Date   

16th Lithuanian Division of the Red Army #lithuania

Dorfleiv@...
 

Dear Ilan,

Th Veterans Council of the Association of Lithuanian Jews published a book
in Yiddish and Hebrew which in English is called the "The Way to Victory,
Jewish Soldiers of the 16th Lithuanian Division 1942-1945". The book was
published in Yiddish and translated to Hebrew and contains a large Yizkor
section which lists 1724 names of the soldiers who died. There are also
short pieces by many of the Veterans and numerous photographs. The book
is now out of print but you may be able to consult a copy at The
Association of Lithuanian Jews in Tel Aviv.

The Veterans Council has authorised me to translate and publish the book
in English. This project was started 3 months ago and is approaching the
half way point. I will be seeking a publisher to undertake printing and
distribution shortly.

Regards,
Dorothy Leivers
Hadlow Kent


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania 16th Lithuanian Division of the Red Army #lithuania

Dorfleiv@...
 

Dear Ilan,

Th Veterans Council of the Association of Lithuanian Jews published a book
in Yiddish and Hebrew which in English is called the "The Way to Victory,
Jewish Soldiers of the 16th Lithuanian Division 1942-1945". The book was
published in Yiddish and translated to Hebrew and contains a large Yizkor
section which lists 1724 names of the soldiers who died. There are also
short pieces by many of the Veterans and numerous photographs. The book
is now out of print but you may be able to consult a copy at The
Association of Lithuanian Jews in Tel Aviv.

The Veterans Council has authorised me to translate and publish the book
in English. This project was started 3 months ago and is approaching the
half way point. I will be seeking a publisher to undertake printing and
distribution shortly.

Regards,
Dorothy Leivers
Hadlow Kent


Re: Jewish Soldiers Killed in Action with the 16th Lithuanian Division during WW-II #lithuania

Jackye Sullins <jsullins@...>
 

I found my cousin's death at the site below. Steve Morse has created an
English front page to make it easy for us to search. It is the actual
document once you find your person. My cousin died in Latvia very early
in the war. You have to be very creative with the names when searching.

http://stevemorse.org/russian/ussrmil.html

Jackye Sullins
Carlsbad, CA

My uncle, Dov-Berl ITING (Berelis ITINGAS) >from Mazheik (Mazeikiai), b.
1913, fell in action while serving with the 16th Lithuanian Division
(nicknamed "The Jewish Division") of the Red Army during WWII.

Does anyone have any idea about any source of information concerning the
16th Lithuanian Division of the Red Army, including list of victims?

Kind Regards,

Ilan Ganot,


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Jewish Soldiers Killed in Action with the 16th Lithuanian Division during WW-II #lithuania

Jackye Sullins <jsullins@...>
 

I found my cousin's death at the site below. Steve Morse has created an
English front page to make it easy for us to search. It is the actual
document once you find your person. My cousin died in Latvia very early
in the war. You have to be very creative with the names when searching.

http://stevemorse.org/russian/ussrmil.html

Jackye Sullins
Carlsbad, CA

My uncle, Dov-Berl ITING (Berelis ITINGAS) >from Mazheik (Mazeikiai), b.
1913, fell in action while serving with the 16th Lithuanian Division
(nicknamed "The Jewish Division") of the Red Army during WWII.

Does anyone have any idea about any source of information concerning the
16th Lithuanian Division of the Red Army, including list of victims?

Kind Regards,

Ilan Ganot,


The KARTA Archives Project #poland

Amos Israel Zezmer <amos.zezmer@...>
 

I would like to remind researchers that on the JRI-Poland home page is a
link to the Karta Archives Project.

I've only noticed it now, so I have no idea how long it's been there.

This link will take you to an index where you can look up relatives who
might have been deported by the Soviets, in 1940, >from that part of
Poland annexed by them.

Although the site has very little data online so far, I managed to track
the whereabouts of four cousins whose timelines are now better known.

Why not check out this link?

Amos Zezmer
Yerres, France

Researching KANTOR, SZENWALD and KRAKAUER >from Czestochowa

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The link is near the botton of the home page. The
direct URL is www.jri-poland.org/karta/karta_archives_project.htm


JRI Poland #Poland The KARTA Archives Project #poland

Amos Israel Zezmer <amos.zezmer@...>
 

I would like to remind researchers that on the JRI-Poland home page is a
link to the Karta Archives Project.

I've only noticed it now, so I have no idea how long it's been there.

This link will take you to an index where you can look up relatives who
might have been deported by the Soviets, in 1940, >from that part of
Poland annexed by them.

Although the site has very little data online so far, I managed to track
the whereabouts of four cousins whose timelines are now better known.

Why not check out this link?

Amos Zezmer
Yerres, France

Researching KANTOR, SZENWALD and KRAKAUER >from Czestochowa

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The link is near the botton of the home page. The
direct URL is www.jri-poland.org/karta/karta_archives_project.htm


Re: The state of Geilich? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 5/24/2008 5:11:59 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
henry.best1@ntlworld.com writes:
I've received some information about an ancestor's wedding in Holland in
1733. The bride is noted as: Mata bat Meyer z.l. >from the State of Geilich.
Does anyone in the group know where Geilich was?

==I googled it. 17,000, mentions, apparently all names. See also spelling
with double ll.

==However, the adjective geil >from which geilich is derived, has a meaning
in German. Today it refers almost exclusively to sexual lust or desire. In
more sedate times it meant "desirous," or "eager...keen...be crazy about"
or "luxuriant" (of vegetation.)

==Perhaps if this was in a light, bantering message it was suggesting that
the bride was in a "state" of eagerness or excitement to marry the groom.

Michael Bernet, New York
mbernet@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Thanks, Michael, for adding a note of humor to the discussion!


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The state of Geilich? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 5/24/2008 5:11:59 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
henry.best1@ntlworld.com writes:
I've received some information about an ancestor's wedding in Holland in
1733. The bride is noted as: Mata bat Meyer z.l. >from the State of Geilich.
Does anyone in the group know where Geilich was?

==I googled it. 17,000, mentions, apparently all names. See also spelling
with double ll.

==However, the adjective geil >from which geilich is derived, has a meaning
in German. Today it refers almost exclusively to sexual lust or desire. In
more sedate times it meant "desirous," or "eager...keen...be crazy about"
or "luxuriant" (of vegetation.)

==Perhaps if this was in a light, bantering message it was suggesting that
the bride was in a "state" of eagerness or excitement to marry the groom.

Michael Bernet, New York
mbernet@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Thanks, Michael, for adding a note of humor to the discussion!


Re: Itinerant peddler missed by US Census? #general

henry
 

Israel,

Itinerants are/were probably the most likely people to be missed by census
enumerators. If your ancestor had some means of transport (a car, van,
bicycle or a horse and cart) it's likely (for reasons of cost and security
of his stock) that he would sleep in or around that, rather than a fixed
building, so had no place of residence or postal address that the enumerator
could visit to get the information. Itinerants were also keen to be
invisible to the local 'authorities' so as not to be moved on before they
had exhausted the potential of the area. In other words, they had an
incentive NOT to be recorded by the enumerators.

Henry Best,
London

----- Original Message -----
From: "Israel P" <IsraelP@pikholz.org>
Subject: Itinerant peddler missed by US Census?

| A man we looked for for several years showed up on a 1921 Cleveland death
| certificate. He had gone to the US to prepare to bring his family, which
| he never managed to do.
|
| I cannot find him anyplace in the 1920 census. Might that be explained
| by the fact that the death certificate says he is an itinerant peddler,
| presumably with no fixed address? Were such people often missed?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Itinerant peddler missed by US Census? #general

henry
 

Israel,

Itinerants are/were probably the most likely people to be missed by census
enumerators. If your ancestor had some means of transport (a car, van,
bicycle or a horse and cart) it's likely (for reasons of cost and security
of his stock) that he would sleep in or around that, rather than a fixed
building, so had no place of residence or postal address that the enumerator
could visit to get the information. Itinerants were also keen to be
invisible to the local 'authorities' so as not to be moved on before they
had exhausted the potential of the area. In other words, they had an
incentive NOT to be recorded by the enumerators.

Henry Best,
London

----- Original Message -----
From: "Israel P" <IsraelP@pikholz.org>
Subject: Itinerant peddler missed by US Census?

| A man we looked for for several years showed up on a 1921 Cleveland death
| certificate. He had gone to the US to prepare to bring his family, which
| he never managed to do.
|
| I cannot find him anyplace in the 1920 census. Might that be explained
| by the fact that the death certificate says he is an itinerant peddler,
| presumably with no fixed address? Were such people often missed?


Re: Weiramer/Veiramer "nickname" for rabbi #rabbinic

sbloom@...
 

To clarify my previous post, the nickname of this rabbi is spelled
in Hebrew/Yiddish on the stone as:

Vav-Vav-Yud-Resh-Aleph-Mem-Ayin-Resh

I though this would be transliterated as roughly, WIERAMER or maybe
WIERAMAYER, but perhaps people have more educated suggestions.

Above this name it has the abbrevition that indicates he is indeed a
rabbi ("the rabbi, the tzadik"--in hebrew, the acronym, hey '' resh
hey'' tzadi).

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: Weiramer/Veiramer "nickname" for rabbi #rabbinic

sbloom@...
 

To clarify my previous post, the nickname of this rabbi is spelled
in Hebrew/Yiddish on the stone as:

Vav-Vav-Yud-Resh-Aleph-Mem-Ayin-Resh

I though this would be transliterated as roughly, WIERAMER or maybe
WIERAMAYER, but perhaps people have more educated suggestions.

Above this name it has the abbrevition that indicates he is indeed a
rabbi ("the rabbi, the tzadik"--in hebrew, the acronym, hey '' resh
hey'' tzadi).

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia


Re: R' Josef HOLLES - Av Beth Din Tismeniz #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

On 2008.05.24, Dan Holles <danholles@bluewin.ch> asked:

[...] He was also the Rov of the Pnei Joshua. Does anyone have
any information regarding him or his descendants?
The book LeToldot HaKehilot BePolin by Zvi Hirsch Horowitz of
Dresden, page 336 has a full biography of Joseph (died in 1830) ben
Zvi Hollis - son-in-law of Isaac HaLevi, brother of the TAZ.

It mentions a son - Joseph LANDAU ABD Chotin, Bessarabia and then 20
years in Jassy - died in 1853. He wrote Responsa Birkat Yosef which
may have more info for you.

Dr. Neil Rosenstein


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic RE: R' Josef HOLLES - Av Beth Din Tismeniz #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

On 2008.05.24, Dan Holles <danholles@bluewin.ch> asked:

[...] He was also the Rov of the Pnei Joshua. Does anyone have
any information regarding him or his descendants?
The book LeToldot HaKehilot BePolin by Zvi Hirsch Horowitz of
Dresden, page 336 has a full biography of Joseph (died in 1830) ben
Zvi Hollis - son-in-law of Isaac HaLevi, brother of the TAZ.

It mentions a son - Joseph LANDAU ABD Chotin, Bessarabia and then 20
years in Jassy - died in 1853. He wrote Responsa Birkat Yosef which
may have more info for you.

Dr. Neil Rosenstein


The 1851 Study of the Jewish Population of the UK #unitedkingdom

Louise Messik <louise@...>
 

Dear Group Members

The 1851 Study at http://jgsgb.org.uk/1851/Introduction.asp has been updated
this week to include another few thousand names. It now contains over half
of the UK Jewish population of 1851 and goes both backwards and forwards in
time where the information on an individual has been researched or made
available.

Our most sincere thanks goes to its editor, Petra Laidlaw, and all the
contributors who have been most generous with their time and knowledge.

Louise Messik
JGSGB Website and Database Manager


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom The 1851 Study of the Jewish Population of the UK #unitedkingdom

Louise Messik <louise@...>
 

Dear Group Members

The 1851 Study at http://jgsgb.org.uk/1851/Introduction.asp has been updated
this week to include another few thousand names. It now contains over half
of the UK Jewish population of 1851 and goes both backwards and forwards in
time where the information on an individual has been researched or made
available.

Our most sincere thanks goes to its editor, Petra Laidlaw, and all the
contributors who have been most generous with their time and knowledge.

Louise Messik
JGSGB Website and Database Manager


Re: The state of Geilich? #general

Sue Clamp <clamp@...>
 

Henry Best wrote:

I've received some information about an ancestor's wedding in Holland in
1733. The bride is noted as: Mata bat Meyer z.l. >from the State of Geilich.
Does anyone in the group know where Geilich was?

Remember that this was the Dutch name for the place, not necessarily the
name of the place used by its natives, just as we call the country Holland,
but to the Dutch its Nederland.

Henry Best,
London
Geilich sounds more German than Dutch to me, and when I enter it into
Google Earth, it just comes up with a list of people by that name all
over Germany.

Playing around with the spelling, I found Gulick on an old map and found
Juelich on modern ones, to the west of Koeln (Cologne)
Read: http://www.juelich.de/geschichte_e

Maybe a candidate?

Sue Clamp


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The state of Geilich? #general

Sue Clamp <clamp@...>
 

Henry Best wrote:

I've received some information about an ancestor's wedding in Holland in
1733. The bride is noted as: Mata bat Meyer z.l. >from the State of Geilich.
Does anyone in the group know where Geilich was?

Remember that this was the Dutch name for the place, not necessarily the
name of the place used by its natives, just as we call the country Holland,
but to the Dutch its Nederland.

Henry Best,
London
Geilich sounds more German than Dutch to me, and when I enter it into
Google Earth, it just comes up with a list of people by that name all
over Germany.

Playing around with the spelling, I found Gulick on an old map and found
Juelich on modern ones, to the west of Koeln (Cologne)
Read: http://www.juelich.de/geschichte_e

Maybe a candidate?

Sue Clamp


Re: Itinerant peddler missed by US Census? #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

A man we looked for for several years showed up on a 1921 Cleveland death
certificate. He had gone to the US to prepare to bring his family, which
he never managed to do.

I cannot find him anyplace in the 1920 census. Might that be explained
by the fact that the death certificate says he is an itinerant peddler,
presumably with no fixed address? Were such people often missed?
Yes. Even people with a fixed address were sometimes missed, and this
still happens with today's censuses. Or they might be counted, but under a
completely wrong name so that you'd never find them. If they are recent
immigrants with a poor command of English, the probability of being missed
or mis-named increases.
--
Robert Israel
israel@math.MyUniversitysInitials.ca
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Itinerant peddler missed by US Census? #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

A man we looked for for several years showed up on a 1921 Cleveland death
certificate. He had gone to the US to prepare to bring his family, which
he never managed to do.

I cannot find him anyplace in the 1920 census. Might that be explained
by the fact that the death certificate says he is an itinerant peddler,
presumably with no fixed address? Were such people often missed?
Yes. Even people with a fixed address were sometimes missed, and this
still happens with today's censuses. Or they might be counted, but under a
completely wrong name so that you'd never find them. If they are recent
immigrants with a poor command of English, the probability of being missed
or mis-named increases.
--
Robert Israel
israel@math.MyUniversitysInitials.ca
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada