Date   

Morris FEIN; born c. 1900-1910; Warsaw? Poland to U.S. (Chicago?); #general

Tim Baker <tbaker@...>
 

Looking for info or descendants of a cousin of my wife's family:
Morris FEIN, son of Pauline (WINEFIELD) and _______ Fein.
Pauline was born around 1884 in Warsaw, Poland and
married [unknown] FEIN. Their child Morris FEIN came to the U.S.
Where he lived is unclear, although Pauline's siblings all lived
in the Chicago area. Pauline's siblings: Samuel WINEFIELD,
Adolph WINEFIELD, Sophie (WINEFIELD) EHRLICH,
Anna (WINEFIELD) FOX. Whether Pauline came to the U.S. is also
unclear, but she supposedly was married again to [unknown] DOLMAJ,
who lived in the U.S.

Tim Baker
Bellingham WA
tbaker@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Morris FEIN; born c. 1900-1910; Warsaw? Poland to U.S. (Chicago?); #general

Tim Baker <tbaker@...>
 

Looking for info or descendants of a cousin of my wife's family:
Morris FEIN, son of Pauline (WINEFIELD) and _______ Fein.
Pauline was born around 1884 in Warsaw, Poland and
married [unknown] FEIN. Their child Morris FEIN came to the U.S.
Where he lived is unclear, although Pauline's siblings all lived
in the Chicago area. Pauline's siblings: Samuel WINEFIELD,
Adolph WINEFIELD, Sophie (WINEFIELD) EHRLICH,
Anna (WINEFIELD) FOX. Whether Pauline came to the U.S. is also
unclear, but she supposedly was married again to [unknown] DOLMAJ,
who lived in the U.S.

Tim Baker
Bellingham WA
tbaker@...


search for alternate surname HOFFMAN #general

Barbara Zimmer <bravo.zulu@...>
 

David Brener has requested information about alternative surname for
HOFFMAN in South Carolina. One possible source of information which
may have been overlooked -- county-wide compilations of upstanding
citizens were often compiled in the 1800's (sort of a "Who's Who" in
XX County) These large books often contained gems of information
about each person's background, place of origin, family members,
dates of arrival, etc. The subscribers (??) may have paid to have
their biographies included. It is worth a try to inquire whether
such a book exists for the counties mentioned in the search request.

Barbara Zimmer
Virginia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen search for alternate surname HOFFMAN #general

Barbara Zimmer <bravo.zulu@...>
 

David Brener has requested information about alternative surname for
HOFFMAN in South Carolina. One possible source of information which
may have been overlooked -- county-wide compilations of upstanding
citizens were often compiled in the 1800's (sort of a "Who's Who" in
XX County) These large books often contained gems of information
about each person's background, place of origin, family members,
dates of arrival, etc. The subscribers (??) may have paid to have
their biographies included. It is worth a try to inquire whether
such a book exists for the counties mentioned in the search request.

Barbara Zimmer
Virginia


Re: ViewMate VM 9018 Yiddish to English translation from Lowicz Yizkor book #general

NATALIE LAMB
 

I have received several responses to my translation request and no longer
need to trouble anyone to do this for me. I have written to everyone
individually to thank them, and it proves once again what a wonderful
community JewishGen is.

The translators are generally agreed that the committee members in the photo
comprised Poles, Jews and Volksdeutsche (people of ethnic German origins).
Having now established that my grandmother's brother Michal ROZENDORN was a
member of the Citizen's Committee of Lowicz in 1915, it makes me wonder what
the duties and responsibilities of such a position might have been.

Since I have other photos (although previously unidentified) of him wearing
his armband of office, I deduce that he must have felt quite honoured to
serve the Lowicz community in this way.

If anyone has any thoughts about what this committee actually did and
whether similar committees existed at that time in other shtetls, please let
me know.

Natalie Lamb
Berkshire, England
Natalie.Lamb@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: ViewMate VM 9018 Yiddish to English translation from Lowicz Yizkor book #general

NATALIE LAMB
 

I have received several responses to my translation request and no longer
need to trouble anyone to do this for me. I have written to everyone
individually to thank them, and it proves once again what a wonderful
community JewishGen is.

The translators are generally agreed that the committee members in the photo
comprised Poles, Jews and Volksdeutsche (people of ethnic German origins).
Having now established that my grandmother's brother Michal ROZENDORN was a
member of the Citizen's Committee of Lowicz in 1915, it makes me wonder what
the duties and responsibilities of such a position might have been.

Since I have other photos (although previously unidentified) of him wearing
his armband of office, I deduce that he must have felt quite honoured to
serve the Lowicz community in this way.

If anyone has any thoughts about what this committee actually did and
whether similar committees existed at that time in other shtetls, please let
me know.

Natalie Lamb
Berkshire, England
Natalie.Lamb@...


Immigrants adopting different names #general

{USER_FIRSTNAME} {USER_LASTNAME} <rnwoolf@...>
 

A recent experience with searching for my father's first cousin Wolf
KUJAWSKI, who immigrated to the United States in the early years of WWII,
has reminded me of the importance of bearing in mind that our immigrant
ancestors sometimes adopted new names after settling in the United States,
England (or elsewhere). The "new" name was sometimes the anglicized,
simplified, or abbreviated version of their original name - last or first -
or even those of family members or friends who arrived in the host country
before them.

According to Ancestor.com's link to the US Alien Passenger Lists 1920 -
1957), Wolf KUJAWKI (known as Willie by my family) and wife Ryka (Regina)
arrived in the States in 1940. The ship's manifest revealed that Wolf and
Ryfka were going to stay with a "brother" living in Paterson, State of New
Jersey. (My initial reaction was "What brother?!") This individual was
identified simply as "B Winter." I subsequently found a Benjamin Winter in
the 1930 US Federal Census (born in Poland in 1892). Benjamin died in New
Jersey in 1973 (birth date given there as 1890).

Accordiing to the same source, I learned that a Jakov (Jakob) Ber KUJAWSKI,
born in Lodz, Poland in 1891, arrived in the United States in 1920. The
ship's manifest revealed that his father was a Pinkus Mayer KUJAWSKI of
Lodz, Poland. Jakob's brother Wolf was also born in Lodz (in 1898). Pinkus
K was my grandfather's brother! I now know - after years of unsuccessful
research - that my paternal grandfather's brother Pinkus had at least two
sons, Jakov and Wolf.

A search of the US Social Security Death Index revealed that a Willy WINTER
(born in 1898) died in New Jersey in 1969 and that a Regina WINTER (born in
1897) died in New York in 1970.

After comparing dates of birth and death, I've concluded that Jakob Ber
KUJAWSKI changed his name to Benjamin WINTER (Ber > Ben> Benjamin) and that
his brother Wolf followed suite by adopting the same surname. Why choose
WINTER? KUJAWSKI>WSKI>WINTER? Will probably never know.

Much of these recent discoveries are thanks to the diligent efforts of other
members of this newsgroup (to whom I've replied personally). Doubt if I
could ever have found my father's long lost cousin Willie and wife Regina
without their help.

So always bear in the mind that your immigrant ancestors may have changed
their names after immigrating to another country!

Naidia Woolf
rnwoolf@...
San Francisco, CA
Formerly of Birmingham, England


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Immigrants adopting different names #general

{USER_FIRSTNAME} {USER_LASTNAME} <rnwoolf@...>
 

A recent experience with searching for my father's first cousin Wolf
KUJAWSKI, who immigrated to the United States in the early years of WWII,
has reminded me of the importance of bearing in mind that our immigrant
ancestors sometimes adopted new names after settling in the United States,
England (or elsewhere). The "new" name was sometimes the anglicized,
simplified, or abbreviated version of their original name - last or first -
or even those of family members or friends who arrived in the host country
before them.

According to Ancestor.com's link to the US Alien Passenger Lists 1920 -
1957), Wolf KUJAWKI (known as Willie by my family) and wife Ryka (Regina)
arrived in the States in 1940. The ship's manifest revealed that Wolf and
Ryfka were going to stay with a "brother" living in Paterson, State of New
Jersey. (My initial reaction was "What brother?!") This individual was
identified simply as "B Winter." I subsequently found a Benjamin Winter in
the 1930 US Federal Census (born in Poland in 1892). Benjamin died in New
Jersey in 1973 (birth date given there as 1890).

Accordiing to the same source, I learned that a Jakov (Jakob) Ber KUJAWSKI,
born in Lodz, Poland in 1891, arrived in the United States in 1920. The
ship's manifest revealed that his father was a Pinkus Mayer KUJAWSKI of
Lodz, Poland. Jakob's brother Wolf was also born in Lodz (in 1898). Pinkus
K was my grandfather's brother! I now know - after years of unsuccessful
research - that my paternal grandfather's brother Pinkus had at least two
sons, Jakov and Wolf.

A search of the US Social Security Death Index revealed that a Willy WINTER
(born in 1898) died in New Jersey in 1969 and that a Regina WINTER (born in
1897) died in New York in 1970.

After comparing dates of birth and death, I've concluded that Jakob Ber
KUJAWSKI changed his name to Benjamin WINTER (Ber > Ben> Benjamin) and that
his brother Wolf followed suite by adopting the same surname. Why choose
WINTER? KUJAWSKI>WSKI>WINTER? Will probably never know.

Much of these recent discoveries are thanks to the diligent efforts of other
members of this newsgroup (to whom I've replied personally). Doubt if I
could ever have found my father's long lost cousin Willie and wife Regina
without their help.

So always bear in the mind that your immigrant ancestors may have changed
their names after immigrating to another country!

Naidia Woolf
rnwoolf@...
San Francisco, CA
Formerly of Birmingham, England


Need help deciphering Russian town and Brooklyn Address from Passenger List #general

Sfingold
 

I finally found a passenger list I had been searching
for. My grandmother Rose FEIN arrived in NYC in Nov,
1913. Departure port was Libau. The relevant part of
the passenger list is on Viewmate:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9024

Rose's information is on Line 8.

I need help deciphering the following:

1. Sister's first name and Brooklyn address.

2. Birth place town name. Scroll horizontally to the
very end to find the birth town name on the last line.
It looks like "Glechenz." I believe Rose was born
in Belarus. In 1913, her father was living in
Plescenitsy in Belarus.

ShtetlSeeker doesn't have an exact match for Glechenz.
In Belarus, two towns come up: Glushintsy and
Glazomichi. There don't seem to be any better matches
in other parts of the pale of settlement.

Finally, what language/writing style was used in Libau
in 1913? Was it Russian or Latvian or German? On the
passenger list (a different page not in Viewmate),
Rose's name is spelled as "Rasja Zeldja Fein" and I am
wondering what language was being used.

Please reply privately. Thanks for your help!

Sharon Fingold
sfingold@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need help deciphering Russian town and Brooklyn Address from Passenger List #general

Sfingold
 

I finally found a passenger list I had been searching
for. My grandmother Rose FEIN arrived in NYC in Nov,
1913. Departure port was Libau. The relevant part of
the passenger list is on Viewmate:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9024

Rose's information is on Line 8.

I need help deciphering the following:

1. Sister's first name and Brooklyn address.

2. Birth place town name. Scroll horizontally to the
very end to find the birth town name on the last line.
It looks like "Glechenz." I believe Rose was born
in Belarus. In 1913, her father was living in
Plescenitsy in Belarus.

ShtetlSeeker doesn't have an exact match for Glechenz.
In Belarus, two towns come up: Glushintsy and
Glazomichi. There don't seem to be any better matches
in other parts of the pale of settlement.

Finally, what language/writing style was used in Libau
in 1913? Was it Russian or Latvian or German? On the
passenger list (a different page not in Viewmate),
Rose's name is spelled as "Rasja Zeldja Fein" and I am
wondering what language was being used.

Please reply privately. Thanks for your help!

Sharon Fingold
sfingold@...


Re: Russian Translation Needed - Polish Marriage Certs #general

Scheimer, Deb <Deb.Scheimer@...>
 

Dear Friends,

The viewmate URL seems to have been corrupted in the email I sent.
Please note that the viewmate numbers are VM9034, VM9035, VM9036 and
VM9037. Or you can replace the third-to-last character in the URL with
"=3D90" (no quotation marks).

Thank you,

Deb Scheimer

-----Original Message-----
From: Scheimer, Deb [mailto:Deb.Scheimer@...]=20
Sent: Monday, December 11, 2006 3:25 PM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: Russian Translation Needed - Polish Marriage Certs

Dear Genners,

I posted 2 Polish marriage certificates which need to be translated from
Russian. The first is >from 1875 and the second >from 1884. Each marriage
cert is divided into a top half and bottom half so it would fit on my
scanner. Thank you in advance for any help anyone can provide.

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9034
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9035
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9036
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9037

Thank you so much,

Deb Scheimer, Pittsburgh, PA
Searching: GUNDERSHEIMER, PERVIN, RUDICK, SUFRIN, MELMAN,
AJZENBERG/ISENBERG


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Russian Translation Needed - Polish Marriage Certs #general

Scheimer, Deb <Deb.Scheimer@...>
 

Dear Friends,

The viewmate URL seems to have been corrupted in the email I sent.
Please note that the viewmate numbers are VM9034, VM9035, VM9036 and
VM9037. Or you can replace the third-to-last character in the URL with
"=3D90" (no quotation marks).

Thank you,

Deb Scheimer

-----Original Message-----
From: Scheimer, Deb [mailto:Deb.Scheimer@...]=20
Sent: Monday, December 11, 2006 3:25 PM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: Russian Translation Needed - Polish Marriage Certs

Dear Genners,

I posted 2 Polish marriage certificates which need to be translated from
Russian. The first is >from 1875 and the second >from 1884. Each marriage
cert is divided into a top half and bottom half so it would fit on my
scanner. Thank you in advance for any help anyone can provide.

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9034
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9035
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9036
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9037

Thank you so much,

Deb Scheimer, Pittsburgh, PA
Searching: GUNDERSHEIMER, PERVIN, RUDICK, SUFRIN, MELMAN,
AJZENBERG/ISENBERG


Lauer=Levi? #general

Rachel Unkefer <runkefer@...>
 

I just had a tombstone translated by several people >from my viewmate
posting, and they all seem to confirm that it is my husband's
g-g-g-grandfather. The dates concur with what I was told by an
elderly relative and the name, Baruch ben Moshe, works also. The one
thing that is a little bit of a discrepancy is that the first line
says "Baruch ben Moshe Levi". The surname the family adopted was
actually Lauer. He died in 1850, so this was many years after surname
adoptions and I have no reason to think that there was any change
after 1850. In fact, his daughter's first child was born in 1814 and
I'm pretty sure the birth record calls her Hanna geb. Lauer at that
time.

Is there any linguistic trick or mathematical trick or anything that
might explain how Lauer might somehow be written as Levi on a
tombstone? Note that it does not say "ha Levi", so I don't think it
refers to his being a Levite. Or am I looking at this wrong? Could
Levi have been the first name of Baruch's grandfather--Moshe's father?

Any thoughts on this?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Lauer=Levi? #general

Rachel Unkefer <runkefer@...>
 

I just had a tombstone translated by several people >from my viewmate
posting, and they all seem to confirm that it is my husband's
g-g-g-grandfather. The dates concur with what I was told by an
elderly relative and the name, Baruch ben Moshe, works also. The one
thing that is a little bit of a discrepancy is that the first line
says "Baruch ben Moshe Levi". The surname the family adopted was
actually Lauer. He died in 1850, so this was many years after surname
adoptions and I have no reason to think that there was any change
after 1850. In fact, his daughter's first child was born in 1814 and
I'm pretty sure the birth record calls her Hanna geb. Lauer at that
time.

Is there any linguistic trick or mathematical trick or anything that
might explain how Lauer might somehow be written as Levi on a
tombstone? Note that it does not say "ha Levi", so I don't think it
refers to his being a Levite. Or am I looking at this wrong? Could
Levi have been the first name of Baruch's grandfather--Moshe's father?

Any thoughts on this?


Re: The common name for Nesanajl #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

At 10:54 PM +1100 12/12/06, Charles and Perla Leinkram wrote:
My husband's grandfather's first name was Nesanajl. Is that the same as
Nathan or Nathaniel?
Thanking you in anticipation.
Perla Leinkram
No it is not Nathan, but yes it is Nathaniel.
That is the stadard English transliteration for
the Hebrew biblical name pronounced Ne-san-'el
by Ashkenazim. The main Biblical Nesan'el is
the one named in the Torah as a leader of the
tribe of Issachar at Numbers 1,8 and several more
times in the book of Numbers. (A different and
much later Nesan'el is mentioned in the
post-exilic books of Ezra, Nehemiah and
Chronicle, but your husband's ancestor.

Nathan is quite a different biblical character.
Several Nathans are mentioned in the bible but
the only important one is the prophet Nathan in
the time of King David, mentioned several times
in 2 Samuel and 1 Kings

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The common name for Nesanajl #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

At 10:54 PM +1100 12/12/06, Charles and Perla Leinkram wrote:
My husband's grandfather's first name was Nesanajl. Is that the same as
Nathan or Nathaniel?
Thanking you in anticipation.
Perla Leinkram
No it is not Nathan, but yes it is Nathaniel.
That is the stadard English transliteration for
the Hebrew biblical name pronounced Ne-san-'el
by Ashkenazim. The main Biblical Nesan'el is
the one named in the Torah as a leader of the
tribe of Issachar at Numbers 1,8 and several more
times in the book of Numbers. (A different and
much later Nesan'el is mentioned in the
post-exilic books of Ezra, Nehemiah and
Chronicle, but your husband's ancestor.

Nathan is quite a different biblical character.
Several Nathans are mentioned in the bible but
the only important one is the prophet Nathan in
the time of King David, mentioned several times
in 2 Samuel and 1 Kings

Judith Romney Wegner


Re: The common name for Nesanajl #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Tue, 12 Dec 2006 13:48:40 UTC, cpleinkram@... (Charles and Perla
Leinkram) opined:

My husband's grandfather's first name was Nesanajl. Is that the same as
Nathan or Nathaniel?
Thanking you in anticipation.
Perla Leinkram
You are very perceptive, to have seen through the Yiddish/Polish rendering
of the Hebrew name Netaniel. (Hebrew lacks a TH sound), and the usual
English spelling Nathaniel can be ignored.)

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The common name for Nesanajl #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Tue, 12 Dec 2006 13:48:40 UTC, cpleinkram@... (Charles and Perla
Leinkram) opined:

My husband's grandfather's first name was Nesanajl. Is that the same as
Nathan or Nathaniel?
Thanking you in anticipation.
Perla Leinkram
You are very perceptive, to have seen through the Yiddish/Polish rendering
of the Hebrew name Netaniel. (Hebrew lacks a TH sound), and the usual
English spelling Nathaniel can be ignored.)

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


Given name Rayler #general

henry
 

Dear Genners,

My grandmother was registered at birth with the given name Rayler,
I believe (I've got to get her birth certificate to be certain).
She appears on at least one UK census with that name.
On another UK census, she is down as Raylia.
During the time I knew her, she was always called Ray by her family.
She always insisted, when asked, that her given name was Raylia and not
Rachael

Her parents were both of Dutch Sephardi origin but were both born in London,
so would have spoken good English.(Her mother is known to have spoken
English without any trace of a foreign accent).
This would tend to discount the possiblity that the name was a spelling
mistake (Rachael??).
I've never seen anyone with either of those given names on any other tree
and I've never heard either of the names elsewhere.
Is it unique to her (and one of her descendants), or does anyone in the
group have a similarly named ancestor?

The reasons I ask are

1) She was the firstborn child and, therefore, it is likely that she was
named after one of her ancestors.
2) Curiosity.

Henry RAYmond Best [LONDON]


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Given name Rayler #general

henry
 

Dear Genners,

My grandmother was registered at birth with the given name Rayler,
I believe (I've got to get her birth certificate to be certain).
She appears on at least one UK census with that name.
On another UK census, she is down as Raylia.
During the time I knew her, she was always called Ray by her family.
She always insisted, when asked, that her given name was Raylia and not
Rachael

Her parents were both of Dutch Sephardi origin but were both born in London,
so would have spoken good English.(Her mother is known to have spoken
English without any trace of a foreign accent).
This would tend to discount the possiblity that the name was a spelling
mistake (Rachael??).
I've never seen anyone with either of those given names on any other tree
and I've never heard either of the names elsewhere.
Is it unique to her (and one of her descendants), or does anyone in the
group have a similarly named ancestor?

The reasons I ask are

1) She was the firstborn child and, therefore, it is likely that she was
named after one of her ancestors.
2) Curiosity.

Henry RAYmond Best [LONDON]