Date   

Transcription help - Polish/Cyrillic Records from Lublin area: WAGNER family #poland

Tamar Amit <tamar.amit@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers:

I posted some documents to ViewMate and would be grateful if someone
would take a look at them. The details I am interested in are names,
dates and professions.

I do not need any details about the dates of the banns or the witnesses.
They are posted on ViewMate with the following details:

[Polish, bad quality] Marriage registration of WAGNER Malka &
ZYLBERBERG Srul Josef, Zamosc, 1864? - VM12223
Direct link: http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=12223

[Cyrillic] Marriage registration of WAGNER Perla Ita & ZILBERBERG
Moszek Jankel, Jozefow Nad Wisla, 1900 - VM12248
Direct link: http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=12248

[Cyrillic] Marriage registration of WAGNER Brandla & ROSENBERG
Gierszon, Jozefow Nad Wisla, 1832 - VM12249
Direct link: http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=12249

[Cyrillic] Marriage registration of WAGNER Szyia Moszek & ZORMAN
Chawa, Jozefow Nad Wisla , 1899 - VM12250
Direct link: http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=12250

[Polish] Marriage registration of WAGNER Gitla & WEBERSZPIL Icek,
Rejowiec, 1843 - VM12251
Direct link: http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=12251
Any help is appreciated.

I can provide a higher resolution image if helpful.

Kindly reply to me privately at tamar.amit@gmail.com . Thank you.


Tamar Amit,
Ramat Hasharon, Israel.

Researching:
WAGNER - Dambie (pronounced Dombia), Zolkiewka, Zamosc and rest of Lublin area
GEWERCMAN & BRONFENBRENER - Izbica, Ruskie Piaski, Szczebrzeszyn, Zamosc
ROSBOIM - Chelm, Wojslowitce, Ruskie Piaski, Szczebrzeszyn, Zamosc


JRI Poland #Poland Transcription help - Polish/Cyrillic Records from Lublin area: WAGNER family #poland

Tamar Amit <tamar.amit@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers:

I posted some documents to ViewMate and would be grateful if someone
would take a look at them. The details I am interested in are names,
dates and professions.

I do not need any details about the dates of the banns or the witnesses.
They are posted on ViewMate with the following details:

[Polish, bad quality] Marriage registration of WAGNER Malka &
ZYLBERBERG Srul Josef, Zamosc, 1864? - VM12223
Direct link: http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=12223

[Cyrillic] Marriage registration of WAGNER Perla Ita & ZILBERBERG
Moszek Jankel, Jozefow Nad Wisla, 1900 - VM12248
Direct link: http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=12248

[Cyrillic] Marriage registration of WAGNER Brandla & ROSENBERG
Gierszon, Jozefow Nad Wisla, 1832 - VM12249
Direct link: http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=12249

[Cyrillic] Marriage registration of WAGNER Szyia Moszek & ZORMAN
Chawa, Jozefow Nad Wisla , 1899 - VM12250
Direct link: http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=12250

[Polish] Marriage registration of WAGNER Gitla & WEBERSZPIL Icek,
Rejowiec, 1843 - VM12251
Direct link: http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=12251
Any help is appreciated.

I can provide a higher resolution image if helpful.

Kindly reply to me privately at tamar.amit@gmail.com . Thank you.


Tamar Amit,
Ramat Hasharon, Israel.

Researching:
WAGNER - Dambie (pronounced Dombia), Zolkiewka, Zamosc and rest of Lublin area
GEWERCMAN & BRONFENBRENER - Izbica, Ruskie Piaski, Szczebrzeszyn, Zamosc
ROSBOIM - Chelm, Wojslowitce, Ruskie Piaski, Szczebrzeszyn, Zamosc


member Steve Lasky honored by IAJGS #galicia

Renee Steinig
 

Congratulations to Gesher Galicia list member Steve Lasky!

Last night at the Chicago2008 Jewish genealogy conference banquet,
the IAJGS -- International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies
-- honored Steve with its annual achievement award for Outstanding
Contribution to Jewish Genealogy via the Internet, Print or Electronic
Product. The award recognizes Steve's

"original contribution to the Jewish genealogical community by the
creation of an online virtual museum, The Museum of Family History.
This impressive and professionally-produced body of work reflects his
hard work and dedication in accumulating, recording and sharing an
incredible variety of relevant resources. Designed to encourage Jewish
families to research and document their own family histories, Steve's
inspiration will continue to benefit future generations."

Steve's website is at www.museumof familyhistory.com .

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
genmaven@gmail.com

MODERATOR;S NOTE: Please send additional congratulations to Steve
privately or via the website's guestbook.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia member Steve Lasky honored by IAJGS #galicia

Renee Steinig
 

Congratulations to Gesher Galicia list member Steve Lasky!

Last night at the Chicago2008 Jewish genealogy conference banquet,
the IAJGS -- International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies
-- honored Steve with its annual achievement award for Outstanding
Contribution to Jewish Genealogy via the Internet, Print or Electronic
Product. The award recognizes Steve's

"original contribution to the Jewish genealogical community by the
creation of an online virtual museum, The Museum of Family History.
This impressive and professionally-produced body of work reflects his
hard work and dedication in accumulating, recording and sharing an
incredible variety of relevant resources. Designed to encourage Jewish
families to research and document their own family histories, Steve's
inspiration will continue to benefit future generations."

Steve's website is at www.museumof familyhistory.com .

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
genmaven@gmail.com

MODERATOR;S NOTE: Please send additional congratulations to Steve
privately or via the website's guestbook.


Burials in Vienna in 1940 #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Milton Koch of Bethesda wrote: "I have requested information from
the Jewish community leaders in Vienna about who may have paid for
a gravestone in 1940 - family member, etc and how to get that
information. I have not received any responses back. Does anyone
have any other suggestions as to how to get this type of information.
The messages went to IKG Vienna."

The first mistake Milton made is to assume his email to the IKG,
Vienna went to the Community leaders! It would have arrived at a
tiny office staffed by one or two very hard-working, conscientious
people who run the Matrikenamt - ie the registry for BMD records.
The cemetery records [as opposed to the death records] are not kept
there and I will send Milton a contact address.

My answer to Milton, without having specific details of the tombstone
and burial, are that if there was an existing family tomb in the
Zentralfriedhof Gate 1 or Gate IV, the deceased could have been added
to this with minimal costs, assuming details were available in his/her will.
I have seen numerous probate documents of this era where it
states that the deceased left no money and the costs of burial were
covered by the Chevra kadisha. Milton has to explore this route.

New burials in 1940 and later war years were generally in a plot
in Zentralfriedhof Tor IV marked with the most meagre of markers.
After the war, these may have been upgraded to something slightly
better, financed by the Chevra kadisha or by family members who had
emigrated. There were Jewish institutions still functioning in Vienna
in 1940, including a number of old age homes and a Chevra kadisha.
Converts and Konfessionsloss [no religion] people were also buried at
Tor IV. These meagre war-time graves can still be seen. Many graves
with magnificent tombstones were exhumed >from Wahringer Friedhof,
to make way for a fire pond and reburied at Tor IV. They can be
seen here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cam37/1064251606/

Obviously not much money was spent on these graves.

The Moderator wisely suggested posting this query on the
Austria-Czech SIG too - there may be other meaningful replies.

Celia Male - London, U.K.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Burials in Vienna in 1940 #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Milton Koch of Bethesda wrote: "I have requested information from
the Jewish community leaders in Vienna about who may have paid for
a gravestone in 1940 - family member, etc and how to get that
information. I have not received any responses back. Does anyone
have any other suggestions as to how to get this type of information.
The messages went to IKG Vienna."

The first mistake Milton made is to assume his email to the IKG,
Vienna went to the Community leaders! It would have arrived at a
tiny office staffed by one or two very hard-working, conscientious
people who run the Matrikenamt - ie the registry for BMD records.
The cemetery records [as opposed to the death records] are not kept
there and I will send Milton a contact address.

My answer to Milton, without having specific details of the tombstone
and burial, are that if there was an existing family tomb in the
Zentralfriedhof Gate 1 or Gate IV, the deceased could have been added
to this with minimal costs, assuming details were available in his/her will.
I have seen numerous probate documents of this era where it
states that the deceased left no money and the costs of burial were
covered by the Chevra kadisha. Milton has to explore this route.

New burials in 1940 and later war years were generally in a plot
in Zentralfriedhof Tor IV marked with the most meagre of markers.
After the war, these may have been upgraded to something slightly
better, financed by the Chevra kadisha or by family members who had
emigrated. There were Jewish institutions still functioning in Vienna
in 1940, including a number of old age homes and a Chevra kadisha.
Converts and Konfessionsloss [no religion] people were also buried at
Tor IV. These meagre war-time graves can still be seen. Many graves
with magnificent tombstones were exhumed >from Wahringer Friedhof,
to make way for a fire pond and reburied at Tor IV. They can be
seen here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cam37/1064251606/

Obviously not much money was spent on these graves.

The Moderator wisely suggested posting this query on the
Austria-Czech SIG too - there may be other meaningful replies.

Celia Male - London, U.K.


Re: seeking Vienna information #general

Wegner, Peter
 

Dear Milton, who asked:

"I have requested information >from the Jewish community leaders in
Vienna about who may have paid for a gravestone in 1940- family member, etc
and how to get that information."

My husband's paternal grandfather died in Vienna in 1940 of natural
causes (i.e., before the deportations began), and is buried in the
"new" Jewish section of the Zentralfriedhof. We discovered this only
recently (>from Austrian state archives), and visited the grave a few
years ago. We perceived at once that the shiny black stone was far
more recent than 1940, and more importantly that it was identical to one
or two hundred others in the immediate vicinity -- not just in the size,
shape, and the stone it was made from, but also in the limited items of
information provided (we checked several), all being in precisely the
same format: Deceased's name and surname, his/her year of birth, and
the exact date of death (all given only in German, no Hebrew information
at all). The deaths all seemed to be dated between 1938 (the year of
the Anschluss) and 1942 (as we know, 1941-2 were the years of
deportation of most remaining Viennese Jews -- so virtually no later
burials occurred during the war.)

On checking into this strange phenomenon, we learned that although the
individual grave locations are reliably accurate (the parameters having
been recorded in the Jewish section's files at the time of burial), the
actual stones were supplied only quite recently (i.e. after Austria
admitted its share of responsibility for the events of the Austrian
Holocaust). The stones were all produced by one stonemason
(I believe around 10-15 years ago).

These stones were obviously not paid for by family members. During
1938-42, the Nazis presumably did not allow the making or placement of
Jewish stones; and after 1942 there were virtually no Jews left to die
in Vienna. Nor, obviously, did many deportees survive -- and few
Viennese Jews who had fled before the war returned after it ended.
Hence there were no family members to supply stones for those who had
died there during 1938-42.

We learned that all the identical stones we observed had been supplied
by a Jewish philanthropical foundation, but I forget which one. I don't
recall whether the Austrian government provided any of the funds used
for this purpose; perhaps someone can tell us.

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: seeking Vienna information #general

Wegner, Peter
 

Dear Milton, who asked:

"I have requested information >from the Jewish community leaders in
Vienna about who may have paid for a gravestone in 1940- family member, etc
and how to get that information."

My husband's paternal grandfather died in Vienna in 1940 of natural
causes (i.e., before the deportations began), and is buried in the
"new" Jewish section of the Zentralfriedhof. We discovered this only
recently (>from Austrian state archives), and visited the grave a few
years ago. We perceived at once that the shiny black stone was far
more recent than 1940, and more importantly that it was identical to one
or two hundred others in the immediate vicinity -- not just in the size,
shape, and the stone it was made from, but also in the limited items of
information provided (we checked several), all being in precisely the
same format: Deceased's name and surname, his/her year of birth, and
the exact date of death (all given only in German, no Hebrew information
at all). The deaths all seemed to be dated between 1938 (the year of
the Anschluss) and 1942 (as we know, 1941-2 were the years of
deportation of most remaining Viennese Jews -- so virtually no later
burials occurred during the war.)

On checking into this strange phenomenon, we learned that although the
individual grave locations are reliably accurate (the parameters having
been recorded in the Jewish section's files at the time of burial), the
actual stones were supplied only quite recently (i.e. after Austria
admitted its share of responsibility for the events of the Austrian
Holocaust). The stones were all produced by one stonemason
(I believe around 10-15 years ago).

These stones were obviously not paid for by family members. During
1938-42, the Nazis presumably did not allow the making or placement of
Jewish stones; and after 1942 there were virtually no Jews left to die
in Vienna. Nor, obviously, did many deportees survive -- and few
Viennese Jews who had fled before the war returned after it ended.
Hence there were no family members to supply stones for those who had
died there during 1938-42.

We learned that all the identical stones we observed had been supplied
by a Jewish philanthropical foundation, but I forget which one. I don't
recall whether the Austrian government provided any of the funds used
for this purpose; perhaps someone can tell us.

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


Placename query on Ellis Island arrivals record #general

stephenfreed@tiscali.co.uk <stephenfreed@...>
 

My great uncle Sam Rosenzweig arrived in Ellis Island 31 Jan 1914. His
name was actually mistakenly recorded as Sam Rosenzwirz. His place of
origin appears to read "Mala" in Austria. His sister's place of origin
is clearly Miechowice in Galicia which I've so far assumed was the home
of the Rosenzweig family. Does anyone mind checking out this record to
see what they make of this placename please?

Steve Freed
Newcastle upon Tyne
UK


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Placename query on Ellis Island arrivals record #general

stephenfreed@tiscali.co.uk <stephenfreed@...>
 

My great uncle Sam Rosenzweig arrived in Ellis Island 31 Jan 1914. His
name was actually mistakenly recorded as Sam Rosenzwirz. His place of
origin appears to read "Mala" in Austria. His sister's place of origin
is clearly Miechowice in Galicia which I've so far assumed was the home
of the Rosenzweig family. Does anyone mind checking out this record to
see what they make of this placename please?

Steve Freed
Newcastle upon Tyne
UK


Re: Surname HAENLE #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Steve Orlen wrote: Can someone tell me what the German (Jewish)
surname HAENLE means? Michael Bernet and Evertjan Hannivoort made
suggestions around the first name Johannes and the word for rooster.

Irene Newhouse >from Hawaii added to the discussion with the comment:
" It would NOT at all surprise me if a name had multiple meanings
in its origins -- our ancestors probably were not above punning,
and since they usually spoke/understood multiple languages -
Hebrew for religious purposes, Yiddish [or not] for every day use
at home & another language or 2 for when dealing with the goyim, --
multilingual puns are not out of the question either...."

I would like to point out that no-one has yet mentioned that HAENLE
is a bona-fide *non-Jewish* family name in Germany and Austria -
I wonder if they too are thinking of hidden meanings?
The Jewish family name may therefore well have been chosen to
blend in with the population at large, with the added bonus, perhaps,
{but not necessarily so] of having another deeper hidden-meaning,
based on a Hebrew word or name. I cannot vouch for this, but Kaganoff
in his 1977 book on family names says "HAHN became a by name for
several Hebrew first names such as Hanoch, Elhanan and Manoah."

Sounds a good enough reason to choose HAENLE to me!

Celia Male - London, U.K.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: Surname HAENLE #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Steve Orlen wrote: Can someone tell me what the German (Jewish)
surname HAENLE means? Michael Bernet and Evertjan Hannivoort made
suggestions around the first name Johannes and the word for rooster.

Irene Newhouse >from Hawaii added to the discussion with the comment:
" It would NOT at all surprise me if a name had multiple meanings
in its origins -- our ancestors probably were not above punning,
and since they usually spoke/understood multiple languages -
Hebrew for religious purposes, Yiddish [or not] for every day use
at home & another language or 2 for when dealing with the goyim, --
multilingual puns are not out of the question either...."

I would like to point out that no-one has yet mentioned that HAENLE
is a bona-fide *non-Jewish* family name in Germany and Austria -
I wonder if they too are thinking of hidden meanings?
The Jewish family name may therefore well have been chosen to
blend in with the population at large, with the added bonus, perhaps,
{but not necessarily so] of having another deeper hidden-meaning,
based on a Hebrew word or name. I cannot vouch for this, but Kaganoff
in his 1977 book on family names says "HAHN became a by name for
several Hebrew first names such as Hanoch, Elhanan and Manoah."

Sounds a good enough reason to choose HAENLE to me!

Celia Male - London, U.K.


seeking: Stuart FREEDMAN, in or near London #general

Carol Baker
 

Does anyone know the home or email address of Stuart Freedman,
in or near London? He was born in 1967, the son of Ralph Freedman
and Phyllis Mincher.

Thank you,
Carol Coplin Baker
carolcbaker@comcast.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen seeking: Stuart FREEDMAN, in or near London #general

Carol Baker
 

Does anyone know the home or email address of Stuart Freedman,
in or near London? He was born in 1967, the son of Ralph Freedman
and Phyllis Mincher.

Thank you,
Carol Coplin Baker
carolcbaker@comcast.net


Re: FLEGENHEIMER #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

wrote on 22 aug 2008 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

Does anyone know the etymology of FLEGENHEIMER?
All I can think of is "flatlander."
Does anyone have a FLEGENHEIMER on their tree?
Flegenheimer seems to me an inhabitant
of the theoretical stetl "Flegenheim",
though ShtetlSeeker cannot find it
which has, in German, nothing to do with "flat".

Perhaps more to the point, a "Pflegeheim" is a nuring home.

You probably know that the real name of the famous gangster
"Dutch Schultz" was Arthur Flegenheimer.

Ah yes, te "Beer Baron of the Bronx", his father had a saloon there.
<http://tinyurl.com/64m8eo>
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_Schultz>
<http://www.feastofhateandfear.com/archives/dutch.html>

The name FLEGENHEIM also appears as a family name,
like Mrs. Alfred, Frau Antoinette Flegenheim,
on board of the Titanic, a resident of Berlin.

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: FLEGENHEIMER #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

wrote on 22 aug 2008 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

Does anyone know the etymology of FLEGENHEIMER?
All I can think of is "flatlander."
Does anyone have a FLEGENHEIMER on their tree?
Flegenheimer seems to me an inhabitant
of the theoretical stetl "Flegenheim",
though ShtetlSeeker cannot find it
which has, in German, nothing to do with "flat".

Perhaps more to the point, a "Pflegeheim" is a nuring home.

You probably know that the real name of the famous gangster
"Dutch Schultz" was Arthur Flegenheimer.

Ah yes, te "Beer Baron of the Bronx", his father had a saloon there.
<http://tinyurl.com/64m8eo>
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_Schultz>
<http://www.feastofhateandfear.com/archives/dutch.html>

The name FLEGENHEIM also appears as a family name,
like Mrs. Alfred, Frau Antoinette Flegenheim,
on board of the Titanic, a resident of Berlin.

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)


JewishGen and Ancestry.com #belarus

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

JewishGen is very pleased to announce that JewishGen.org,
the premier resource for Jewish genealogy, and Ancestry.com,
the largest online resource for family history information,
have entered into a cooperative agreement.

Basics of the agreement:

* JewishGen will make some of its databases available on
the Ancestry website.
* Ancestry will provide hardware and network support for
the JewishGen website.

Benefits of the agreement:

* JewishGen will be able to provide more robust and
functional resources to genealogists throughout the world.
* Specific and immediate improvements will be seen in
the speed of the JewishGen website, along with greater
accessibility when searching databases.
* More people will be exposed to Jewish genealogy and
have access to a greater range of resources to assist in
researching family history.
* JewishGen’s comprehensive records and information,
contributed by volunteers >from around the world, will
continue to remain freely available on JewishGen.org.

Details of the agreement:

* JewishGen remains an independent non-profit organization,
affiliated with the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living
Memorial to the Holocaust.
* There will be no change to the JewishGen management team,
structure or affiliation with the museum.
* This new agreement, combined with the generosity of
our donors throughout the world, will allow us to continue
offering all of JewishGen’s extensive resources for no charge.
* All of the JewishGen data licensed to Ancestry will
be freely available on the Ancestry.com website without charge.
* Privacy of personal information for JewishGen users is of
key importance to us. Information about JewishGen registrants
will *not* be shared.
* Personal information stored on JewishGen, such as data in
the JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) and the Family Tree of the
Jewish People (FTJP), will *not* be shared with Ancestry.
* JewishGen will continue to independently administer the
JewishGen website, mailing lists and affiliates.
* There will be no changes to the content of the JewishGen
website, or any of JewishGen's programs or mailing lists.
JewishGen remains an independent non-profit organization.

Further information, including Ancestry's press release,
is available at the JewishGen blog:
< http://jewishgen.blogspot.com >.

A FactSheet about the agreement is being prepared.
We welcome your questions and concerns. *All* questions
will be answered on he JewishGen blog.

Warren

Warren Blatt
Managing Director, JewishGen
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


Re: Types of Yarmulke #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 8/21/2008 7:49:21 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
_sorlen@email.arizona.edu_ (mailto:sorlen@email.arizona.edu) writes:
<< In some early 19th century eastern European photographs, we see our
ancestors wearing a sort of skullcap that could be pulled down a bit
so it won't fly off in the wind. In other photographs I've seen, the
small cap is prevalent. Is the difference a matter of time and / or
place? Can we more or less date a photograph by the type of yarmulke worn?>>

==You have a point there about being blown off by the wind. I believe the
tiny yarmulke under 6 inches was designed to be worn under a hat
or at home indoors. Today's tiny ones, and the little knitted ones >from
Israel became popular only in the last seventy years.

==I'm not sure what exactly you mean by "a sort of skullcap that could
be pulled down a bit so it won't fly off in the wind." The alternative
to my mind is a black cylinder about 4 inches deep. For what it's worth,
that was common also in Germany into the 1930s, more so by the
very religious and by older men.

==Yes, I think it varied with time, occasion, and ambience, not just
by geography. In photos I've seen, it seems to have been favored by
those at work--mechanics, shopkeepers . . . probably because it could
be worn securely while reaching for a high shelf.

==The first man who used one of the new-fangled woman's hairclip
(ignoring the Torah's injunctions against wearing female clothing)
started something of a sartorial revolution.

Michael Bernet, New York
mbernet@aol.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus JewishGen and Ancestry.com #belarus

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

JewishGen is very pleased to announce that JewishGen.org,
the premier resource for Jewish genealogy, and Ancestry.com,
the largest online resource for family history information,
have entered into a cooperative agreement.

Basics of the agreement:

* JewishGen will make some of its databases available on
the Ancestry website.
* Ancestry will provide hardware and network support for
the JewishGen website.

Benefits of the agreement:

* JewishGen will be able to provide more robust and
functional resources to genealogists throughout the world.
* Specific and immediate improvements will be seen in
the speed of the JewishGen website, along with greater
accessibility when searching databases.
* More people will be exposed to Jewish genealogy and
have access to a greater range of resources to assist in
researching family history.
* JewishGen’s comprehensive records and information,
contributed by volunteers >from around the world, will
continue to remain freely available on JewishGen.org.

Details of the agreement:

* JewishGen remains an independent non-profit organization,
affiliated with the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living
Memorial to the Holocaust.
* There will be no change to the JewishGen management team,
structure or affiliation with the museum.
* This new agreement, combined with the generosity of
our donors throughout the world, will allow us to continue
offering all of JewishGen’s extensive resources for no charge.
* All of the JewishGen data licensed to Ancestry will
be freely available on the Ancestry.com website without charge.
* Privacy of personal information for JewishGen users is of
key importance to us. Information about JewishGen registrants
will *not* be shared.
* Personal information stored on JewishGen, such as data in
the JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) and the Family Tree of the
Jewish People (FTJP), will *not* be shared with Ancestry.
* JewishGen will continue to independently administer the
JewishGen website, mailing lists and affiliates.
* There will be no changes to the content of the JewishGen
website, or any of JewishGen's programs or mailing lists.
JewishGen remains an independent non-profit organization.

Further information, including Ancestry's press release,
is available at the JewishGen blog:
< http://jewishgen.blogspot.com >.

A FactSheet about the agreement is being prepared.
We welcome your questions and concerns. *All* questions
will be answered on he JewishGen blog.

Warren

Warren Blatt
Managing Director, JewishGen
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Types of Yarmulke #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 8/21/2008 7:49:21 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
_sorlen@email.arizona.edu_ (mailto:sorlen@email.arizona.edu) writes:
<< In some early 19th century eastern European photographs, we see our
ancestors wearing a sort of skullcap that could be pulled down a bit
so it won't fly off in the wind. In other photographs I've seen, the
small cap is prevalent. Is the difference a matter of time and / or
place? Can we more or less date a photograph by the type of yarmulke worn?>>

==You have a point there about being blown off by the wind. I believe the
tiny yarmulke under 6 inches was designed to be worn under a hat
or at home indoors. Today's tiny ones, and the little knitted ones >from
Israel became popular only in the last seventy years.

==I'm not sure what exactly you mean by "a sort of skullcap that could
be pulled down a bit so it won't fly off in the wind." The alternative
to my mind is a black cylinder about 4 inches deep. For what it's worth,
that was common also in Germany into the 1930s, more so by the
very religious and by older men.

==Yes, I think it varied with time, occasion, and ambience, not just
by geography. In photos I've seen, it seems to have been favored by
those at work--mechanics, shopkeepers . . . probably because it could
be worn securely while reaching for a high shelf.

==The first man who used one of the new-fangled woman's hairclip
(ignoring the Torah's injunctions against wearing female clothing)
started something of a sartorial revolution.

Michael Bernet, New York
mbernet@aol.com