Date   

JRI Poland #Poland Need help with searching for family #poland

bubulina1950@...
 

Shalom!

I look about informations.

After WWII we have no tcontact with family my grandmother. Mayby who
know anything about:

Ladislaw Karwat(or Chorwat,or Horvat)and Miriam Karwat ,nee Palinski,
and their daughter, Esther nee Karwat? >from Chelmzain Poland?

Sigmond Malinowski and Pola Levin (Levinski?) >from Wloclawek in Poland,
with daughter Lucyna Silber and her son Georg Silber? Lucyna was in Israel
after WWII...

Family Rotstein >from Lipno in Poland? Their had in Lipno a great sawmill.

Family Barshch (Barszczor Borszcz) >from Lipno?

Family Honel (or Huenel) >from Lipno in Poland? Myaunt, Irene Czeslawski
(or Tsheslawski?) was nee Honel. Her husband, Olek Malinowski,was officer
in the Anders army, was in Tobruk and Monte Cassino...

Family Falenczykowski, >from Wloclawek in Poland. There was in US, I think,
daughter, Sofienee Falenczykowski, with husband Bob and son. Bob was in
Cleveland in Ohio US...

I am Miriam Bera, relative to all these people,and search any family
contact.

Am Jewish woman, 56year old,live in Warszawa in Poland.

Have only these names,without otheri nformations...
Please, mayby who can help me with searching?
And so sorry, but my English isn't fine. So, please,
forgive me mylanguage's errors...

Sincerely
Miriam Bera

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for research methods and resources may be shared with
the list.


Need help with searching for family #poland

bubulina1950@...
 

Shalom!

I look about informations.

After WWII we have no tcontact with family my grandmother. Mayby who
know anything about:

Ladislaw Karwat(or Chorwat,or Horvat)and Miriam Karwat ,nee Palinski,
and their daughter, Esther nee Karwat? >from Chelmzain Poland?

Sigmond Malinowski and Pola Levin (Levinski?) >from Wloclawek in Poland,
with daughter Lucyna Silber and her son Georg Silber? Lucyna was in Israel
after WWII...

Family Rotstein >from Lipno in Poland? Their had in Lipno a great sawmill.

Family Barshch (Barszczor Borszcz) >from Lipno?

Family Honel (or Huenel) >from Lipno in Poland? Myaunt, Irene Czeslawski
(or Tsheslawski?) was nee Honel. Her husband, Olek Malinowski,was officer
in the Anders army, was in Tobruk and Monte Cassino...

Family Falenczykowski, >from Wloclawek in Poland. There was in US, I think,
daughter, Sofienee Falenczykowski, with husband Bob and son. Bob was in
Cleveland in Ohio US...

I am Miriam Bera, relative to all these people,and search any family
contact.

Am Jewish woman, 56year old,live in Warszawa in Poland.

Have only these names,without otheri nformations...
Please, mayby who can help me with searching?
And so sorry, but my English isn't fine. So, please,
forgive me mylanguage's errors...

Sincerely
Miriam Bera

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for research methods and resources may be shared with
the list.


Re: Questioning the theory of surnames #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 7/30/2007 11:39:35 A.M. Central Daylight Time,
kos@... writes:

<< Could it be that Jews possibly accepted some kind of unwritten surnames -
like a nickname - prior to the 1800 date? Could it be that these surnames
are much more casual than we think - that people just chose them because
they sounded nice, cool, or exotic, regardless of where they lived or what
they did? >>

==Yes, you're correct, many Ashkenasi families had eke (supplementary) names
before they were imposed by law. It was a means of telling one Yitzhaq ben
Avraham >from all the other Yitzhaq ben Avrahams.

==You got Gross and Klein (Big and small); Lang and Kurz (long and short);
Schwartz and Roth and Weiss (black/red/white [haired]). You had Schneider,
Schmidt, Becker, Fleischman (tailor, smith, baker, butcher). It's probably quite
similar to a system you use in the family, on the job, or at the synagogue to
distinguish one person or family >from another.

==Then you got the topological name--after a geographic location. Low or
high on the hill, by the Red Barn or the wooden bridge, or the newcomer >from
Warsaw or Vienna or Berlin. Note that no one was generally named after the town
in which he is currently living--otherwise everyone in the town or village
would have the same name, which would defeat the purpose. Local people have a
thing about strangers moving in (not just a Jewish thing; I've noticed it to be
very strong among Gentiles in England and the highlands of Scotland.
"They''re not really >from here, you know; they moved here less than 120 years ago
from Tewksbury (or Drumnadrochit)."
==Note, though, that someone surnamed London is probably not >from England
but descended >from a teacher (Heb. "Lamdan"); sometime, the London actually gets
embellished as "Englander."

==And, of course, Jews were known by their patronymics, often carried down
for a few generations.

==These eke-names were usually decided on by the neighbors in the village or
the congregation, and were not chosen by their owners. When Jews were
required to take names, the majority continued using their customary eke names (a
nickname = an eke name). If they didn't have one, the patronym was familiar
and useful. Sometimes the name was too simple, or too "Jewish." That was easy,
add a syllable or two. So Ber became Bernstein or Bernholtz, or Berlin.
Mendel became Mandelbaum or Mandeltort. Feld became Feldman, Feldstein,
Grossfeld, Hochfeld . . . .

==The sources of surnames have been discussed, explored and archived
hundreds of time in Jewishgen. It's worth looking up those archives to understand
how it all worked.

Michael Bernet
_www.mem-Ber.net_

MODERATOR NOTE: As suggested by Micheal, have a look at the
Jewishgen InfoFiles related to Jewish naming practices
<http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/#Names>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Questioning the theory of surnames #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 7/30/2007 11:39:35 A.M. Central Daylight Time,
kos@... writes:

<< Could it be that Jews possibly accepted some kind of unwritten surnames -
like a nickname - prior to the 1800 date? Could it be that these surnames
are much more casual than we think - that people just chose them because
they sounded nice, cool, or exotic, regardless of where they lived or what
they did? >>

==Yes, you're correct, many Ashkenasi families had eke (supplementary) names
before they were imposed by law. It was a means of telling one Yitzhaq ben
Avraham >from all the other Yitzhaq ben Avrahams.

==You got Gross and Klein (Big and small); Lang and Kurz (long and short);
Schwartz and Roth and Weiss (black/red/white [haired]). You had Schneider,
Schmidt, Becker, Fleischman (tailor, smith, baker, butcher). It's probably quite
similar to a system you use in the family, on the job, or at the synagogue to
distinguish one person or family >from another.

==Then you got the topological name--after a geographic location. Low or
high on the hill, by the Red Barn or the wooden bridge, or the newcomer >from
Warsaw or Vienna or Berlin. Note that no one was generally named after the town
in which he is currently living--otherwise everyone in the town or village
would have the same name, which would defeat the purpose. Local people have a
thing about strangers moving in (not just a Jewish thing; I've noticed it to be
very strong among Gentiles in England and the highlands of Scotland.
"They''re not really >from here, you know; they moved here less than 120 years ago
from Tewksbury (or Drumnadrochit)."
==Note, though, that someone surnamed London is probably not >from England
but descended >from a teacher (Heb. "Lamdan"); sometime, the London actually gets
embellished as "Englander."

==And, of course, Jews were known by their patronymics, often carried down
for a few generations.

==These eke-names were usually decided on by the neighbors in the village or
the congregation, and were not chosen by their owners. When Jews were
required to take names, the majority continued using their customary eke names (a
nickname = an eke name). If they didn't have one, the patronym was familiar
and useful. Sometimes the name was too simple, or too "Jewish." That was easy,
add a syllable or two. So Ber became Bernstein or Bernholtz, or Berlin.
Mendel became Mandelbaum or Mandeltort. Feld became Feldman, Feldstein,
Grossfeld, Hochfeld . . . .

==The sources of surnames have been discussed, explored and archived
hundreds of time in Jewishgen. It's worth looking up those archives to understand
how it all worked.

Michael Bernet
_www.mem-Ber.net_

MODERATOR NOTE: As suggested by Micheal, have a look at the
Jewishgen InfoFiles related to Jewish naming practices
<http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/#Names>


Re: Questioning the theory of surnames in the Pale #belarus

Roger Lustig
 

Bob:
You raise lots of issues, so I'll respond in-line.

kos@... wrote:

The generally accepted theory concerning Jews in the "Pale" (generally
western Poland, Belarus, Latvia, Ukraine, and Russia) is that they
generally did not have surnames until around 1800. Around that time,
geo-political changes necessitated keeping lists of tax payers. In
order to achieve this, authorities impelled the Jews to get surnames.
And so they did.
I think you mean "eastern Poland" here.

I believe (in one of his books) Alexander Beider lists four criteria
upon which Jews adopted surnames: place of living or origin,
profession, priestly status (if the person was a Kohen or Levi), and
...I forget the fourth.
There are at least three more:

1) names based on beauty:, e.g., gold/silver/flower + thing/place type
of names. SILBERFELD, ROSENBAUM, etc. (Of course, there are a few town
names like Rosenberg, Goldberg, etc. out there, just to keep us on our
toes.)

2) surnames based on given names, e.g., one's own name or one's
patronym, but perhaps an entirely different one. HIRSCH, ABRAMOWICZ,
KOPPEL, etc.

3) Those derived >from a physical attribute: DICKMANN, KRAUSHAAR, KURZ,
KENDZIORA.

The problem I have with this theory is that it seems to be
contradicted by evidence.

If this theory were true, logic would indicate that a majority of
people >from a particular town would have that town's name, and smaller
amounts would be called by their priestly status or profession.
Careful: Beider states that those types are the *sources* of surnames,
not the surnames themselves. Note that these sources are very broad.
"Origin" doesn't mean "where one lives now" or even "where one lived as
a child"--it can mean where the family was (believed to be) from. In
general, there would have been little point in naming oneself after
one's current residence--although people did do that. (In Pless, Upper
Silesia, now Pszczyna, Poland, a good percentage chose PLESSNER as their
surname. How useful for us later on...)

Look at the vast number of Eastern-European toponyms (surnames based on
a place) that refer to places in Germany. Jews emigrated >from those
places to Poland 300 to 600 years before surnames were adopted. In
*some* sense, SHAPIROs came >from Speyer, HALPERNs >from Heilbronn, etc.
But that sense could be distant ancestry or legend. (There were also
rabbinical surnames, which often lasted for many, many generations.
They functioned as brand names as well as for family identification--the
young scholar who married his teacher's daughter might adopt the
trademark that showed where he was coming >from conceptually if not
geographically or genetically.)

Having now observed a number of these taxation lists >from 1795-1818,
what I find striking is the variety of surnames for any town seems to
be hardly less than it would be 100 years later. JewishGen has a
number of these early documents on its site, and anyone can see the
variety of surnames, even to the earliest years of the 19th century.

Having done a lot of research on my surname and its variants, I do
generally notice a concentration in a relatively small swatch of area
from Poland, Belarus and Russia (but with exceptions in Ukraine and
Lativa). I've also done DNA testing and notice a similar pattern -
most matches basically centered around Belarus, but with an exception
or two in Latvia or Ukraine. And (with one exception in my case) all
matches have very different surnames.
Well, now: are you sure these people had just those surnames before they
crossed the ocean?

So I'm wondering how (my understanding of) this theory should be
revised. Could it be that Jews possibly accepted some kind of
unwritten surnames - like a nickname - prior to the 1800 date? Could
it be that these surnames are much more casual than we think - that
people just chose them because they sounded nice, cool, or exotic,
regardless of where they lived or what they did? (e.g., I have met a
number of people named COHN or COHEN who are not kohanim.)

I'll be interested to hear of people's ideas.
I think that a) your guess is a good one, and b) the theory doesn't need
any revision, because you seem to be remembering it as stricter than it
is. My own TROPLOWITZ ancestors took that surname 75 years after one of
them had resided in Troplowitz (now Opavica/Opavice on the Czech-Polish
border). Since then, they'd lived in Gleiwitz. The fact of their
having lived in that particular wide place in the road was not likely a
matter of great familial pride--it just happened to be the nickname the
family had acquired, I bet.

One of them moved to Pillitz (Slovakia, I think) before fixed surnames
were adopted and took the name David GLEIWITZ. Later his son moved to
Veszprem in Hungary and became the noted rabbi Chananel PILLITZ.

Yes, of course Jews had nicknames or epithets. One of the features of
Jewish life was mobility: unlike the aristocracy, Jews generally didn't
own much land; unlike serfs, they weren't owned by it either. They
served as merchants, brokers, peddlers, livestock traders, etc.--jobs
involving travel. Some kind of identification beyond patronymics would
have been necessary, because even if one had the three Shlomo ben
Yitzhaks in one's own community sorted out, one might encounter one or
two more on one's next journey--or when some others came through one's
shtetl. Place of origin, occupation, a physical attribute--all would
have been obvious choices, just as they are on streets and in
schoolyards today.

The "sounded cool" theory is also well-recognized, especially with the
names based on beautiful or valuable objects. But there had to have
been some inspiration for the choice of surnames, and the "sources" are
simply a categorization of those inspirations. The priestly and
occupational names were more likely to be based directly on
characteristics of the person adopting them, and we still often refer to
people by their professions when clarification is needed. (Remember the
joke that ends: Oh, you want HOROWITZ the spy! Second floor, in the back!)

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Questioning the theory of surnames in the Pale #general

Roger Lustig
 

Bob:
You raise lots of issues, so I'll respond in-line.

kos@... wrote:

The generally accepted theory concerning Jews in the "Pale" (generally
western Poland, Belarus, Latvia, Ukraine, and Russia) is that they
generally did not have surnames until around 1800. Around that time,
geo-political changes necessitated keeping lists of tax payers. In
order to achieve this, authorities impelled the Jews to get surnames.
And so they did.
I think you mean "eastern Poland" here.

I believe (in one of his books) Alexander Beider lists four criteria
upon which Jews adopted surnames: place of living or origin,
profession, priestly status (if the person was a Kohen or Levi), and
...I forget the fourth.
There are at least three more:

1) names based on beauty:, e.g., gold/silver/flower + thing/place type
of names. SILBERFELD, ROSENBAUM, etc. (Of course, there are a few town
names like Rosenberg, Goldberg, etc. out there, just to keep us on our
toes.)

2) surnames based on given names, e.g., one's own name or one's
patronym, but perhaps an entirely different one. HIRSCH, ABRAMOWICZ,
KOPPEL, etc.

3) Those derived >from a physical attribute: DICKMANN, KRAUSHAAR, KURZ,
KENDZIORA.

The problem I have with this theory is that it seems to be
contradicted by evidence.

If this theory were true, logic would indicate that a majority of
people >from a particular town would have that town's name, and smaller
amounts would be called by their priestly status or profession.
Careful: Beider states that those types are the *sources* of surnames,
not the surnames themselves. Note that these sources are very broad.
"Origin" doesn't mean "where one lives now" or even "where one lived as
a child"--it can mean where the family was (believed to be) from. In
general, there would have been little point in naming oneself after
one's current residence--although people did do that. (In Pless, Upper
Silesia, now Pszczyna, Poland, a good percentage chose PLESSNER as their
surname. How useful for us later on...)

Look at the vast number of Eastern-European toponyms (surnames based on
a place) that refer to places in Germany. Jews emigrated >from those
places to Poland 300 to 600 years before surnames were adopted. In
*some* sense, SHAPIROs came >from Speyer, HALPERNs >from Heilbronn, etc.
But that sense could be distant ancestry or legend. (There were also
rabbinical surnames, which often lasted for many, many generations.
They functioned as brand names as well as for family identification--the
young scholar who married his teacher's daughter might adopt the
trademark that showed where he was coming >from conceptually if not
geographically or genetically.)

Having now observed a number of these taxation lists >from 1795-1818,
what I find striking is the variety of surnames for any town seems to
be hardly less than it would be 100 years later. JewishGen has a
number of these early documents on its site, and anyone can see the
variety of surnames, even to the earliest years of the 19th century.

Having done a lot of research on my surname and its variants, I do
generally notice a concentration in a relatively small swatch of area
from Poland, Belarus and Russia (but with exceptions in Ukraine and
Lativa). I've also done DNA testing and notice a similar pattern -
most matches basically centered around Belarus, but with an exception
or two in Latvia or Ukraine. And (with one exception in my case) all
matches have very different surnames.
Well, now: are you sure these people had just those surnames before they
crossed the ocean?

So I'm wondering how (my understanding of) this theory should be
revised. Could it be that Jews possibly accepted some kind of
unwritten surnames - like a nickname - prior to the 1800 date? Could
it be that these surnames are much more casual than we think - that
people just chose them because they sounded nice, cool, or exotic,
regardless of where they lived or what they did? (e.g., I have met a
number of people named COHN or COHEN who are not kohanim.)

I'll be interested to hear of people's ideas.
I think that a) your guess is a good one, and b) the theory doesn't need
any revision, because you seem to be remembering it as stricter than it
is. My own TROPLOWITZ ancestors took that surname 75 years after one of
them had resided in Troplowitz (now Opavica/Opavice on the Czech-Polish
border). Since then, they'd lived in Gleiwitz. The fact of their
having lived in that particular wide place in the road was not likely a
matter of great familial pride--it just happened to be the nickname the
family had acquired, I bet.

One of them moved to Pillitz (Slovakia, I think) before fixed surnames
were adopted and took the name David GLEIWITZ. Later his son moved to
Veszprem in Hungary and became the noted rabbi Chananel PILLITZ.

Yes, of course Jews had nicknames or epithets. One of the features of
Jewish life was mobility: unlike the aristocracy, Jews generally didn't
own much land; unlike serfs, they weren't owned by it either. They
served as merchants, brokers, peddlers, livestock traders, etc.--jobs
involving travel. Some kind of identification beyond patronymics would
have been necessary, because even if one had the three Shlomo ben
Yitzhaks in one's own community sorted out, one might encounter one or
two more on one's next journey--or when some others came through one's
shtetl. Place of origin, occupation, a physical attribute--all would
have been obvious choices, just as they are on streets and in
schoolyards today.

The "sounded cool" theory is also well-recognized, especially with the
names based on beautiful or valuable objects. But there had to have
been some inspiration for the choice of surnames, and the "sources" are
simply a categorization of those inspirations. The priestly and
occupational names were more likely to be based directly on
characteristics of the person adopting them, and we still often refer to
people by their professions when clarification is needed. (Remember the
joke that ends: Oh, you want HOROWITZ the spy! Second floor, in the back!)

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ


How to obtain copies of Workmen's Circle Rosters? #general

JrRothst@...
 

My grandparent's, HARRY and KATE BEEBER, were members of the Los Angeles
branch of the Workmen's Circle (Jewish Fraternal Organization) >from the
late 1920's through at least the 1930's. I would like to obtain some copies
of their names listed in some old Workmen's Circle membership rosters, or
anything else. The Los Angeles branch and national headquarters of the
Workmen's Circle had no copies of these. Maybe some of you have copies of
these? Please answer privately.

Jerald A. Rothstein #112162
JrRothst@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen How to obtain copies of Workmen's Circle Rosters? #general

JrRothst@...
 

My grandparent's, HARRY and KATE BEEBER, were members of the Los Angeles
branch of the Workmen's Circle (Jewish Fraternal Organization) >from the
late 1920's through at least the 1930's. I would like to obtain some copies
of their names listed in some old Workmen's Circle membership rosters, or
anything else. The Los Angeles branch and national headquarters of the
Workmen's Circle had no copies of these. Maybe some of you have copies of
these? Please answer privately.

Jerald A. Rothstein #112162
JrRothst@...


How to obtain proof of Italian citizenship? #general

sartori <leosartori@...>
 

I am asking this question on behalf of my husband:

My husband, Leo Sartori, would like to regain his Italian citizenship. His
family (father, mother, two children) were expelled >from Italy in 1938.
They came to the US via the UK and became US citizens in 1945.

My father-in-law became an Italian citizen in 1921 (he and his wife came
from Russia), probably in Milan.
Can anyone tell me what office my husband should write to to obtain proof
of his father's Italian citizenship?

Thank you in advance for your help.

Sincerely,

Eva Sartori

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately, unless the answer has
genealogical relevance.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen How to obtain proof of Italian citizenship? #general

sartori <leosartori@...>
 

I am asking this question on behalf of my husband:

My husband, Leo Sartori, would like to regain his Italian citizenship. His
family (father, mother, two children) were expelled >from Italy in 1938.
They came to the US via the UK and became US citizens in 1945.

My father-in-law became an Italian citizen in 1921 (he and his wife came
from Russia), probably in Milan.
Can anyone tell me what office my husband should write to to obtain proof
of his father's Italian citizenship?

Thank you in advance for your help.

Sincerely,

Eva Sartori

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately, unless the answer has
genealogical relevance.


Eidel , Adinah #general

Chaim freedman
 

I would like to clarify the possible source of the late Rabbi Shmuel Gorr's
comment in his book "Jewish Personal Names etc" (Avotaynu 1992) of which I
was the editor. Rabbi Gorr gives several possibilities for the origin of the
name Adinah, >from which are derived names such as Ednah, Eidel and others.
His first comment was "Biblical. Oral Tradition"

As stated by Jewishgen correspondent Ury Link, no source is given. The
comment "Oral Tradition" suggests to me that there may be a reference in the
Talmud, rather than in the Bible itself. I have not located such a
reference. However I did find in "Sefer Hayashar"
http://www.thelostbooks.com/women3.htm which claims that Adinah was the wife
of Levi ben Yaakov.

The above is not undisputed, see
http://www.sichosinenglish.org/books/vedibarta-bam/041.htm

A Google search for "Adinah Levi" yields many results, some worth taking
with a grain of salt.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel
chaimjan@...
http://chfreedman.blogspot.com/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Eidel , Adinah #general

Chaim freedman
 

I would like to clarify the possible source of the late Rabbi Shmuel Gorr's
comment in his book "Jewish Personal Names etc" (Avotaynu 1992) of which I
was the editor. Rabbi Gorr gives several possibilities for the origin of the
name Adinah, >from which are derived names such as Ednah, Eidel and others.
His first comment was "Biblical. Oral Tradition"

As stated by Jewishgen correspondent Ury Link, no source is given. The
comment "Oral Tradition" suggests to me that there may be a reference in the
Talmud, rather than in the Bible itself. I have not located such a
reference. However I did find in "Sefer Hayashar"
http://www.thelostbooks.com/women3.htm which claims that Adinah was the wife
of Levi ben Yaakov.

The above is not undisputed, see
http://www.sichosinenglish.org/books/vedibarta-bam/041.htm

A Google search for "Adinah Levi" yields many results, some worth taking
with a grain of salt.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel
chaimjan@...
http://chfreedman.blogspot.com/


Remember Bialystok! #general

Ada Holtzman
 

Message on behalf of the Bialystok Society in Israel
--------------------------------------------------------------
Zu Unzere Tayere Landsleit!

The Society of Former Resident of Bialystok and Surroundings (The "Vaad" -
Landsmanschaft K. Bialystok) is honored to invite you to participate in
the 64th Remembrance Assembly to the Revolt & Liquidation of Bialystok
Ghetto.

The assembly will take place in Kiryat Bialystok – Yehud, near the memorial
monument to our brothers murdered in the Holocaust, which stands in the
square of the great Synagogue, in Icchak Melamed's Street, the corner
of the Ghettos Fighters Street, on Av 14, 5767, Tuesday 28 August 2007, at
19:00.

A special appeal is made to the Successor Generation to attend the assembly
and our Landsleit all over the world.

The "Vaad"

P.O.Box 7241
Yehud 56215
ISRAEL

http://www.zchor.org/bialystok/bialystok.htm


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Remember Bialystok! #general

Ada Holtzman
 

Message on behalf of the Bialystok Society in Israel
--------------------------------------------------------------
Zu Unzere Tayere Landsleit!

The Society of Former Resident of Bialystok and Surroundings (The "Vaad" -
Landsmanschaft K. Bialystok) is honored to invite you to participate in
the 64th Remembrance Assembly to the Revolt & Liquidation of Bialystok
Ghetto.

The assembly will take place in Kiryat Bialystok – Yehud, near the memorial
monument to our brothers murdered in the Holocaust, which stands in the
square of the great Synagogue, in Icchak Melamed's Street, the corner
of the Ghettos Fighters Street, on Av 14, 5767, Tuesday 28 August 2007, at
19:00.

A special appeal is made to the Successor Generation to attend the assembly
and our Landsleit all over the world.

The "Vaad"

P.O.Box 7241
Yehud 56215
ISRAEL

http://www.zchor.org/bialystok/bialystok.htm


help requested regarding identification of antique jewlery #general

Paul & Irene Berman <ikpjb@...>
 

My mother was given a small and apparently gold heart on a chain as a child
in New York City sometime between 1907 and 1920 by her grandmother, who had
emigrated >from Kossovo in Belarus.
The heart is decorated with what appear to be tiny diamonds in the shapes of
a crescent and *six* ( not five) pointed star.
As the crescent and five pointed star is an Arab symbol, could the heart's
design been a show of identification with Zionism?
Is anyone at all familiar with this kind of design, and whether such a heart
was likely to have been produced in Russia or in New York?

Irene Berman
Shoham, Israel

MODERATOR NOTE: You may get more results by submitting a scan
to Viewmate <http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen help requested regarding identification of antique jewlery #general

Paul & Irene Berman <ikpjb@...>
 

My mother was given a small and apparently gold heart on a chain as a child
in New York City sometime between 1907 and 1920 by her grandmother, who had
emigrated >from Kossovo in Belarus.
The heart is decorated with what appear to be tiny diamonds in the shapes of
a crescent and *six* ( not five) pointed star.
As the crescent and five pointed star is an Arab symbol, could the heart's
design been a show of identification with Zionism?
Is anyone at all familiar with this kind of design, and whether such a heart
was likely to have been produced in Russia or in New York?

Irene Berman
Shoham, Israel

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Interesting Website #hungary

Adam Smith <ajsmith98@...>
 

Hi Everyone,
I discovered a very nice website in Hebrew about Transcarpathian Jewry. The
link is:
http://www.subcarpathianjews.org/
For non-Hebrew speakers, there are plenty of pictures to check out.

Take care,
Adam Smith

New York, NY

Researching:
OBERLANDER: Munkacs and Bereg Region
BEZDEDI: Any
TAMBOR: Khust area
SAPSOVICS: Khust area


Where is Gross Warersdorf? #hungary

Yohanan
 

Dear Researchers,
Anybody knows where is/was the village called "Gross Warersdorf"
(Groszwarersdorf). Might be in Burgenland?
We think that my Grandmother, Irma Lederer, was born there 1889.
May reply to Yohanan at: loeflery@...
Thanks!
Yohanan Loeffler
Melbourne, Australia


Hungary SIG #Hungary Interesting Website #hungary

Adam Smith <ajsmith98@...>
 

Hi Everyone,
I discovered a very nice website in Hebrew about Transcarpathian Jewry. The
link is:
http://www.subcarpathianjews.org/
For non-Hebrew speakers, there are plenty of pictures to check out.

Take care,
Adam Smith

New York, NY

Researching:
OBERLANDER: Munkacs and Bereg Region
BEZDEDI: Any
TAMBOR: Khust area
SAPSOVICS: Khust area


Hungary SIG #Hungary Where is Gross Warersdorf? #hungary

Yohanan
 

Dear Researchers,
Anybody knows where is/was the village called "Gross Warersdorf"
(Groszwarersdorf). Might be in Burgenland?
We think that my Grandmother, Irma Lederer, was born there 1889.
May reply to Yohanan at: loeflery@...
Thanks!
Yohanan Loeffler
Melbourne, Australia