Date   

Re: Yiddish Given Name #general

Zev Griner <zgriner@...>
 

You pose an interesting question.

Although there are no hard and fast naming rules, in my experience I
have seen the following:
Gertrude is Gitel or Genya, Ethel is Etel or Etla, Sara is Sury or
Sural, and Rose is Raisel or Roise. Scheindel may have been a second
name or nickname.

Zev Griner

Irv Kramer wrote:
The family had 4 girls, Gertrude, Ethel, Sara, and Rose.
The boarding pass shows a female with the name of Scheindel. Which or
these 4 girls could have had this name?
MODERATOR NOTE: You may find the Given Names Data Bases at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/> helpful.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish Given Name #general

Zev Griner <zgriner@...>
 

You pose an interesting question.

Although there are no hard and fast naming rules, in my experience I
have seen the following:
Gertrude is Gitel or Genya, Ethel is Etel or Etla, Sara is Sury or
Sural, and Rose is Raisel or Roise. Scheindel may have been a second
name or nickname.

Zev Griner

Irv Kramer wrote:
The family had 4 girls, Gertrude, Ethel, Sara, and Rose.
The boarding pass shows a female with the name of Scheindel. Which or
these 4 girls could have had this name?
MODERATOR NOTE: You may find the Given Names Data Bases at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/> helpful.


Re: Peine cemetery,Germany #general

Diane Jacobs <thegenie@...>
 

Esther,

First try to find them on google.com or any other good search engine.
I did this successfully for Halifax, NS in Canada and was met at the pier,
as I was on a cruise, by the head of the Jewish cemetery and a distant
relative taken to the cemetery and spent the day with them learning about
the Jewish community and my relations. They also gave me a book of l00
Years of Jewish Life in Halifax which listed many names and family
connections.

Diane Jacobs
Somerset, NJ

-----Original Message-----
From: esther morag [mailto:marriana@netvision.net.il]
Sent: Tuesday, January 16, 2007 10:40 AM
Subject: Peine cemetery,Germany

Dear Sir .
How do I contact the Peine cemetery where my ancestors are buried?
Or the jewish congregation?
Thank you E. Morag


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Peine cemetery,Germany #general

Diane Jacobs <thegenie@...>
 

Esther,

First try to find them on google.com or any other good search engine.
I did this successfully for Halifax, NS in Canada and was met at the pier,
as I was on a cruise, by the head of the Jewish cemetery and a distant
relative taken to the cemetery and spent the day with them learning about
the Jewish community and my relations. They also gave me a book of l00
Years of Jewish Life in Halifax which listed many names and family
connections.

Diane Jacobs
Somerset, NJ

-----Original Message-----
From: esther morag [mailto:marriana@netvision.net.il]
Sent: Tuesday, January 16, 2007 10:40 AM
Subject: Peine cemetery,Germany

Dear Sir .
How do I contact the Peine cemetery where my ancestors are buried?
Or the jewish congregation?
Thank you E. Morag


rifleman Lazarus Jacobs #general

Irina Fridman
 

Dear Genners,

I'm looking for descendants of Lazarus JACOBS (c. 1875, Louisville,
Kentucky, USA - 10 May 1917 Chatham, Kent, UK). He was a rifleman in the 5th
Bn, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Approximately 20 years prior to his death he
served with Scottish Cameronians. His wife's name was Rachel, and they lived
in 5 Essex Street, Hackney in London.

Does anyone have any information on this guy? Any advice is welcome!

Thank you very much in advance.
Irina Shub
Chatham, UK

MODERATOR NOTE: You may also want to post your query on the JCR-UK list,
a joint project of JewishGen and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Great
Britain. For further information, see <http://www.jewishgen.org/JCR-UK/>.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen rifleman Lazarus Jacobs #general

Irina Fridman
 

Dear Genners,

I'm looking for descendants of Lazarus JACOBS (c. 1875, Louisville,
Kentucky, USA - 10 May 1917 Chatham, Kent, UK). He was a rifleman in the 5th
Bn, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Approximately 20 years prior to his death he
served with Scottish Cameronians. His wife's name was Rachel, and they lived
in 5 Essex Street, Hackney in London.

Does anyone have any information on this guy? Any advice is welcome!

Thank you very much in advance.
Irina Shub
Chatham, UK

MODERATOR NOTE: You may also want to post your query on the JCR-UK list,
a joint project of JewishGen and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Great
Britain. For further information, see <http://www.jewishgen.org/JCR-UK/>.


French Lines Database #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

The French Lines have an on-line database for passenger manifests for the
period of 1864-1936. While this only covers 27 different ship's crossings,
it is still of interest.

The site is in French, but is easily navigatable.

http://www.frenchlines.com/index.php

Look at the "Listes de passager".

An example of what one can find is a listing for the SS Normandie, Le
Havre - Southampton - New York, May 29, 1935.

There is a listing for Percy Trilnick, a Jewish British dress designer in
First Class. Unfortunately, there is no further information given on each
passenger.

Another Jewish passenger in First Class is Abraham Mintz, but he is not
identified by profession.

Where the person is a notable personality, their occupation is given such as
Lucius Boomer, President of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net

MODERATOR NOTE: An English-language version of the site is available by
clicking on a UK or USA flag.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen French Lines Database #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

The French Lines have an on-line database for passenger manifests for the
period of 1864-1936. While this only covers 27 different ship's crossings,
it is still of interest.

The site is in French, but is easily navigatable.

http://www.frenchlines.com/index.php

Look at the "Listes de passager".

An example of what one can find is a listing for the SS Normandie, Le
Havre - Southampton - New York, May 29, 1935.

There is a listing for Percy Trilnick, a Jewish British dress designer in
First Class. Unfortunately, there is no further information given on each
passenger.

Another Jewish passenger in First Class is Abraham Mintz, but he is not
identified by profession.

Where the person is a notable personality, their occupation is given such as
Lucius Boomer, President of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net

MODERATOR NOTE: An English-language version of the site is available by
clicking on a UK or USA flag.


RECHES, Lisa #general

Fritz Neubauer
 

Debbie wrote:

I need help with the information below obtained >from JRI.
Lisa WANG RECHES was deported to Zamoc >from Siegen, Germany. Which Zamoc
could this be, there are several near Poznan and Kalisz or was it Eastern
Galicia? Was there a concentration camp? Or could Zamoc have been her
original home town?

My comment:

Lisa RECHES also has an entry in the German Memorial Book of 2006 where her
birth place is provided:

*Reches*, Lisa
geb. Wang
* 08.01.1883 in Przeworsk
last residence in Siegen
Deportation:
1942, Zamosc

The book also lists all the deportations, among them one on
April 27/29, 1942 >from Dortmund to Zamosc with the arrival date May 1, 1942
Note that the place in Poland is called Zamosc, with sc at the end.

A description of the history of the Zamosc Ghetto can be found at the
address

http://www.deathcamps.org/occupation/zamosc%20ghetto.html

I hope that the information helps,

with kind regards

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RECHES, Lisa #general

Fritz Neubauer
 

Debbie wrote:

I need help with the information below obtained >from JRI.
Lisa WANG RECHES was deported to Zamoc >from Siegen, Germany. Which Zamoc
could this be, there are several near Poznan and Kalisz or was it Eastern
Galicia? Was there a concentration camp? Or could Zamoc have been her
original home town?

My comment:

Lisa RECHES also has an entry in the German Memorial Book of 2006 where her
birth place is provided:

*Reches*, Lisa
geb. Wang
* 08.01.1883 in Przeworsk
last residence in Siegen
Deportation:
1942, Zamosc

The book also lists all the deportations, among them one on
April 27/29, 1942 >from Dortmund to Zamosc with the arrival date May 1, 1942
Note that the place in Poland is called Zamosc, with sc at the end.

A description of the history of the Zamosc Ghetto can be found at the
address

http://www.deathcamps.org/occupation/zamosc%20ghetto.html

I hope that the information helps,

with kind regards

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany


Re: German diminutives (was:Yiddish translation: "khe" as opposed to "ke" name suffixes) #general

Nick <tulse04-news1@...>
 

"Nicole Heymans" <nheymans@ulb.ac.be> wrote

"chen" and "lein" are definitely German, as is "li" as I found >from tales
of my (very small) mother's days at the German school in Rotterdam in the
1920's where she was known (and teased) as "Margotlichenlein". I believe
"li" is closer to schwitzerdutsch than to orthodox German.
According to
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20060814022008AAJVwa9 "li" is
definitely Swiss German.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany),
THALHEIMER (Mainbernheim, Germany), KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and
Kleinerdlingen,Germany), LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Russia/Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?)
(Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Russia/Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: German diminutives (was:Yiddish translation: "khe" as opposed to "ke" name suffixes) #general

Nick <tulse04-news1@...>
 

"Nicole Heymans" <nheymans@ulb.ac.be> wrote

"chen" and "lein" are definitely German, as is "li" as I found >from tales
of my (very small) mother's days at the German school in Rotterdam in the
1920's where she was known (and teased) as "Margotlichenlein". I believe
"li" is closer to schwitzerdutsch than to orthodox German.
According to
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20060814022008AAJVwa9 "li" is
definitely Swiss German.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany),
THALHEIMER (Mainbernheim, Germany), KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and
Kleinerdlingen,Germany), LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Russia/Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?)
(Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Russia/Belarus)


KIRZNER #general

sbloom@...
 

Looking up this name in Beider's book on surnames, I find that KIRZNER is a
variant of KIRSZNER, which means "furrier" in Yiddish. The "sz" in Polish is
often rendered as "sh" in English, but I suppose sometimes the "s" is just lost.

Polish influences in surnames would have reached into Lithuania and parts of
Lithuania and Ukraine.

I have seen this name myself a few times (just among folks Ive met over the
years), so I have the feeling that its not that uncommon, particularly since
it refers back to a profession anyway.

So, answering the original questioner, who was >from Belarus, I doubt all folks
with this name are >from Belarus (and in fact, I found the name among Polish
surnames and is listed as occuring in many different area of Poland). Though,
perhaps certain variants are more common in certain places.

Nonetheless, as with just about any surname, your are more likely to be related
to folks within the region you are "originally" from. Of course, that depends on
how long your family was in the area you mention. There was much flux of
population over the centuries. I originally thought my BLUMENZON family was >from
Pabianice, Poland, only to find a huge related clan that had been in Przedborz,
Poland since 1818, and *then* I found out the original ancestor of this family
moved >from Piotrkow! And to confuse it all, I have taken part in a Y-DNA project
with a certain well known DNA genealogy company, and find my closest matches are
all mostly >from the Vilna district of Lithuania, and the parts of Belarus that
were also part of that region. So, some common ancestors, at least 400 years ago
wass likely >from somewhere other than Piotrkow.

Incidentally, though most BLUMENZON are related to me, there seem to be various
unrelated families throughout Poland and Lithuania (the name just means "son of
Bluma", so thats hardly surprising).

In summmation, I would say that *most* folks named KIRZNER or a variant are not
related, but that there is a decent chance that those >from a small area are, so
check that out first. Then, just increase the area, and see if you can still
match families.

And or try DNA genealogy, although I think we should keep the discussion of that
last point private, or switch to the separate DNA genealogy list.

I hope this helps.

***
Steven D. Bloom
Central Virginia


Re: Yiddish Given Name #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

Irv Kramer <irvdk@comcast.net> wrote:

I have a boarding pass for a family member that I cannot understand.
The family had 4 girls, Gertrude, Ethel, Sara, and Rose.
The boarding pass shows a female with the name of Scheindel.
Which or these 4 girls could have had this name?
I don't think there is any particular logical or historical
connection of any of those four names with Scheindel.
Apparently Scheindel chose a new name that sounded more
"American". There were no rules to follow when choosing
such a name, it was largely a matter of individual taste.
It could have been any of the four, but if I had to bet,
I'd bet on Sara, simply because it has the same initial.
Gertrude might have originally been Gitel, Ethel might
have been Esther, and Rose might have been Raizel. Or
maybe not...

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen KIRZNER #general

sbloom@...
 

Looking up this name in Beider's book on surnames, I find that KIRZNER is a
variant of KIRSZNER, which means "furrier" in Yiddish. The "sz" in Polish is
often rendered as "sh" in English, but I suppose sometimes the "s" is just lost.

Polish influences in surnames would have reached into Lithuania and parts of
Lithuania and Ukraine.

I have seen this name myself a few times (just among folks Ive met over the
years), so I have the feeling that its not that uncommon, particularly since
it refers back to a profession anyway.

So, answering the original questioner, who was >from Belarus, I doubt all folks
with this name are >from Belarus (and in fact, I found the name among Polish
surnames and is listed as occuring in many different area of Poland). Though,
perhaps certain variants are more common in certain places.

Nonetheless, as with just about any surname, your are more likely to be related
to folks within the region you are "originally" from. Of course, that depends on
how long your family was in the area you mention. There was much flux of
population over the centuries. I originally thought my BLUMENZON family was >from
Pabianice, Poland, only to find a huge related clan that had been in Przedborz,
Poland since 1818, and *then* I found out the original ancestor of this family
moved >from Piotrkow! And to confuse it all, I have taken part in a Y-DNA project
with a certain well known DNA genealogy company, and find my closest matches are
all mostly >from the Vilna district of Lithuania, and the parts of Belarus that
were also part of that region. So, some common ancestors, at least 400 years ago
wass likely >from somewhere other than Piotrkow.

Incidentally, though most BLUMENZON are related to me, there seem to be various
unrelated families throughout Poland and Lithuania (the name just means "son of
Bluma", so thats hardly surprising).

In summmation, I would say that *most* folks named KIRZNER or a variant are not
related, but that there is a decent chance that those >from a small area are, so
check that out first. Then, just increase the area, and see if you can still
match families.

And or try DNA genealogy, although I think we should keep the discussion of that
last point private, or switch to the separate DNA genealogy list.

I hope this helps.

***
Steven D. Bloom
Central Virginia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish Given Name #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

Irv Kramer <irvdk@comcast.net> wrote:

I have a boarding pass for a family member that I cannot understand.
The family had 4 girls, Gertrude, Ethel, Sara, and Rose.
The boarding pass shows a female with the name of Scheindel.
Which or these 4 girls could have had this name?
I don't think there is any particular logical or historical
connection of any of those four names with Scheindel.
Apparently Scheindel chose a new name that sounded more
"American". There were no rules to follow when choosing
such a name, it was largely a matter of individual taste.
It could have been any of the four, but if I had to bet,
I'd bet on Sara, simply because it has the same initial.
Gertrude might have originally been Gitel, Ethel might
have been Esther, and Rose might have been Raizel. Or
maybe not...

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada


Polish Translation Needed/Documents on Viewmate #poland

roberta rosen
 

I have posted three Polish documents to Viewmate.
I would very much appreciate having them
translated.

1. VM9306: 1859 death of Hil Leyb Rojzenman. I am
particularly interested in the names of his
parents, and any other family members mentioned.

2. VM9307: 1858 marriage of Estera Bejla Knop and
Szmul Mozek Shortz. Again, I am especially
interested in the parents of the bride and groom,
and any other family members.

3. VM9308: 1862 birth of Frajda Rozenman. I am
again interested in names of parents and any
other family members.

Thank you in advance for any help you can give
me!
Roberta Rosen

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Viewmate may be found at www.jewishgen.org/viewmate


JRI Poland #Poland Polish Translation Needed/Documents on Viewmate #poland

roberta rosen
 

I have posted three Polish documents to Viewmate.
I would very much appreciate having them
translated.

1. VM9306: 1859 death of Hil Leyb Rojzenman. I am
particularly interested in the names of his
parents, and any other family members mentioned.

2. VM9307: 1858 marriage of Estera Bejla Knop and
Szmul Mozek Shortz. Again, I am especially
interested in the parents of the bride and groom,
and any other family members.

3. VM9308: 1862 birth of Frajda Rozenman. I am
again interested in names of parents and any
other family members.

Thank you in advance for any help you can give
me!
Roberta Rosen

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Viewmate may be found at www.jewishgen.org/viewmate


Re: Linguistic question about name KIRZNER and variants #belarus

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

henryn <henryn@zzzspacebbs.com> wrote:

Folks:

I'm descended >from a KIRZNER family of the Kletsk -- Lyakhovichi -- Nesvizh
region, now in Belarus. A small group of us descended >from this name and
this area-of-origin have found each other and are working together to find
out if we are related. We assume that people with the same relatively
uncommon name >from such a small area are very likely to be related. (This
region is smaller than about 50km x 50km or 30mi x 30mi).

In Yiddish the name was spelled kuf-yud-resh-zayin-nun-resh. (Sometimes
there was an 'ayin" before the last resh.) We have seen the name written by
our ancestors on photos and documents this way.

We're trying to understand the linguistic history of this name, including:

* Origin. Was this name originally unique to this particular region of
Eastern Europe? How likely is it that KIRZNERs we find now scattered over
the world are descended >from the same region?

* Meaning. We are under the impression that this name originally meant "cap
maker" or "hat maker". We know of some KIRZNERs in our common ancestral
region who did make hats, and some others with quite different occupations.
I think you're right. Harduf's English-Yiddish Yiddish-English Dictionary has
kuf-yud-resh-zayin-shin-nun-ayin-resh: hatter; furrier

Clearly this is related to the German Kurschner (with umlaut on the u) meaning
furrier.

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada


Russian translation request (1883 Polish birth) VM9292 #poland

h gershon <hggen2001@...>
 

I have posted a 1883 Russian language birth
certificate for Szolom Fajwisz WARTELSKI on Viewmate.
Szolom was born in the Suwalki area of Poland. His
parents were Tanchel and Sora.

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9292

I would greatly appreciate a translation >from Russian
into English. I am looking for the usual details such
as the two dates of birth and name of the town, but
would also appreciate knowing ages, witnesses,
occupations and which parent appeared to register the
birth.

A high resolution scan can be provided upon request as
the post is sideways (sorry). Please respond
privately.

Thanks in advance.

hariette gershon
Atlanta, GA, USA
Jewish Genealogical Society of Georgia member

Researching in Poland

CHVILOVITZKY, LEVY, RIGRODSKY->Suwalk area
WARTELSKY->BARTELL, BARTELS: Jeleniewo -> NYC
YATKOVSKY, YALINSKY, JARDOVSKY->Suwalk area
SZAFIR->GOLD: Glowno. Radogoszcz -> New York City
KALMANOWICZ->COHEN: Lodz, -> NYC / Paterson, NJ, USA
YUKOBOVICZOW, GAWRONSKA-> Piotrkow area