Date   

Viewmate 8313:Thanks for the many responses #general

BABYCAT3@...
 

I have received several responses to my request for translation of a letter
from Polish Civil Records. Thank you to all of you once again, and to those
who planned to respond. I appreciate the assistance.

Regards,
Barbara Meyers
babycat3@aol.com
NJ, USA
Researching KAFLOWITZ, ALK >from Bialystok and surrounding areas


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate 8313:Thanks for the many responses #general

BABYCAT3@...
 

I have received several responses to my request for translation of a letter
from Polish Civil Records. Thank you to all of you once again, and to those
who planned to respond. I appreciate the assistance.

Regards,
Barbara Meyers
babycat3@aol.com
NJ, USA
Researching KAFLOWITZ, ALK >from Bialystok and surrounding areas


Re: London names: HOLRIE, ABRAHAM, BRAHAM, POULTON/POULTOW, #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Bubby" <yeruchem18@bestweb.net> wrote:

Are there arrival records for people coming to Great Britain similar to
the Castle Garden and Ellis Island records?
See "Anglo-Jewish History, 18th-20th Centuries: Sources in The National
Archives"

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/RdLeaflet.asp?sLeafletID=249

and National Archives Research Guide on Immigrants

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/RdLeaflet.asp?sLeafletID=243

My understanding is that there is not such a list and that ships manifests
is what people use.

You need to read the second document but I have never heard it suggested.

Aliens would or might have had to register at a Police Station.

Would naturalization papers show the name that a person entered Great
Britain with and can one get copies of them?
One can get copies of naturalisation papers >from the National Archives as I
posted the other day.

One can actually do a search on the name and then order on-line.

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/search.asp

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany),
THALHEIMER (Mainbernheim, Germany), KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and
Kleinerdlingen,Germany), LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Russia/Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?)
(Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Russia/Belarus)


Re: Lomza naming patterns #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Shari Kantrow" <sjoysk@yahoo.com> wrote
Hello,
In researching family names for the first time in
Lomza mid 19th century (1830's-1880's), I came across
something I had not seen before and wonder what your
thoughts are on this. I noticed that unlike in other
towns I had researched in Galicia or Ukraine, the
naming patterns in the Lomza region were very
patryonymic, for example, Herszkowicz,Danielowicz,
Abramowicz,etc. Would several generations keep that
name once assigned; or would it change with each
person? For example, Daniel's son Abram would be Abram
Danielowicz, and likewise, would Abram's son Mendel be
Mendel Abramowicz?
I am very confused. Please share your thoughts.
Shari Kantrow
Lomza was part of the Russian Empire and this is the reason that
administration has been following pattern already adopted by the Russians in
assigning surnames for the non-Jewish residents.

Surname once assigned, could not be changed. For this (surname change),
disposition of the highest authority was required.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: London names: HOLRIE, ABRAHAM, BRAHAM, POULTON/POULTOW, #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Bubby" <yeruchem18@bestweb.net> wrote:

Are there arrival records for people coming to Great Britain similar to
the Castle Garden and Ellis Island records?
See "Anglo-Jewish History, 18th-20th Centuries: Sources in The National
Archives"

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/RdLeaflet.asp?sLeafletID=249

and National Archives Research Guide on Immigrants

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/RdLeaflet.asp?sLeafletID=243

My understanding is that there is not such a list and that ships manifests
is what people use.

You need to read the second document but I have never heard it suggested.

Aliens would or might have had to register at a Police Station.

Would naturalization papers show the name that a person entered Great
Britain with and can one get copies of them?
One can get copies of naturalisation papers >from the National Archives as I
posted the other day.

One can actually do a search on the name and then order on-line.

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/search.asp

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany),
THALHEIMER (Mainbernheim, Germany), KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and
Kleinerdlingen,Germany), LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Russia/Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?)
(Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Russia/Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Lomza naming patterns #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Shari Kantrow" <sjoysk@yahoo.com> wrote
Hello,
In researching family names for the first time in
Lomza mid 19th century (1830's-1880's), I came across
something I had not seen before and wonder what your
thoughts are on this. I noticed that unlike in other
towns I had researched in Galicia or Ukraine, the
naming patterns in the Lomza region were very
patryonymic, for example, Herszkowicz,Danielowicz,
Abramowicz,etc. Would several generations keep that
name once assigned; or would it change with each
person? For example, Daniel's son Abram would be Abram
Danielowicz, and likewise, would Abram's son Mendel be
Mendel Abramowicz?
I am very confused. Please share your thoughts.
Shari Kantrow
Lomza was part of the Russian Empire and this is the reason that
administration has been following pattern already adopted by the Russians in
assigning surnames for the non-Jewish residents.

Surname once assigned, could not be changed. For this (surname change),
disposition of the highest authority was required.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


Re: Lomza naming patterns #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 23:01:27 UTC, sjoysk@yahoo.com (Shari Kantrow) opined:

Hello,
In researching family names for the first time in
Lomza mid 19th century (1830's-1880's), I came across
something I had not seen before and wonder what your
thoughts are on this. I noticed that unlike in other
towns I had researched in Galicia or Ukraine, the
naming patterns in the Lomza region were very
patryonymic, for example, Herszkowicz,Danielowicz,
Abramowicz,etc. Would several generations keep that
name once assigned; or would it change with each
person? For example, Daniel's son Abram would be Abram
Danielowicz, and likewise, would Abram's son Mendel be
Mendel Abramowicz?
I am very confused. Please share your thoughts.
Shari Kantrow
If a patronym survives for several generatons, then it is not a patronym but
a surname. Depending on where you live, you may be surrounded by examples of
surnames derived >from patronyms, changed only to accomodate American
orthographical conventions, e.g. "Moskowitz".

Note that not everything that ends in "-wicz" was ever a patronym. An
example is "Rabinowicz" (Rabinowitz), which indicates the son of the Rabbi.
Your own name is another example, because "Kantrow" is clipped >from
"Kantrowicz", the son of the H.azan, the Cantor. The son of the Tsar was
"Tsarewicz", in Polish spelling.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


Re: New family surname found LANSMAN #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 22:48:22 UTC, thegenie@patmedia.net (Diane Jacobs)
opined:

I have a Riva LANSMAN JACOBSON >from Myszniec (prounounced Mushnick), Poland
For what it's worth, "Myszniec" is pronounced "Mishnietz". For all I know,
its Yiddish-speaking inhabitants may have called it "Mushnick", but not
because that is how "Myszniec" is pronounced.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Lomza naming patterns #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 23:01:27 UTC, sjoysk@yahoo.com (Shari Kantrow) opined:

Hello,
In researching family names for the first time in
Lomza mid 19th century (1830's-1880's), I came across
something I had not seen before and wonder what your
thoughts are on this. I noticed that unlike in other
towns I had researched in Galicia or Ukraine, the
naming patterns in the Lomza region were very
patryonymic, for example, Herszkowicz,Danielowicz,
Abramowicz,etc. Would several generations keep that
name once assigned; or would it change with each
person? For example, Daniel's son Abram would be Abram
Danielowicz, and likewise, would Abram's son Mendel be
Mendel Abramowicz?
I am very confused. Please share your thoughts.
Shari Kantrow
If a patronym survives for several generatons, then it is not a patronym but
a surname. Depending on where you live, you may be surrounded by examples of
surnames derived >from patronyms, changed only to accomodate American
orthographical conventions, e.g. "Moskowitz".

Note that not everything that ends in "-wicz" was ever a patronym. An
example is "Rabinowicz" (Rabinowitz), which indicates the son of the Rabbi.
Your own name is another example, because "Kantrow" is clipped >from
"Kantrowicz", the son of the H.azan, the Cantor. The son of the Tsar was
"Tsarewicz", in Polish spelling.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: New family surname found LANSMAN #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 22:48:22 UTC, thegenie@patmedia.net (Diane Jacobs)
opined:

I have a Riva LANSMAN JACOBSON >from Myszniec (prounounced Mushnick), Poland
For what it's worth, "Myszniec" is pronounced "Mishnietz". For all I know,
its Yiddish-speaking inhabitants may have called it "Mushnick", but not
because that is how "Myszniec" is pronounced.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


Ordering Copies of Documents Online from the National Archive - Problem #unitedkingdom

N.Landau@...
 

Has anyone tried ordering copies of documents online >from the National
Archives using the http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/digitalexpress/?

I tried this and didn't get it to work ie the shopping basket didn't seem to
operate/

I have emailed the Archives. Has anyone managed to successfully order using
it.

Nick Landau
London, UK


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Ordering Copies of Documents Online from the National Archive - Problem #unitedkingdom

N.Landau@...
 

Has anyone tried ordering copies of documents online >from the National
Archives using the http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/digitalexpress/?

I tried this and didn't get it to work ie the shopping basket didn't seem to
operate/

I have emailed the Archives. Has anyone managed to successfully order using
it.

Nick Landau
London, UK


Contact info for Arthur Bay or George Mason #lithuania

Deena Berton <deenahome@...>
 

If anyone knows how to contact Arthur Bay or George Mason, please send me
their email addresses privately or ask them to contact me.

They are members of the Telsiai District Research Group but recent emails to
them have bounced.

Thank you in advance for your help,
Deena Berton
Telsiai District Coordinator
LitvakSIG
deenahome@camcom.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Contact info for Arthur Bay or George Mason #lithuania

Deena Berton <deenahome@...>
 

If anyone knows how to contact Arthur Bay or George Mason, please send me
their email addresses privately or ask them to contact me.

They are members of the Telsiai District Research Group but recent emails to
them have bounced.

Thank you in advance for your help,
Deena Berton
Telsiai District Coordinator
LitvakSIG
deenahome@camcom.com


Re: Lomza region #poland

Alexander Sharon
 

Shari Kantrow wrote:

Was Lomza part of Russian-Poland?
Yes, it was.

Regards,

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Lomza region #poland

Alexander Sharon
 

Shari Kantrow wrote:

Was Lomza part of Russian-Poland?
Yes, it was.

Regards,

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


Mauritius Jewish cemetery #general

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

As described at www.jewishgen.org/cemetery/africa/mauritius.html, many
hundreds of Jewish refugees trying to enter Palestine were deported to
Mauritius, in the Indian Ocean, and detained there during 1940-1945. 127 of
the detainees never left the island and are buried in the St. Martin Jewish
Cemetery in Bambous. Henry Wellisch has transcribed data about them from
the book "The Mauritian Shekel: The Story of the Jewish Detainees in
Mauritius, 1940-1945," by Genevieve Pitot (Port Louis, Mauritius: Editions
Vizavi, 1998), and this is now available online as part of the JewishGen
Online World Burial Registry (JOWBR) at
www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/. If you include "Town Is Exactly
Mauritius" in your JOWBR search, you will be searching this information.

Please note that, in JOWBR, the field labelled "Place of Birth" should,
instead, be understood to be "Country of Origin."

For most of the deceased, the age at death, date of burial, and plot
location are also recorded.

Thanks very much to Henry for doing the data entry, to Owen Griffiths of
Mauritius for granting permission for us to place it online, and to Joyce
Field and Nolan Altman of JOWBR for incorporating the data into the
ever-expanding database of Jewish burials.

If you are related to one of the detainees >from Danzig, please contact me if
you would like to share his/her/your story on the Danzig SIG website
(www.jewishgen.org/danzig).

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Re: Anglicization of Polish Names #general

Jules Levin
 

: "It does seem strange that Samuel took it upon himself to
anglicize the forename of a parent who was in Poland and therefore
not in need of anglicization, but we know little of Samuel and his
proclivities."

This odd practice was not uncommon in the States. In a number of
obituaries, I found family members who hadn't immigrated given
American names. In one case, Chana became Anna, and her husband
Raphael was written as Robert. Who knows why, though I can imagine a
number of possibilities.
Perhaps under the influence of the Polish (and even Lithuanian)
bourgeoisie and professionals, who did sometimes use "English" names
such as Robert.
Jules Levin


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Mauritius Jewish cemetery #general

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

As described at www.jewishgen.org/cemetery/africa/mauritius.html, many
hundreds of Jewish refugees trying to enter Palestine were deported to
Mauritius, in the Indian Ocean, and detained there during 1940-1945. 127 of
the detainees never left the island and are buried in the St. Martin Jewish
Cemetery in Bambous. Henry Wellisch has transcribed data about them from
the book "The Mauritian Shekel: The Story of the Jewish Detainees in
Mauritius, 1940-1945," by Genevieve Pitot (Port Louis, Mauritius: Editions
Vizavi, 1998), and this is now available online as part of the JewishGen
Online World Burial Registry (JOWBR) at
www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/. If you include "Town Is Exactly
Mauritius" in your JOWBR search, you will be searching this information.

Please note that, in JOWBR, the field labelled "Place of Birth" should,
instead, be understood to be "Country of Origin."

For most of the deceased, the age at death, date of burial, and plot
location are also recorded.

Thanks very much to Henry for doing the data entry, to Owen Griffiths of
Mauritius for granting permission for us to place it online, and to Joyce
Field and Nolan Altman of JOWBR for incorporating the data into the
ever-expanding database of Jewish burials.

If you are related to one of the detainees >from Danzig, please contact me if
you would like to share his/her/your story on the Danzig SIG website
(www.jewishgen.org/danzig).

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Anglicization of Polish Names #general

Jules Levin
 

: "It does seem strange that Samuel took it upon himself to
anglicize the forename of a parent who was in Poland and therefore
not in need of anglicization, but we know little of Samuel and his
proclivities."

This odd practice was not uncommon in the States. In a number of
obituaries, I found family members who hadn't immigrated given
American names. In one case, Chana became Anna, and her husband
Raphael was written as Robert. Who knows why, though I can imagine a
number of possibilities.
Perhaps under the influence of the Polish (and even Lithuanian)
bourgeoisie and professionals, who did sometimes use "English" names
such as Robert.
Jules Levin