Date   

Re: WW I German military cemeteries #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Jules Levin" <ameliede@earthlink.net> wrote
I am wondering if there has ever been an inventory of such gravestones?
But there are some puzzles here. Curious that the grave markers remained
untouched during the Nazi period--unless a soldier's burial among
Christians gave some immunity? Somewhere I read that 200,000 Jews served
in the Central Powers armies in WW I
(my Bar Mitzvah teacher had been a chaplain on the Eastern Front). If
so, it seems that 20,000 KIA, missing, etc. would
not be unreasonable. Your thoughts?
While searching about the family of a cousin's father in Germany I came
across the listing of the death of her uncle in WWI at this website
http://www.denkmalprojekt.org/Verlustlisten/rjf_wk1.htm.

It is not a Jewish project but the Jewish section is apparently based on
Gedenkbuch des Reichsbund jüdischer Frontsoldaten (RjF).

It gives the following information:

Dienstgrad (rank)
Name (surname)
Vorname (first name)
Geburtsdatum & Ort (Date of birth and place of birth)
Todesdatum (Date of death)
Einheit (Unit)

There is a letter on the website >from the President Hindenburg to the
Reichsbund jüdischer Frontsoldaten dated 3 October 1932 thanking them for
their good wishes on Hindenburg's 85th birthday. Hindenburg signs it with
comradely greetings.

The Nazis came to power in January 1933.

There are 4 pages in German about the list or the Jewish soldiers. I haven't
had the time to try and read it.

Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany),
THALHEIMER (Mainbernheim, Germany), KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and
Kleinerdlingen,Germany), LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Russia/Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?)
(Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Russia/Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: WW I German military cemeteries #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Jules Levin" <ameliede@earthlink.net> wrote
I am wondering if there has ever been an inventory of such gravestones?
But there are some puzzles here. Curious that the grave markers remained
untouched during the Nazi period--unless a soldier's burial among
Christians gave some immunity? Somewhere I read that 200,000 Jews served
in the Central Powers armies in WW I
(my Bar Mitzvah teacher had been a chaplain on the Eastern Front). If
so, it seems that 20,000 KIA, missing, etc. would
not be unreasonable. Your thoughts?
While searching about the family of a cousin's father in Germany I came
across the listing of the death of her uncle in WWI at this website
http://www.denkmalprojekt.org/Verlustlisten/rjf_wk1.htm.

It is not a Jewish project but the Jewish section is apparently based on
Gedenkbuch des Reichsbund jüdischer Frontsoldaten (RjF).

It gives the following information:

Dienstgrad (rank)
Name (surname)
Vorname (first name)
Geburtsdatum & Ort (Date of birth and place of birth)
Todesdatum (Date of death)
Einheit (Unit)

There is a letter on the website >from the President Hindenburg to the
Reichsbund jüdischer Frontsoldaten dated 3 October 1932 thanking them for
their good wishes on Hindenburg's 85th birthday. Hindenburg signs it with
comradely greetings.

The Nazis came to power in January 1933.

There are 4 pages in German about the list or the Jewish soldiers. I haven't
had the time to try and read it.

Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany),
THALHEIMER (Mainbernheim, Germany), KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and
Kleinerdlingen,Germany), LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Russia/Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?)
(Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Russia/Belarus)


PACHTER - from Siemiatycze #general

tina levine
 

I am searching for the descendants of Peretz and Chana
PACHTER >from Siemiatycze in Grodno Gubernia.
They had four children Moshe, Avraham, Shulem and
Leah.

The children immigrated to Israel and Abraham's son
Pinhas contributed to the Siemiatycze Yizkor Book.

I believe Peretz was a sibling or cousin of my
great-grandfather David PACHTER, son of Yisroel, who
immigrated to NYC in 1907 >from Siemiatycze.

If anyone has any information about Peretz'
descendants living in Israel, please contact me.

Thank you for your assistance.

Tina Levine, nee PACHTER
TLS553@yahoo.com
Searching PACHTER (Siemiatycze-Grodno Gub.), ROSENBERG
and ZOLONDEK (Wawolnica-Lublin Gob.), KIRZNER
(Nesvh-Minsk Gob.)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen PACHTER - from Siemiatycze #general

tina levine
 

I am searching for the descendants of Peretz and Chana
PACHTER >from Siemiatycze in Grodno Gubernia.
They had four children Moshe, Avraham, Shulem and
Leah.

The children immigrated to Israel and Abraham's son
Pinhas contributed to the Siemiatycze Yizkor Book.

I believe Peretz was a sibling or cousin of my
great-grandfather David PACHTER, son of Yisroel, who
immigrated to NYC in 1907 >from Siemiatycze.

If anyone has any information about Peretz'
descendants living in Israel, please contact me.

Thank you for your assistance.

Tina Levine, nee PACHTER
TLS553@yahoo.com
Searching PACHTER (Siemiatycze-Grodno Gub.), ROSENBERG
and ZOLONDEK (Wawolnica-Lublin Gob.), KIRZNER
(Nesvh-Minsk Gob.)


Were Eliezer Lezer and (Froom) Leizer the same man? #general

cecilia <myths@...>
 

The Great Synagogue (London) marriages transcription includes a
marriage for PHILLIPS Lazarus with Hebrew name Eliezer Lezer (GSM
274/33 1831 [26 May] ). The bride was Leah Rogers.

Assuming that Leah changed her name-of-use to Louisa (which seems
reasonable enough to me), I have traced Lazarus though the 1851, 1871,
1881, 1891 censuses. He died in 1892, and the death was reported in
the Jewish Chronicle, referring to him as Lazarus Phillips (Froom
Leizer).

Is it likely that the name transcribed as Eliezer Lezer >from the 1831
marriage entry would have become (Froom) Leizer in 1892? I.e. have I
been tracing the man who married in 1831?

Cecilia Nyleve


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Were Eliezer Lezer and (Froom) Leizer the same man? #general

cecilia <myths@...>
 

The Great Synagogue (London) marriages transcription includes a
marriage for PHILLIPS Lazarus with Hebrew name Eliezer Lezer (GSM
274/33 1831 [26 May] ). The bride was Leah Rogers.

Assuming that Leah changed her name-of-use to Louisa (which seems
reasonable enough to me), I have traced Lazarus though the 1851, 1871,
1881, 1891 censuses. He died in 1892, and the death was reported in
the Jewish Chronicle, referring to him as Lazarus Phillips (Froom
Leizer).

Is it likely that the name transcribed as Eliezer Lezer >from the 1831
marriage entry would have become (Froom) Leizer in 1892? I.e. have I
been tracing the man who married in 1831?

Cecilia Nyleve


Databases no substitute for original records #general

trob@...
 

They are, and they arent.
In about two hours I'm going to be making a presentation at the JGS
conference in NYC about on-line resources for researching buildings.
The premise is simple: I've taught a seminar on this subject for 20 years;
for 16 years the materials were always the same. Since four years ago,
I've had to update the material each year to account for on-line resources.
It is truly stunning how much information is on-line today. It is now
possible, for instance, to get a pretty good idea of the date and architect
and client for most buildings in Manhattan built between 1900 and 1986,
and in about 10 minutes, while sitting in front of a computer anywhere
in the world - where it used to take a morning hunting through documents
at the municipal archives and the buildings department in lower Manhattan,
and reading microfilm copies of the New York Times.
At the same time, it is still true that there is no substitute for looking
through the original documents. I can get a summary of the New Building
application online, for instance, but I can't actually read through the
file, see the changes to the application, read attached correspondence,
check to make sure the building was actually constructed. Perhaps some
day all those documents will be scanned and available on-line (which
has already happened with Certificates of Occupancy, for instance,
going back several decades). But we're not there yet.
Does that mean it's a mistake to rely on the on-line resources?
They are like any other resources - it depends on how you use them,
and on how carefully you evaluate their accuracy. It also depends on
the level of detail you're searching for.
If you look up, on-line, the 1930 New Building application for 350
Fifth Avenue, for instance, you'll find it describes a 55-story building,
and names its architect. Not bad - except that 350 Fifth Avenue is
the Empire State Building, and 55 stories today is just a little more
than half-way up the tower. Clearly, looking at the file is important -
this is a project that evolved over time. It's possible to figure that
out, on-line, by checking New York Times stories - but only because the
Empire State Building got a lot more coverage than most buildings.
You certainly can't just rely on what an on-line summary of a document
suggests. And you need to understand what kind of document it is and
how to evaluate it.
With caution and common sense, you can reap tremendous benefits >from
the proliferation of on-line resources. They still can't replace a visit
to examine the original documents - yet. I'm skeptical that the entire
collection of Building Department documents - in Manhattan going back to
1866 - will ever be optically scanned and available on-line. But if
three years ago someone had predicted that the entire run of the New
York Times >from 1857 to date - or even every single nomination to the
National Register of Historic Places for New York State - would be on-line,
I would have been skeptical of that too. Yet, there they sit.
You'll find information about researching NYC buildings on-line on my
web site, www.UrbanGenealogy.com.

Tony Robins
www.UrbanGenealogy.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Databases no substitute for original records #general

trob@...
 

They are, and they arent.
In about two hours I'm going to be making a presentation at the JGS
conference in NYC about on-line resources for researching buildings.
The premise is simple: I've taught a seminar on this subject for 20 years;
for 16 years the materials were always the same. Since four years ago,
I've had to update the material each year to account for on-line resources.
It is truly stunning how much information is on-line today. It is now
possible, for instance, to get a pretty good idea of the date and architect
and client for most buildings in Manhattan built between 1900 and 1986,
and in about 10 minutes, while sitting in front of a computer anywhere
in the world - where it used to take a morning hunting through documents
at the municipal archives and the buildings department in lower Manhattan,
and reading microfilm copies of the New York Times.
At the same time, it is still true that there is no substitute for looking
through the original documents. I can get a summary of the New Building
application online, for instance, but I can't actually read through the
file, see the changes to the application, read attached correspondence,
check to make sure the building was actually constructed. Perhaps some
day all those documents will be scanned and available on-line (which
has already happened with Certificates of Occupancy, for instance,
going back several decades). But we're not there yet.
Does that mean it's a mistake to rely on the on-line resources?
They are like any other resources - it depends on how you use them,
and on how carefully you evaluate their accuracy. It also depends on
the level of detail you're searching for.
If you look up, on-line, the 1930 New Building application for 350
Fifth Avenue, for instance, you'll find it describes a 55-story building,
and names its architect. Not bad - except that 350 Fifth Avenue is
the Empire State Building, and 55 stories today is just a little more
than half-way up the tower. Clearly, looking at the file is important -
this is a project that evolved over time. It's possible to figure that
out, on-line, by checking New York Times stories - but only because the
Empire State Building got a lot more coverage than most buildings.
You certainly can't just rely on what an on-line summary of a document
suggests. And you need to understand what kind of document it is and
how to evaluate it.
With caution and common sense, you can reap tremendous benefits >from
the proliferation of on-line resources. They still can't replace a visit
to examine the original documents - yet. I'm skeptical that the entire
collection of Building Department documents - in Manhattan going back to
1866 - will ever be optically scanned and available on-line. But if
three years ago someone had predicted that the entire run of the New
York Times >from 1857 to date - or even every single nomination to the
National Register of Historic Places for New York State - would be on-line,
I would have been skeptical of that too. Yet, there they sit.
You'll find information about researching NYC buildings on-line on my
web site, www.UrbanGenealogy.com.

Tony Robins
www.UrbanGenealogy.com


Re: Databases no substitute for original records #general

HPOLLINS@...
 

In a message dated 18/08/2006 02:27:01 GMT Standard Time,
tulse04-news@yahoo.co.uk writes:
I have looked at this article and it refers to people going to the local
court house or to other local archives with the original document.

There is only one UK National Archives, one Leo Baeck Archives etc.

I live near the UK Archives and I have visited the Leo Baeck Archives but
given that most people cannot visit these they do have an online catalogue
and the ability to look at what is available there before a visit in order
to make use of a visit - or the ordering of material online is a very
---------------------------------
You have forgotten that in addition to such national archives, in the UK
there are plenty of local archives. Thus each county (or similar administrative
area) has a Records Office and all local authorities have public libraries
which often have collections of records. SImilarly universities have records.
If one is doing a piece of local research these repositories are invaluable.

Harold Pollins
Oxford


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Databases no substitute for original records #general

HPOLLINS@...
 

In a message dated 18/08/2006 02:27:01 GMT Standard Time,
tulse04-news@yahoo.co.uk writes:
I have looked at this article and it refers to people going to the local
court house or to other local archives with the original document.

There is only one UK National Archives, one Leo Baeck Archives etc.

I live near the UK Archives and I have visited the Leo Baeck Archives but
given that most people cannot visit these they do have an online catalogue
and the ability to look at what is available there before a visit in order
to make use of a visit - or the ordering of material online is a very
---------------------------------
You have forgotten that in addition to such national archives, in the UK
there are plenty of local archives. Thus each county (or similar administrative
area) has a Records Office and all local authorities have public libraries
which often have collections of records. SImilarly universities have records.
If one is doing a piece of local research these repositories are invaluable.

Harold Pollins
Oxford


Vienna Cemetery #general

Evelyn Filippi
 

Dear Genners, If anyone is going to visit the Cemetery in Vienna with
digital camera and are able I would appreciate it if they could snap a few
stones for me.my grandfather Abraham Jonas Bergler and great grand parents
Dreizel and Chaim Ebenstein.. if someone can I can supply the grave
numbers if someone can. Also I was wondering if its possible that Goldhaber
and Goldapper could be a variation of each other . I have a few
variations of first names and I am curious.
There should be some better variations of the words Thank You that I
could say for all the help I have gotten >from the room.
Evelyn Filippi


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Vienna Cemetery #general

Evelyn Filippi
 

Dear Genners, If anyone is going to visit the Cemetery in Vienna with
digital camera and are able I would appreciate it if they could snap a few
stones for me.my grandfather Abraham Jonas Bergler and great grand parents
Dreizel and Chaim Ebenstein.. if someone can I can supply the grave
numbers if someone can. Also I was wondering if its possible that Goldhaber
and Goldapper could be a variation of each other . I have a few
variations of first names and I am curious.
There should be some better variations of the words Thank You that I
could say for all the help I have gotten >from the room.
Evelyn Filippi


notation on reverse of NYC marriage Certificates #general

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Genners,

I recently ordered a microfilm of marriage certificates which I
reviewed at my local Mormon FHC. I was intrigued to see that on the
reverse of the certificate I ordered (where the signatures are) were
hand-written notations of a number and date and another number.

There were two sets of notations on the reverse: 163693, and the date
7/13/45, then the number 1 and then initials. Another set of
notations read: 17-33765, followed by the date 81-6-47, followed by a
1 then initials. The marriage itself took place in January of 1920.

I wound the film on to see if there were more of these and there
were. There was also one with a "stamp" with the words "Order No"
"Date" "Number" and "Photo Op." Has anyone noticed these notations
before and do they know what they mean?

Just in case anyone is thinking that it related to a naturalization
request, the couple were naturalized in 1905 and 1908 respectively
(according to the 1930 US Census).

Additionally, on the one with the "stamp" there was also an oval
stamp, not unlike the one on the front of the certificate which is
the office of the borough, but this one looks like it says in three
lines "Ben. Joe. Cohen" "of Congregation" and "Yehuda Halevy."

Any ideas?

Jeremy G Frankel
ex Edgware, London, England
Berkeley, California, USA

EBIN: Russia -> New York, USA
FRANKEL: Poland -> London, England
GOLD (RATH): Praszka, Poland -> London, England
KOENIGSBERG: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania -> London, England -> NYC, NY, USA
LEVY (later LEADER): Kalisz, Poland -> London, England
PRINCZ/PRINCE: Krakow, Poland -> London, England -> NYC, NY, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen notation on reverse of NYC marriage Certificates #general

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Genners,

I recently ordered a microfilm of marriage certificates which I
reviewed at my local Mormon FHC. I was intrigued to see that on the
reverse of the certificate I ordered (where the signatures are) were
hand-written notations of a number and date and another number.

There were two sets of notations on the reverse: 163693, and the date
7/13/45, then the number 1 and then initials. Another set of
notations read: 17-33765, followed by the date 81-6-47, followed by a
1 then initials. The marriage itself took place in January of 1920.

I wound the film on to see if there were more of these and there
were. There was also one with a "stamp" with the words "Order No"
"Date" "Number" and "Photo Op." Has anyone noticed these notations
before and do they know what they mean?

Just in case anyone is thinking that it related to a naturalization
request, the couple were naturalized in 1905 and 1908 respectively
(according to the 1930 US Census).

Additionally, on the one with the "stamp" there was also an oval
stamp, not unlike the one on the front of the certificate which is
the office of the borough, but this one looks like it says in three
lines "Ben. Joe. Cohen" "of Congregation" and "Yehuda Halevy."

Any ideas?

Jeremy G Frankel
ex Edgware, London, England
Berkeley, California, USA

EBIN: Russia -> New York, USA
FRANKEL: Poland -> London, England
GOLD (RATH): Praszka, Poland -> London, England
KOENIGSBERG: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania -> London, England -> NYC, NY, USA
LEVY (later LEADER): Kalisz, Poland -> London, England
PRINCZ/PRINCE: Krakow, Poland -> London, England -> NYC, NY, USA


A Dispersao/ Notes sur L'Histoire...Nantes #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Does anyone know where I can borrow or whatever 2 books which cannot be
bought and aren't available on Interlibrary Loan? One is J. Mathorez 'Notes
Sur L'Histoire de la Colonie Portugaise de Nantes; the other is in a
magazine, I guess, A Dispersao vol. 2, p. 429-484 by Jose Mendes dos
Remedios - this is >from 1928.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A Dispersao/ Notes sur L'Histoire...Nantes #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Does anyone know where I can borrow or whatever 2 books which cannot be
bought and aren't available on Interlibrary Loan? One is J. Mathorez 'Notes
Sur L'Histoire de la Colonie Portugaise de Nantes; the other is in a
magazine, I guess, A Dispersao vol. 2, p. 429-484 by Jose Mendes dos
Remedios - this is >from 1928.


Mako Jews Website #general

G Czene
 

Hello JewishGen-ers!

In my random search for a Hungarian artist, I stumbled
upon a site for the Jews of Mako (in southern
Hungary).

The site is in Hungarian;however, there is a section
for Shoah victims which includes the last known
address,parents' names and date of deportation:

http://www.mzsh.hu/soa.html

A couple of listings refer to the Israeli "Book of
Remembrance".

Gizella Czene
Los Angeles, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Mako Jews Website #general

G Czene
 

Hello JewishGen-ers!

In my random search for a Hungarian artist, I stumbled
upon a site for the Jews of Mako (in southern
Hungary).

The site is in Hungarian;however, there is a section
for Shoah victims which includes the last known
address,parents' names and date of deportation:

http://www.mzsh.hu/soa.html

A couple of listings refer to the Israeli "Book of
Remembrance".

Gizella Czene
Los Angeles, CA


Re: Meier Perla/ Peter Meyer in Lomza #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Shari Kantrow" wrote

(...)

Additionally, I have heard that it was possible from
someone >from Russian/Poland to claim they were of
German nationality and totally convert the name, for
example, >from Meier PERLA to Peter MEYER. Is this
definitely so in this case, I don't know, but it gives
me hope.
This was not the case. People traveling on the Russian passports, could not
claim German citizenship. Perhaps they have resided for some years in
Germany and have subsequently acquired German nationality.

Does anyone know why someone in 1884 might claim a
different origin on the passenger list (German)or
perhaps why they would leave >from Rotterdam, which
appears to be quite a distance >from Lomza?
Regards,
Lomza was not exactly located on the sea. People were forced to schlep to
the Atlantic sea port to take the steamer to America.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Meier Perla/ Peter Meyer in Lomza #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Shari Kantrow" wrote

(...)

Additionally, I have heard that it was possible from
someone >from Russian/Poland to claim they were of
German nationality and totally convert the name, for
example, >from Meier PERLA to Peter MEYER. Is this
definitely so in this case, I don't know, but it gives
me hope.
This was not the case. People traveling on the Russian passports, could not
claim German citizenship. Perhaps they have resided for some years in
Germany and have subsequently acquired German nationality.

Does anyone know why someone in 1884 might claim a
different origin on the passenger list (German)or
perhaps why they would leave >from Rotterdam, which
appears to be quite a distance >from Lomza?
Regards,
Lomza was not exactly located on the sea. People were forced to schlep to
the Atlantic sea port to take the steamer to America.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab