of
the Viennese banker Adam Isaac von ARNSTEIN and the nephew of the famous
Nathan ARNSTEIN; David was born in Vienna on Oct. 15 1765 -
http://tinyurl.com/hdnct

The poem is lengthily entitled in "Einige judische Familienszenen bey
Erblickung des Patents uber die Freyheit, welche die Juden in den
kaiserlichen Staaten erhalten haben, von einem judischen Jungling Arenhof."

The teenager describes, in rhyme, the scenes of rejoicing in the households
of the ARNSTEIN and ESKELES families of Vienna - the Jews will now be free,
liberated and equal. However, in later years, he was to be disappointed.
Nothing much had changed in everyday life - except of course all the Jews
in the Habsburg Empire now had family names and in legislation they had
more rights and admittedly, an excellent education system.

This is the grave of the David Benedict in Wahring - a wonderful link to
Vienna in the the time of Mozart, da Ponte and the excitement surrounding
the enactment of the Toleranz Patent:

ARNSTEIN Benedict David, Benedict 83 yrs 06.01.1841
Wahringer Friedhof 4 707

I have no idea whether many more copies of the Toleranz Patent exist and,
if so, where they are located. I am pleased, at long last, to have seen
a copy of the famous document.

Celia Male [U.K.]


Re: The Changing Borders of .......... NY Cemeteries! (aka Cypress #general

Steve Nathan <nathansb@...>
 

David Priever wrote:

Cypress Hills Cemetery is surrounded by the following Jewish
Cemeteries: to the east, Maimonides and east of Maimonides, Mt. Hope.
North of Cypress Hills is Mt. Carmel, Mt. Neboh and New Mt. Carmel. New
Mt. Carmel extends to Myrtle Ave. and is just north of Mt. Carmel
Cemetery. These two cemeteries have their entrances on Cypress Hills
St (1). Also north and to the east of CHC, with its entrance along
Myrtle Ave. (and located in
Glendale (Queens County), NY is Mt. Lebanon Cemetery.

Note: Mt Carmel does not extend to Myrtle Ave, but Cooper Ave. CHC has
an enterance on Cooper Ave.

Steve (Stephen Nathan)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The Changing Borders of .......... NY Cemeteries! (aka Cypress #general

Steve Nathan <nathansb@...>
 

David Priever wrote:

Cypress Hills Cemetery is surrounded by the following Jewish
Cemeteries: to the east, Maimonides and east of Maimonides, Mt. Hope.
North of Cypress Hills is Mt. Carmel, Mt. Neboh and New Mt. Carmel. New
Mt. Carmel extends to Myrtle Ave. and is just north of Mt. Carmel
Cemetery. These two cemeteries have their entrances on Cypress Hills
St (1). Also north and to the east of CHC, with its entrance along
Myrtle Ave. (and located in
Glendale (Queens County), NY is Mt. Lebanon Cemetery.

Note: Mt Carmel does not extend to Myrtle Ave, but Cooper Ave. CHC has
an enterance on Cooper Ave.

Steve (Stephen Nathan)