Date   

Streets,inhabitants and shopowners in Vishki #latvia

christineusd <christineusd@...>
 

Dear Genners,
I have made a list of shops and houses with the owners listed on specific
streets in Vishki. I was hoping that i would find someone whose ancestors
lived in Vishki which is the shtetl situated 18 miles north of Daugavpils
and who knew of other names and street numbers.

Go to http://usdin.dumes.net/vishkistreets.html

Isn't that strange,that among the Latvian Jewishgenners we are only two
whose ancestors came >from this village.
Thank you.
Christine Usdin
France
christineusd@wanadoo.fr


USHMM announcement of ITS archive #latvia

Joyce Field
 

On January 17 the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) began
providing information >from the International Tracing Service (ITS) archive,
formerly located only in Bad Arolsen, Germany. The archive contains
information on about 17.5 million victims of Nazism, Jews and non-Jews,
and consists of 100 million images of documentation.

The archive is not machine searchable. Researchers >from the Registry of
Holocaust Survivors will assist persons seeking information >from this file.
Requests may be made by email, regular mail, or fax. Researchers can also
visit the Museum to access the material.

Information on the collection is available at <www.ushmm.org/its> or by
calling 866-912-4385.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


USHMM announcement of ITS archive #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

On January 17 the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) began
providing information >from the International Tracing Service (ITS) archive,
formerly located only in Bad Arolsen, Germany. The archive contains
information on about 17.5 million victims of Nazism, Jews and non-Jews,
and consists of 100 million images of documentation.

The archive is not machine searchable. Researchers >from the Registry of
Holocaust Survivors will assist persons seeking information >from this file.
Requests may be made by email, regular mail, or fax. Researchers can also
visit the Museum to access the material.

Information on the collection is available at <www.ushmm.org/its> or by
calling 866-912-4385.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Latvia SIG #Latvia Streets,inhabitants and shopowners in Vishki #latvia

christineusd <christineusd@...>
 

Dear Genners,
I have made a list of shops and houses with the owners listed on specific
streets in Vishki. I was hoping that i would find someone whose ancestors
lived in Vishki which is the shtetl situated 18 miles north of Daugavpils
and who knew of other names and street numbers.

Go to http://usdin.dumes.net/vishkistreets.html

Isn't that strange,that among the Latvian Jewishgenners we are only two
whose ancestors came >from this village.
Thank you.
Christine Usdin
France
christineusd@wanadoo.fr


Latvia SIG #Latvia USHMM announcement of ITS archive #latvia

Joyce Field
 

On January 17 the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) began
providing information >from the International Tracing Service (ITS) archive,
formerly located only in Bad Arolsen, Germany. The archive contains
information on about 17.5 million victims of Nazism, Jews and non-Jews,
and consists of 100 million images of documentation.

The archive is not machine searchable. Researchers >from the Registry of
Holocaust Survivors will assist persons seeking information >from this file.
Requests may be made by email, regular mail, or fax. Researchers can also
visit the Museum to access the material.

Information on the collection is available at <www.ushmm.org/its> or by
calling 866-912-4385.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia USHMM announcement of ITS archive #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

On January 17 the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) began
providing information >from the International Tracing Service (ITS) archive,
formerly located only in Bad Arolsen, Germany. The archive contains
information on about 17.5 million victims of Nazism, Jews and non-Jews,
and consists of 100 million images of documentation.

The archive is not machine searchable. Researchers >from the Registry of
Holocaust Survivors will assist persons seeking information >from this file.
Requests may be made by email, regular mail, or fax. Researchers can also
visit the Museum to access the material.

Information on the collection is available at <www.ushmm.org/its> or by
calling 866-912-4385.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


USHMM announcement of ITS archive #romania

Joyce Field
 

On January 17 the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) began
providing information >from the International Tracing Service (ITS) archive,
formerly located only in Bad Arolsen, Germany. The archive contains
information on about 17.5 million victims of Nazism, Jews and non-Jews,
and consists of 100 million images of documentation.

The archive is not machine searchable. Researchers >from the Registry of
Holocaust Survivors will assist persons seeking information >from this file.
Requests may be made by email, regular mail, or fax. Researchers can also
visit the Museum to access the material.

Information on the collection is available at <www.ushmm.org/its> or by
calling 866-912-4385.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


USHMM announcement of ITS archive #yizkorbooks

Joyce Field
 

On January 17 the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) began
providing information >from the International Tracing Service (ITS) archive,
formerly located only in Bad Arolsen, Germany. The archive contains
information on about 17.5 million victims of Nazism, Jews and non-Jews,
and consists of 100 million images of documentation.

The archive is not machine searchable. Researchers >from the Registry of
Holocaust Survivors will assist persons seeking information >from this file.
Requests may be made by email, regular mail, or fax. Researchers can also
visit the Museum to access the material.

Information on the collection is available at <www.ushmm.org/its> or by
calling 866-912-4385.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Romania SIG #Romania USHMM announcement of ITS archive #romania

Joyce Field
 

On January 17 the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) began
providing information >from the International Tracing Service (ITS) archive,
formerly located only in Bad Arolsen, Germany. The archive contains
information on about 17.5 million victims of Nazism, Jews and non-Jews,
and consists of 100 million images of documentation.

The archive is not machine searchable. Researchers >from the Registry of
Holocaust Survivors will assist persons seeking information >from this file.
Requests may be made by email, regular mail, or fax. Researchers can also
visit the Museum to access the material.

Information on the collection is available at <www.ushmm.org/its> or by
calling 866-912-4385.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks USHMM announcement of ITS archive #yizkorbooks

Joyce Field
 

On January 17 the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) began
providing information >from the International Tracing Service (ITS) archive,
formerly located only in Bad Arolsen, Germany. The archive contains
information on about 17.5 million victims of Nazism, Jews and non-Jews,
and consists of 100 million images of documentation.

The archive is not machine searchable. Researchers >from the Registry of
Holocaust Survivors will assist persons seeking information >from this file.
Requests may be made by email, regular mail, or fax. Researchers can also
visit the Museum to access the material.

Information on the collection is available at <www.ushmm.org/its> or by
calling 866-912-4385.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Addendum to Janowitz Thread #austria-czech

Paul King
 

I overlooked a Janowitz origin >from Celia Male's mention of a Prague
Janowitz >from Alt Bunzlau. A quick scanning of Somer showed that there were
other locations with the name of Janowitz/Janovice in the districts of
Koniggrazer, Chrudim, Prachiner, and Caslau, all of which did not have
Jewish populations in the early part of the 18th c. Only Kaurimer district
had 9 Jewish families [was this Janovice then siphoned off to become part of
Bunzlau kreis?] and my guess is that this is Celia's reference to Brenn
Poritschen and Alt Bunzlau. Anyway, for the early 18th c. records, Thomas
Fuerth's Janowitz would appear - with much reservation -to be >from either
the Janowitz in Klattau or the Janowitz in the Kaurim/Bunzlau area. Later
migration could have placed this Janowitz family in one of the four
districts mentioned above which had no Jewish families in the early part of
the 18th century.

Paul King
Jerusalem


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Addendum to Janowitz Thread #austria-czech

Paul King
 

I overlooked a Janowitz origin >from Celia Male's mention of a Prague
Janowitz >from Alt Bunzlau. A quick scanning of Somer showed that there were
other locations with the name of Janowitz/Janovice in the districts of
Koniggrazer, Chrudim, Prachiner, and Caslau, all of which did not have
Jewish populations in the early part of the 18th c. Only Kaurimer district
had 9 Jewish families [was this Janovice then siphoned off to become part of
Bunzlau kreis?] and my guess is that this is Celia's reference to Brenn
Poritschen and Alt Bunzlau. Anyway, for the early 18th c. records, Thomas
Fuerth's Janowitz would appear - with much reservation -to be >from either
the Janowitz in Klattau or the Janowitz in the Kaurim/Bunzlau area. Later
migration could have placed this Janowitz family in one of the four
districts mentioned above which had no Jewish families in the early part of
the 18th century.

Paul King
Jerusalem


Janowitz as a Topograph after 1787 #austria-czech

Paul King
 

Celia Male in "Janowitzer >from Prague" (18 January 2008) notes that Abraham
Janowitz had a topographic surname since his schutz status was >from
Janowitz. The official records state that this was not Janowitz in the
Beroun district.

At this point, this appears difficult to untangle. I wish to add several
points that might help others in suggesting what is meant by this specific
topographical denial. The second clause of the July 1787 compulsory Jewish
surname decree explicitly forbids Jews to adopt their residential settlement
as a surname. For example, a native of Kolin could not call himself Abraham
Kolin. Whether Abraham >from Osek could register as Abraham Kolin is not
clear to me, although it seems to defeat the purpose of the clause and might
create future personal confusion for Abraham >from Osek.

A second possibility is that Abraham already had the surname Janowitz before
promulgation of the 1787 Decree and thus could retain his surname. There is
a Janovice nad Uhlavou in the south-west of Bohemia which is in Klattau
Kreis and Somer (vol. 7 for Klattauer) has a Janowitz [location] on p. 92
and there were Jewish families there of long-standing.

So Abraham Janowitz, based on what we know, would seem to have acquired the
surname Janowitz after 1724 and before 1787 and came >from the town [stadt]
of Janowitz in Klattau. The best verification for this would be the 1783
cadaster, although it gives a four-year leeway for surname change.

Paul King
Jerusalem


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Janowitz as a Topograph after 1787 #austria-czech

Paul King
 

Celia Male in "Janowitzer >from Prague" (18 January 2008) notes that Abraham
Janowitz had a topographic surname since his schutz status was >from
Janowitz. The official records state that this was not Janowitz in the
Beroun district.

At this point, this appears difficult to untangle. I wish to add several
points that might help others in suggesting what is meant by this specific
topographical denial. The second clause of the July 1787 compulsory Jewish
surname decree explicitly forbids Jews to adopt their residential settlement
as a surname. For example, a native of Kolin could not call himself Abraham
Kolin. Whether Abraham >from Osek could register as Abraham Kolin is not
clear to me, although it seems to defeat the purpose of the clause and might
create future personal confusion for Abraham >from Osek.

A second possibility is that Abraham already had the surname Janowitz before
promulgation of the 1787 Decree and thus could retain his surname. There is
a Janovice nad Uhlavou in the south-west of Bohemia which is in Klattau
Kreis and Somer (vol. 7 for Klattauer) has a Janowitz [location] on p. 92
and there were Jewish families there of long-standing.

So Abraham Janowitz, based on what we know, would seem to have acquired the
surname Janowitz after 1724 and before 1787 and came >from the town [stadt]
of Janowitz in Klattau. The best verification for this would be the 1783
cadaster, although it gives a four-year leeway for surname change.

Paul King
Jerusalem


USHMM announcement of ITS archive #austria-czech

Joyce Field
 

On January 17 the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) began
providing information >from the International Tracing Service (ITS) archive,
formerly located only in Bad Arolsen, Germany. The archive contains
information on about 17.5 million victims of Nazism, Jews and non-Jews,
and consists of 100 million images of documentation.

The archive is not machine searchable. Researchers >from the Registry of
Holocaust Survivors will assist persons seeking information >from this file.
Requests may be made by email, regular mail, or fax. Researchers can also
visit the Museum to access the material.

Information on the collection is available at <www.ushmm.org/its> or by
calling 866-912-4385.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech USHMM announcement of ITS archive #austria-czech

Joyce Field
 

On January 17 the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) began
providing information >from the International Tracing Service (ITS) archive,
formerly located only in Bad Arolsen, Germany. The archive contains
information on about 17.5 million victims of Nazism, Jews and non-Jews,
and consists of 100 million images of documentation.

The archive is not machine searchable. Researchers >from the Registry of
Holocaust Survivors will assist persons seeking information >from this file.
Requests may be made by email, regular mail, or fax. Researchers can also
visit the Museum to access the material.

Information on the collection is available at <www.ushmm.org/its> or by
calling 866-912-4385.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Flour mill near Khotin / WEITZMAN surname #ukraine

Caroline Weitzman <arbitress419@...>
 

Dear Ukraine SIG,

Have any of you heard of a flour mill near Khotin? I am trying to identify the hometown of my grandfather
Philip WEITZMAN, born 1907 in Bessarabia. For some bizarre reason I haven't been able to
find any immigration records for him, his mother, or his siblings, but I did
find a passenger manifest for his father, Morris (Moische) WEITZMAN (born about
1880). In this document >from 1910, his
last residence is given as "Chotyn," which I assume to be the city
Khotin now in Ukraine. However, the recollections of my grandfather
indicate that he grew up in a small rural town, whereas Khotin seems to have
been a developed city in the early 20th century. I'm now trying to figure out if there was a
smaller town near Khotin that fits the information I have. This shtetl would have had a flour mill, or
been very near to one, because that's where my grandmother (Tillie WEITZMAN,
born Taube WEISER about 1882) worked during the German occupation. Like
Khotin, it would have been on the Dniester. The name might have sounded like "Godol-godoliya."

I've searched JewishGen's ShtetlSeeker for towns near Khotin
and towns that sound like Godol-godoliya, with no luck. The Romanian map in the Yizkor book for Khotin
doesn't show anything promising. Unfortunately
I can't read Yiddish or Hebrew, so the Yizkor book hasn't been of much use to
me.

One final note: my great-grandfather seems to have been
traveling with Moische AKERMAN and Semion PISLAR, also >from Chotyn/Khotin.

For further details, please refer to a rough draft of my
research that I've put online at http://www.brandeis.edu/~weitzman/2/moischeweitzman.htm.

I have a couple other questions that are more general; I hope you don't mind me sending them to this list.

In general, when were passenger manifests filled out? Before or after the ship sailed?

What is the meaning of the notes sometimes found in the
margins of passenger manifests? Often I
see numbers with six or seven digits, puncuated by hyphens, and sometimes even
dates, like "Rech. 1/30/37." Where do they come from?

If my great-grandfather filed his Declaration of Intent
for Naturalization in the District Court of New York, NY, in 1926, can I expect
to find his other naturalization papers in the records of the same court? His family later relocated to the Bronx.

Please reply privately.

Thank you very much,

Caroline Weitzman
Waltham, MA, USA

Researching:

Khotin, Ukraine: WEITZMAN and WEISER
Odessa, Ukraine: SCHNEIDMAN
Tolczin (Tuchin?), Russia: LAMPERT


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Flour mill near Khotin / WEITZMAN surname #ukraine

Caroline Weitzman <arbitress419@...>
 

Dear Ukraine SIG,

Have any of you heard of a flour mill near Khotin? I am trying to identify the hometown of my grandfather
Philip WEITZMAN, born 1907 in Bessarabia. For some bizarre reason I haven't been able to
find any immigration records for him, his mother, or his siblings, but I did
find a passenger manifest for his father, Morris (Moische) WEITZMAN (born about
1880). In this document >from 1910, his
last residence is given as "Chotyn," which I assume to be the city
Khotin now in Ukraine. However, the recollections of my grandfather
indicate that he grew up in a small rural town, whereas Khotin seems to have
been a developed city in the early 20th century. I'm now trying to figure out if there was a
smaller town near Khotin that fits the information I have. This shtetl would have had a flour mill, or
been very near to one, because that's where my grandmother (Tillie WEITZMAN,
born Taube WEISER about 1882) worked during the German occupation. Like
Khotin, it would have been on the Dniester. The name might have sounded like "Godol-godoliya."

I've searched JewishGen's ShtetlSeeker for towns near Khotin
and towns that sound like Godol-godoliya, with no luck. The Romanian map in the Yizkor book for Khotin
doesn't show anything promising. Unfortunately
I can't read Yiddish or Hebrew, so the Yizkor book hasn't been of much use to
me.

One final note: my great-grandfather seems to have been
traveling with Moische AKERMAN and Semion PISLAR, also >from Chotyn/Khotin.

For further details, please refer to a rough draft of my
research that I've put online at http://www.brandeis.edu/~weitzman/2/moischeweitzman.htm.

I have a couple other questions that are more general; I hope you don't mind me sending them to this list.

In general, when were passenger manifests filled out? Before or after the ship sailed?

What is the meaning of the notes sometimes found in the
margins of passenger manifests? Often I
see numbers with six or seven digits, puncuated by hyphens, and sometimes even
dates, like "Rech. 1/30/37." Where do they come from?

If my great-grandfather filed his Declaration of Intent
for Naturalization in the District Court of New York, NY, in 1926, can I expect
to find his other naturalization papers in the records of the same court? His family later relocated to the Bronx.

Please reply privately.

Thank you very much,

Caroline Weitzman
Waltham, MA, USA

Researching:

Khotin, Ukraine: WEITZMAN and WEISER
Odessa, Ukraine: SCHNEIDMAN
Tolczin (Tuchin?), Russia: LAMPERT


Taber Family from Bronx #general

Howard Coupland <how.jacque@...>
 

I am looking for descendants of Jacob & Leibe TABER (aka Libby,Lizzie or
Louise Taber). They came to New York >from Iasi, Romania around 1900 and
had six children -
Irvin, Abraham and William who were born in Romania.
Jean/Jennie (b1902), Sidney (b1911) and Manuel (b1916) were all born in New York.
According to both 1920/30 census they were living at 858 Intervale Avenue,
Bronx, NY.

Abraham married Amelia GLASS in 1924 and had a daughter Leatrice born 1929c
which according to 1930 census they lived in The Bronx at 5 Minerva Place &
Jerome Avenue .

Jean married a Frank KOHN in 1933 and Irvin married a Jennie BIDERMAN (nee
KLAPPER) and settled in Flushing I believe their address around the 1940's
was 75 - 45 186th Street ,Queens , NY.

If you know of this family or feel there is a connection worth following up
then please do not hesitate to contact me.

Jacque Coupland
Leeds, UK.

Researching:
CAPLAN/PLOTKIN (Vilnius),PRENSKY (Šakiai), GRYNWALD (Marijampole & Liudvinavas),
KLEPPER/CLAPER (Iasi), SMOLENSKI (Romania), SHER (Siauliau),KATZ (Siauliau, Varniai, Skuodas,
Lithuania & Oslo)ABRAMSON/LIPMAN (Johannesburg), TABER (Iasi, Romania & New York),
LIVINGSTONE (Birmingham), DEITCH (Grimsby), DENKINSON (Nottingham), SMALL
(Manchester), WEINBERG (Manchester), RENTZLER (Roman and Manchester),
KLEIN (Chicago).

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Taber Family from Bronx #general

Howard Coupland <how.jacque@...>
 

I am looking for descendants of Jacob & Leibe TABER (aka Libby,Lizzie or
Louise Taber). They came to New York >from Iasi, Romania around 1900 and
had six children -
Irvin, Abraham and William who were born in Romania.
Jean/Jennie (b1902), Sidney (b1911) and Manuel (b1916) were all born in New York.
According to both 1920/30 census they were living at 858 Intervale Avenue,
Bronx, NY.

Abraham married Amelia GLASS in 1924 and had a daughter Leatrice born 1929c
which according to 1930 census they lived in The Bronx at 5 Minerva Place &
Jerome Avenue .

Jean married a Frank KOHN in 1933 and Irvin married a Jennie BIDERMAN (nee
KLAPPER) and settled in Flushing I believe their address around the 1940's
was 75 - 45 186th Street ,Queens , NY.

If you know of this family or feel there is a connection worth following up
then please do not hesitate to contact me.

Jacque Coupland
Leeds, UK.

Researching:
CAPLAN/PLOTKIN (Vilnius),PRENSKY (Šakiai), GRYNWALD (Marijampole & Liudvinavas),
KLEPPER/CLAPER (Iasi), SMOLENSKI (Romania), SHER (Siauliau),KATZ (Siauliau, Varniai, Skuodas,
Lithuania & Oslo)ABRAMSON/LIPMAN (Johannesburg), TABER (Iasi, Romania & New York),
LIVINGSTONE (Birmingham), DEITCH (Grimsby), DENKINSON (Nottingham), SMALL
(Manchester), WEINBERG (Manchester), RENTZLER (Roman and Manchester),
KLEIN (Chicago).

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.