Date   

Bessarabia vs Bazar #ukraine

ms nodrog
 

Dear Genners,
On my grandmother's and mother's manifest it
states that they came >from "BAZAR." Is this the
same place as "BESSARABIA?" Is Bazar in the
Ukraine?
Please respond to msnodrog@yahoo.com

Thanks in advance,
Channah



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Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Bessarabia vs Bazar #ukraine

ms nodrog
 

Dear Genners,
On my grandmother's and mother's manifest it
states that they came >from "BAZAR." Is this the
same place as "BESSARABIA?" Is Bazar in the
Ukraine?
Please respond to msnodrog@yahoo.com

Thanks in advance,
Channah



____________________________________________________________________________________
Sponsored Link

$200,000 mortgage for $660/ mo
30/15 yr fixed, reduce debt
http://yahoo.ratemarketplace.com


Re: How Long To Receive 1931 N.Y.C . Marriage Record With Known Certificate No. & Date From Health Dept.? #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Richard May asked, "How long should it take to get a copy of a 1931
marriage record, with both certificate number and date known, >from the New
York City Department of Public Health (not the Municipal Archives)?"

I answer: Richard is getting trapped in the New York City bureaucracy.
The Department of Health has given *all* their marriage records to the
Department of Records and Information Services, which has given them to
the Municipal Archives, which in turn makes them available via microfilm.

Health no longer has *any* marriage records. At best, they'll direct
Richard, or his request, to the proper place. At worst, they'll send
him/it to the wrong place, or tell him that no records exist.

There used to be two sets of marriage records, one set recorded at the
Dept. of Health, and the other at the Office of the City Clerk. The
latter is still there, for marriages recorded during 1930 and afterward.
City Clerk records >from 1929 and prior are at the Municipal Archives, just
like all the Health records.

But there is a way out of the bureaucracy. Write to the Municipal
Archives or make the request on line, both ways using the information at
http://www.nyc.gov/html/records/html/vitalrecords/marriage.shtml, which
states that the turnaround time is 4 to 6 weeks. )It's usually a little
shorter.)

I hope that this helps.

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: How Long To Receive 1931 N.Y.C . Marriage Record With Known Certificate No. & Date From Health Dept.? #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Richard May asked, "How long should it take to get a copy of a 1931
marriage record, with both certificate number and date known, >from the New
York City Department of Public Health (not the Municipal Archives)?"

I answer: Richard is getting trapped in the New York City bureaucracy.
The Department of Health has given *all* their marriage records to the
Department of Records and Information Services, which has given them to
the Municipal Archives, which in turn makes them available via microfilm.

Health no longer has *any* marriage records. At best, they'll direct
Richard, or his request, to the proper place. At worst, they'll send
him/it to the wrong place, or tell him that no records exist.

There used to be two sets of marriage records, one set recorded at the
Dept. of Health, and the other at the Office of the City Clerk. The
latter is still there, for marriages recorded during 1930 and afterward.
City Clerk records >from 1929 and prior are at the Municipal Archives, just
like all the Health records.

But there is a way out of the bureaucracy. Write to the Municipal
Archives or make the request on line, both ways using the information at
http://www.nyc.gov/html/records/html/vitalrecords/marriage.shtml, which
states that the turnaround time is 4 to 6 weeks. )It's usually a little
shorter.)

I hope that this helps.

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


Re: Persist #general

david nathan <d.nathan1@...>
 

Marian Brown wrote:

<<With free access to passenger lists on a well-known commercial site
this month, I have spent many hours searching the manifests, page by
page, name by name, and I want to share my experiences.

Looking for my great-grandparents, Rosa and Adolph Lissauer, and their
children who immigrated in 1887, I finally found them as Rosa and Adr
Cirzomer. The "L" in Lissauer was written as a lower case letter and
was magically transformed into a "C" --- The names and ages of the
children were also wierd but somewhat recognizable.

Then, I decided to look for my other great-grandmother, whose manifest I
possess. Her name was Marie Huebschman and Ancestry listed her as Marie
Rubschmann. The children were noted as Tom, a female, written Toni;
Rees, written Resi, and another Marie, very clearly written as Minna.

SO -- even though the index to these records has many, many
inaccuracies, don't give up. When I began, all I really knew was
approximate years of immigration.

Marian Brown
Cincinnati, OH>>

David replies:

What we must all remember is that the person compiling the original;
listings wrote down what they thought they heard. Most of the accents of
the time would have been alien to them, so they made the best guesses
possible. Also, the immigrants themselves may have had only limited - or
even no - English, so they would have been unable to check the spellings.
Thus the errors arose and, in many cases, perpetuated.

David Nathan, London, England


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Persist #general

david nathan <d.nathan1@...>
 

Marian Brown wrote:

<<With free access to passenger lists on a well-known commercial site
this month, I have spent many hours searching the manifests, page by
page, name by name, and I want to share my experiences.

Looking for my great-grandparents, Rosa and Adolph Lissauer, and their
children who immigrated in 1887, I finally found them as Rosa and Adr
Cirzomer. The "L" in Lissauer was written as a lower case letter and
was magically transformed into a "C" --- The names and ages of the
children were also wierd but somewhat recognizable.

Then, I decided to look for my other great-grandmother, whose manifest I
possess. Her name was Marie Huebschman and Ancestry listed her as Marie
Rubschmann. The children were noted as Tom, a female, written Toni;
Rees, written Resi, and another Marie, very clearly written as Minna.

SO -- even though the index to these records has many, many
inaccuracies, don't give up. When I began, all I really knew was
approximate years of immigration.

Marian Brown
Cincinnati, OH>>

David replies:

What we must all remember is that the person compiling the original;
listings wrote down what they thought they heard. Most of the accents of
the time would have been alien to them, so they made the best guesses
possible. Also, the immigrants themselves may have had only limited - or
even no - English, so they would have been unable to check the spellings.
Thus the errors arose and, in many cases, perpetuated.

David Nathan, London, England


GRUNWALD Family from Budapest and Former Austro-Hungarian Empire #general

pollinia@...
 

Dear Genners,

Is any of you researching the GRUNWALD family >from Budapest, who also had
branches in Transylvania and Slovakia as well? If so, please contact in private.


Best Regards,
Shaul Sharoni,
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen GRUNWALD Family from Budapest and Former Austro-Hungarian Empire #general

pollinia@...
 

Dear Genners,

Is any of you researching the GRUNWALD family >from Budapest, who also had
branches in Transylvania and Slovakia as well? If so, please contact in private.


Best Regards,
Shaul Sharoni,
Israel


Re: BRENSON, KOSMAN & GOTTLIEB #latvia

Evelyn Waldstein
 

Nina Kossman" <nina@ninakossman.com> asked

I wonder if any of the survivors of the Riga ghetto know about the fate of
Ruth KOSSMAN (nee BRENSON), Robert BRENSON, Ellen MELZER (nee BRENSON) and
her husband Yakov MELZER, and their six-year old son Alex MELZER. I know
they did not survive, I don't know whether they committed suicide (Ellen was
a doctor and had access to poison or were killed in one of the Actions. Ruth,
Ellen, and Robert were offspring of doctor Isidor BRENSON (Issidorus BRENNSOHN),
historian of medicine and author of biographical dictionaries "The Doctors
of Courland," "The Doctors of Livland," "The Doctors of Estland (Estonia)",
resources well known to many users of JewishGen...
------------------------
First of all thanks for letting us see Brennsohn family photos and letting
us know that Isidor Brennsohn published biographical dictionaries not only
about medical doctors in Latvia (Courland and Livland) but also of Estonia.

To get answers about the fate of his daughter Ellen Melzer I would contact
the P. Stradina Medical History Museum in Riga on Antonijas iela 1, Riga
LV-1360.

This museum has a good medical library and a lot of material about medical
doctors in Latvia. I repeatedly used this library and got some additional
help >from Mrs. Danusewitch in 2002.

Evelyn Waldstein
evewa@post.tau.ac.il


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: BRENSON, KOSMAN & GOTTLIEB #latvia

Evelyn Waldstein
 

Nina Kossman" <nina@ninakossman.com> asked

I wonder if any of the survivors of the Riga ghetto know about the fate of
Ruth KOSSMAN (nee BRENSON), Robert BRENSON, Ellen MELZER (nee BRENSON) and
her husband Yakov MELZER, and their six-year old son Alex MELZER. I know
they did not survive, I don't know whether they committed suicide (Ellen was
a doctor and had access to poison or were killed in one of the Actions. Ruth,
Ellen, and Robert were offspring of doctor Isidor BRENSON (Issidorus BRENNSOHN),
historian of medicine and author of biographical dictionaries "The Doctors
of Courland," "The Doctors of Livland," "The Doctors of Estland (Estonia)",
resources well known to many users of JewishGen...
------------------------
First of all thanks for letting us see Brennsohn family photos and letting
us know that Isidor Brennsohn published biographical dictionaries not only
about medical doctors in Latvia (Courland and Livland) but also of Estonia.

To get answers about the fate of his daughter Ellen Melzer I would contact
the P. Stradina Medical History Museum in Riga on Antonijas iela 1, Riga
LV-1360.

This museum has a good medical library and a lot of material about medical
doctors in Latvia. I repeatedly used this library and got some additional
help >from Mrs. Danusewitch in 2002.

Evelyn Waldstein
evewa@post.tau.ac.il


Philadelphia Marriage Records #general

J SCHWARTZ
 

On Nov 20, 2006 Dennis Gries wrote:
.....
<<The City Archives at 3101 Market does have the marriages for that earliest
period on films, but there is a charge to use the readers, and then when you
find the record you want, you may then take the film to another
reader/printer, "cue" it up, and pay about a dollar for a copy. I believe
that they may have a service for you for this, but I am not sure.>>
..
The City Archives no longer charges to use the readers. The printers are
mediocre at best and usually at least one of the three is down. However, it
is possible for an individual to get decent copies of marriages >from the
1885-1915 period for about $2.50, if my math is correct. It costs $.25 just
to get the printer started. Each 8 x 11 page printed is $.75. Marriage
applications and certificate are 3 pages if you copy the front, inside and
certificate. For some legal reason, which I have never been able to get
anyone to explain, The City Archives staff cannot handle mail order requests
for marriages in this range, only City Hall. Any one can goto the Archives
and print the records themselves, but the staff is not allowed to do it.

I know the LDS have filmed the marriage index for this period and I believe
they have filmed the corresponding marriage records. If you can't get to
the City Archives to do it yourself or find a volunteer or professional to
do it for you, this may be the least expensive way to go.

BTW, as of the last time I checked at City Hall, mail order requests for
these marriages were not just $20, but required an aditional $15 "service
charge" fee, with the total made in two checks. As the rules change out
from under you here, possibly you can make one check now, but the extra $15
has not gone away.

Jo Schwartz
Philadelphia
Researching Stepan, Rafalowka, Mayunicze, Chartoryisk (sp?) in Volyhnia, Ukraine
for Schwartz, Brat (Brown) and related families.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Philadelphia Marriage Records #general

J SCHWARTZ
 

On Nov 20, 2006 Dennis Gries wrote:
.....
<<The City Archives at 3101 Market does have the marriages for that earliest
period on films, but there is a charge to use the readers, and then when you
find the record you want, you may then take the film to another
reader/printer, "cue" it up, and pay about a dollar for a copy. I believe
that they may have a service for you for this, but I am not sure.>>
..
The City Archives no longer charges to use the readers. The printers are
mediocre at best and usually at least one of the three is down. However, it
is possible for an individual to get decent copies of marriages >from the
1885-1915 period for about $2.50, if my math is correct. It costs $.25 just
to get the printer started. Each 8 x 11 page printed is $.75. Marriage
applications and certificate are 3 pages if you copy the front, inside and
certificate. For some legal reason, which I have never been able to get
anyone to explain, The City Archives staff cannot handle mail order requests
for marriages in this range, only City Hall. Any one can goto the Archives
and print the records themselves, but the staff is not allowed to do it.

I know the LDS have filmed the marriage index for this period and I believe
they have filmed the corresponding marriage records. If you can't get to
the City Archives to do it yourself or find a volunteer or professional to
do it for you, this may be the least expensive way to go.

BTW, as of the last time I checked at City Hall, mail order requests for
these marriages were not just $20, but required an aditional $15 "service
charge" fee, with the total made in two checks. As the rules change out
from under you here, possibly you can make one check now, but the extra $15
has not gone away.

Jo Schwartz
Philadelphia
Researching Stepan, Rafalowka, Mayunicze, Chartoryisk (sp?) in Volyhnia, Ukraine
for Schwartz, Brat (Brown) and related families.


Re: Persist in the search of lost passengers #general

Barb & Howard
 

Thank you Marion Brown and David Nathan for your encouraging words regarding
the search for arrival of lost ancestors on ship manifests.

I am in total accord for the reasons why we have difficulty in locating
records when we know the familiar usual spellings of both given and surname
plus the arrival year. Still we are unable to locate our family members. The
gracious folks at LDS, who undertook the massively monumental task of
interpreting and transcribing the ship manifests, did to the best of their
abilities, could not possibly be acquainted with the myriad of handwriting
styles, and the formed shapes of the individual letters, as entered and
written by each and every ship's pursuer as persons boarded the departing
ship.

My question, to the mavens out there, is would there be a simple way to
correct the miss transcribed records as they are identified, on the
transcribed Ellis Island Data Base? Thus, making it easier for subsequent
researchers to locate the arrival of passengers, and eliminate endless
futile searches.

In a slightly different vein, we know that our pregnant (in 1901) maternal
grand mother, Rivke nee ZUTS coming >from the town called Krinky immediately
on the Polish side of the Russian border; (Rivke possibly also had her
maiden surname changed to SACHS prior to departure. It now appears that at
least two of her several brothers were involved in labor strikes and unrest
in the town of Krinky's leather processing industry). Two of Rivke's
brothers had changed their surname to SACHS in order to escape detection
while in pursuit attempting to get out of Russia) Rivke's baby had died
while she was still in Russia; but Rivke is known to have arrived in the USA
two to three years after her husband Mones LABENSKY arrived in the USA from
the close by city named Grodno, which is in the Gabernia known by the same
name. Mones was easy to locate in the records; he arrived at Ellis Island in
1901. However, I have been totally stumped after trying all kinds of
possible scenarios, for years, to locating our grand mother's true arrival.
Rivke LABENSKY, however does show up on all subsequent USA censuses, during
her life time, as Rebecca LABENSKY. Any counseling to locate and determine
my grand mother's actual arrival would be most welcomed; any suggestions?

To throw in still another interesting sidelight that has been ferreted out;
an unmarried female by the same unusual name of Rivke ZUTS did finally
arrive in the port of New York in 1911.That person, as it seemingly turns
out, true surname was actually KORNGOLD. This KORNGOLD woman was met
dockside upon arrival and was subsequently married to her old boy friend,
who just happened to be one my grand mother's brother who had changed his
surname identity to SACHS while still in Europe. It certainly seems that
they went to great lengths to disguise and swap their individual identies in
order to escape >from Russia.

Howard Steinmetz
Colorado, USA

-----Original Message-----
Marian Brown wrote:

<<With free access to passenger lists on a well-known commercial site
this month, I have spent many hours searching the manifests, page by
page, name by name, and I want to share my experiences.

Looking for my great-grandparents, Rosa and Adolph Lissauer, and their
children who immigrated in 1887, I finally found them as Rosa and Adr
Cirzomer. The "L" in Lissauer was written as a lower case letter and
was magically transformed into a "C" --- The names and ages of the
children were also wierd but somewhat recognizable.

Then, I decided to look for my other great-grandmother, whose manifest I
possess. Her name was Marie Huebschman and Ancestry listed her as Marie
Rubschmann. The children were noted as Tom, a female, written Toni;
Rees, written Resi, and another Marie, very clearly written as Minna.

SO -- even though the index to these records has many, many
inaccuracies, don't give up. When I began, all I really knew was
approximate years of immigration.

David Nathan replies:

What we must all remember is that the person compiling the original;
listings wrote down what they thought they heard. Most of the accents of
the time would have been alien to them, so they made the best guesses
possible. Also, the immigrants themselves may have had only limited - or
even no - English, so they would have been unable to check the spellings.
Thus the errors arose and, in many cases, perpetuated.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Persist in the search of lost passengers #general

Barb & Howard
 

Thank you Marion Brown and David Nathan for your encouraging words regarding
the search for arrival of lost ancestors on ship manifests.

I am in total accord for the reasons why we have difficulty in locating
records when we know the familiar usual spellings of both given and surname
plus the arrival year. Still we are unable to locate our family members. The
gracious folks at LDS, who undertook the massively monumental task of
interpreting and transcribing the ship manifests, did to the best of their
abilities, could not possibly be acquainted with the myriad of handwriting
styles, and the formed shapes of the individual letters, as entered and
written by each and every ship's pursuer as persons boarded the departing
ship.

My question, to the mavens out there, is would there be a simple way to
correct the miss transcribed records as they are identified, on the
transcribed Ellis Island Data Base? Thus, making it easier for subsequent
researchers to locate the arrival of passengers, and eliminate endless
futile searches.

In a slightly different vein, we know that our pregnant (in 1901) maternal
grand mother, Rivke nee ZUTS coming >from the town called Krinky immediately
on the Polish side of the Russian border; (Rivke possibly also had her
maiden surname changed to SACHS prior to departure. It now appears that at
least two of her several brothers were involved in labor strikes and unrest
in the town of Krinky's leather processing industry). Two of Rivke's
brothers had changed their surname to SACHS in order to escape detection
while in pursuit attempting to get out of Russia) Rivke's baby had died
while she was still in Russia; but Rivke is known to have arrived in the USA
two to three years after her husband Mones LABENSKY arrived in the USA from
the close by city named Grodno, which is in the Gabernia known by the same
name. Mones was easy to locate in the records; he arrived at Ellis Island in
1901. However, I have been totally stumped after trying all kinds of
possible scenarios, for years, to locating our grand mother's true arrival.
Rivke LABENSKY, however does show up on all subsequent USA censuses, during
her life time, as Rebecca LABENSKY. Any counseling to locate and determine
my grand mother's actual arrival would be most welcomed; any suggestions?

To throw in still another interesting sidelight that has been ferreted out;
an unmarried female by the same unusual name of Rivke ZUTS did finally
arrive in the port of New York in 1911.That person, as it seemingly turns
out, true surname was actually KORNGOLD. This KORNGOLD woman was met
dockside upon arrival and was subsequently married to her old boy friend,
who just happened to be one my grand mother's brother who had changed his
surname identity to SACHS while still in Europe. It certainly seems that
they went to great lengths to disguise and swap their individual identies in
order to escape >from Russia.

Howard Steinmetz
Colorado, USA

-----Original Message-----
Marian Brown wrote:

<<With free access to passenger lists on a well-known commercial site
this month, I have spent many hours searching the manifests, page by
page, name by name, and I want to share my experiences.

Looking for my great-grandparents, Rosa and Adolph Lissauer, and their
children who immigrated in 1887, I finally found them as Rosa and Adr
Cirzomer. The "L" in Lissauer was written as a lower case letter and
was magically transformed into a "C" --- The names and ages of the
children were also wierd but somewhat recognizable.

Then, I decided to look for my other great-grandmother, whose manifest I
possess. Her name was Marie Huebschman and Ancestry listed her as Marie
Rubschmann. The children were noted as Tom, a female, written Toni;
Rees, written Resi, and another Marie, very clearly written as Minna.

SO -- even though the index to these records has many, many
inaccuracies, don't give up. When I began, all I really knew was
approximate years of immigration.

David Nathan replies:

What we must all remember is that the person compiling the original;
listings wrote down what they thought they heard. Most of the accents of
the time would have been alien to them, so they made the best guesses
possible. Also, the immigrants themselves may have had only limited - or
even no - English, so they would have been unable to check the spellings.
Thus the errors arose and, in many cases, perpetuated.


Transcription errors [ was <Passenger Lists - Persist!>] #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

David Nathan replied re the transcription errors LISSAUER>Cirzomer and
HUEBSCHMANN>Rubschmann which Marian Brown found on the ships' manifests:

<What we must all remember is that the person compiling the original listings
wrote down what they thought they heard. Most of the accents of the time would
have been alien to them, so they made the best guesses possible. Also, the
immigrants themselves may have had only limited - or even no - English, so they
would have been unable to check the spellings. Thus the errors arose and, in
many cases, perpetuated.>

That may well be so some cases, but most of the transcription errors I have
solved have been where the transcriber in the *past few years*, through lack of
general knowledge or inability to read older scripts has made guesses at the
name. Some are frankly ludicrous and a supervisor who has some knowledge of
languages/family history/ethnicities should have spotted them.

I take as an example all the SUESS entries on the England and Wales censuses. I
have been through most of them and they are all errors except for one - a Swiss
citizen. The letter L has often been misread for an S; and how many people
called SUESS would have lived in English villages in the early 1800s?

The name LISSAUER is easily legible, except it appears to be written LISZAUER.
as for HUBSCHMANN, that even has an umlaut and the three daughters as Marian
told us are mistranscribed as Maria [Minna], Tom [Toni] and Rees [Resi]!
Tom and Rees - little Hungarian girls in 1880, should have aroused some
suspicion in a proof reader! They should all be corrected.

The other HUBSCHMANN who turns up {Johanna} should read RUTSCHMANN. The name
above Maria HUBSCHMANN is Moritz LORBER - that too is obviously mistranscribed
and he appears as Morry LORBER; another Moritz appears as Marity!

If you have nothing better to do, I suggest you enter *Gellert* into the name
of the ship - 1880 as the year of arrival and Hungary as the origin and see if
you can beat the transcribers! Obviously a knowledge of Central
European/Hungarian names would be an advantage. This seems more
constructive/educational to me than doing crossword puzzles, especially if you
correct the entries.

When we find strange, anomalous names in typewritten form, which are easily
legible, then David's conclusion may be correct. Handwritten censuses and
manifests, however may be hard to decipher [faded, damaged, poor script] but
may nevertheless have been perfectly correct when written.

Celia Male [U.K.]


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Transcription errors [ was <Passenger Lists - Persist!>] #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

David Nathan replied re the transcription errors LISSAUER>Cirzomer and
HUEBSCHMANN>Rubschmann which Marian Brown found on the ships' manifests:

<What we must all remember is that the person compiling the original listings
wrote down what they thought they heard. Most of the accents of the time would
have been alien to them, so they made the best guesses possible. Also, the
immigrants themselves may have had only limited - or even no - English, so they
would have been unable to check the spellings. Thus the errors arose and, in
many cases, perpetuated.>

That may well be so some cases, but most of the transcription errors I have
solved have been where the transcriber in the *past few years*, through lack of
general knowledge or inability to read older scripts has made guesses at the
name. Some are frankly ludicrous and a supervisor who has some knowledge of
languages/family history/ethnicities should have spotted them.

I take as an example all the SUESS entries on the England and Wales censuses. I
have been through most of them and they are all errors except for one - a Swiss
citizen. The letter L has often been misread for an S; and how many people
called SUESS would have lived in English villages in the early 1800s?

The name LISSAUER is easily legible, except it appears to be written LISZAUER.
as for HUBSCHMANN, that even has an umlaut and the three daughters as Marian
told us are mistranscribed as Maria [Minna], Tom [Toni] and Rees [Resi]!
Tom and Rees - little Hungarian girls in 1880, should have aroused some
suspicion in a proof reader! They should all be corrected.

The other HUBSCHMANN who turns up {Johanna} should read RUTSCHMANN. The name
above Maria HUBSCHMANN is Moritz LORBER - that too is obviously mistranscribed
and he appears as Morry LORBER; another Moritz appears as Marity!

If you have nothing better to do, I suggest you enter *Gellert* into the name
of the ship - 1880 as the year of arrival and Hungary as the origin and see if
you can beat the transcribers! Obviously a knowledge of Central
European/Hungarian names would be an advantage. This seems more
constructive/educational to me than doing crossword puzzles, especially if you
correct the entries.

When we find strange, anomalous names in typewritten form, which are easily
legible, then David's conclusion may be correct. Handwritten censuses and
manifests, however may be hard to decipher [faded, damaged, poor script] but
may nevertheless have been perfectly correct when written.

Celia Male [U.K.]


Re: Slovakian Town #general

Vivian Kahn
 

Avigdor,

There was a Vaga, which is now Vahovce, Slovakia. It is east of
Bratislava and north of Galanta. There is also a place called Vagh
in Hungary.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA
H-SIG Coordinator


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Slovakian Town #general

Vivian Kahn
 

Avigdor,

There was a Vaga, which is now Vahovce, Slovakia. It is east of
Bratislava and north of Galanta. There is also a place called Vagh
in Hungary.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA
H-SIG Coordinator


Re: Slovakian town #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I am not clear whether Avigdor is referring to one word VAH or three with the
intial letters V, A and H. If three words, it be a mistranscription for: Nove
Mesto nad Vahom (German: Neustadt an der Waag/Neustadtl, Waag Neustadl;
Hungarian: Vagujhely) which is a town in the Trencin Region of Slovakia.

If Vah, it could refer to the river Vah - Waag in German - see for example
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pie%C5%A1%C5%A5any

There were many Jewish settlements in the area.

Celia Male [U.K.]


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: Slovakian town #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I am not clear whether Avigdor is referring to one word VAH or three with the
intial letters V, A and H. If three words, it be a mistranscription for: Nove
Mesto nad Vahom (German: Neustadt an der Waag/Neustadtl, Waag Neustadl;
Hungarian: Vagujhely) which is a town in the Trencin Region of Slovakia.

If Vah, it could refer to the river Vah - Waag in German - see for example
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pie%C5%A1%C5%A5any

There were many Jewish settlements in the area.

Celia Male [U.K.]