Date   

IAJGS Conference early registration ends in just one week! #yiddish

Information <information@...>
 

If you have been to an IAJGS conference, you know what a great
experience it is. If you have never been to one, you may not realize
the amazing connections made during these events.

The person sitting next to you might turn out to be an unknown
relative, might hold a piece of your family puzzle or may have done
research in your ancestral village. >from early morning to late at night,
groups of attendees discuss their common interests and share
experiences in every corner of the conference hotel.

For beginners, there are getting-started sessions and entry-level
computer workshops. Experts >from the Family History Library will
speak at breakfasts each morning, providing pointers on making the
most of the amazing resources at the Library.

Where else can you find a relative in a birth, marriage or naturalization
index, immediately get the microfilm reel containing the original
document and print off a copy yourself? Where else can you find
microfilmed records >from all parts of the globe? And ... you are not
alone as everyone else is also working on their genealogical research.
The staff is knowledgeable, helpful and there are daily orientation
sessions.

For those with specific research interests, more than 200 lectures,
computer labs, films and meetings provide opportunities to learn,
share and explore. This year, there will be special emphasis on
genetics, Special Interest Groups (SIGs) and the opening of the
World War II Arolsen records.

Still not enough? Organize your own Birds-of-a-Feather session.
Many Special Interest and Area Research groups began as informal
discussions between like-minded people at the annual conferences.

To read more about the conference, click
www.slc2007.org/breaking_news.cfm. Elsewhere on the conference
website, www.slc2007.org, browse the full listing of lectures,
computer labs and films, register for the conference, sign up for a
lab or a breakfast with the experts, SIG luncheon, or the conference
banquet, book your hotel room or a tour, and learn more about what
you and your family can do in Salt Lake City while you pursue your
roots, renew old acquaintances and make new friends.

Early registration discounts end May 1, so you still have a week to take
advantage of the price break. And, at special conference rates, the
four-star Hilton Salt Lake City Center is a terrific bargain.

We look forward to seeing you in Salt Lake City on Sunday, July 15!
Hal Bookbinder & Michael Brenner, conference co-chairs


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre IAJGS Conference early registration ends in just one week! #yiddish

Information <information@...>
 

If you have been to an IAJGS conference, you know what a great
experience it is. If you have never been to one, you may not realize
the amazing connections made during these events.

The person sitting next to you might turn out to be an unknown
relative, might hold a piece of your family puzzle or may have done
research in your ancestral village. >from early morning to late at night,
groups of attendees discuss their common interests and share
experiences in every corner of the conference hotel.

For beginners, there are getting-started sessions and entry-level
computer workshops. Experts >from the Family History Library will
speak at breakfasts each morning, providing pointers on making the
most of the amazing resources at the Library.

Where else can you find a relative in a birth, marriage or naturalization
index, immediately get the microfilm reel containing the original
document and print off a copy yourself? Where else can you find
microfilmed records >from all parts of the globe? And ... you are not
alone as everyone else is also working on their genealogical research.
The staff is knowledgeable, helpful and there are daily orientation
sessions.

For those with specific research interests, more than 200 lectures,
computer labs, films and meetings provide opportunities to learn,
share and explore. This year, there will be special emphasis on
genetics, Special Interest Groups (SIGs) and the opening of the
World War II Arolsen records.

Still not enough? Organize your own Birds-of-a-Feather session.
Many Special Interest and Area Research groups began as informal
discussions between like-minded people at the annual conferences.

To read more about the conference, click
www.slc2007.org/breaking_news.cfm. Elsewhere on the conference
website, www.slc2007.org, browse the full listing of lectures,
computer labs and films, register for the conference, sign up for a
lab or a breakfast with the experts, SIG luncheon, or the conference
banquet, book your hotel room or a tour, and learn more about what
you and your family can do in Salt Lake City while you pursue your
roots, renew old acquaintances and make new friends.

Early registration discounts end May 1, so you still have a week to take
advantage of the price break. And, at special conference rates, the
four-star Hilton Salt Lake City Center is a terrific bargain.

We look forward to seeing you in Salt Lake City on Sunday, July 15!
Hal Bookbinder & Michael Brenner, conference co-chairs


Seminar in Israel - The Wandering Jew: Jewish Migration Between the 18th and 20th Centuries #galicia

Billie Stein <billie.stein@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society was inundated with emails following
our original call for papers for the Third Annual One Day Seminar on
Jewish Genealogy to be held on Monday, 12 November 2007 at Beit Wolyn
in Givatayim, Israel. Some of the ideas were very exciting. However,
email notification of a proposal or an idea for a talk is not enough.
We would like to take this opportunity to remind you that the final
date for submission of an abstract is 1 June 2007.

To remind you:
Our topic this year is vital to the understanding of Jewish
genealogy and history:
The Wandering Jew: Jewish Migration Between the 18th and 20th Centuries

This covers any Jewish community anywhere at any time within this
200-year time span. As always, the emphasis of any presentation
should include available resources and should deal with availability
and access to documentation.

Guidelines for Submission of Proposals:
Authors wishing to present a paper at the one day seminar are
invited to submit an abstract by e-mail attachment in Word format to
Dr. Martha Lev-Zion, or mail it on a diskette in Word format to reach
the One Day Seminar Committee by June 1, 2007, together with 3
original hard copies.

Proposals, whether accepted or declined, will not be returned. Make
sure you retain a copy of your proposal. Please note that lectures
are limited to 35 minutes, with an additional 10 minutes for
questions and answers.
Email address: Martha Lev-Zion <martha@bgu.ac.il>
Postal address: Yom Iyun, POB 786, 84965 Omer
Proposals Format:
If you plan to submit more than one proposal, please use a separate
page for each submission.
1. File format must be either Microsoft Word (*.DOC) or Rich Text
Format (*.RTF) only.
2. Abstracts may be written either in Hebrew or in English, Times
New Roman font, 12 points and single-spaced. Please limit your
submission to 250 words.
3. Page margins are 2.5 cm (1 inch) >from each side.
At the end of your proposal, please state:
1. the language (Hebrew or English) in which you would prefer to
present your lecture.
2. if any equipment is required, such as a computer, projector or
overhead projector, please include those needs in your proposal.
[We advise lecturers to bring their own laptops.]
3. For those proposals that are accepted for presentation, the
lecturers will be expected to send in a full version of their talk
to the organizing committee prior to the One Day Seminar. Exact
details will be included in the letter of acceptance to the lecturer.

Deadlines:
1 June 2007 - Submission of abstracts
1 July 2007 - Notification of acceptance

Billie Stein
President, Tel Aviv Branch
Israel Genealogical Society


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Seminar in Israel - The Wandering Jew: Jewish Migration Between the 18th and 20th Centuries #galicia

Billie Stein <billie.stein@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society was inundated with emails following
our original call for papers for the Third Annual One Day Seminar on
Jewish Genealogy to be held on Monday, 12 November 2007 at Beit Wolyn
in Givatayim, Israel. Some of the ideas were very exciting. However,
email notification of a proposal or an idea for a talk is not enough.
We would like to take this opportunity to remind you that the final
date for submission of an abstract is 1 June 2007.

To remind you:
Our topic this year is vital to the understanding of Jewish
genealogy and history:
The Wandering Jew: Jewish Migration Between the 18th and 20th Centuries

This covers any Jewish community anywhere at any time within this
200-year time span. As always, the emphasis of any presentation
should include available resources and should deal with availability
and access to documentation.

Guidelines for Submission of Proposals:
Authors wishing to present a paper at the one day seminar are
invited to submit an abstract by e-mail attachment in Word format to
Dr. Martha Lev-Zion, or mail it on a diskette in Word format to reach
the One Day Seminar Committee by June 1, 2007, together with 3
original hard copies.

Proposals, whether accepted or declined, will not be returned. Make
sure you retain a copy of your proposal. Please note that lectures
are limited to 35 minutes, with an additional 10 minutes for
questions and answers.
Email address: Martha Lev-Zion <martha@bgu.ac.il>
Postal address: Yom Iyun, POB 786, 84965 Omer
Proposals Format:
If you plan to submit more than one proposal, please use a separate
page for each submission.
1. File format must be either Microsoft Word (*.DOC) or Rich Text
Format (*.RTF) only.
2. Abstracts may be written either in Hebrew or in English, Times
New Roman font, 12 points and single-spaced. Please limit your
submission to 250 words.
3. Page margins are 2.5 cm (1 inch) >from each side.
At the end of your proposal, please state:
1. the language (Hebrew or English) in which you would prefer to
present your lecture.
2. if any equipment is required, such as a computer, projector or
overhead projector, please include those needs in your proposal.
[We advise lecturers to bring their own laptops.]
3. For those proposals that are accepted for presentation, the
lecturers will be expected to send in a full version of their talk
to the organizing committee prior to the One Day Seminar. Exact
details will be included in the letter of acceptance to the lecturer.

Deadlines:
1 June 2007 - Submission of abstracts
1 July 2007 - Notification of acceptance

Billie Stein
President, Tel Aviv Branch
Israel Genealogical Society


NYC Death Records #galicia

phylliskramer1@...
 

Bruce Wexler posted seeking a NY death record circa 1950.

To find the death record I think you have 2 choices since
www.italiangen.org indexes only go to 1948:

1. There are death index books in the NY Public Library on 42nd St
(genealogy room).
2. The Mormons have all boro death indexes to 1965. Go to
www.familysearch.com and click on catalog, then New York
(Death: index_ to deaths, NYC 1888-1965. Arranged alphabetically
within each year. >from 1898-1936 each borough is listed separately.
Beginning with 1937, all deaths are listed by month with each
borough identified by a key letter. Information contained is name
of deceased, dod, age, borough, cert #.)

Once you get the certificate number and year, you can send for the
death record >from the Dept. of Health, Division of Vital Records,
125 Worth St, PO Box 3776, NY NY 10013; (212) 619-4530; get the
application online at
http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/vr/vrbappl.shtml

PS: i did find a SSDI listing for a simon posner born 9/9/06, died
9/85 in the Bronx--

Happy Hunting!
Phyllis Kramer, Wilton, Conn & Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
VP, Education, JewishGen, Inc.
PhyllisKramer1@att.net, researching (mostly Galicia):
STECHER, TRACHMAN,>from Zmigrod, Dukla, Krosno
KRAMER, BEIM, WISNER >from Jasienica
SCHEINER, KANDEL, SCHIMMEL >from Strzyzow, Dubiecko
LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn(also Iasi, Romania)


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia NYC Death Records #galicia

phylliskramer1@...
 

Bruce Wexler posted seeking a NY death record circa 1950.

To find the death record I think you have 2 choices since
www.italiangen.org indexes only go to 1948:

1. There are death index books in the NY Public Library on 42nd St
(genealogy room).
2. The Mormons have all boro death indexes to 1965. Go to
www.familysearch.com and click on catalog, then New York
(Death: index_ to deaths, NYC 1888-1965. Arranged alphabetically
within each year. >from 1898-1936 each borough is listed separately.
Beginning with 1937, all deaths are listed by month with each
borough identified by a key letter. Information contained is name
of deceased, dod, age, borough, cert #.)

Once you get the certificate number and year, you can send for the
death record >from the Dept. of Health, Division of Vital Records,
125 Worth St, PO Box 3776, NY NY 10013; (212) 619-4530; get the
application online at
http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/vr/vrbappl.shtml

PS: i did find a SSDI listing for a simon posner born 9/9/06, died
9/85 in the Bronx--

Happy Hunting!
Phyllis Kramer, Wilton, Conn & Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
VP, Education, JewishGen, Inc.
PhyllisKramer1@att.net, researching (mostly Galicia):
STECHER, TRACHMAN,>from Zmigrod, Dukla, Krosno
KRAMER, BEIM, WISNER >from Jasienica
SCHEINER, KANDEL, SCHIMMEL >from Strzyzow, Dubiecko
LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn(also Iasi, Romania)


Re: Romantic relationships #general

Marilwebb@...
 

Thank you all so much for notes on my "romantic relationships" post. Also
for the reference to Amos Oz's book, a book called Marriage Customs in
Imperial Russia, and to the Jewish Gen archives. I will look at them all.

Just to explain my slang, however, by "issues" I meant they eventually had
problems in their relationship. And yes, I did mean would they have had sex
when the girl was 12 or 13. (Especially, as in this case, the girl was a
rabbi's daughter.)

The "issue" later on is that my great-grandfather came to America and I
think she stayed behind in Odessa. None of their names are on any ship
manifests and the dates on census material don't seem right. Anyway, I think
she wasn't here for four years while he was.

Then, in 1898 my great-grandfather allegedly had sex with a girl who was 12.
There were Jewish prostitutes all over the lower east side in New York,
where he lived, but this girl was his boss's daughter. He was charged with four
different counts of rape but, according to the prosecutor's records, only was
convicted of statutory rape, meaning the girl wasn't of age. There are no
records >from his side of the case but he must have had a strong case or he would
have been charged with the other three counts, including assault and battery,
forced "entry" so to speak, etc.

Her only complaint was that he didn't pay her, as she said he had promised.
He said he was innocent, and I don't know what he meant he was innocent
of--rape (which in his mind likely seemed like pogrom-style rape) or having
had sex with her or of promising to pay and then not paying.

I'm trying to figure out what in the world he might have been thinking....to
sleep with the boss's daughter, to say he was innocent, not to have paid,
and then to have actually married in the old country -- whether or not he had
sex--when that girl was also 12 or 13. And the rabbi's daughter, to boot.

Anyway, he was sent to Sing Sing. And then when he got out his wife came
over. I don't think they spoke much after that. Thanks so much for all the
responses. If anyone has any more insights please let me know.

All best,
Marilyn Webb


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Romantic relationships #general

Marilwebb@...
 

Thank you all so much for notes on my "romantic relationships" post. Also
for the reference to Amos Oz's book, a book called Marriage Customs in
Imperial Russia, and to the Jewish Gen archives. I will look at them all.

Just to explain my slang, however, by "issues" I meant they eventually had
problems in their relationship. And yes, I did mean would they have had sex
when the girl was 12 or 13. (Especially, as in this case, the girl was a
rabbi's daughter.)

The "issue" later on is that my great-grandfather came to America and I
think she stayed behind in Odessa. None of their names are on any ship
manifests and the dates on census material don't seem right. Anyway, I think
she wasn't here for four years while he was.

Then, in 1898 my great-grandfather allegedly had sex with a girl who was 12.
There were Jewish prostitutes all over the lower east side in New York,
where he lived, but this girl was his boss's daughter. He was charged with four
different counts of rape but, according to the prosecutor's records, only was
convicted of statutory rape, meaning the girl wasn't of age. There are no
records >from his side of the case but he must have had a strong case or he would
have been charged with the other three counts, including assault and battery,
forced "entry" so to speak, etc.

Her only complaint was that he didn't pay her, as she said he had promised.
He said he was innocent, and I don't know what he meant he was innocent
of--rape (which in his mind likely seemed like pogrom-style rape) or having
had sex with her or of promising to pay and then not paying.

I'm trying to figure out what in the world he might have been thinking....to
sleep with the boss's daughter, to say he was innocent, not to have paid,
and then to have actually married in the old country -- whether or not he had
sex--when that girl was also 12 or 13. And the rabbi's daughter, to boot.

Anyway, he was sent to Sing Sing. And then when he got out his wife came
over. I don't think they spoke much after that. Thanks so much for all the
responses. If anyone has any more insights please let me know.

All best,
Marilyn Webb


1862 San Francisco Birth Records #general

hekenvin@...
 

My ancestral cousin Max JACOBS, son of Samuel Jacobs and Ernestine (Esther)
ROTHOLZ, was born in 1862 in San Francisco. I have been unable to find any
record of his birth and would welcome suggestions as to where to look.

California became a state in 1850. Are there any official government birth
records for San Francisco in 1862? The FHL catalogue does not appear to have
anything relevant.

I understand the Magnes Museum has some synagogue archives >from this era. As
the family was orthodox, I am hoping there might be a record of brit millahs.
Does anyone know if such records exist?

With thanks,
Helene Kenvin
USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1862 San Francisco Birth Records #general

hekenvin@...
 

My ancestral cousin Max JACOBS, son of Samuel Jacobs and Ernestine (Esther)
ROTHOLZ, was born in 1862 in San Francisco. I have been unable to find any
record of his birth and would welcome suggestions as to where to look.

California became a state in 1850. Are there any official government birth
records for San Francisco in 1862? The FHL catalogue does not appear to have
anything relevant.

I understand the Magnes Museum has some synagogue archives >from this era. As
the family was orthodox, I am hoping there might be a record of brit millahs.
Does anyone know if such records exist?

With thanks,
Helene Kenvin
USA


BRANDWEIN, BEIZMAN, KRIPKE from Ostrog #general

mark
 

Dear Genners.
I read that there are still several Jews in Ostrog, Ukraine.I think that
there must me somebody of my family. How can I contact them? I wrote to the
archive of Ostrog, to the municipality, to the rabbi of Rovno,tried ICQ,
nothing, no answer.I am searching BRANDWEIN, BEIZMAN, KRIPKE >from Ostrog,
Zdolbunov. Maybe somebody can help me with idea?
Thank you
Wajsenberg Mark
Israel
mark306@bezeqint.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen BRANDWEIN, BEIZMAN, KRIPKE from Ostrog #general

mark
 

Dear Genners.
I read that there are still several Jews in Ostrog, Ukraine.I think that
there must me somebody of my family. How can I contact them? I wrote to the
archive of Ostrog, to the municipality, to the rabbi of Rovno,tried ICQ,
nothing, no answer.I am searching BRANDWEIN, BEIZMAN, KRIPKE >from Ostrog,
Zdolbunov. Maybe somebody can help me with idea?
Thank you
Wajsenberg Mark
Israel
mark306@bezeqint.net


IAJGS Conference early registration ends in just one week! #galicia

Information <information@...>
 

If you have been to an IAJGS conference, you know what a great
experience it is. If you have never been to one, you may not realize
the amazing connections made during these events.

The person sitting next to you might turn out to be an unknown
relative, might hold a piece of your family puzzle or may have done
research in your ancestral village. >from early morning to late at
night, groups of attendees discuss their common interests and share
experiences in every corner of the conference hotel.

For beginners, there are getting-started sessions and entry-level
computer workshops. Experts >from the Family History Library will
speak at breakfasts each morning, providing pointers on making the
most of the amazing resources at the Library.

Where else can you find a relative in a birth, marriage or
naturalization index, immediately get the microfilm reel containing
the original document and print off a copy yourself? Where else can
you find microfilmed records >from all parts of the globe? And... you
are not alone as everyone else is also working on their genealogical
research. The staff is knowledgeable, helpful and there are daily
orientation sessions.

For those with specific research interests, more than 200 lectures,
computer labs, films and meetings provide opportunities to learn,
share and explore. This year, there will be special emphasis on
genetics, Special Interest Groups (SIGs) and the opening of the
World War II Arolsen records.

Still not enough? Organize your own Birds-of-a-Feather session.
Many Special Interest and Area Research groups began as informal
discussions between like-minded people at the annual conferences.

To read more about the conference, click
www.slc2007.org/breaking_news.cfm. Elsewhere on the conference
website, www.slc2007.org, browse the full listing of lectures,
computer labs and films, register for the conference, sign up for a
lab or a breakfast with the experts, SIG luncheon, or the conference
banquet, book your hotel room or a tour, and learn more about what
you and your family can do in Salt Lake City while you pursue your
roots, renew old acquaintances and make new friends.

Early registration discounts end May 1, so you still have a week to
take advantage of the price break. And, at special conference rates,
the four-star Hilton Salt Lake City Center is a terrific bargain.

We look forward to seeing you in Salt Lake City on Sunday, July 15!

Hal Bookbinder & Michael Brenner, conference co-chairs


Re: help reading name and place from ship manifest #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Bruce Dumes wrote
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Like the subject says, I'm hoping someone can help decipher the name and
place on this clip >from a ship manifest.
http://dumes.net/ChanaDanskerBrother.jpg
They came >from Russia. The entire page, if that helps, is here:
http://dumes.net/ChanaDanskerShipManifest.jpeg
Hi Bruce,

Town in question is Belozerka, Wolhyn Guberniya (Province) Ukraine.
Brother/uncle surname is probably Steinlauf, but this just a semintelligent
guess

BTW, Surname Dansker variation is Danzker, there are few entries for
Danzkers >from Rovno region in Wolhyn listed in JGFF database

Regards,

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia IAJGS Conference early registration ends in just one week! #galicia

Information <information@...>
 

If you have been to an IAJGS conference, you know what a great
experience it is. If you have never been to one, you may not realize
the amazing connections made during these events.

The person sitting next to you might turn out to be an unknown
relative, might hold a piece of your family puzzle or may have done
research in your ancestral village. >from early morning to late at
night, groups of attendees discuss their common interests and share
experiences in every corner of the conference hotel.

For beginners, there are getting-started sessions and entry-level
computer workshops. Experts >from the Family History Library will
speak at breakfasts each morning, providing pointers on making the
most of the amazing resources at the Library.

Where else can you find a relative in a birth, marriage or
naturalization index, immediately get the microfilm reel containing
the original document and print off a copy yourself? Where else can
you find microfilmed records >from all parts of the globe? And... you
are not alone as everyone else is also working on their genealogical
research. The staff is knowledgeable, helpful and there are daily
orientation sessions.

For those with specific research interests, more than 200 lectures,
computer labs, films and meetings provide opportunities to learn,
share and explore. This year, there will be special emphasis on
genetics, Special Interest Groups (SIGs) and the opening of the
World War II Arolsen records.

Still not enough? Organize your own Birds-of-a-Feather session.
Many Special Interest and Area Research groups began as informal
discussions between like-minded people at the annual conferences.

To read more about the conference, click
www.slc2007.org/breaking_news.cfm. Elsewhere on the conference
website, www.slc2007.org, browse the full listing of lectures,
computer labs and films, register for the conference, sign up for a
lab or a breakfast with the experts, SIG luncheon, or the conference
banquet, book your hotel room or a tour, and learn more about what
you and your family can do in Salt Lake City while you pursue your
roots, renew old acquaintances and make new friends.

Early registration discounts end May 1, so you still have a week to
take advantage of the price break. And, at special conference rates,
the four-star Hilton Salt Lake City Center is a terrific bargain.

We look forward to seeing you in Salt Lake City on Sunday, July 15!

Hal Bookbinder & Michael Brenner, conference co-chairs


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: help reading name and place from ship manifest #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Bruce Dumes wrote
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Like the subject says, I'm hoping someone can help decipher the name and
place on this clip >from a ship manifest.
http://dumes.net/ChanaDanskerBrother.jpg
They came >from Russia. The entire page, if that helps, is here:
http://dumes.net/ChanaDanskerShipManifest.jpeg
Hi Bruce,

Town in question is Belozerka, Wolhyn Guberniya (Province) Ukraine.
Brother/uncle surname is probably Steinlauf, but this just a semintelligent
guess

BTW, Surname Dansker variation is Danzker, there are few entries for
Danzkers >from Rovno region in Wolhyn listed in JGFF database

Regards,

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


IAJGS Conf. early reg. ends in a week! #rabbinic

Information <information@...>
 

If you have been to an IAJGS conference, you know what a great
experience it is. If you have never been to one, you may not realize
the amazing connections made during these events.

The person sitting next to you might turn out to be an unknown
relative, might hold a piece of your family puzzle or may have done
research in your ancestral village. >from early morning to late at
night, groups of attendees discuss their common interests and share
experiences in every corner of the conference hotel.

For beginners, there are getting-started sessions and entry-level
computer workshops. Experts >from the Family History Library will
speak at breakfasts each morning, providing pointers on making the
most of the amazing resources at the Library.

Where else can you find a relative in a birth, marriage or
naturalization index, immediately get the microfilm reel containing
the original document and print off a copy yourself? Where else can
you find microfilmed records >from all parts of the globe? And ...
you are not alone as everyone else is also working on their
genealogical research. The staff is knowledgeable, helpful and
there are daily orientation sessions.

For those with specific research interests, more than 200 lectures,
computer labs, films and meetings provide opportunities to learn,
share and explore. This year, there will be special emphasis on
genetics, Special Interest Groups (SIGs) and the opening of the
World War II Arolsen records.

Still not enough? Organize your own Birds-of-a-Feather session.
Many Special Interest and Area Research groups began as informal
discussions between like-minded people at the annual conferences.

To read more about the conference, click
<www.slc2007.org/breaking_news.cfm>. Elsewhere on the conference
website, <www.slc2007.org>, browse the full listing of lectures,
computer labs and films, register for the conference, sign up for a
lab or a breakfast with the experts, SIG luncheon, or the conference
banquet, book your hotel room or a tour, and learn more about what
you and your family can do in Salt Lake City while you pursue your
roots, renew old acquaintances and make new friends.

Early registration discounts end May 1, so you still have a week to
take advantage of the price break. And, at special conference rates,
the four-star Hilton Salt Lake City Center is a terrific bargain.

We look forward to seeing you in Salt Lake City on Sunday, July 15!

Hal Bookbinder & Michael Brenner
Conference Co-Chairs


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic IAJGS Conf. early reg. ends in a week! #rabbinic

Information <information@...>
 

If you have been to an IAJGS conference, you know what a great
experience it is. If you have never been to one, you may not realize
the amazing connections made during these events.

The person sitting next to you might turn out to be an unknown
relative, might hold a piece of your family puzzle or may have done
research in your ancestral village. >from early morning to late at
night, groups of attendees discuss their common interests and share
experiences in every corner of the conference hotel.

For beginners, there are getting-started sessions and entry-level
computer workshops. Experts >from the Family History Library will
speak at breakfasts each morning, providing pointers on making the
most of the amazing resources at the Library.

Where else can you find a relative in a birth, marriage or
naturalization index, immediately get the microfilm reel containing
the original document and print off a copy yourself? Where else can
you find microfilmed records >from all parts of the globe? And ...
you are not alone as everyone else is also working on their
genealogical research. The staff is knowledgeable, helpful and
there are daily orientation sessions.

For those with specific research interests, more than 200 lectures,
computer labs, films and meetings provide opportunities to learn,
share and explore. This year, there will be special emphasis on
genetics, Special Interest Groups (SIGs) and the opening of the
World War II Arolsen records.

Still not enough? Organize your own Birds-of-a-Feather session.
Many Special Interest and Area Research groups began as informal
discussions between like-minded people at the annual conferences.

To read more about the conference, click
<www.slc2007.org/breaking_news.cfm>. Elsewhere on the conference
website, <www.slc2007.org>, browse the full listing of lectures,
computer labs and films, register for the conference, sign up for a
lab or a breakfast with the experts, SIG luncheon, or the conference
banquet, book your hotel room or a tour, and learn more about what
you and your family can do in Salt Lake City while you pursue your
roots, renew old acquaintances and make new friends.

Early registration discounts end May 1, so you still have a week to
take advantage of the price break. And, at special conference rates,
the four-star Hilton Salt Lake City Center is a terrific bargain.

We look forward to seeing you in Salt Lake City on Sunday, July 15!

Hal Bookbinder & Michael Brenner
Conference Co-Chairs


Identifying Kelme rabbi b. 1820s-1840s #rabbinic

dogwalker47-research@...
 

I am investigating a family story that was transcribed in 1932.
I have found supporting documentation when I have been able to
interpret the "Americanized" and phonetically spelled names. The
story references the WOLPART family of Kelme, and their connection
to famous rabbis "Nathan Hersh" (Notte Hirsh Finkel) and "Simon
Ruben." To wit:

"Rebecca and Meyer WOLPERT are both >from rabbinical families of the
highest order. Rebecca herself is called "The Golden Belly" for
having had five sons, all of whom become rabbis. Simon Ruben,
Rebecca&#146;'s brother, had been so important and holy a rabbi that upon
his death a mausoleum is built for his body and people who come to
see it must keep ten steps away >from the sacred ground of his burial
place."

Does anyone have any ideas on who "Simon Ruben" could have been?
Rebecca's children seem to have been born in the 1860s, which is why
I'm guessing "Simon Ruben" was born in the 1820s-40s.

Laurel Singer
San Ramon, CA, USA


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Identifying Kelme rabbi b. 1820s-1840s #rabbinic

dogwalker47-research@...
 

I am investigating a family story that was transcribed in 1932.
I have found supporting documentation when I have been able to
interpret the "Americanized" and phonetically spelled names. The
story references the WOLPART family of Kelme, and their connection
to famous rabbis "Nathan Hersh" (Notte Hirsh Finkel) and "Simon
Ruben." To wit:

"Rebecca and Meyer WOLPERT are both >from rabbinical families of the
highest order. Rebecca herself is called "The Golden Belly" for
having had five sons, all of whom become rabbis. Simon Ruben,
Rebecca&#146;'s brother, had been so important and holy a rabbi that upon
his death a mausoleum is built for his body and people who come to
see it must keep ten steps away >from the sacred ground of his burial
place."

Does anyone have any ideas on who "Simon Ruben" could have been?
Rebecca's children seem to have been born in the 1860s, which is why
I'm guessing "Simon Ruben" was born in the 1820s-40s.

Laurel Singer
San Ramon, CA, USA