Date   

School data for Bohemia and Moravia {1884-1938} from Prerov/Prerau Museum? #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Could someone please tell us if this data, mostly 1884-1938, contains
school/pupil lists >from the named Moravian and Bohemian towns:

Moravia
Uherske Hradiste/Ungarisch – Hradisch/
Uhersky Brod - Ung Brod
Unicov – Mahr. Neustadt

Bohemia
Upice - Eipel
Ustí nad Labem - Aussig
Ustí nad Orlicí - Wildenschwert

If so, they could be very useful for us, genealogically.
see: http://www.prerovmuzeum.cz/muzeum/data/soupis-vz-u.doc.
[a pdf word document]

If not what are these lists?

Celia Male [U.K.]


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech School data for Bohemia and Moravia {1884-1938} from Prerov/Prerau Museum? #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Could someone please tell us if this data, mostly 1884-1938, contains
school/pupil lists >from the named Moravian and Bohemian towns:

Moravia
Uherske Hradiste/Ungarisch – Hradisch/
Uhersky Brod - Ung Brod
Unicov – Mahr. Neustadt

Bohemia
Upice - Eipel
Ustí nad Labem - Aussig
Ustí nad Orlicí - Wildenschwert

If so, they could be very useful for us, genealogically.
see: http://www.prerovmuzeum.cz/muzeum/data/soupis-vz-u.doc.
[a pdf word document]

If not what are these lists?

Celia Male [U.K.]


Re: NAME CHANGES #unitedkingdom

Jjlaca@...
 

Josie's stories are consistent with my family's story.

My grandfather came to Leeds in 1891 >from Kolo, Poland. In the old country,
the family name was Kuczynski. Before he left Poland, his brother Simon
told him that he had taken the surname Joseph in Leeds and that he should use
the same name. Although the Polish records, Birth and Marriage, do not contain
the middle name Joseph (which is where we suspected the name was obtained),
his brother's tombstone reads "Shimon Yosef."

As I understand it, the ship manifests were written by the ship captain or
one of his crew. The question is how would an immigrant have been able to
give a name that was not the name on his/her travel documents? Were they not
vigilant about these details? Did teh immigration folks just accept the
manifests at face value?

Jonny Joseph
Los Angeles


Where was my family prior to 1901 #unitedkingdom

Alan Rackow
 

The 1901 UK census shows my Rackow grandparents and their children, and my
then 65-year-old great-grandfather living with them. The two eldest
children are shown as having been born in Russia, but the next one, who was
10 at the time of the census, and the younger ones, are all shown as
English-born. Therefore I assume that the family was living in London in
1891, and even earlier. My question therefore - how can I locate them
inasmuch as I couldn't find them in the 1891 census? I know that my
great-grandmother had died earlier but I have no idea where or when, and I
know that my ggf had remarried, but again I know not when. Can anyone help?
Alan Rackow, Ottawa, Canada


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Re: NAME CHANGES #unitedkingdom

Jjlaca@...
 

Josie's stories are consistent with my family's story.

My grandfather came to Leeds in 1891 >from Kolo, Poland. In the old country,
the family name was Kuczynski. Before he left Poland, his brother Simon
told him that he had taken the surname Joseph in Leeds and that he should use
the same name. Although the Polish records, Birth and Marriage, do not contain
the middle name Joseph (which is where we suspected the name was obtained),
his brother's tombstone reads "Shimon Yosef."

As I understand it, the ship manifests were written by the ship captain or
one of his crew. The question is how would an immigrant have been able to
give a name that was not the name on his/her travel documents? Were they not
vigilant about these details? Did teh immigration folks just accept the
manifests at face value?

Jonny Joseph
Los Angeles


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Where was my family prior to 1901 #unitedkingdom

Alan Rackow
 

The 1901 UK census shows my Rackow grandparents and their children, and my
then 65-year-old great-grandfather living with them. The two eldest
children are shown as having been born in Russia, but the next one, who was
10 at the time of the census, and the younger ones, are all shown as
English-born. Therefore I assume that the family was living in London in
1891, and even earlier. My question therefore - how can I locate them
inasmuch as I couldn't find them in the 1891 census? I know that my
great-grandmother had died earlier but I have no idea where or when, and I
know that my ggf had remarried, but again I know not when. Can anyone help?
Alan Rackow, Ottawa, Canada


Levi J. ABRAHAMS - Amsterdam to US 1801 #usa

Marsh <marshcat@...>
 

Levi J. ABRAHAMS came to Philadelphia in 1801. He then went to Savannah, GA
and was naturalized in 1807. He listed his place of birth as Amsterdam,
Holland. He then moved to Charleston, SC and married Elizabeth MATTUCE
PREVOST (non-Jewish) and had a large family.

Levi is listed as a member of the very early Reform movement in Charleston
(we speculate because he had married outside the faith and wanted to
participate in Temple services), but died in Charleston in April 1830. We
have a funeral notice >from the Charleston newspaper, but have not found a
place of burial. His wife was buried at St. Phillip's Episcopal Church in
Charleston. Several of the children, my ancestor included, were sent to the
Charleston Orphan House, and we have no Jewish tradition in our family.

There is confusion because there was a Levi Abrahams in Savannah earlier,
and another Levi Abrahams born in Virginia, son of Solomon ABRAHAMS.
Neither of these appear to be my Levi J. ABRAHAMS. My ancestor was born
about 1777 in Amsterdam, and died in 1830 in Charleston, SC.

DNA testing has found several close matches at the 67-marker level. They
are families >from the Ukraine. Obviously, some family members went one way,
and some another. I'd love to find more information about the family of Levi.

Kathy Marsh Gainesville, FL <marshcat@cox.net>


Early American SIG #USA Levi J. ABRAHAMS - Amsterdam to US 1801 #usa

Marsh <marshcat@...>
 

Levi J. ABRAHAMS came to Philadelphia in 1801. He then went to Savannah, GA
and was naturalized in 1807. He listed his place of birth as Amsterdam,
Holland. He then moved to Charleston, SC and married Elizabeth MATTUCE
PREVOST (non-Jewish) and had a large family.

Levi is listed as a member of the very early Reform movement in Charleston
(we speculate because he had married outside the faith and wanted to
participate in Temple services), but died in Charleston in April 1830. We
have a funeral notice >from the Charleston newspaper, but have not found a
place of burial. His wife was buried at St. Phillip's Episcopal Church in
Charleston. Several of the children, my ancestor included, were sent to the
Charleston Orphan House, and we have no Jewish tradition in our family.

There is confusion because there was a Levi Abrahams in Savannah earlier,
and another Levi Abrahams born in Virginia, son of Solomon ABRAHAMS.
Neither of these appear to be my Levi J. ABRAHAMS. My ancestor was born
about 1777 in Amsterdam, and died in 1830 in Charleston, SC.

DNA testing has found several close matches at the 67-marker level. They
are families >from the Ukraine. Obviously, some family members went one way,
and some another. I'd love to find more information about the family of Levi.

Kathy Marsh Gainesville, FL <marshcat@cox.net>


Bela-Beile BRANDEIS, b. Fuerth after 1785 #germany

MBernet@...
 

Bela-Beile BRANDEIS was the youngest child of Samuel b Israel BRANDEIS of
Fuerth and his wife, Frumet b. R' Ascher EMSEL (?) district rabbi of Grabfeld
district with a seat in Burgpreppach. Judging by the dates of her 7 siblings,
she could not have been born before 1785.

She married Jona b Menachem Koenigshofer in Ermreuth (Upper Franconia, near
Erlangen), who was possibly >from Bad Koenigshofen-in-Grabfeld (her mother's
childhood neighborhood), and probably considerably older than she. She was
widowed in 1815 and disappeared >from Ermreuth, leaving her son, my mgggf b.1806,
in the care of that town's Jewish school teacher.

Thanks to a query she posted here a couple of days ago by Ruth Fenichel
Kornbluth, I have just received >from Ruth a copy of the hand-written tree of
this Brandeis branch prepared by Charles Stanton and now in the LBI collection.
This is helping to fill in one of the essential links in my family tree; thank
you Ruth, Charles Stanton and the LBI. I'd appreciate any help in finding
out what happened to Bela after she was widowed.

Stanton cites a will by her oldest brother, Joseph, who died in 1856,
leaving a bequest to his sister "Bela Koenigshofer in Ermreuth."
She had then been a widow for 41 years and was long gone >from Ermreuth.
She was only a girl of 30 when she was widowed and I'm more than a
little worried for her.

Michael Bernet, New York mbernet@aol.com


German SIG #Germany Bela-Beile BRANDEIS, b. Fuerth after 1785 #germany

MBernet@...
 

Bela-Beile BRANDEIS was the youngest child of Samuel b Israel BRANDEIS of
Fuerth and his wife, Frumet b. R' Ascher EMSEL (?) district rabbi of Grabfeld
district with a seat in Burgpreppach. Judging by the dates of her 7 siblings,
she could not have been born before 1785.

She married Jona b Menachem Koenigshofer in Ermreuth (Upper Franconia, near
Erlangen), who was possibly >from Bad Koenigshofen-in-Grabfeld (her mother's
childhood neighborhood), and probably considerably older than she. She was
widowed in 1815 and disappeared >from Ermreuth, leaving her son, my mgggf b.1806,
in the care of that town's Jewish school teacher.

Thanks to a query she posted here a couple of days ago by Ruth Fenichel
Kornbluth, I have just received >from Ruth a copy of the hand-written tree of
this Brandeis branch prepared by Charles Stanton and now in the LBI collection.
This is helping to fill in one of the essential links in my family tree; thank
you Ruth, Charles Stanton and the LBI. I'd appreciate any help in finding
out what happened to Bela after she was widowed.

Stanton cites a will by her oldest brother, Joseph, who died in 1856,
leaving a bequest to his sister "Bela Koenigshofer in Ermreuth."
She had then been a widow for 41 years and was long gone >from Ermreuth.
She was only a girl of 30 when she was widowed and I'm more than a
little worried for her.

Michael Bernet, New York mbernet@aol.com


Re. Inscriptions on other graves in Hessen - Jewish tradition questions #germany

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Justin Levy posted on the GerSIG digest as follows:

"I have the list of burials in the large cemetery in Kassel (Bettenhausen).
Many of the gravestones indicate that individuals had most unexpected
composite names, e.g. Moshe Uri Shraga ben Abraham or
Baruch Daniel Shmuel ben Moshe Yehuda.

Dr. Jona Schellekens, the accomplished Jewish genealogist and senior
lecturer at the Hebrew University, noted a similar pattern amongst
the Dutch Ashkenazi Jewry. His explanation is:

..sometimes true middle names or composite first names do occur.
These names often derive >from the custom of 'changing' the name
of a person who is ill. Usually a new name is added to the original
first name instead of replacing it (Kaganoff 1977, p. 102).
...People who were seriously ill more than once, may have undergone this
process more than once (Luria 1861/62, folio 21)..."

In addition to changing names as described by Dr. Schellekens, there was
also the custom of giving the sick person one of a small group of special
names which expressed a desire for life, for example. Neither of the above
two multiple given names seems to fall into this category.

It should also be kept in mind that multiple given names were also commonly
given to newborns to memorialize one or more dead family members. One
example would be the given name presented by Justin Levy, "Moshe Uri
Shraga", which is composed of the Hebrew name "Moshe" and the Hebrew double
name "Uri Shraga" (also, Urshraga). The name Uri Shraga is a double name
composed of the Hebrew name "Uri" and the Yiddish name "Shraga". The
Yiddish name "Shraga" was sometimes used as a stand-alone name in Germany
and other countries, and sometimes as a Yiddish kinui for the name Uri.

The other name presented by Justin Levy, "Baruch Daniel Shmuel", is a
triple of three unrelated Hebrew names, "Baruch", "Daniel", and "Shmuel",
having no relation to one another.

In these two examples, there are two main possibilities: the multiple
given names were given to memorialize only one deceased ancestor, or that
they were given to memorialize two or three deceased ancestors.

Professor G L Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel <jerry@vms.huji.ac.il>


German SIG #Germany Re. Inscriptions on other graves in Hessen - Jewish tradition questions #germany

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Justin Levy posted on the GerSIG digest as follows:

"I have the list of burials in the large cemetery in Kassel (Bettenhausen).
Many of the gravestones indicate that individuals had most unexpected
composite names, e.g. Moshe Uri Shraga ben Abraham or
Baruch Daniel Shmuel ben Moshe Yehuda.

Dr. Jona Schellekens, the accomplished Jewish genealogist and senior
lecturer at the Hebrew University, noted a similar pattern amongst
the Dutch Ashkenazi Jewry. His explanation is:

..sometimes true middle names or composite first names do occur.
These names often derive >from the custom of 'changing' the name
of a person who is ill. Usually a new name is added to the original
first name instead of replacing it (Kaganoff 1977, p. 102).
...People who were seriously ill more than once, may have undergone this
process more than once (Luria 1861/62, folio 21)..."

In addition to changing names as described by Dr. Schellekens, there was
also the custom of giving the sick person one of a small group of special
names which expressed a desire for life, for example. Neither of the above
two multiple given names seems to fall into this category.

It should also be kept in mind that multiple given names were also commonly
given to newborns to memorialize one or more dead family members. One
example would be the given name presented by Justin Levy, "Moshe Uri
Shraga", which is composed of the Hebrew name "Moshe" and the Hebrew double
name "Uri Shraga" (also, Urshraga). The name Uri Shraga is a double name
composed of the Hebrew name "Uri" and the Yiddish name "Shraga". The
Yiddish name "Shraga" was sometimes used as a stand-alone name in Germany
and other countries, and sometimes as a Yiddish kinui for the name Uri.

The other name presented by Justin Levy, "Baruch Daniel Shmuel", is a
triple of three unrelated Hebrew names, "Baruch", "Daniel", and "Shmuel",
having no relation to one another.

In these two examples, there are two main possibilities: the multiple
given names were given to memorialize only one deceased ancestor, or that
they were given to memorialize two or three deceased ancestors.

Professor G L Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel <jerry@vms.huji.ac.il>


Re: 2008 Conference in Chicago.. #france

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

DEar Fellow SIGgers,

Well, I have now heard >from about 4 of you, which is better ;-D! Since
we are likely to be such a small bunch I am going to request a Birds of
a Feather meeting, rather than a full SIG meeting. That way we can get
together in a small group and discuss what we would like to do,
research in France and other French-speaking areas, etc., in a more
informal setting. If any of you have any other ideas or suggestions
please let me know ASAP.

Rosanne Leeson


French SIG #France RE: 2008 Conference in Chicago.. #france

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

DEar Fellow SIGgers,

Well, I have now heard >from about 4 of you, which is better ;-D! Since
we are likely to be such a small bunch I am going to request a Birds of
a Feather meeting, rather than a full SIG meeting. That way we can get
together in a small group and discuss what we would like to do,
research in France and other French-speaking areas, etc., in a more
informal setting. If any of you have any other ideas or suggestions
please let me know ASAP.

Rosanne Leeson


Re: frenchsig digest: October 07, 2007 #france

Anne-Marie Rychner-Faraggi <am.faraggi@...>
 

"I am looking for descendents of Saveur LELLOUCHE, who lived in Tunis
in the 20s-40s...."

In the French naturalisations data base, I found many LELLOUCHE. Among them, was
Sauveur (not Saveur !) LELLOUCHE, born 30-09-1924 in Tunis, naturalised
15-09-1925 (réf. official newspaper 9206-25). He had a sister Marie born
24-08-1914 in Sousse(Tunisia), and two brothers: Joseph born 24-10-1915 in
Sousse and Isaac born 10-12-1917 in Sousse, two. Their father was Raphael born
17-05-1885 in Monastir and their mother, whose maiden surname was FARGEON, was
born 20-04-1891 in Tunis.
Good luck !

Anne-Marie Faraggi, Switzerland


French SIG #France Re: frenchsig digest: October 07, 2007 #france

Anne-Marie Rychner-Faraggi <am.faraggi@...>
 

"I am looking for descendents of Saveur LELLOUCHE, who lived in Tunis
in the 20s-40s...."

In the French naturalisations data base, I found many LELLOUCHE. Among them, was
Sauveur (not Saveur !) LELLOUCHE, born 30-09-1924 in Tunis, naturalised
15-09-1925 (réf. official newspaper 9206-25). He had a sister Marie born
24-08-1914 in Sousse(Tunisia), and two brothers: Joseph born 24-10-1915 in
Sousse and Isaac born 10-12-1917 in Sousse, two. Their father was Raphael born
17-05-1885 in Monastir and their mother, whose maiden surname was FARGEON, was
born 20-04-1891 in Tunis.
Good luck !

Anne-Marie Faraggi, Switzerland


meeting of the IGS Negev branch, Wednesday 10 October #general

Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

Our October meeting of the IGS-Negev will take place this Wednesday evening, 10
October 2007 at 20:00 at Beit Knesset Magen Avraham on Margalit Street, corner of
'Ad'ad, in Omer.

It will feature Yitzchak Kerem, speaking on "Sources for Researching Military
Records of Sephardic Jews in the Balkans."

Yitzchak Kerem is a well known historian and genealogist and is co-author of the
recently published Guidebook For Sephardic and Oriental Genealogical Sources in
Israel. He co-hosts the weekly Hebrew radio broadcast "The Jewish Diaspora"
[Reshet aleph]

It will be nice to see all of you again after the summer hiatus followed by all
the holidays!

Also, please remember to register for the 3rd Annual IGS one day seminar to take
place on 12 November. Interest is very high, judging >from the number of people >from
abroad who have notified us of their intention to attend. Just remember that
seating is limited and early registration ends on 28 October.

*The Wandering Jew: Jewish Migration Between The 18th and 20th Centuries*


You can download a registration form and the program on our IGS site:

http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2007/index.html

See you on Wednesday!

Martha Lev-Zion
IGS-Negev


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen meeting of the IGS Negev branch, Wednesday 10 October #general

Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

Our October meeting of the IGS-Negev will take place this Wednesday evening, 10
October 2007 at 20:00 at Beit Knesset Magen Avraham on Margalit Street, corner of
'Ad'ad, in Omer.

It will feature Yitzchak Kerem, speaking on "Sources for Researching Military
Records of Sephardic Jews in the Balkans."

Yitzchak Kerem is a well known historian and genealogist and is co-author of the
recently published Guidebook For Sephardic and Oriental Genealogical Sources in
Israel. He co-hosts the weekly Hebrew radio broadcast "The Jewish Diaspora"
[Reshet aleph]

It will be nice to see all of you again after the summer hiatus followed by all
the holidays!

Also, please remember to register for the 3rd Annual IGS one day seminar to take
place on 12 November. Interest is very high, judging >from the number of people >from
abroad who have notified us of their intention to attend. Just remember that
seating is limited and early registration ends on 28 October.

*The Wandering Jew: Jewish Migration Between The 18th and 20th Centuries*


You can download a registration form and the program on our IGS site:

http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2007/index.html

See you on Wednesday!

Martha Lev-Zion
IGS-Negev


Re: Looking for Grandfather Woods #unitedkingdom

Marcy Zaslow
 

My paternal great-grandather seems to be a mystery
man. He was born in Minsk cir. 1859 and emmigrated to
England where he married my great grandmother, Anna or
Hannah Decker >from Spitalfields. She disappears from
the census roles until she shows up again in the US in
1910 as Hannah Woods along with her husband Charles A.
Woods and their 7 children, including the four born in
England. I cannot locate a marriage cerificate for
this couple. I have not been able to find any of this
family on the manifests entering the United States
either under Decker or Woods.

I have assumed that "Woods" was an adopted name. It
was very common for Russian Jews in England at that
time to take very English sounding names. I have
tried translations of Woods such as Goltz, Holtz,
etc., and have come up empty. The middle intial "A" in
my great grandfather's name may allude to Anshel or a
a version of it as Anshel was often translated as
Charles. But that is a guess. My great grandparents
are not buried in the same town in the US either. He
seems to evaporated. Any new suggestions?

Marcy Va Es Zaslow
Florida, USA

Researching Decker, Woods, Van Es, Naskitel-Cohen


Re: Name Changes #hungary

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Josie

Warren Blatt of JewishGen gave a presentation at an IAJGS Conference
a few years ago. After carrying out some research he said that, yes,
emigrants did indeed take popular names in order to fit in. Though as
we know, there was a "link" to the original name by using a name with
the same first letter or sound.

Jeremy G Frankel
ex-London, England
Berkeley, California, USA

At 1:04 AM -0500 10/9/07, Josie Barnett wrote:
I think the above shows quite a lot of possibilities
as to what could happen. I would also add that the
names Barnett, Harris, Davis, Levene/Levine, Lewis,
seem to be very popular English Jewish names.
I presume that it must have been fashionable to take
these names for whatever reason.