Date   

BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Yizkor Book Project January 2007 #poland

Joyce Field
 

It's good that January was such a productive
month as February and March may be quite slow.
I will be away during the first two weeks of
February and Lance Ackerfeld, our html
coordinator, will be away mid-February to
mid-March So please understand that if you send
me translations, it could be awhile until they
get online. We know you are accustomed to fast
turnaround, so we ask for your patience.

In January we had 11 new entries, 12 updates and
one new book. All new material is flagged for
your convenience.

New book:

-Zuromin, Poland

New entries:

-Berschad, Ukraine, Bukowina book
-Brazlaw, Ukraine, Bukowina bok
-Burstadt, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Flonheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, Vol. III
-Hechtasheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-H=F6ringhausen, Germany, Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Hoof, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, vol. III
-Nieder-Olm, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Obernkirchen, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, vol. III
-Usingen, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Vendersheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III

Updates:

-Bukowina: Geschichte der Juden: pp. 164, 165
-Bedzin, Poland
-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dzialoszyce, Poland
-Kletsk, Belarus
-Novy Sacz, Poland
-Sala's Gift
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Warsaw, Poland
-Zloczew, Poland

As always, thanks to our donors and volunteers.
Please remember to contribute translations and/or
financial support to the yizkor book projects
listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Yizkor Book Project January 2007 #poland

Joyce Field
 

It's good that January was such a productive
month as February and March may be quite slow.
I will be away during the first two weeks of
February and Lance Ackerfeld, our html
coordinator, will be away mid-February to
mid-March So please understand that if you send
me translations, it could be awhile until they
get online. We know you are accustomed to fast
turnaround, so we ask for your patience.

In January we had 11 new entries, 12 updates and
one new book. All new material is flagged for
your convenience.

New book:

-Zuromin, Poland

New entries:

-Berschad, Ukraine, Bukowina book
-Brazlaw, Ukraine, Bukowina bok
-Burstadt, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Flonheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, Vol. III
-Hechtasheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-H=F6ringhausen, Germany, Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Hoof, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, vol. III
-Nieder-Olm, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Obernkirchen, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, vol. III
-Usingen, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Vendersheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III

Updates:

-Bukowina: Geschichte der Juden: pp. 164, 165
-Bedzin, Poland
-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dzialoszyce, Poland
-Kletsk, Belarus
-Novy Sacz, Poland
-Sala's Gift
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Warsaw, Poland
-Zloczew, Poland

As always, thanks to our donors and volunteers.
Please remember to contribute translations and/or
financial support to the yizkor book projects
listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


JRI Poland #Poland Yizkor Book Project January 2007 #poland

Joyce Field
 

It's good that January was such a productive
month as February and March may be quite slow.
I will be away during the first two weeks of
February and Lance Ackerfeld, our html
coordinator, will be away mid-February to
mid-March So please understand that if you send
me translations, it could be awhile until they
get online. We know you are accustomed to fast
turnaround, so we ask for your patience.

In January we had 11 new entries, 12 updates and
one new book. All new material is flagged for
your convenience.

New book:

-Zuromin, Poland

New entries:

-Berschad, Ukraine, Bukowina book
-Brazlaw, Ukraine, Bukowina bok
-Burstadt, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Flonheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, Vol. III
-Hechtasheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-H=F6ringhausen, Germany, Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Hoof, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, vol. III
-Nieder-Olm, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Obernkirchen, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, vol. III
-Usingen, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Vendersheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III

Updates:

-Bukowina: Geschichte der Juden: pp. 164, 165
-Bedzin, Poland
-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dzialoszyce, Poland
-Kletsk, Belarus
-Novy Sacz, Poland
-Sala's Gift
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Warsaw, Poland
-Zloczew, Poland

As always, thanks to our donors and volunteers.
Please remember to contribute translations and/or
financial support to the yizkor book projects
listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Yizkor Book Project January 2007 #poland

Joyce Field
 

It's good that January was such a productive
month as February and March may be quite slow.
I will be away during the first two weeks of
February and Lance Ackerfeld, our html
coordinator, will be away mid-February to
mid-March So please understand that if you send
me translations, it could be awhile until they
get online. We know you are accustomed to fast
turnaround, so we ask for your patience.

In January we had 11 new entries, 12 updates and
one new book. All new material is flagged for
your convenience.

New book:

-Zuromin, Poland

New entries:

-Berschad, Ukraine, Bukowina book
-Brazlaw, Ukraine, Bukowina bok
-Burstadt, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Flonheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, Vol. III
-Hechtasheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-H=F6ringhausen, Germany, Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Hoof, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, vol. III
-Nieder-Olm, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Obernkirchen, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, vol. III
-Usingen, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Vendersheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III

Updates:

-Bukowina: Geschichte der Juden: pp. 164, 165
-Bedzin, Poland
-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dzialoszyce, Poland
-Kletsk, Belarus
-Novy Sacz, Poland
-Sala's Gift
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Warsaw, Poland
-Zloczew, Poland

As always, thanks to our donors and volunteers.
Please remember to contribute translations and/or
financial support to the yizkor book projects
listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


JRI Poland #Poland Polish State Archives Invoice-translation help? #poland

elars@...
 

I have successfully communicated with the Czestochowa Regional Archives,
requesting several records. Their response, although positive, is
written in Polish. I can make out the general gist, but need specific
information about how to get payment into their hands.

The one page invoice has been placed on Viewmate.
The address to view it is:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9371

I would be very grateful if someone could translate the page for me,
especially the parts which indicate the amounts and payment
isntructions.? Please respond to me privately.

With appreciation

Art Spira
British Columbia, Canada

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Just a reminder that any queries about ordering
directly >from the Polish State Archive should be addressed to
< questions@... > Please respond directly to Mr. Spira
with translation help.


Polish State Archives Invoice-translation help? #poland

elars@...
 

I have successfully communicated with the Czestochowa Regional Archives,
requesting several records. Their response, although positive, is
written in Polish. I can make out the general gist, but need specific
information about how to get payment into their hands.

The one page invoice has been placed on Viewmate.
The address to view it is:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9371

I would be very grateful if someone could translate the page for me,
especially the parts which indicate the amounts and payment
isntructions.? Please respond to me privately.

With appreciation

Art Spira
British Columbia, Canada

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Just a reminder that any queries about ordering
directly >from the Polish State Archive should be addressed to
< questions@... > Please respond directly to Mr. Spira
with translation help.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen May Laws of 1880s (I'm confused) #general

Arnold Rabinowitz <arnold.rabinowitz@...>
 

"The May Laws introduced by Tsar Alexander III of Russia in 1882
banned Jews >from rural areas and towns of fewer than ten thousand
people" - >from Wikipedia

Did the May laws of 1880s immediately push the Jews out of the shtetls
and into the larger towns or was there a time period for this to
happen?

Is this why on the US passenger manifests all show the places of
origin as large towns?

I understand that most chose emigration instead of moving to the
larger cities, but Im trying to understand so that I save time when I
look for genealogy records asto correct locations - my grandfather
always stated that the family was >from Vilna (manifest, US Census,etc)
*except* one of his sons stated on a WWI draft registration that his
father's birthplace was a small town in the Pale (Swir). Did he move
to the big city or did just tell the bureacrats the name of the
nearest big city?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Where was/ is Hycz? #general

Aida <atedege@...>
 

Joy Weaver wrote:
"On some ships manifests >from the early 1920s, a
country designation of "Hycz" appears. The related
town is either Kolryn or Kobryn."

Joy,
It occurs to me that this could be a garbled 'manifest
version' of "Uyezd", as in "Kobryn Uyezd" (a district
in Polesie, one of the Kresy provinces in the II
Polish republic, which existed >from +/- 1920 to 1939).
All the best,
Aida Rauch [Belgium]


Re: Where was/ is Hycz? #general

Aida <atedege@...>
 

Joy Weaver wrote:
"On some ships manifests >from the early 1920s, a
country designation of "Hycz" appears. The related
town is either Kolryn or Kobryn."

Joy,
It occurs to me that this could be a garbled 'manifest
version' of "Uyezd", as in "Kobryn Uyezd" (a district
in Polesie, one of the Kresy provinces in the II
Polish republic, which existed >from +/- 1920 to 1939).
All the best,
Aida Rauch [Belgium]


May Laws of 1880s (I'm confused) #general

Arnold Rabinowitz <arnold.rabinowitz@...>
 

"The May Laws introduced by Tsar Alexander III of Russia in 1882
banned Jews >from rural areas and towns of fewer than ten thousand
people" - >from Wikipedia

Did the May laws of 1880s immediately push the Jews out of the shtetls
and into the larger towns or was there a time period for this to
happen?

Is this why on the US passenger manifests all show the places of
origin as large towns?

I understand that most chose emigration instead of moving to the
larger cities, but Im trying to understand so that I save time when I
look for genealogy records asto correct locations - my grandfather
always stated that the family was >from Vilna (manifest, US Census,etc)
*except* one of his sons stated on a WWI draft registration that his
father's birthplace was a small town in the Pale (Swir). Did he move
to the big city or did just tell the bureacrats the name of the
nearest big city?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Looking for town in Poland; sounds like Chelish #general

tom klein <bossman@...>
 

You might try "Kalisz" (pronounced "kah-leesh").


Tom Klein, Toronto

Subject: Looking for town in Poland; sounds like Chelish
From: kagsef@...
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2007 16:17:21 -0500
X-Message-Number: 19

My grandmother, Gittel (ERLICH) KAGAN, referred to her home town in
Poland as "Chelish." I am trying to figure out where that might be. She
was born in 1900, and in 1914, the entire town was evacuated by the
Russians and sent to Penza, Russia. Can anyone guide me? I looked
through Shtelfinder, but couldn't decide if Czeladz would be right or
not.

Thank you,
Kathy Sefton, Chicago, Illinois


Re: Looking for town in Poland; sounds like Chelish #general

tom klein <bossman@...>
 

You might try "Kalisz" (pronounced "kah-leesh").


Tom Klein, Toronto

Subject: Looking for town in Poland; sounds like Chelish
From: kagsef@...
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2007 16:17:21 -0500
X-Message-Number: 19

My grandmother, Gittel (ERLICH) KAGAN, referred to her home town in
Poland as "Chelish." I am trying to figure out where that might be. She
was born in 1900, and in 1914, the entire town was evacuated by the
Russians and sent to Penza, Russia. Can anyone guide me? I looked
through Shtelfinder, but couldn't decide if Czeladz would be right or
not.

Thank you,
Kathy Sefton, Chicago, Illinois


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: US Non-Immgrant Records? #general

Michael McTeer <mcteer@...>
 

Apparently I owe everyone an apology as both my subject and content was
confusing.

My comment, "going to 'bil'(?) in Philadelphia, PA" seems to have been the
most understood. The "(?)" was not a request for a definition of the
abbreviation of "brother-in-law." Rather it was referencing my
interpretation of the handwritting on the manifest. I believe it is "bil".

The overall topic was the possibility of US govenment records for people who
were just "visiting" as opposed to immigrating or seeking citizenship. My
desire was to identify this family in order to determine if it is my
ancestral family which I believe them to be. The answer to that question
seems to have been answered by Mark Jacobson who detailed response I include
below. In a word, the answer to my question was *no*.
According to the 1931 passenger listing of my great grandmother, Liba
(LENCZNER) LIEBERMAN KALKOPF FRYMORGEN, she had been in the US as
early as 1903 (to Philadelphia). I knew some of the family (including my
grandmother) came through St. Louis where there were relatives but the
Philadelphia connection was not known to me. It would be *years* later that I
would learn of "Uncle Sol" GLICKSMAN who arrived in Philadelphia in the
1890's. Until recently I have never really had "access" to the on line
Philadelphia listings (where I just found the Apr 1939 manifest for my
half great aunt) so I have not yet had time to check on all possible KALKOPF
enteries there. But of course a "KALKOPF" family going to Philadelphia is of
great interest to me. I do not know if the subject family was attempting
immigration or just visiting. My great grandfather, "Aaron", I was told was
a tailor as was the subject husband.

(Mark Jacobson ) "....The fact that they
are listed on an immigration manifest and were not US
citizens means (and there is no stamp "non-immigrant
passenger" which was used for people in transit) means
they were immigrants. There were no special
immigration markings on manifests, the manifests
themselves were immigration documentation. There were
no entry visas before World War I, no 'resident
aliens' before World War II, no other paperwork for
immigrants. There was no immigrant legal status in the
United States at this time nor for many years after.
People could come and go at will, as long as they
could purchase tickets, were not criminals or
indigents, and the passed the medical inspection.
These people were immigrants. They did not have to
ever apply for naturalization, they were still
immigrants. The only information ever added to
manifests is an application for a Certificate of
Arrival, one of the steps in the Petition process, and
since they arrived in January 1906 this was before the
Certificate of Arrival law existed, so if any one of
them ever applied for citizenship there would be no
Certificates of Arrival created for any of them. You
have all the immigration paperwork which exists if you
have the manifest."

Thanks to all who responded to me and sorry for the confusion.

Michael McTeer
29 Palms, CA
mcteer@...


Re: US Non-Immgrant Records? #general

Michael McTeer <mcteer@...>
 

Apparently I owe everyone an apology as both my subject and content was
confusing.

My comment, "going to 'bil'(?) in Philadelphia, PA" seems to have been the
most understood. The "(?)" was not a request for a definition of the
abbreviation of "brother-in-law." Rather it was referencing my
interpretation of the handwritting on the manifest. I believe it is "bil".

The overall topic was the possibility of US govenment records for people who
were just "visiting" as opposed to immigrating or seeking citizenship. My
desire was to identify this family in order to determine if it is my
ancestral family which I believe them to be. The answer to that question
seems to have been answered by Mark Jacobson who detailed response I include
below. In a word, the answer to my question was *no*.
According to the 1931 passenger listing of my great grandmother, Liba
(LENCZNER) LIEBERMAN KALKOPF FRYMORGEN, she had been in the US as
early as 1903 (to Philadelphia). I knew some of the family (including my
grandmother) came through St. Louis where there were relatives but the
Philadelphia connection was not known to me. It would be *years* later that I
would learn of "Uncle Sol" GLICKSMAN who arrived in Philadelphia in the
1890's. Until recently I have never really had "access" to the on line
Philadelphia listings (where I just found the Apr 1939 manifest for my
half great aunt) so I have not yet had time to check on all possible KALKOPF
enteries there. But of course a "KALKOPF" family going to Philadelphia is of
great interest to me. I do not know if the subject family was attempting
immigration or just visiting. My great grandfather, "Aaron", I was told was
a tailor as was the subject husband.

(Mark Jacobson ) "....The fact that they
are listed on an immigration manifest and were not US
citizens means (and there is no stamp "non-immigrant
passenger" which was used for people in transit) means
they were immigrants. There were no special
immigration markings on manifests, the manifests
themselves were immigration documentation. There were
no entry visas before World War I, no 'resident
aliens' before World War II, no other paperwork for
immigrants. There was no immigrant legal status in the
United States at this time nor for many years after.
People could come and go at will, as long as they
could purchase tickets, were not criminals or
indigents, and the passed the medical inspection.
These people were immigrants. They did not have to
ever apply for naturalization, they were still
immigrants. The only information ever added to
manifests is an application for a Certificate of
Arrival, one of the steps in the Petition process, and
since they arrived in January 1906 this was before the
Certificate of Arrival law existed, so if any one of
them ever applied for citizenship there would be no
Certificates of Arrival created for any of them. You
have all the immigration paperwork which exists if you
have the manifest."

Thanks to all who responded to me and sorry for the confusion.

Michael McTeer
29 Palms, CA
mcteer@...


German SIG #Germany German entries in Yizkor Book Project report January 2007 #germany

Joyce Field
 

It's good that January was such a productive month as February and March
may be quite slow. I will be away during the first two weeks of February
and Lance Ackerfeld, our html coordinator, will be away mid-February to
mid-March So please understand that if you send me translations, it could
be awhile until they get online. We know you are accustomed to fast turnaround,
so we ask for your patience.

In January we had 11 new entries, 12 updates and one new book. All new material
is flagged for your convenience.
New book:
-Zuromin, Poland

New entries:
-Berschad, Ukraine, Bukowina book
-Brazlaw, Ukraine, Bukowina bok
-Burstadt, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Flonheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, Vol. III
-Hechtasheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Höringhausen, Germany, Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III [Hoeringshausen]
-Hoof, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, vol. III
-Nieder-Olm, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Obernkirchen, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, vol. III
-Usingen, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Vendersheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III

Updates:
-Bukowina: Geschichte der Juden: pp. 164, 165
-Bedzin, Poland
-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dzialoszyce, Poland
-Kletsk, Belarus
-Novy Sacz, Poland
-Sala's Gift
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Warsaw, Poland
-Zloczew, Poland

As always, thanks to our donors and volunteers. Please remember to contribute
translations and/or financial support to the yizkor book projects listed at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=3D=23

Joyce Field JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


German entries in Yizkor Book Project report January 2007 #germany

Joyce Field
 

It's good that January was such a productive month as February and March
may be quite slow. I will be away during the first two weeks of February
and Lance Ackerfeld, our html coordinator, will be away mid-February to
mid-March So please understand that if you send me translations, it could
be awhile until they get online. We know you are accustomed to fast turnaround,
so we ask for your patience.

In January we had 11 new entries, 12 updates and one new book. All new material
is flagged for your convenience.
New book:
-Zuromin, Poland

New entries:
-Berschad, Ukraine, Bukowina book
-Brazlaw, Ukraine, Bukowina bok
-Burstadt, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Flonheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, Vol. III
-Hechtasheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Höringhausen, Germany, Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III [Hoeringshausen]
-Hoof, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, vol. III
-Nieder-Olm, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Obernkirchen, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, vol. III
-Usingen, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III
-Vendersheim, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot, Germany, vol. III

Updates:
-Bukowina: Geschichte der Juden: pp. 164, 165
-Bedzin, Poland
-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dzialoszyce, Poland
-Kletsk, Belarus
-Novy Sacz, Poland
-Sala's Gift
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Warsaw, Poland
-Zloczew, Poland

As always, thanks to our donors and volunteers. Please remember to contribute
translations and/or financial support to the yizkor book projects listed at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=3D=23

Joyce Field JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Tzdok as grandfather's name #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/30/2007 10:09:54 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
en@... writes:

<< My grandfather was born in Mir, Belarus. The Hebrew name on his
grave is tzade, dalet, vav, he. The family always pronounced this Tzdok. I
thought a tzodk was the term for a learned, righteous man, not a name. Has
anyone heard of this as a name? How should it be pronounced? >>

The name is Tsadok; (a priest at the time of David and Solomon. I Sam.
15:34-37; I Kings 1:7, 8.). Pronounced Tsodek in Yiddish. The last letter of
his name, perhaps eroded, perhaps badly engraved, perhaps misread, perhaps
misspelled should be a kof.

The heh-at-the-end spelling may arise >from a confusion with
Tseydeh/Seydeh for "grandfather"

Tsadok and Tsadik are >from the same Hebrew root. Only the former is a
personal name, relatively rare among Ashkenasim. The Sadducees took their name
from Tsadok.
Michael Bernet, New York


Re: Tzdok as grandfather's name #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/30/2007 10:09:54 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
en@... writes:

<< My grandfather was born in Mir, Belarus. The Hebrew name on his
grave is tzade, dalet, vav, he. The family always pronounced this Tzdok. I
thought a tzodk was the term for a learned, righteous man, not a name. Has
anyone heard of this as a name? How should it be pronounced? >>

The name is Tsadok; (a priest at the time of David and Solomon. I Sam.
15:34-37; I Kings 1:7, 8.). Pronounced Tsodek in Yiddish. The last letter of
his name, perhaps eroded, perhaps badly engraved, perhaps misread, perhaps
misspelled should be a kof.

The heh-at-the-end spelling may arise >from a confusion with
Tseydeh/Seydeh for "grandfather"

Tsadok and Tsadik are >from the same Hebrew root. Only the former is a
personal name, relatively rare among Ashkenasim. The Sadducees took their name
from Tsadok.
Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Tzdok as grandfather's name #general

Dr.Josef ASH
 

The last letter is not "He", it is sure "Kof" (you should just prolong down
the left line of it).
The first Tsadok was a cohen during the time of the King David. (look the
second book of Samuil, 15,24)
Dr Josef Ash

-----Original Message-----
From: Ellen Gottfried [mailto:en@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 4:02 AM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: Tzdok as grandfather's name

Dear Genners:
My grandfather was born in Mir, Belarus. The Hebrew name on his
grave is tzade, dalet, vav, he. The family always pronounced this Tzdok. I
thought a tzodk was the term for a learned, righteous man, not a name. Has
anyone heard of this as a name? How should it be pronounced?
Thank you for your help.

Ellen GOTTFRIED


Re: Tzdok as grandfather's name #general

Dr.Josef ASH
 

The last letter is not "He", it is sure "Kof" (you should just prolong down
the left line of it).
The first Tsadok was a cohen during the time of the King David. (look the
second book of Samuil, 15,24)
Dr Josef Ash

-----Original Message-----
From: Ellen Gottfried [mailto:en@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 4:02 AM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: Tzdok as grandfather's name

Dear Genners:
My grandfather was born in Mir, Belarus. The Hebrew name on his
grave is tzade, dalet, vav, he. The family always pronounced this Tzdok. I
thought a tzodk was the term for a learned, righteous man, not a name. Has
anyone heard of this as a name? How should it be pronounced?
Thank you for your help.

Ellen GOTTFRIED